Student Loan ReFi

Should You Refinance Your Student Loans with a Credit Card?

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The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Using a balance transfer credit card can be a great way to lower the interest rates on your debt to help you save money and pay your debt off faster. Most people only think about doing a balance transfer with high-interest credit card debt, but recently I’ve been considering a 0% interest balance transfer credit card to help me pay off my student loan.

After making my final credit card payment to be credit card debt free, I started thinking about how I could use a balance transfer offer extended by my creditor to help pay off other types of debt I still have. Since the highest interest debt I have remaining is my student loan, this is what I’m considering refinancing with a 0% interest balance transfer. My student loan only has a remaining balance of about $6,000, which means I could transfer the entire balance to the credit card and pay it off before the promotional rate expires, if I pay it off aggressively.

Of course, there are lots of reasons why you could choose to refinance or consolidate your student loans. I was curious whether or not a balance transfer could be a viable option as well.

Here are some of the pros and cons you should consider before deciding to refinance your student loans with a balance transfer credit card.

Benefits of Refinancing Student Loans with a Balance Transfer Credit Card

There are several benefits you could take advantage of by refinancing your student loans with a balance transfer credit card.

A Lower Interest Rate

One of the main reasons people choose to refinance student loans is to lock in a lower interest rate. For example, my student loans are at 6.8%. If I do a balance transfer to a 0% interest credit card, I could save hundreds of dollars on interest through the end of the 0% interest rate period on the balance transfer.

But keep in mind that not all balance transfers are created equal. You might get all kinds of different balance transfer offers from companies trying to entice you to sign up for a new credit card, or even transfer a balance to a card you already have. Some of these transfer offers will be better than others. You might encounter offers that have a 1% to 3% interest rate for a certain period of time, usually 12, 18, or 24 months. But the best balance transfer offers have a 0% interest rate, obviously saving you more on interest than the others.

Pay Off Student Loans Faster

Transferring student loan debt to a credit card can save money, but only as long as you get the balance transfer paid off before the promotional interest rate expires. This time limit is a big motivation for people to pay extra on their student loans to make sure the balance transfer is paid off before it expires. If you struggle with being motivated to make extra payments, the reality that your interest rate may spike up to 15% or more after a few months may be just the motivation you need to get serious about paying off debt. It’s worked well for me in the past when I’ve transferred high-interest credit card debt to a 0% balance transfer credit card, helping me to pay off $5,284.18 much faster than I would have otherwise.

Drawbacks of Refinancing Student Loans with a Balance Transfer Credit Card

Although using a balance transfer to help pay off your student loans sounds like a great way to save money and pay your debt off faster, there are some potential downsides you should be aware of.

Balance Transfer Fees

A lower interest rate makes balance transfer credit cards an attractive option for those looking to refinance debt, but you need to consider more than just the interest rate before deciding to refinance your student loans with a balance transfer credit card. Make sure you consider the balance transfer fee that many credit cards charge. This can eat away at the amount of money you save on interest. Luckily, some credit cards do have a cap on this fee at $50 or $75, which can be helpful if you plan to transfer a large balance that would otherwise result in a fee higher than that cap. But at that point, it could be difficult to get your student loan transfer paid off before the promotional interest rate on the balance transfer expires.

There are balance transfers without fees, but your options may be limited. If you find a no-fee, 0% interest transfer option you qualify for, it’s almost a no-brainer to use it to pay off other debt.

Potential Loss of Savings on Interest

As mentioned, it’s imperative that you pay off your entire balance transfer before the promotional interest rate expires in 12, 18, or 24 months. If you don’t, the high interest rate after the transfer expires will quickly negate any interest savings you earned by doing the transfer in the first place. In fact, you may end up paying more in interest than if you’d skipped the balance transfer in the first place.

You May Not Qualify

In order to use a balance transfer credit card to refinance your student loans, you first have to qualify for one. In order to qualify for many balance transfer credit cards you must have a credit score of at least 680.

Applying Could Ding Your Credit Score

If you don’t already have a credit card with a balance transfer offer available, you may need to apply for a new card. Anytime you apply for a new line of credit, it will ding your credit score slightly. This may or may not be an important factor depending on what your score is and if you plan to apply for any other credit cards or loans in the near future.

Loss of Federal Student Borrower Protections

A final and very important consideration to think about before you decide to refinance your student loans with a balance transfer credit card is the loss of student loan protections you may have. If you are refinancing federal student loans, you will lose the protections that are offered to you as a borrower, such as:

  • Income-driven repayment plans
  • The opportunity for student loan forgiveness
  • Deferment or forbearance
  • Discharge upon permanent disability or death

Some credit card companies may be willing to work with you in an emergency situation, but chances are high that even in those situations the flexibility offered to federal student loan borrowers is far greater. In some cases, you may be better off not refinancing your student loans in order to maintain your borrower protections.

With most low or 0% interest balance transfer credit cards, you can’t miss a payment or pay late. If you do, your promotional interest rate may be void and you will be subject to the regular interest rate, which could be 15% or more depending on the card and your credit score.

Despite these drawbacks, doing a balance transfer to help pay off your student loans can be a good idea if your goal is to get out of debt quickly while saving money on interest.

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Credit Cards

6 Credit Card Perks You Should Know About

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The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Earning rewards is probably one of the most talked about benefits of using a credit card aside from being able to use it to increase your credit score.

While earning points and cash back that you can redeem for travel, gift cards, and other rewards is nice, that’s not the only benefit involved with choosing to use a credit card.

In many cases, a credit card can actually be safer than cash or a debit card or even provide you with additional savings. Here are six credit card perks you should know about if you want to make the most out of using your credit card(s).

Purchase Protection

If you need to purchase something valuable, you might want to do it on a credit card if the card offers purchase protection. Most credit cards offer purchase protection for items that are lost, damaged, or stolen as long as you paid for the item with the credit card.

Each credit card has different policies and may reimburse you up to different amounts. For example, American Express credit card holders can file a claim to report any theft, accidental damage, or loss of a product they purchased with their card within the past 90 days, and they can be reimbursed for the amount paid for the item up to $10,000.

Price Protection 

With credit card price protection benefits, you could receive a refund if the price drops on an item you purchased with your card. This can happen a lot around the holidays, so it’s a good benefit to have.

With most credit cards, there is a time limit to take advantage of price protection, which is usually anywhere from 30 to 90 days after you make the initial purchase. That being said, you won’t get price protection for an item you purchased last year that suddenly went on sale the other day.

With price protection, you can save quite a bit if you purchase a big item like an appliance or a TV on your credit card and the price suddenly drops. That’s why it’s best to hold onto your receipts for at least 30-90 days depending on your credit card’s price protection terms.

Extended Warranty 

An extended warranty offered by your credit card company can be very similar to a manufacturer’s warranty in that it can add up to a year of additional coverage for certain purchases.

