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How to Choose the Right Type Of Debt Consolidation

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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If you’re feeling buried by what you owe, debt consolidation could provide you with both immediate relief and a quicker path to debt-free.

Debt consolidation is the process of taking out a new loan and using that money to pay off your existing debt. It can help in a number of ways:

  • A lower interest rate could save you money and allow you to pay your debt off sooner
  • A longer repayment period could reduce your monthly payment
  • A single loan and single payment could be easier to manage than multiple loans

But debt consolidation isn’t without its potential pitfalls. First and foremost: Consolidating your debt doesn’t address the behavior that got you into trouble in the first place. If you’re in debt because of overspending, consolidating may actually exacerbate your problems by opening up new lines of credit that you can use to spend even more.

And every debt consolidation option has its own set of pros and cons that can make it a good fit or a bad one, depending on your circumstances.

This post explains all of those pros and cons. It should help you decide if debt consolidation is the right move for you, and, if so, which option is best.

Six Consolidation Options to Choose From

1. Credit card balance transfers

A credit card balance transfer is often the cheapest debt consolidation option, especially if you have excellent credit.

With this kind of transfer, you open a new credit card and transfer the balance on your existing card(s) to it. There is occasionally a small fee for the transfer, but if you have excellent credit, you can often complete the transfer for free and take advantage of 0 percent interest offers for anywhere from 12-21 months. None of the other debt consolidation options can match that interest rate.

There are some downsides, though:

  • You need a credit score of 700 or above to qualify for the best interest rate promotional periods.
  • Many cards charge fees of 3 to 5 percent on the amount that you transfer, which can eat into your savings.
  • Unless you cancel your old cards, you’re opening up additional borrowing capacity that can lead to even more credit card debt. Let’s put that another way: Now that you’ve paid off your old cards, you might be tempted to start using them again. (Don’t!)
  • If you don’t pay the loan back completely during the promotional period, your interest rate can subsequently soar. Some balance transfer cards also charge deferred interest, which can further increase the cost if you don’t pay your debt off in time.
  • This just isn’t for people with high levels of debt. Credit limits are relatively low compared with those tied to other debt consolidation options.

Given all of that, a credit card balance transfer is best for someone with excellent credit, relatively small amounts of debt and strong budgeting habits that will prevent them from adding to their burden by getting even further into debt.

Comparecards.com, also owned by LendingTree, tracks the best 0 percent balance transfer offers.

2. Home equity/HELOCs

Home equity loans and home equity lines of credit (HELOCs) allow you to tap into the equity you’ve built in your home for any number of reasons, including to pay off some or all of your other debt.

The biggest benefit of this approach is that interest rates are still near all-time lows, giving you the opportunity to significantly reduce the cost of your debt. You may even be able to deduct your interest payments for tax purposes.

But again, there are perils. Here are some of the downsides to using a HELOC/home equity loan for debt consolidation:

  • Upfront processing fees. You need to watch out for upfront costs, which can eat into or even completely negate the impact of lowering your interest rate. You can run the numbers yourself here.
  • Long loan terms. You also need to be careful about extending your loan term. You might be able to reduce your monthly payment that way, but if you extend it too far, you could end up paying more interest overall. Home equity loans typically have terms of five to 15 years, while home equity lines of credit typically have 10-to-20-year repayment periods.
  • You could lose your home. Finally, you need to understand that these loans are secured by your home. Fail to make timely payments, and you put that home in jeopardy. This is why, though the interest rates are lower than with most other debt consolidation options, there’s also added risk.

Home equity loans and HELOCs are generally best for people who have built up significant equity in their home, can get a loan with minimal upfront costs, and either don’t have excellent credit or need to consolidate more debt than is possible with a simple balance transfer.

You can ask your current mortgage provider about taking out a home equity loan or line of credit. Also, compare offers at MagnifyMoney’s parent company, LendingTree, here and here.

3. Personal loans

Personal loans are unsecured loans, typically with terms of two to seven years. Interest rates typically range from 5 to 36 percent, depending on your credit score and the amount you borrow.

The advantage of a personal loan over a credit card balance transfer is that it’s easier to qualify. While you typically need a credit score of 700 for a balance transfer, you can get a personal loan with a credit score as low as 580. You can also qualify for larger loan amounts than the typical balance transfer.

And the big advantage over a home equity loan or line of credit is that the loan is not secured by your house. This means you can’t lose your home if you have trouble paying back the debt. You can also apply for and obtain a personal loan very quickly, often at a lower cost than a home equity loan or line of credit.

The biggest disadvantage is that your interest rate will likely be higher than either of those options. And if your credit score is low, you may not find a better interest rate than what you already have.

Generally, a personal loan is best for someone with a credit score between 600 and 700 who either doesn’t have home equity or doesn’t want to borrow against his or her home.

You can shop around for a personal loan at LendingTree here. It’s important to compare offers to get the best deal possible.

4. Banks and credit unions

In addition to shopping for a personal loan online, you can contact your local banks or credit unions to see what types of loan options offer.

This is more time-consuming than applying online, and it can be harder to compare a variety of loan options. But it may lead to a better interest rate, especially if you already have a good relationship with a local bank.

One strategy you might try: Get quotes online using a service like LendingTree’s, then take those quotes to the bank or credit union and give it a chance to do better.