With some purchases, getting an extended warranty is definitely worth it even if it costs a little extra money. However, if your credit card offers an extended warranty, you may not need to purchase one on your own.

All Discover cards have an extended warranty feature for up to one additional year for original warranties that are 36 months or less. Discover’s extended warranty covers most items, but may not protect you from a repair caused by normal wear and tear, a power surge, or if the item is covered by a product recall.

The maximum coverage is $10,000 / $50,000 (per item / per year). You must file your claim within 45 days of the loss or incident, and as long as you send the necessary paperwork, you will receive a reimbursement within 60 days.

Credit Monitoring 

Monitoring your credit is very important because it can help you know where you stand and help you avoid situations like identity theft. Monitoring your credit is a good habit to adopt so you can track your score and see how your spending and payment activity affects it.

Instead of having to pay a monthly fee to have your credit monitored by a third-party service, you can see if your credit card issuer provides this service as a courtesy to cardholders.

Chase Slate allows cardholders to view their FICO score monthly and use their Credit Dashboard for free to monitor their credit.

Select Citi credit cards also provide you with your FICO score for free.

Rental Car Insurance

If you’re traveling and need a rental car, most credit cards offer free rental car insurance coverage as long as you pay for the rental car with your card.

The rental car insurance provided by your credit card can include coverage for collision damage or theft, but there may be some limitations to the coverage so don’t assume certain things are covered like the loss of items during a collision or personal injuries.

Some credit cards with rental insurance options may not even cover cars that aren’t standard, like large trucks or luxury car rentals, so it’s important to thoroughly read your credit cards terms if you’re thinking of taking advantage of this feature.

Airport Lounge Access 

Why pay to access an airline’s lounge when many credit cards provide you with this option for free?

Airport lounges are a great amenity to check out when you’re traveling or have a long layover. They tend to offer exclusive amenities including Wi-Fi, desks, comfortable seating, personal assistance, arrival recovery, and more.

The Citi Prestige card and the American Express Platinum card are just two credit cards that include free airport lounge access.

Final Word

It pays to read the fine print when reviewing your credit card terms because you could learn more about additional free benefits you can take advantage of.

Carefully review the card agreement details for any new or existing credit cards you have. You may not need benefits like rental car insurance or purchase protection all the time, but when you do, you’ll know how to access them for free with your credit card.

TAGS:

Life Events, Pay Down My Debt

What Happens to Loans When We Die?

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The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

You may not have to pay loans after you pass away, but that doesn’t mean they disappear into thin air. There isn’t a one-size-fits-all answer as to what happens to your loans when you die, but there are many factors that can affect them. Where you live, the types of loans you have, as well as who applied for them can determine what happens.

While it’s not fun to think about your eventual demise, it’s necessary to know if your debt could be passed onto another person.

Gathering Up Loans

When you pass on, your executor will notify creditors, hopefully as soon as possible. Whatever known creditors you have, the executor will notify them and forward a copy of your death certificate and request that they update their files. He or she will also notify the three major credit reporting agencies to notify them that you are no longer alive, which will help prevent identity theft. As well, the executor will then get a copy of your credit report to figure out what debts are outstanding.

When that is completed, the executor will go through probate, which means that your estate goes through a process of paying off bills and dividing what’s left to the state or whoever you named in your will.

When Someone May Be Responsible for Paying Back Your Loans

Simply put, your loans are the responsibility of your estate, which means everything that you owned up until your death. Whoever is responsible for dealing with your estate (usually your executor) will use those assets to pay off your debts. This could involve selling off property to get money to pay it off or writing checks to do so. The rest of it then will distributed according to the wishes in your will. If there isn’t enough money to pay off the debtors, then they’re usually out of luck.

However, this isn’t always the case. If you co-signed a loan or have joint accounts (like credit cards), then the account holders may be fully responsible to pay off the whole debt, no matter who incurred it.

If you live in a community property state, then your spouse could be responsible for paying off your loans. If you have property in Arizona, California, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, or Wisconsin, your spouse may have to pay back half of any community property from a marriage. This doesn’t include any loans you have that came before the marriage. However, Alaska only holds a spouse responsible if they enter into a community property agreement. All states have different rules, so it’s best to check what will apply to your situation.

There is also the “filial responsibility” law that could hold your adult children responsible for paying back loans that are related to medical or long-term care. The same works in reverse. Currently, there are around 30 states that enforce this law, including Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. Some enforce this law pretty strictly, so it’s best to check with your state to see what could happen.

For more details on the different types of loans, read on to find out about what could happen to each when you pass on.

Credit Card Debt

If the credit card debt was yours and yours alone, then your estate is responsible for paying off the debt. Depending on which state you live in, creditors may only have a limited time to file a claim after you have died. If your estate goes through probate, then the executor will look at your assets and debts and determine which bills should be paid first, according to the law.

If there isn’t money left when it comes time to pay off your credit cards, those companies unfortunately have to call it a loss. Credit card companies cannot legally force family, friends, or heirs to pay back your debt unless you live in a community property state. In that case, your surviving spouse may be liable.

However, if the credit card is joint, the other account holder is responsible for it. That means if a family member or business partner signed the card application as a joint account owner, then he or she will need to help pay back the loan along with your estate. However, if your partner is just an authorized user (meaning he or she didn’t sign the application), then they’re not held responsible.

Mortgages and Home Equity Loans

There are several options for dealing with an outstanding mortgage after you have passed away. Due to the complexity of these options, it may be worth speaking with a local estate attorney.

If you are the sole owner and your mortgage has a due-on-sale clause, your lender may try to collect the entire balance of the loan or foreclose on the property. However, the CFPB has expanded protection for heirs who have inherited a home. The transfer of property after your death won’t trigger the Bureau’s ability-to-repay rule, making it easier for your heirs to pay off your loan or refinance.

In contrast, a home equity loan against your home is different. A lender may have the right to force someone who inherits the home to pay back the loan right away. Some lenders may work with your heirs to take over the payments or work out a plan, but you shouldn’t assume that will be the case. In a worst-case scenario, your heirs may have to sell your property to pay back your home equity loan.

Car Loans

Car loans are similar to the other types of debt we have discussed. The steps for handling this type of debt will depend on whose name is on the loan and where you live. If your heirs or co-signer are willing to take over your payments, the lender won’t need to take any action. However, the lender can repossess the car if the loan isn’t paid back.

Student Loans

If you have federal student loans, these will be discharged when you die. It will not be passed onto anyone else. If you were a student recipient of Parent PLUS loans, you’re also eligible for a death discharge. These loans will not be the responsibility of your estate. Your executor simply has to present an original death certificate or certified copy of your death certificate to your loan servicer.