This strategy is best for anyone who already has a good and lengthy banking relationship, particularly with a credit union. But if you’re going the personal-loan route, it’s worth looking into in any case.

You can find credit unions in your area here.

5. Borrowing from family or friends

If you’re lucky enough to have family members or friends who have ample assets and are happy to help, this could be the easiest and cheapest debt consolidation option.

With no credit check, no upfront fees and relatively lenient interest rate policies, this might seem like the best of all worlds.

Even so, there are some things to watch out for.

First: A loan fundamentally changes your relationship with the person from whom you borrow. No matter what terms you’re on now or how much you love and trust this person, borrowing money introduces the potential for the relationship to sour in a hurry.

Consequently, if you do want to go this route, you need to do it the right way.

Eric Rosenberg, the chief executive of Money Mola, an app that lets friends and family track loans and calculate interest, suggests creating a contract that outlines each party’s responsibilities, how much money will be borrowed, the timeline for repayment, the payment frequency and the interest rate. He also suggests using a spreadsheet to keep track of the payments made and the balance due.

And Neal Frankle, a certified financial planner and the founder of Credit Pilgrim, suggests adhering to the current guidelines for Applicable Federal Rate (AFR), which as of this writing require a minimum interest of 1.27 to 2.5 percent, depending on the length of the loan. Otherwise, you may have to explain yourself to the IRS and the person lending you the money could be charged imputed interest and have to pay additional taxes.

If you have a family member or a friend who is both willing and able to lend you money, and if your credit isn’t strong enough to qualify favorably for one of the other options above, this could be a quick and inexpensive way to consolidate your debt.

6. Retirement accounts

Employer retirement plans like 401(k)s and 403(b)s often have provisions that allow you to borrow from the accumulated sums, with repayment of the loan going right back into your account.

And while you can’t borrow from an IRA, you can withdraw up to the amount you’ve contributed to a Roth IRA at any time without penalties or taxes, and you can withdraw money from a traditional IRA early if you’re willing to pay both taxes and a 10 percent penalty (with a few exceptions).

The biggest advantage of taking the money out of a retirement account is that there is no credit check. You can get the money quickly, no matter what your credit history looks like. And with a 401(k) or 403(b), you are also paying interest back to yourself rather than giving it to a lender.

Still, while there are situations in which borrowing from an employer plan can make sense, most financial experts agree that this should be considered a last-resort debt consolidation option.

One reason is simply this: Your current debt is already hindering your ability to save for the future, while taking money out of these accounts will only exacerbate the problem. Another is that tapping a retirement account now may increase the odds that it will happen again.

“I’d stay away from a 401(k) loan like the plague,” says Ryan McPherson. McPherson, based in Atlanta, Ga., is a certified financial planner and fee-only financial planner and the founder of Intelligent Worth. “With no underwriting process, and because you’re not securing it with your house, you’re more likely to do it again in the future.”

If you are in dire straits and cannot use any of the other strategies above, then borrowing or withdrawing from a retirement account may be the only consolidation option you have. Otherwise, you are likely to be better off going another route.

Things to consider before picking a debt consolidation strategy

With all these debt consolidation options at your disposal, how do you choose the right one for your situation? To be sure, it’s a key decision: The right option will make it easier for you to pay your obligations, and less likely that you’ll fall back into debt.

Here are the biggest variables you should consider before making the choice:

  1. Have you fixed the cause of the debt? Until you’ve addressed the root cause of your debt, how can any consolidation option help you get and stay out of debt?
  2. How much debt do you have? Smaller debts can be handled through any of these options. Larger debts might rule out balance transfers or borrowing from relatives or friends.
  3. What are your interest rates? You need to be able to compare your current interest rates with the interest rates you’re offered by the options above, if you want to know whether you’re getting a good deal.
  4. What is your credit score? Your score determines eligibility for various debt consolidation options, as well as the quality of the offers you’ll receive. You can check your credit score here.
  5. When do you want to be debt-free? Shorter repayment periods will cost less but require a higher monthly payment. Longer repayment periods will cost more but with a lower monthly payment. With this in mind, you need to decide both what you want and what you can afford.
  6. Do you have home equity? This determines whether a home equity loan or line of credit is an option. If it is, you should decide if you’re comfortable putting your home on the line.
  7. Do you have savings? Could you use some of your savings, outside of retirement accounts, to pay off some or all of your debt? That may allow you to avoid debt consolidation altogether and save yourself some money.

So … what’s the best consolidation strategy?

Unfortunately, there is no single answer to this tough question. The right answer for you depends the specifics of the situation.

Your job is to know what you currently owe and understand the pros and cons of each option we’ve outlined above. In this fashion, you can make an informed choice, one that’ll get you out of debt now and keep you out of it forever.

Matt Becker
Matt Becker |

Matt Becker is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Matt at matt@magnifymoney.com

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Mortgage

Understanding the FHA 203k Loan

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Finding your dream home is hard.

Unless you have an unlimited budget, just about any home you buy will require compromise. The house that’s move-in ready might have fewer bedrooms than you’d like. The house that’s in the perfect location might need a lot of repairs.

Sometimes it feels like you’ll never be able to afford the house you truly want.

This is where the FHA 203(k) loan can be a huge help.

The FHA 203(k) loan is a government-backed mortgage that’s specifically designed to fund a home renovation. Whether you’re buying a new house that needs work or you want to upgrade your current home, this program can help you do it affordably.

Part I: Understanding the basics of 203(k) loans

What is a 203(k) loan?

The FHA 203(k) loan is simply an extension of the regular FHA mortgage loan program. The loan is backed by the federal government, which provides two big advantages:

  1. You can qualify for a down payment as low as 3.5 percent.
  2. You can quality with a credit score as low as 500, although better credit scores allow for better loan terms.

The additional benefit of the 203(k) loan over regular FHA loans is that it allows you to take out a single loan to finance both the purchase and renovation of a property, giving you the opportunity to build your dream home with minimal money down.

How a 203(k) loan works

A 203(k) loan can be used for one of two purposes:

  1. Buying a new property that’s in need of renovations, from relatively minor improvements to a complete teardown and rebuild.
  2. Refinancing your existing home in order to fund repairs and improvements.

The maximum loan amount is determined by the general FHA mortgage limits for your area, and the minimum repair cost is $5,000. But as opposed to a conventional loan, in which your mortgage is limited to the current appraisal value of the property, a 203(k) loan bases the mortgage amount on the lesser of the following:

  • The current value of the property, plus the cost of the renovations
  • 110 percent of the appraised value of the property after the renovations are complete

In other words, it enables you to purchase a property that you otherwise might not be able to take out a mortgage on because the 203(k) loan factors in the value of the improvements to be made.

And it allows you to do so with a down payment as low as 3.5 percent, which can be especially helpful for first-time homebuyers who often don’t have as much cash to bring to the table.

All of this opens up a number of opportunities that would otherwise be off limits to many homebuyers. For Pamela Capalad, a fee-only certified financial planner and the founder of Brunch & Budget, it was the only way that she and her husband could afford a house in Brooklyn, N.Y., which is where they wanted to live.

“Finding out about the 203(k) loan opened us up to the idea of buying a house that needed to be renovated,” Capalad said. “It was by far the most budget-friendly way to do it.”

Of course, the opportunity comes with some additional costs.

According to Eamon McKeon, a New York-based renovation loan specialist, interest rates on a 203(k) loan are typically 0.25 to 0.375 percentage points higher than conventional loans.

They also require you to pay mortgage insurance. There is an upfront premium equal to 1.75 percent of the base loan amount, which is rolled into the mortgage. And there is an annual premium, paid monthly, that ranges from 0.45 to 1.05 percent, depending on the size of the loan, the size of the down payment, and the length of your mortgage.

Additionally, McKeon cautioned that unlike conventional loans, this mortgage insurance premium is applied for the entire life of the loan unless you put at least 10 percent down. The only way to get rid of it is to refinance.

What renovations can be financed through a 203(k) loan?

Source: iStock

A 203(k) loan allows you to finance a wide range of renovations, all the way from small improvements like kitchen appliance upgrades to major projects like completely tearing down and rebuilding the house.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development provides a list of eligible improvements:

The big stipulation is the work has to be done by a contractor. You are not allowed to do any of the work yourself (though there is an exception to this rule for people who have the skills to do it).

According to McKeon, this is the most challenging part of successfully executing a 203(k) loan. He said the vast majority of the projects he sees go south have contractor-related issues, from underestimating the bid, to being unresponsive, to not having the correct licenses.

On the flip side, one of the benefits is that the bank helps you manage costs. They put the money needed for the renovations into an escrow account and only release it to the contractor as improvements are made and inspected.

For Capalad and her husband, this arrangement was one of the draws of the 203(k) loan.

“I liked knowing that the contractor couldn’t suddenly gouge us,” she said. “He couldn’t quote $30,000 and then come back later and tell us we actually owed him $100,000.”

Capalad suggested using sites like Yelp and HomeAdvisor, as well as references from friends, to find a contractor. She said you should interview at least four to five people, get bids from each, and not necessarily jump at the cheapest bid.

“We made the mistake of immediately rejecting higher estimates,” said Capalad. “We realized later that their estimates were higher because they were more aware of what needed to be done and how the process would work.”

Who can use a 203(k) loan?

A 203(k) loan is available to anyone who meets the eligibility requirements (discussed below) and is looking to renovate a home.

It’s often appealing to first-time homebuyers, who are generally younger and therefore less likely to have the cash necessary for either a conventional mortgage or to fund the renovations themselves. But there is no requirement that you have to be a first-time homebuyer.

The program can also be used to finance either the purchase of a home in need of renovation or to refinance an existing mortgage in order to update your current home.

3 reasons to use a 203(k) loan

There are a few common situations in which a 203(k) loan can make a lot of sense:

  1. Expand your opportunity: In a hot market, move-in ready homes often sell quickly and for more than asking price. A 203(k) loan can open up the market for you, allowing you to choose from a wider range of properties knowing that you can improve upon any house you buy.
  2. Upgrade your current home: If you want to add a bedroom, redo your kitchen, or make any other improvements to your current home, a 203(k) loan allows you to refinance and fold the cost of those upgrades into your new mortgage with a smaller down payment than other options.
  3. Increase your home equity: McKeon argued that anyone taking out a regular FHA loan should at least consider turning it into a 203(k) loan. With the right improvements, you could increase the value of your home to the point that you have enough equity after the renovations to refinance into a conventional mortgage and remove or reduce your monthly mortgage insurance premium.