However, if you and your spouse co-signed Parent PLUS loans on behalf of a student, your spouse will still be responsible for the balance.

Some private lenders may also offer a death discharge if you don’t have a co-signer. However, these policies vary by institution. You should review the terms of your loan for the specifics. Wells Fargo is an example of a company that may allow student loan forgiveness in the case of death.

However, if your private loan has a co-signer, your co-signer may be legally responsible to pay back your debts. Some companies may ask for the balance immediately. Also, if you live in a community property state, your spouse may be held responsible for your student loans if the debt was acquired during the marriage.

Medical Bills

If you have outstanding medical bills, nursing home bills, or any expense related to your long-term care, your spouse or family members may be responsible for paying it back per your state’s filial responsibility laws.

Your children could be held responsible for your medical bills if the following scenarios are true:

  • You receive care in a state with a filial responsibility law.
  • You don’t qualify for Medicaid while receiving care.
  • You can’t afford your bills, but your children can.
  • Your caregiver sues your children to collect on your unpaid bills.

Final Thoughts

The last thing your family members want to think about after you have died is outstanding loans. This is why it is essential to get organized in advance. It may be worth speaking with a financial planner regarding the specifics of your individual situation. They can help you review which options could best protect your heirs from your unpaid debt. Once you have passed away, your heirs should seek assistance from a qualified estate attorney.

TAGS:

Featured, Health, Strategies to Save

What To Do if Your Insurance Doesn’t Cover a Health Care Provider

Advertiser Disclosure

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Smiling senior man having measured blood pressure

It’s a pretty common scenario: you’re looking to book a medical appointment, so you go to your insurance company’s website to find an in-network doctor. You book the appointment, see the doctor, and all seems well — until you get a whopping bill. Apparently, that doctor wasn’t in your network after all, and now you’re faced with out-of-network charges.

This happens more often than we think. Unfortunately, insurance company websites are notoriously fallible. Not only that, but they change so frequently that it can be difficult to nail down just who is and isn’t covered. At some point or another, just about everyone will have to deal with a situation where their insurance doesn’t cover a provider.

It’s easy to feel duped in this scenario. Navigating the ins and outs of insurance is hard enough, but there’s nothing more frustrating than being fed incorrect information.

So what should you do?

What to Do If You’ve Already Gotten the Bill

Call the doctor

Doctors don’t usually consider themselves responsible for significant out-of-pocket costs resulting from a lack of research on the part of the patient.

But if you asked the doctor or their representative about insurance coverage beforehand, you should contact them immediately if that information ends up being false. Many physicians will honor the price they initially told you or at least give a hefty discount. Don’t get discouraged if they don’t get back to you right away. Keep calling to see if you can get a lower price.

Negotiate and ask for a better rate

Most doctors have two different rates: one for insurance companies and one for self-pay individuals. If your doctor’s visit isn’t going to be covered by your insurance, call the doctor’s billing department to ask for the self-pay cost.

“Most physician offices will accept a lesser amount, especially if they know the service is not going toward a deductible,” said health insurance agent Natalie Cooper of Best Quote Insurance of Ohio.

Ask about a payment plan if you can’t afford to pay the bill in one go. Most medical offices would rather get the money a little bit at a time than not at all.

“Most physician and hospital groups will accept a small payment of $25 or $50 per month until it’s paid off,” Cooper said.

Use a health savings account

If you’re struggling to pay a medical bill out of pocket, see if you can open an HSA and use those funds to pay for it. If you owe $2,000, you can transfer $2,000 to an HSA and then pay the doctor directly from that account.

What’s the benefit? HSA contributions are deductible on your taxes. Unfortunately, only people with high-deductible plans are eligible to start an HSA. Individuals can only contribute up to $3,400 a year or $6,750 in an HSA. You can start an HSA anytime if you have an eligible healthcare plan.

The IRS says you can only use your HSA to pay for qualified medical expenses, a list of which you can find here. Funds in an HSA roll over from year to year, and you can contribute up to $3,400 annually or $6,750 for families.

You can also open a Flex Spending Account, which works similarly to an HSA. However, funds don’t roll over to the next year and users can only contribute $2,550 a year.

How to Prevent Out-of-Pocket Expenses

Ask beforehand

Many people use the insurance company’s website to find a doctor, but those lists are often out of date. Insurance information can even change daily. The only way to confirm a doctor’s status with an insurance company is to call them directly and ask if they’re a network provider — not just if they accept your insurance.

“When they are a network provider, they are contractually required to accept no more than the negotiated contracted rate as payment in full, which is usually less than the billed rate,” said human resources expert Laurie A. Brednich. “When they say they ‘accept xyz insurance,’ they are usually not a network provider, but will file the claims on your behalf, and you are responsible for the full billed charges.”

It can also be helpful to give them your insurance group and account numbers beforehand so there’s no question about your specific policy. The more specific you can be, the more accurately you’ll be able to navigate the insurance labyrinth.

Find out if all procedures and doctors are covered

Have you ever been to a doctor who’s recommended you see a specialist for a certain procedure — only to find out that the specialist isn’t covered by your insurance, even though they’re in the same building?

When a doctor recommends you to a colleague, they’re not confirming that the other physician is covered in-network. Before you make the appointment, talk to the billing department to see what their policies are. You can request an estimate in writing beforehand so you’ll have an idea of what the costs will be.

Some procedures might not be covered even if they’re being ordered by your in-network doctor. If your doctor sends your results to a lab, that lab might be out of network, even if your insurance covers the doctor who ordered them.

Confirm the lab’s status before you go in. If it’s too late, call your insurance and ask if they can bill the service as in-network. Cite the fact that you weren’t aware the lab would not be covered.

If they refuse, contact the doctor’s office and explain your situation. Ask them why they used an out-of-network provider and see if they’re willing to write off the bill. Be polite, but firm.

Ask the doctor to apply

When Julie Rains’ insurance changed to a preferred provider plan, she discovered her trusted doctor was now going to be out of network. Instead of searching for a replacement, she asked if her physician would apply to the insurance company to be covered by her new plan. He agreed.

It took almost two months for him to be accepted, Rains said. If you’re going this route, it’s best to start as soon as you find out your insurance company has changed policies. Rains said between the time she found out about the changes and when they went into effect, her doctor had already been approved.

You might have less luck with a doctor you’ve only been seeing for a short time, but most medical professionals take long-term patient relationships seriously — especially if your whole family goes to the same office. As always, it doesn’t hurt to ask.

TAGS:

Credit Cards, Featured

How to Redeem Cash Back with Citi

Advertiser Disclosure

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Citi is well known for offering quality credit cards with great balance transfer offers, but the Citi Double Cash card, in particular, is a strong contender for cash back rewards.

The Citi Double Cash card has no annual fee and offers unlimited 1% cash back on purchases plus an additional 1% cash back as you pay for those purchases.

This card also has a variable interest rate of 14.24% to 24.24% and a balance transfer APR of 0% for 18 months.

Even though Citi doesn’t have the highest cash back rate, the fact that you can earn unlimited cash back sets this card apart from others.

In this post, we’ll touch on:

  • How to earn and track cash back rewards with your Citi Double Cash card
  • Navigating through Citi’s online portal to access cash back rewards
  • How to redeem cash back rewards

How to Access Cash Back with Citi

To access your cash back rewards with your Citi Double Cash card, you’ll need to log in to your account by visiting Citi.com/credit-cards. You’ll see a screen similar to the one below. Then, you can log in with your credentials.

screen shot of Citi homepage

Next, you’ll see the main dashboard and all your card information. You’ll also see your cash back balance off to the right.

I have two Citi credit cards so I scrolled down to show my Citi Double Cash card along with where you can expect to see your cash back amount.

screen shot of Citi account dashboard

How to Redeem Cash Back

If you have a cash back balance that you’d like to redeem, you’ll want to click on the button that says “View/Redeem Cash Rewards.”

Once you click that button, you’ll be taken to a page that shows you an entire summary of your cash back earnings per billing statement.

Your cash back earnings will be split up between cash back earned from purchases and cash back earned from payments.

I just signed up for the Citi Double Cash card and have yet to make my first purchase so my cash back amount is currently $0, but when you have a balance, you’ll click the green button that says “Redeem” to move forward with redemption options.

Screen shot Citi redeem cash back

Next, you’ll be taken to a page with different redemption prompts to choose from. You need a balance of at least $25 in cash back before you can successful redeem your earnings.

Citi cash back buttons

As you can see, there are four different ways to redeem cash back with your Citi Double Cash card, and here is an explanation of each of them.

Gift Card

If you choose to redeem your cash back for a gift card, you must click the gift card option, then you’ll be directed to Citi’s gift card marketplace where you can choose from retail, restaurant, entertainment, and electronic gift cards.

Screen shot of Citi gift card redemption

Gift cards are worth $25, $50, and $100, and once you select one, Citi will mail it to you.

Statement Credit

You can also opt to use your cash back earnings as a statement credit to lower the current balance you owe on your Citi Double Cash card. Your statement credit will post to your account within 2-3 business days and will appear on your next statement after it is posted.

It’s also important to realize that Citi does not count a statement credit as a payment even though it will reduce your current balance. You must still make at least your minimum monthly payment by the due date if you want to avoid getting charged a late fee.

Direct Deposit

You can redeem cash back by transferring it directly to your bank account whether it’s a Citi account or not. In order to use this redemption option, you must have either linked your Citi checking or savings account OR have paid a Citi credit card bill at least two times from a non-Citi checking account.

Once you’ve done either of these things, all you need to do is enter in the amount you wish to deposit along with your account information when you redeem cash back via this option. The direct deposit will post to your account within 1-2 business days in most cases.

Check

The final option you have to redeem your cash back is to do so by paper check. Just make sure Citi has the correct address on file for you, then allow 7-10 business days for the check to arrive in the mail.

Final Word

The Citi Double Cash card has one of the easiest online cash back redemption processes, along with plenty of options to accommodate your preferences.

Keep in mind that payments based on balance transfers, interest, fees, and cash advances won’t earn 1%, but you will earn cash back on all other purchases plus additional cash back when you make at least your minimum monthly payment on time.

The Citi Double Cash card is unique in that it rewards you for paying your monthly credit card bill on time, which is a good habit to adopt.

While there is a minimum cash back balance required in order to redeem your rewards, you can track your progress regularly by logging into Citi’s online portal.

 

TAGS:

Featured, Strategies to Save

How to Use Truebill to Identify & Cancel Recurring Subscriptions

Advertiser Disclosure

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

 

Have you ever forgotten to cancel a subscription that charges you automatically each month? Me, too.

Thanks to Apple Music album exclusives, I’ve racked up quite a few charges from a subscription that I initially planned to cancel right after the free trial.

Truebill is an app that wants to make you aware of all the seemingly low-cost subscriptions that can add up to a lot of money spent. Truebill uses an algorithm to help you identify and cancel recurring payments made from your credit cards and bank accounts so you can find savings.

We tried out the app to see whether or not using it to cut costs is worthwhile. In this post, we’ll cover:

  • How it works
  • Truebill extra features
  • The cost
  • Pros and cons

How Truebill Works

You need to download the Truebill app from iTunes or GooglePlay to get started. The app lets you sign up for a Truebill account by email or Facebook.

Truebill mobile interface

After you create an account, the next step is signing into your credit card and bank accounts through Truebill so that it can review your account data. I signed into one bank account and one credit card account for this trial.

Truebill mobile interface connect accounts

The results of the Truebill statement scan

Truebill scan of bills

The results of the account scan will appear in your app dashboard within a few minutes.

Recurring transactions found are broken down into three categories — subscriptions, recurring bills, and miscellaneous recurring payments.

Here’s what Truebill found from my accounts:

For subscriptions:

  • A recurring Express Scripts prescription charge
  • Payments for monthly services I use to run a business including:
    • ConvertKit
    • FreshBooks
    • Grammarly
    • GoDaddy

For recurring bills and utilities:

  • An annual credit card membership fee
  • A Comcast bill
  • An insurance bill

For recurring miscellaneous payments: 

  • A Bluehost monthly service charge
  • An iTunes (Hulu) monthly subscription

All of the above are current recurring payments that I’m making periodically.

Truebill also has a section that lists your inactive recurring payments.

Inactive payments are for past recurring items that are no longer posting to your account regularly.

In my inactive section, Truebill has recurring transactions and subscriptions from as far back as 2013, including old student loan payments, car note payments, and more.

If you discover that Truebill is missing a subscription, there’s an option to enter the service name, and Truebill will perform another search on your account.

Truebill no results screen show

You can reach out to a customer service representative for extra help if Truebill still can’t locate a subscription after doing this search.

Does Truebill Find All the Sneaky Costs?

The current auto-payments that show up for me are ones I already know about. I’m also someone who pays pretty close attention to every account transaction so I didn’t expect any surprises.

Despite being aware of these auto-payments, I still find it impressive how many past and present recurring transactions the algorithm picked up on. I can see how this tool can be a shortcut for catching pesky auto-payments in one fell swoop for someone who monitors their statements a little less frequently.

I did learn something new related to very old charges.

Truebill found a questionable Home Depot Project Loan transaction from 2013 and was unsure whether or not to mark it as an old inactive recurring payment.

Truebill Home Depot loan

I’ve never taken out a Home Depot Project Loan, so that’s a charge I plan on researching.

How to Cancel Recurring Payments

The second key feature of Truebill is that it helps you cancel these services.