What it takes to qualify for a 203(k) loan

Qualifying for a 203(k) loan is much like qualifying for a regular FHA mortgage loan, but with slightly stricter credit requirements.

“FHA may allow FICO scores in the 500s, [but] banks/lenders have discretion or are required to only go so low on the score,” McKeon said.

Here are the major criteria you’ll have to meet:

  • You have to work with an FHA-approved lender.
  • The minimum credit score is 500, though McKeon said a credit score of 640 is typically needed in order to secure the smallest down payment of 3.5 percent.
  • You have to have sufficient income to afford the mortgage payments, which the lender determines by evaluating two years of tax returns.
  • Your total debt-to-income ratio typically cannot exceed 43 percent.
  • You must have a clear CAIVRS report, indicating that you are not currently delinquent and have never defaulted on any loans backed by the federal government. This includes federal student loans, SBA loans and prior FHA loans.
  • The current property value plus the cost of the renovations must fall within FHA mortgage limits.

The 203(k) loan application process

McKeon said the process of applying for a 203(k) loan generally looks like this:

  1. Get preapproved for a mortgage by an FHA-approved lender.
  2. Find a property you want to buy and submit an offer.
  3. Find an approved 203(k) consultant to inspect the property and create a write-up of repairs needed and the estimated cost.
  4. Interview contractors, receive estimates, and select one to be vetted and approved by your lender.
  5. Obtain an appraisal to determine the post-renovation value of your house.
  6. Provide other information and documentation as requested by your lender in order to finalize loan approval.

Property types eligible for 203(k) loans

A 203(k) loan can be used for any single-family home that was built at least one year ago and has anywhere from one to four units. You can use the loan to increase a single-unit property into a multi-unit property, up to the four-unit limit, and you can also use it to turn a multi-unit property into a single-unit property.

These loans can be used to improve a condominium, provided it meets the following conditions:

  • It must be located in an FHA-approved condominium project.
  • Improvements are generally limited to the interior of the unit.
  • No more than 5 units, or 25 percent of all units, in a condominium association can be renovated at any time.
  • After renovation, the unit must be located in a structure that contains no more than four units total.

A 203(k) loan can also be used on a mixed residential/business property if at least 51 percent of the property is residential and the business use of the property does not affect the health or safety of the residential occupants.

It’s worth noting that the property must be owner-occupied, so a 203(k) loan is not an option for a pure investment property.

Within those limits, a wide variety of properties could qualify. McKeon noted that when he writes these loans, he doesn’t care about the current condition of the property. Everything is based on the renovations to be done and the future condition of the property.

Part II: Types of 203(k) loans

Standard vs. streamline 203(k) loans

A streamline 203(k) loan, or limited 203(k) loan, is a version of the 203(k) loan that can be used for smaller renovations. While there is no limit to the renovation costs associated with a standard 203(k) loan — other than the general FHA mortgage limits — a streamline 203(k) can only be used for up to $35,000 in repairs. There is no minimum repair cost.

In return, you get an easier application process. While a standard 203(k) loan requires you to hire a HUD-approved 203(k) consultant to help manage the renovation process, a streamline 203(k) does not.

However, there are limits to the kind of work you can have done with a streamline 203(k) loan. You can review the list of allowed improvements here and the list of ineligible improvements here, but here’s a quick overview of what isn’t allowed with a streamline 203(k):

  • The improvements can’t be expected to take more than six months to complete.
  • The improvements can’t prevent you from occupying the property for more than 15 days during the renovation.
  • You cannot convert a single-unit home into a multi-unit home, or vice versa.
  • You cannot do a complete teardown.

So when does a streamline 203(k) loan make sense over a standard 203(k) loan? Here is when it’s worth considering:

  • The property requires less than $35,000 in repairs and otherwise falls within the requirements for an eligible renovation.
  • You are comfortable scoping the work, gathering contractor estimates, and supervising the renovations without the help of a consultant.
  • You don’t expect the renovations to require an extensive amount of time.
  • You like the idea of minimizing paperwork and otherwise shortening the entire process.

Part III: Is a 203(k) loan the best option for you?

Alternatives to a 203(k) loan

Of course, a 203(k) loan isn’t the only way to finance a renovation. Here are some of the alternatives.

Fannie Mae HomeStyle Renovation Mortgage

The Fannie Mae HomeStyle Renovation Mortgage is a conventional conforming mortgage that, like the 203(k) loan, is specifically designed to finance renovations.

The biggest drawback is that it requires a 5 percent down payment as opposed to 3.5 percent. That can potentially require you to bring a few thousand dollars more in cash to the table.

But McKeon says that if you can afford it, it’s usually a better option. The biggest reason is that your monthly private mortgage insurance (PMI) is typically less, and it automatically drops off once your loan-to-value ratio reaches 78 percent, as opposed to a 203(k) loan where the PMI generally lasts for the life of the loan.

Home equity loan

If you’re looking to renovate your current home, one option would simply be to take out a home equity loan that allows you to borrow against the equity you’ve already built up in your house.

The advantages over a 203(k) loan would generally be a potentially lower interest rate and fewer restrictions around what improvements are made and who makes them.

The big downside is that your loan is limited to your current equity. If you purchased your home relatively recently, or if your home has decreased in value, you may not have enough equity to finance a sizable improvement. And if you are looking to purchase and renovate a new home, the 203(k) loan is likely the better option.