You’re able to terminate many subscriptions within the app itself. When you click on a specific subscription, there’s an “Options” link, and then a red button to “cancel” the subscription appears.

Truebill cancel ConvertKit

However, the option to cancel isn’t available for all services on auto-payment. This is the case for my Express Scripts recurring payment below.

Truebill cancel subscription

If cancellation isn’t an option, you can head over to the Truebill cancellation page for additional instructions.

On this page, there’s a mega list of companies with directions on how to cancel services from each one. The list includes insurance companies, telephone companies, music streaming services, gyms, and more.

You need to fill out more information about yourself for Truebill to move forward with the cancellation of Express Scripts. The site gives a phone number you can call to cancel on your own. For some companies, Truebill even has video instructions on how to cancel a service.

Truebill form to cancel subscriptions

Truebill Extras to Lower Your Bills

Canceling isn’t the only action you can take to cut costs. The app also notifies you of opportunities to renegotiate contract terms for bills like cable, internet, and insurance to save money.

According to the app, my Comcast bill is high, and it recommends using the BillShark service to negotiate a lower bill. BillShark is a partner of Truebill and renegotiates contracts for consumers. If BillShark can lower your bill, it takes a 40% cut of the savings as a service fee. You do not have to pay a dime if BillShark isn’t able to reduce your bill.

I got a notification that my insurance bill seems high as well. The app refers me to a third party called SolidQuote to shop for competitive insurance rates.

We’ll talk a little bit more about these recommendations in the next section.

The Cost of Truebill

The Truebill app is entirely free to download and use. The one extra service that you may have to pay for is BillShark if you choose to use it to renegotiate your bill contracts. Technically, you’re not paying out of pocket for this service either. You will only pay if BillShark is able to find you savings.

How Does Truebill Make Money?

On the terms and conditions page, there’s mention of Truebill having sponsored links to third parties and advertisements. Truebill may receive compensation from recommending other companies to you.

For example, under the suggestion to shop for competitive insurance quotes with SolidQuote, there’s a link to an advertiser disclosure stating Truebill can get paid for the referral.

Truebill advertiser disclosure

You do not have to sign up for any of these third-party offers to use the service for free. You can simply avoid offers throughout the app and still benefit from using it.

Truebill Security

Truebill uses 256-bit encryption and bank-level security to protect your information. The account history used from your financial institutions to manage auto-payments is read-only, and your information is not stored by Truebill servers. Find out more about Truebill security here.

Pros and Cons

Pros:

  • Truebill is free for users.
  • The app is simple to use and reviews your accounts for subscription information quickly.
  • It shows you both active and inactive recurring payments.
  • You may be able to cancel bills with one click on the app. If you can’t cancel through the app, there are instructions on how you can terminate contracts with many companies on the website. Some cancellation instructions even include step-by-step video tutorials.

Cons:

  • There are advertisements to special offers on the app. These offers are not too distracting, but you should be aware that recommendations may be from paid affiliates.
  • The Truebill algorithm works by analyzing your account data. You need to sign in to your financial accounts for it to do its magic. If that’s a turnoff, you won’t get much use from this app.

The Final Verdict

The Truebill app is easy to use and definitely one to consider if you might be flushing money down the toilet with random subscriptions and services. The fact that it shows both current and past subscriptions is a highlight because it’s also helpful to review how much you’ve spent on these recurring payments in the past few years.

TAGS:

Featured, Strategies to Save

Clever Ways to Reduce or Eliminate Your Housing Costs

Advertiser Disclosure

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

We all know that aiming to live well below your means will help you save more money, get out of debt, and get ahead financially overall. To supercharge this process, you may want to consider attacking your largest expense: housing.

Just being able to save $200, $500, or more each month on housing could put a large dent in your debt repayment or help you seriously pad your savings. Reducing or eliminating your housing expenses might sound difficult, but there are so many different strategies, at least one could work for you.

What’s more is that these options don’t have to be permanent. You can always go back to a more traditional housing situation once you feel like the arrangement has run its course.

See if one of these ways of cutting your housing costs might work for you.

Be Energy Efficient

The eco-revolution is here, and as a result, there are so many ways to save on utilities. A bonus is that some energy-efficient modifications and products can help you earn federal tax credits.

The list of things you can do is long and can get expensive, but there’s some low-hanging fruit when it comes to reducing your energy consumption:

  • Stop air leaks with caulk, insulation, or weatherstripping
  • Swap out incandescent lights for LED lights
  • Turn down your water heater and get a jacket for it
  • Plug your devices into powerstrips that minimize idle current usage (or unplug devices altogether)
  • Use rainwater barrels for your outdoor water needs
  • Air-dry your clothing
  • Choose light colors on flooring and walls to minimize artificial light use during daylight hours
  • Program your thermostat
  • Get alerts for higher priced kilowatt rates during certain hours of the day

You get the point. The more you can minimize your energy use, obviously the more money you’ll save on these costs. Pick a few that work for you, then use the money saved to get ahead in your finances.

Put Your Bills on Autopay

Not only will this small gesture save your sanity, it could potentially save you fees and penalties connected with late payments. You can set up automatic payments to be deducted from your bank account or a credit card account. If you choose the latter, be sure to avoid carrying a balance from month to month and pay your credit card bill on time as well. Otherwise, the interest and late fees from missing your credit card payment could cancel out the benefits of your autopay set-up.

Appeal Your Property Taxes

If you’ve ever gotten those solicitations in the mail from companies that claim to reduce your property tax bill, don’t put it in the junk pile quite yet. According to the National Taxpayers Union, up to 60% of U.S. properties are over-assessed. This means that 60% of Americans could be paying inflated property tax bills.

Many property owners don’t even know that they can get their property tax bill reduced via an appeal process. Because of this, it’s very possible that you are paying too much for your property taxes.

The appeal process to get your taxes can seem daunting, but it’s usually a string of paperwork and deadlines. Of course, you’ll be dealing with government entities so that could add a layer of complexity to the whole ordeal, but it’s not insurmountable.

If you have the time and ambition, it’s a process you could easily undertake yourself. If not, it may be worth hiring help to file and follow up through the property-tax appeal process. If the appeal is successful and your property taxes are reduced, you’d fork over a portion of the savings to the firm or person you hire.

Shop Around for Insurance

If you’ve got home insurance, you are likely to have other policies for vehicles, and perhaps you also have coverage for health and life insurance benefits, too. If you’ve got insurance needs that require multiple policies, you can leverage your buying power to shop around for better rates.

Shopping around for insurance can seem straightforward, but be ready to use your brain to the utmost in this endeavor. Not only will you need to compare prices, but you’ll also want to compare things like coverage amounts, premiums, deductibles, and available riders at the quoted prices.

Fortunately, there are comparison sites and independent insurance agents that can make this task a little easier. Either way you do it, it’s a good idea to check around every once in a while to make sure your current insurance provider is being competitive and offering you the best rate.

Become a DIYer

One of the most costly expenses of owning a home can be maintenance, repairs, and upgrades. Save money by learning to do some things around the house yourself. There are many resources to help you with anything you don’t know much about, from books, to websites, to YouTube. Though it can take more time, you might come out ahead by cutting your own grass or installing your own kitchen backsplash.

If you’ve got complicated jobs that require special expertise and equipment, consider a partial DIY approach. For example, if you’re redoing your bathroom, you might ask the contractor about things you can do yourself to shave the bill down some. Demolition and cleanup of existing fixtures might be the type of work you can handle.

Don’t be afraid to experiment, but definitely be wise about the projects you decide to take on yourself. Finding the right balance between hiring and DIYing can save you time, money, and headaches as a homeowner.

Rethink Your Home Purchase Plan

Getting a conventional mortgage with vanilla terms that include a 10%-20% down payment and a 30-year loan period are all too familiar to the home-buying public. But if you really want to save on the single largest expense in your life, you might have to be a little more flexible than the standard terms accepted on most home loans.

Larger Down Payment

One approach to consider is putting down at least 20% on your home purchase. This will allow you to skip private mortgage insurance (PMI), which can amount to thousands of dollars over the life of your home loan. PMI can eventually go away over the life of the loan when certain criteria is met, but you can save more money by dumping it sooner than later.

Refinance Your Mortgage

Many people refinance their homes in hopes of getting a lower monthly payment or locking in a lower interest rate. Adjusting these numbers downward can definitely save money for some homeowners over the long run.

However, refinancing your home loan is not a silver-bullet solution that will work in every scenario. In some cases, it makes perfect sense to refinance, and in others, it wouldn’t be a good idea. The best thing to do is run the refinance numbers and make a decision. After doing the math, you might actually find that fees and extended loan terms could cause you to lose money rather than save it.

Make sure you fully understand the terms of your refinanced mortgage along with the potential impact on your entire financial outlook. Most definitely, confirm your assumptions about this move with math. If you need help running the numbers, check out this refinance calculator from myFICO.

Pay Cash for Your Home

While not an option for the average American, paying cash for your home is not unheard of. Paying cash for a home would eliminate tens, maybe hundreds of thousands of dollars in interest, mortgage fees, and PMI. If you think you’d like to go for the gusto and pay cash for a home, consider ways to make this feat possible:

Drastically Change Your Lifestyle

Though these options aren’t for everyone, they are still worth a mention. These suggestions are for those who might be willing to change their lifestyle in order to garner the most savings possible when it comes to housing.

Get a Roommate (or Two)

The home-sharing revolution has caught on, and everyone from young professionals to empty nesters are finding boarders on places like Craigslist and Airbnb. If it works out, it can truly be a good solution to help lower your housing costs. Plus, having a roommate can be temporary or longer term, based on your living preferences.

Again, this option is not for the faint of heart. Adding a roommate to your living equation could be utterly disastrous or surprisingly pleasant, so choose your housemates wisely.

Buy a Multifamily Unit, Rent One Unit Out

Depending on the location and property type in these situations, homeowners can often cover their entire mortgage amount with their renters’ payments. It can definitely have its benefits, but don’t buy that two-flat just yet.

Remember, with this arrangement, you’ll be swimming deep in the waters of landlordship. How it all pans out can be based on so many variables: the landlord, tenant, property, location, and a host of other factors can make this arrangement easy income or a nightmarish headache.

If things go wrong with your property, your tenant doesn’t share the burden of fixing things though they live there just the same. There can be costs associated with maintenance and repairs that go well beyond the monthly income your rented unit brings in. You’ll want to have a comfortable cash cushion for incidentals before starting your homeownership journey as a landlord.

Downsize

You don’t have to join the tiny home revolution to downsize (though it’s not a terrible idea). Downsizing can look different for different people. Downsizing for one person might be moving from the lake-view two-bedroom apartment to a studio in a less ritzy location. You’ll have to decide what downsizing looks like for you and if it will be worth the effort.

While you might not be game for all of these suggestions, you can probably adopt a few that could change your financial situation significantly. Whatever measures you choose to save or eliminate your housing costs, make sure you are ready to deal with the consequences. These consequences can be both beneficial and somewhat inconvenient for your quality of life and your financial health. In the end, you’ll have to determine if it’s worth it.

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Credit Cards, Featured, News

3 Ways to Get a Credit Limit Increase

Advertiser Disclosure

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

In many cases, a credit limit increase can sound like a good idea. If you start out with a credit limit of $2,000, for example, it’s good to know that your limit can increase in the future so you can have more buying power and find it easier to maintain a low utilization rate.

Sometimes, increasing your credit limit will not always be in your best interest because it can tempt you to overspend. In that case, it’s also easy to drive up your utilization rate, which is how much you are spending versus how much available credit you have. If your utilization rate gets higher than 20%-30%, it can begin to hurt your credit score.

What’s worse, by overspending and not paying your credit card balance off in full each month, you can get into debt.

If you’d like to secure a credit limit increase for a credit card and you know that you’ll have a good sense of self-control over your spending, there are quite a few ways to obtain a credit limit increase.

In this article, we’ll go over your different options when it comes to obtaining a credit limit increase and what you might want as an alternative.

How to Ask for a Credit Limit Increase on Your Current Card

One of the most common ways to obtain a credit limit increase is to simply ask for one. Most credit card companies and banks allow you to request a credit limit increase online or you can do it by phone.

We’ve gone through the process of requesting a credit limit increase with various banks in detail, including Wells Fargo, Capital One, Discover, Barclaycard, American Express, and more, if you need specific instructions regarding the process.

When requesting a credit limit increase, it’s important to make sure you meet the criteria to be considered. Some banks have certain requirements and like to see your account paid off and in good standing, a good credit score, and recent spending activity on your end.

If you haven’t been consistent about paying your credit card bill on time, that may work against you when you decide to request a higher credit limit.

On the other hand, if you’ve been managing your card well and paying your bill on time and would like more buying power, you may want to consider requesting a credit limit increase just to see what the end result will be.

Sit and Wait (Automatic)

Some credit card companies will offer you a credit limit increase automatically so you won’t need to do anything on your end.

If you’ve been spending on your card regularly, paying your bill on time, and keeping your utilization rate low, you may receive an offer to increase your credit limit automatically.

In this case, you can either accept or deny the offer. In most cases, accepting the offer will be your best bet if you like the credit card and use it from time to time. Even if you don’t use the card often, having a higher limit will only help lower your utilization rate as long as your spending doesn’t increase significantly.