Title I property improvement loan

Like 203(k) loans, Title I property improvement loans are backed by the federal government. They allow you to borrow up to $25,000 for single-family homes, and up to $12,000 per unit for multi-unit properties, to improve a home you currently own.

This loan could be preferable to a 203(k) loan if the improvements you want to make are relatively small, you don’t want to refinance or don’t have the money for a down payment, and/or you’d like to avoid some of the requirements and inspections surrounding a 203(k) loan.

Personal savings

If you have the savings to afford the renovations yourself, or if you can wait until you do have the savings, you could save yourself a lot of money by avoiding financing altogether.

Of course, this may or may not be realistic, depending on the type of project you’re considering. For smaller projects that aren’t urgent, this is a worthy candidate. For larger projects or those that need to be addressed immediately, financing may be the only way to make it happen.

203(k) loans open up new opportunities

The FHA 203(k) loan isn’t for everybody. As Capalad found out the hard way, the money you save is often more than made up in sweat equity.

“I was making calls during my lunch break, and my husband was regularly stopping at the house to check in on things,” she said. “It really felt like our lives stopped for those 10 months.”

But McKeon said that if you have a creative eye and you’re willing to put in the work, you can end up with a much better home than you would have been able to purchase if you limited yourself to move-in ready properties, especially if you have a limited amount of cash to bring to the table.

In the end, it’s all about understanding the trade-offs and doing what’s right for you and your family. At the very least, the 203(k) loan expands the realm of possibility.

Matt Becker
Matt Becker |

Matt Becker is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Matt at matt@magnifymoney.com

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Small Business

Where to Find the Best Short-Term Business Loans in 2017

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

This guide will help you decide whether a short-term business loan is the right move for your company and how to get one that meets your needs.

You’ll learn:

Part I: Explaining Short-Term Business Loans

Whether you’re running your own business or you have a small team of employees, at the end of the day everything falls on your shoulders as a business owner. Every opportunity is yours to take. Every problem is yours to solve.

And the truth is that both opportunities and problems often require cash. Cash to buy more inventory. Cash to market your services. Cash to get you through a rough patch.

But sometimes the cash isn’t there when you need it. And that’s where a short-term business loan can be helpful.

Short-term business loans give you access to money quickly so that you can address your immediate need and pay the loan back with the revenue you earn over the next several months.

They essentially act as a bridge, allowing you to get from Point A to Point B even if you don’t have the cash on hand to do it yourself.

Recommended short-term business loan options

You have a lot of lenders to choose from when looking for a short-term business loan, and you should expect to spend some time sorting through them to find the best option for your personal needs.

Here are a few good options to get you started, and you can refer to the following guide for even more: 17 Options for Small Business Loans.

OnDeck

  • Website: https://www.ondeck.com/short-term-small-business-loan
  • Max loan amount = $500,000
  • Loan terms from 3 to 36 months
  • Annual interest rates start at 9.99%, with an average annual rate of 49.7%
  • 2.5 percent to 4 percent origination fee
  • Eligibility requirements
    • 1+ years in business. The average customer has been in business for 7 years.
    • $100,000+ annual gross revenue. The typical customer has $450,000+ annual gross revenue.
    • 500+ credit score. The majority of customers are at 660+.

RapidAdvance

  • Website: http://www.rapidadvance.com/sba-bridge-loan
  • Max loan amount = $1,000,000
  • Monthly fees from 10 percent to 50 percent
  • Eligibility requirements
    • 2+ years in business
    • $5,000+ monthly gross revenue
    • 600+ credit score

National Funding

  • Website: https://www.nationalfunding.com/solutions/short-term-business-loans
  • Max loan amount = $500,000
  • Loan terms from 6 to 12 months
  • Fees from 24 percent to 80 percent
  • Eligibility requirements
    • 1+ years in business
    • $100,000+ annual gross revenue
    • No defined minimum credit score, but representatives indicated that 465-480 was the lowest they have previously seen qualified
    • 3 months’ of bank statements

Kabbage

Compare small business loans online

These sites are great tools for small business owners looking to compare offers from several small business lenders all at once. They typically ask for some key info about your business and the type of loan you are looking for, then match you with lenders that fit your needs.

Fundera

*As Fundera notes on its site, these are general qualifications. In a study of the borrowers who shopped on Fundera and successfully secured business loans, the site found they typically had a 600 credit score, annual revenue of $150,000, and were in business at least two years.

LendingTree

Website: https://www.lendingtree.com/business/small/

  • Eligibility requirements:
  • 1+ years in business
  • Credit score, revenue and other factors will be evaluated independently by each lender

Disclosure: LendingTree.com is the parent company of MagnifyMoney.

SBA Lender Match

Website: https://www.sba.gov/lendermatch

4 smart ways to use a short-term business loan

Source: iStock

Taking on debt should almost never be your first option, but there are a few situations in which a short-term business loan can make a lot of sense.

1. Buying More Inventory

Maybe you’re just starting out and you need to buy the inventory you’ll eventually sell. Or maybe you’re gearing up for a heavier sales period than usual.

Whatever the case, there are times where you need to buy more inventory and you don’t have the cash on hand to cover it. And as long as the expected revenue exceeds the amount you’re borrowing, plus interest, paying the loan off quickly shouldn’t be an issue.