Consider a New Card

If you’re on the fence about getting a credit limit increase, you can always consider signing up for a new credit card instead. Adding a new credit card to your wallet can increase the number of accounts you have, which can be a positive move for your credit if you only have a low number of accounts total.

Some new credit cards also have great sign-up bonuses so you can take advantage of more cash back offers, an extended 0% APR rate, balance transfers, etc., and these are benefits you might not be able to receive if you only increase the limit on your existing credit card.

To find out if you’ll be approved for a new credit card without hurting your score, you can get pre-qualified, which typically allows banks to peek at your creditworthiness via a soft inquiry. Getting pre-qualified for a credit card can reduce your risk of getting denied, and it’s pretty simple. Find out how to do it here.

Also, another reason why you might opt to just get a new credit card instead of considering a credit limit increase is if you don’t like or use your current card often. If you have an annual fee, a high-interest rate, and little reward opportunities with your existing card, it won’t make much sense to increase your limit and buying power.

Instead, signing up for a new and better credit card can be more beneficial and help you save money, especially if it has no annual fee.

Get a Personal Loan

If you are thinking about a credit limit increase because you need the extra money but don’t want to obtain a hard credit inquiry, a personal loan is an alternative option.

There are quite a few internet-only personal loan companies that allow you to see if you are pre-approved for a loan without involving a hard credit inquiry. Personal loans also tend to have lower interest rates than credit cards, so if your main intention is to borrow money to cover an expense, this may be a better option.

To see if you qualify for a loan, use our online tool here. You just need to fill out one application, and MagnifyMoney will check your rate with multiple lenders (without harming your credit score) to help you find the best offer.

What to Do If You Get Denied

If you request a credit limit increase and get denied, you’ll usually receive a response explaining why you didn’t get approved. Once you know why you didn’t get approved, you can take the necessary steps to fix the issues outlined and request an increase again if you wish.

Be mindful that some banks will let you request a credit limit increase at any time, while others may require that you wait a few weeks or months before putting in a request again.

While waiting it out and correcting the issues that contributed to you getting denied should fix the issue, you can also try either of the alternative options mentioned above as well if you didn’t get approved for a credit limit increase the first time around.

Benefits of Requesting a Credit Limit Increase

Obtaining a credit limit increase can be a smart move and provide you with benefits like increasing your credit limit and having more buying power in the event that you need to use your card for a large expense or emergency. With a higher limit, you are less likely to max out your card.

A credit limit increase will also make it easier for you to keep your utilization rate low and preferably below 20%. The process may also be easier than applying for a brand new credit card, especially if you receive credit limit increase offers automatically.

Drawbacks of Requesting a Credit Limit Increase

Increasing your credit limit isn’t always the best option for everyone, so it’s only fair to go over some of the possible drawbacks of making this decision.

In some cases, you’ll receive an extra credit inquiry, which could be a hard credit inquiry when you request a credit limit increase. Increasing your limit can also increase the risk of overspending and getting into debt.

There’s also no guarantee that you’ll get approved for a credit limit increase, so your request can get rejected. Also, if you have a card with a high-interest rate and an annual fee, you might be better off signing up for a better credit card.

Final Word

Requesting a credit limit increase can seem like a good idea on the surface, but it’s not the best solution for everyone. You must determine your needs, current situation, and intentions before going through with your decision.

If you decide to move forward with obtaining a credit card limit increase, be sure to pay your credit card balance off in full each month and keep your overall utilization rate at 20% or lower.

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Credit Cards

Disputing Credit Card Charges: What You Need to Know and Instructions for Each Card Issuer

Advertiser Disclosure

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

If you use credit cards, chances are at some point you’ll need to dispute a charge that appears on your statement for one reason or another. The good news is that this common practice has some pretty awesome guidelines and provisions protected under both state and federal laws.

Whether your dispute is straightforward or complicated, you’ll want to know the ins and outs of how the dispute process works so that it can ultimately work for you should you need it. The dispute process will help you get the best outcome in the case of billing errors, fraud, misrepresented products, or any other charge on your statement you believe you shouldn’t be responsible for.

When to Dispute a Charge on Your Account

The Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA) protects consumers from unfair credit billing practices. This federal law also provides guidelines to both consumers and credit card issuers for dispute management and resolution. According to the FCBA, consumers can file disputes, according to the FCBA settlement procedures, for the following billing errors (list provided by the FTC website):

  • Unauthorized charges. Federal law limits your responsibility for unauthorized charges to $50.
  • Charges that list the wrong date or amount.
  • Charges for goods and services you didn’t accept or that weren’t delivered as agreed.
  • Math errors.
  • Failure to post payments and other credits, like returns.
  • Failure to send bills to your current address — assuming the creditor has your change of address, in writing, at least 20 days before the billing period ends.
  • Charges for which you ask for an explanation or written proof of purchase, along with a claimed error or request for clarification.

There are additional FCBA provisions covering problems with the actual goods or services, aside from billing errors. This is known as the right to assert “claims and defenses.” In other words, the charge is correct, but the goods or services are not delivered as promised or described. This right can be exercised up to one year after purchase.

Under claims and defenses, the purchase has to be made within 100 miles of your current billing address and be more than $50, and you’ve got to make a “good faith” effort to resolve the dispute with the merchant first. The dollar and distance rules don’t apply if there is a special relationship between the buyer and seller or the purchase was made via internet, mail, or phone.

When you are initiating a dispute on this basis, make that clear with the credit card company so they’ll process the dispute accordingly. In this case, state laws may also play a part in determining what actions you can take against the merchant and the credit card issuer if the dispute is not resolved in your favor.

How to Dispute a Charge on Your Credit Card

The first thing you’ll want to do is determine if the charge is really an error. A little research will help you figure out if a charge is an error, fraudulent, or a purchase gone wrong. Some things to consider:

  • Did you let someone use your card? Do you have an authorized user on your account? They may have made a purchase with it.
  • Is it possible that someone obtained your information illegally and made a fraudulent charge on your card?
  • Does the merchant use another company name that appears on your credit card statement? (For example, Binky Toys can appear as “TOY CORP” on your billing statement.)
  • Did you read the fine print? You may have signed a contract with a merchant authorizing charges you were not aware of.

Once you determine there is an actual problem with your statement, you’ll want to figure out if the problem is with your credit card issuer or a merchant. The process can be slightly different if a merchant is involved or not.

If the charge is an error that doesn’t involve a merchant, like fraud or identity theft, then you can contact your credit card issuer directly. Though it’s best to document your dispute in writing, many card issuers will discuss the issue with you (and sometimes even resolve it) over the phone.

Nowadays, most major card issuers will allow you to log in to your account and file the dispute or initiate an inquiry about a charge online. If you don’t feel comfortable with any of these methods, you can use this sample dispute letter provided by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and begin the dispute process via mail.