2. Opening a new location

Opening a new store or a new office has the potential to grow your business by leaps and bounds. More locations means more opportunities to serve more people.

But it can cost a lot of money to open a new location. A loan can help you get it up and running, with the revenue produced by that new location being used to pay off the loan.

3. Hiring employees for the busy season

A lot of businesses need extra workers at certain points in the year. Think vacation destination restaurants in the summer or retail stores during the holidays.

A short-term business loan could help you hire those extra employees ahead of time, ensuring that you have all the help you need to take full advantage of the busy season.

4. Getting through a financial emergency

Unfortunately, business isn’t always booming. Sometimes you hit a rough patch, business is slow, and there isn’t enough revenue to cover all your expenses.

Taking on debt to address financial difficulties is risky. A loan is an additional financial burden that could make your problems worse.

But if you have good reason to expect a turnaround in the near future, a short-term loan could help you keep the lights on in the meantime.

Pros of Short-Term Business Loans

While a short-term business loan isn’t always the right solution, these loans do have a few advantages over other forms of financing:

  • Fast approval process – Certain online lenders will issue approval in just a few hours and deposit the money in your account in as little as 24 hours. If you need money fast, that could be the way to go.
  • Build your business credit – Short-term business loans are often available to businesses with little to no credit history. This both allows you to borrow money when other avenues are unavailable to you and to build a credit history that makes it easier to qualify for bigger loans down the line.
  • Take advantage of business opportunities – Because of the fast approval process and less stringent credit requirements, short-term business loans often allow you to take advantage of business opportunities that otherwise wouldn’t be available to you. This can sometimes make the difference between a business that fails and one that succeeds.
  • Match your borrowing needs – It doesn’t make sense to take out a 10-year loan if you just need help buying inventory you’ll sell in the next few months. Getting a short-term loan allows you to get the money you need and pay it back quickly so that it isn’t a burden any longer than it needs to be.

Cons of Short-Term Business Loans

While short-term business loans can be helpful in the right situations, they have a few characteristics that should make you think twice before taking them out:

  • Typically smaller loan amounts – Many short-term business loans are capped at $500,000 or less. If you’re in need of more than that, you may need to find a different form of financing.
  • Higher APR – Short-term loans typically have higher interest rates than longer term loans that come with longer application processes and stricter eligibility requirements. You’re paying the interest over a shorter time period, but it can still be an expensive way to access money.
  • Could be subject to daily/weekly payments – Shorter loans also come with more frequent payments. Many lenders require daily repayment, and even weekly repayment could be difficult if you won’t get the revenue right away.
  • Can lead to spending beyond your means – Due to the ease and speed with which you can obtain these loans, there’s a risk of developing a dependency upon debt that leads you to spending more than your business can truly afford. While debt can be helpful on occasion, it is not a sustainable way to run a business.

Short-term loan vs. line of credit

A line of credit is a popular alternative to taking out a short-term business loan, and there are situations in which it can be the better option.

A line of credit is an amount of money that a lender makes available to you to borrow. But unlike a loan, you don’t receive the entire amount right away. Instead, you are allowed to borrow money as you need it, up to the maximum amount, and you only pay interest on the amount you have actually borrowed.

According to Cathy Derus, CPA, a financial planner and the founder of Brightwater Financial in Chicago, the main advantage of a line of credit is the flexibility it provides. You borrow only what you need when you need it, allowing you to more precisely match your debt with your expenses.

The flip side, Derus says, is that a line of credit typically comes with a higher interest rate. If you are fairly certain of the amount of money you need, a short-term loan often allows you to borrow it at a lower cost.

Interest rates always depend on the lender you use and the specifics of the situation, so these aren’t hard and fast rules. But generally you can approach this decision like this:

  • If you’re unsure of the amount of money you need, or if you don’t need it all at once, the flexibility a line of credit provides may be worth the extra cost.
  • If you have a specific amount of money you need right now, a short-term loan may be the cheaper option.

PART II: Qualifying for a Short-Term Business Loan

Source: iStock

What it takes to qualify for a short-term business loan

Every lender has a different set of standards and will evaluate your business a little differently. But Derus says that there are three main factors that almost all lenders consider when deciding whether to offer you a loan, and on what terms:

  1. Time in business – Businesses that have been around for a longer period of time are less likely to fail and are therefore considered less risky. Older businesses are therefore generally able to qualify for larger loans at preferable rates.
  2. Credit history – Just like applying for a personal loan, lenders prefer long credit histories that show consistent, on-time payments. One of the benefits of short-term business loans is that you can often qualify without an extensive business credit history, but in that situation your personal credit will be scrutinized more closely and you may be held personally liable for the loan if the business can’t pay it back.
  3. Financial health of your business – The lender will look at bank statements and financial reports like profit and loss statements and your balance sheet to make sure that your company has the financial resources to pay back the loan. Most lenders specify a minimum gross revenue in order to qualify.

Lenders may also look at things like the industry you’re in, the amount of equity you personally have in the company, other debts or liens against the company, and even your business plan so they can feel confident you’ll use the money well.