If the charge involves a merchant whose goods or services were either defective, misrepresented, or not delivered as agreed, then you’ll want to contact them first. You can place a call to start the process, but it’s best to have things in writing. So an email or snail mail letter can either kick things off or confirm and reiterate what was discussed over the phone regarding the issue.

Many times, merchants will work with you because they want to keep their chargeback rates (credit card refunds due to errors and disputes) low. Merchants who have higher chargeback rates are deemed high risk by credit card processors and face higher penalties and processing rates which cut deeply into their bottom line. For this reason, try to settle with them before going to your credit card company with the problem.

If you can’t get an acceptable resolution from the merchant who charged your card, then it’s time to contact your credit card issuer. Just like the process outlined above for billing errors, you can choose to initiate the dispute via phone, internet portal, or mail.

In all your disputing, remember the timelines set forth by the Fair Credit Billing Act. If your problem is with a merchant, you’ve got up to a year to make a claim under “claims and defenses.”

For errors, your dispute correspondence has to be received by the credit card issuer no later than 60 days after the first statement containing the charge you are disputing. In either case, if you decide to send your correspondence via mail, it’s a good idea to send it certified with proof of delivery.

What Happens After You Initiate a Dispute

Under the FCBA, your card issuer has to acknowledge your complaint 30 days after receiving it (unless they resolve it before then). Sometimes, the dispute process is fairly straightforward and within a matter of minutes the dispute could be resolved in your favor. You’ll receive a credit on your statement and the issue is resolved.

You should also be aware that under the FCBA, you don’t actually have to pay the amount in dispute or any interest or any related late fees while the dispute is ongoing. Sometimes, the card issuer will even remove the charge under investigation right away. The bank has 90 days to investigate the issue and resolve it either in your favor or the merchant’s favor.

Keep in mind that you could be asked for supporting documentation to back up your dispute. This could include police reports, photos of a defective product, manufacturer claims and descriptions, tracking numbers, screenshots, and email correspondence.

This evidence will be gathered and checked against any evidence supplied from the merchant. Once the bank has concluded the investigation, you’ll receive a final ruling where the charge is either removed permanently or placed back onto your statement and becomes your responsibility to pay. You should also know that you may be responsible for interest and fees that accrue for a dispute you ultimately do not win.

What If Your Dispute Isn’t Approved

If finally, despite your best efforts, you’re deemed responsible for the disputed charge, you still have a few options. You could appeal the final decision with the credit card issuer within 10 days of the decision. Sometimes, the investigation could be reopened. Inform the bank that you’ve got new information they should consider.

If they still decline to reconsider or resolve in your favor, they can report your failure to pay to credit bureaus. If they do report this information, it must also state that you do not believe you owe the amount in question.

Another option is to take the merchant, your bank, or both parties to court. This can be costly, but for an amount that’s high enough, a court case could be justified. Be sure to check terms and conditions for both the merchant and the issuer, because you may have waived your right to this course of action in doing business with them. Also, state laws will have a say in what legal recourse is available to you against both the merchant and credit card company. Check with the consumer protection division of your state’s attorney general office for guidance in this area.

Also, don’t be afraid to engage help and organizations that might have oversight of the institutions involved in your dispute. You can file a complaint against credit issuers with the FTC. The FTC complaint process, however, won’t apply to banks. Banks are regulated by the FDIC. You can find the regulator that has oversight of the bank you are dealing with here, or you can file a complaint with the Federal Reserve Consumer Help website.

If you’ve got the time, energy, and ambition, you can always take to social media to vent and tell the world about your experience. Many companies are diligent about protecting their online reputation and prefer to route these conversations offline for resolution. If possible, be just as polite and diplomatic on social media channels as you would be with a phone call or written complaint. You’ll likely get further with this approach.

Where It Can Get Sticky

As mentioned, disputes can be settled quickly and easy. Some people say that their card issuer didn’t even ask for documentation but charges were immediately reversed. Other times, it can be a longer process, especially if a merchant objects to your dispute.

When this happens, there can be a lot of back-and-forth between everyone involved in a credit dispute. The purchaser, the merchant, the acquirer (Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover), and the issuing bank all have to coordinate communication to make sure disputes are investigated thoroughly and resolved appropriately.

Be aware that there are circumstances that can complicate, delay, and even hinder the dispute procedures.

Bankruptcy

When a merchant doesn’t deliver goods or services due to insolvency, there may not actually be any money in their bank’s account to cover a chargeback. You might be better off filing a case in small claims court. Sadly, in many bankruptcy proceedings, outstanding payables due to customers are one of the last payment priorities.

Collections

Though the dispute can be resolved in your favor from the credit issuer, the merchant could come back and bill you anyway. They can even send your account into collections. In this case, keep your documentation and be ready for a potential battle with collection agencies that have been engaged to recoup the funds from you. You credit report could also suffer.

Prepaid services

Let’s say you make an advance payment on a fitness camp 12 months in advance, but the company goes out of business and won’t be hosting the camp after all. You’ll want to make sure that you fully understand the dispute resolution process regarding future purchases. It will vary for each card issuer, so find out how you are protected in a situation like this. Consult your bank’s card member agreement and speak with someone who can give you clarity on dispute terms before making advanced payments with your credit card.

Product returns

If the dispute is resolved in your favor, part of the resolution may be connected to returning goods in order to receive the refund amount. There are very clear rules around what merchants must do when they receive your goods — a credit must be transmitted to the card issuer within seven days. From there, the issuer must ensure it shows up on your account within three days. It’s not unheard of for a seller to “send” for an item and never retrieve it in order to delay or avoid issuing a refund. Make sure that you take responsibility for returning goods. It’s a good idea to pay for tracking and insurance to make sure your items arrive safely, with proof of delivery, to the seller.

Pre-existing contracts

Terms and conditions are no fun to read, but it’s a good practice to look at the fine print (especially for large purchases). Hidden in these terms could be strict refund policies and even waivers to the dispute process should a problem occur with a sale.

Instructions for Filing Disputes with Major Credit Card Issuers:

 

Card Issuer: Instructions for Disputes:
Chase Chase dispute instructions
Bank of America Bank of America dispute instructions
Capital One Capital One dispute instructions
Barclays Barclays dispute instructions
Discover Discover dispute instructions
Citi Citi dispute instructions
American Express American Express dispute instructions

Final Thoughts on Credit Card Instructions

There are so many variables that can influence the outcome in all of these cases that it can seem like the final decisions are arbitrary. What worked in one scenario may not work in another with a different company or cardholder.

Many times, you’ll be working with a customer service representative who is unfamiliar with your rights as a consumer and the laws that should govern the outcomes of credit card charge disputes. When all else fails, research, education, and persistence may be your most powerful weapons in the fight for your consumer rights.

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