Questions to ask before shopping for a short-term loan

Given those criteria, how can you put yourself in the best position possible to qualify for a favorable short-term business loan? Here a few questions you can ask yourself:

  • How long have you owned your business? The longer you’ve been in business, the more likely it is that you’ll be able to borrow the money you need at a reasonable cost.
  • Do you have organized and consistent financial reports? You’ll need to provide these to the lender during the application process, so you’ll want to make sure you have them ready and that they are accurate.
  • Do you have the revenue needed to pay back the loan? In addition to the lender’s evaluation of your revenue, you need to be confident yourself that you’ll have the money to pay back the loan quickly.
  • What is your company’s credit history? A strong and extensive credit history will make it easier to qualify for a loan. Minimal credit history means your personal credit will be more important. A negative credit history will make it harder to qualify.
  • What is your personal credit history? Even with minimal business credit history, you can often qualify for a short-term business loan if your personal credit history is strong.
  • Do you have other loans or obligations? Your credit utilization is the amount of debt you currently have compared to the amount of credit you have available to you, and a low credit utilization rate is one of the big keys to a good credit score. Loans and other financial obligations can not only hurt your credit score, but they can make you more risky in the lender’s eyes because you have multiple debts to pay back.
  • Do you have a relationship with any particular bank? A strong and extensive history with a particular bank might make it easier to borrow money on preferable terms.
  • Do you qualify for any government loans? The government offers lending programs to companies in specific situations. If you qualify, you may be able to borrow on more favorable terms than you would through private lenders.

How to determine what type of business loan you need

Finding the right short-term business loan for your needs requires some work on your part. Your job is first to understand your need, and second to find the loan that matches that need at the lowest cost possible.

Here’s a step-by-step process you can follow:

  1. Figure out how much money you need – You don’t want to borrow more than you need, but you also don’t want to come up short. In addition, the amount of money you need will affect the lender you choose, as different lenders have different maximum loan amounts.
  2. Determine when you need the money – Do you need it right away or can you afford to wait? The more time you have, the more options you’ll have available to you, as some of the loans with better terms require a longer application process.
  3. Determine when you’ll be able to pay back the loan – When will you have the revenue to pay back the loan? This will help determine how long your loan term needs to be.
  4. Can you afford to make daily or weekly payments? Short-term loans often require daily or weekly payments, so you need to make sure you’ll be able to make them.
  5. Check your business credit history – Business credit scores range from 0 to 100, with the SBA noting that 75 or above is the ideal range. You can research your business’s credit history through Experian and Dun & Bradstreet.
  6. Check your personal credit history – You can pull your credit history for free once per year from annualcreditreport.com. And you can use this guide to get a sense for your credit score. A stronger credit history and higher credit score will lead to better loans.
  7. Prepare your financial reports – You should have well-organized bank statements, a profit and loss statement, and a balance sheet ready to provide during the application process. If you haven’t been keeping your books up to date, you might want to obtain the help of a CPA to make sure everything is done correctly.
  8. Evaluate alternatives to a short-term loan – There are alternatives to taking out a short-term loan, such as taking out a line of credit or utilizing a small business credit card. Make sure that a loan is truly the best option before proceeding.
  9. Reach out to the bank you already do business with – The bank you already work with may be your best bet for favorable terms, especially if you’ve had a long and positive relationship. Reach out to them first to see what they’re able to offer.
  10. Research local credit unions – Credit unions are member-owned and therefore often offer better deals than the big banks. Search for credit unions in your area and reach out to see what types of loans they offer and whether you qualify for membership.
  11. Apply with online lenders – Online lenders often offer shorter applications, quicker approvals, and better user experiences, but those benefits often come at the cost of higher interest rates. If you need money quickly, or if your credit isn’t ideal, these may be your best option. Either way, it’s worth applying to see what you qualify for. To compare offers for small business loans from various lenders, check out MagnifyMoney parent company LendingTree.com’s small business offer tool. 
  12. Compare the offers you received – Once you’ve shopped around, you can compare the loan offers you’ve received both to each other and to your borrowing needs. You should compare them along variables like the amount of money being offered, the interest rate, the frequency and amount of payments required, and the overall length of the loan, along with any other terms and conditions each loan comes with.
  13. Make a final decision – At this point you should be ready to make a final decision. And remember, not taking out a loan is still an option at this point, especially if none of the offers were exactly what you were looking for.

Alternatives to a short-term business loan

While a short-term business loan can be invaluable in the right situations, it isn’t your only option when it comes to financing your needs. Here are a few more to consider:

  • Future revenue – If you can afford to wait and you expect revenue to be coming in soon, you may be better using that future revenue to finance your project yourself. There’s no application process and no interest to pay.
  • Line of credit – As discussed above, a line of credit is a good option when you’re unsure how much money you’ll need and when you need it. You can secure the line of credit and simply borrow the money as needed, with the likely trade-off of borrowing at a higher interest rate.
  • Business credit card – There are a number of small business credit cards available, some of which provide a promotional period with 0% interest. If your borrowing needs are relatively small and you can qualify for these cards, you may be able to borrow the money cost-free.
  • Personal line of credit – If you can’t qualify for a business line of credit, you still may be able to qualify for a personal line of credit. Derus warns against this option, though, since it blurs the line between you and your business, which can lead to you being personally liable for your business’s obligations. And she warns about following all relevant tax laws, such as calculating imputed interest, when using personal money in your business that you plan to pay back to yourself.
Matt Becker
Matt Becker |

Matt Becker is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Matt at matt@magnifymoney.com

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Ultimate Guide to Maximizing Your 401(k)

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

You’re probably familiar with the basics of a 401(k).

You know that it’s a retirement account and that it’s offered by your employer. You know that you can contribute a percentage of your salary and that you get tax breaks on those contributions. And you know that your employer may offer some type of matching contribution.

But beyond the basics, you may have some confusion about exactly how your 401(k) works and what you should be doing to maximize its benefits.

That’s what this guide is going to show you. We’ll tell you everything you need to know in order to maximize your 401(k) contributions.

The 4 Types of 401(k) Contributions You Need to Understand

When it comes to maximizing your 401(k), nothing you do will be more important than maximizing your contributions.

Because while most investment advice focuses on how to build the perfect portfolio, the truth is that your savings rate is much more important than the investments you choose. Especially when you’re just starting out, the simple act of saving more money is far and away the most effective way to accelerate your path toward financial independence.

There are four different ways to contribute to your 401(k), and understanding how each one works will allow you to combine them in the most efficient way possible, adding more money to your 401(k) and getting you that much closer to retirement.

1. Employee Contributions

Employee contributions are the only type of 401(k) contribution that you have full control over and are likely to be the biggest source of your 401(k) funds.

Employee contributions are the contributions that you personally make to your 401(k). They’re typically set up as a percentage of your salary and are deducted directly from your paycheck.

For example, let’s say that you are paid $3,000 every two weeks. If you decide to contribute 5% of your salary to your 401(k), then $150 will be taken out of each paycheck and deposited directly into your 401(k).

There are two different types of employee contributions you can make to your 401(k), each with a different set of tax benefits:

  1. Traditional contributions – Traditional contributions are tax-deductible in the year you make the contribution, grow tax-free while inside the 401(k), and are taxed as ordinary income when you withdraw the money in retirement. This is just like a traditional IRA. All 401(k)s allow you to make traditional contributions, and in most cases your contributions will default to traditional unless you choose otherwise.
  2. Roth contributions – Roth contributions are NOT tax-deductible in the year you make the contribution, but they grow tax-free while inside the 401(k) and the money is tax-free when you withdraw it in retirement. This is just like a Roth IRA. Not all 401(k)s allow you to make Roth contributions.

For more on whether you should make traditional or Roth contributions, you can refer to the following guide that’s specific to IRAs but largely applies to 401(k)s as well: Guide to Choosing the Right IRA: Traditional or Roth?

Maximum personal contributions

The IRS sets limits on how much money you can personally contribute to your 401(k) in a given year. For 2017, employee contributions are capped at $18,000, or $24,000 if you’re age 50 or older. In subsequent sections we’ll talk about how much you should be contributing in order to maximize these contributions.

2. Employer Matching Contributions

Many employers match your contributions up to a certain point, meaning that they contribute additional money to your 401(k) each time you make a contribution.

Employer matching contributions are only somewhat in your control. You can’t control whether your employer offers a match or the type of match they offer, but you can control how effectively you take advantage of the match they do offer.

Taking full advantage of your employer match is one of the most important parts of maximizing your 401(k). Skip ahead to this section to learn more on how to maximize your employer match.

3. Employer Non-Matching Contributions

Non-matching 401(k) contributions are contributions your employer makes to your 401(k) regardless of how much you contribute. Some companies offer this type of contribution in addition to, or in lieu of, regular matching contributions.

For example, your employer might contribute 5% of your salary to your 401(k) no matter what. Or they might make a variable contribution based on the company’s annual profits.

It’s important to note that these contributions are not within your control. Your employer either makes them or not, no matter what you do.

However, they can certainly affect how much you need to save for retirement, since more money from your employer may mean that you don’t personally have to save as much. Or they could be viewed as additional free savings that help you reach financial independence even sooner.

4. Non-Roth After-Tax Contributions

This last type of 401(k) contribution is rare. Many 401(k) plans don’t even allow this type of contribution, and even when they do, these contributions are rarely utilized.

The big catch is again that most 401(k) plans don’t allow these contributions. You can refer to your 401(k)’s summary plan description to see if it does.

And even if they are allowed, it typically only makes sense to take advantage of them if you’re already maxing out all of the other retirement accounts available to you.

But if you are maxing out those other accounts, you want to save more, and your 401(k) allows these contributions, they can be a powerful way to get even more out of your 401(k).

Here’s how they work:

Non-Roth after-tax 401(k) contributions are sort of a hybrid between Roth and traditional contributions. They are not tax-deductible, like Roth contributions, which means they are taxed first and then the remaining money is what is contributed to your account. The money grows tax-free while inside the 401(k), but the earnings are taxed as ordinary income when they are withdrawn. The contributions themselves are not taxed again.

A quick example to illustrate how the taxation works:

  • You make $10,000 of non-Roth after-tax contributions to your 401(k). You are not allowed to deduct these contributions for tax purposes.
  • Over the years, that $10,000 grows to $15,000 due to investment performance.
  • When you withdraw this money, the $10,000 that is due to contributions is not taxed. But the $5,000 that is due to investment returns — your earnings — is taxed as ordinary income.

This hybrid taxation means that on their own non-Roth after-tax 401(k) contributions are typically not as effective as either pure traditional or Roth contributions.

But they can be uniquely valuable in two big ways:

  1. You can make non-Roth after-tax contributions IN ADDITION to the $18,000 annual limit on regular employee contributions, giving you the opportunity to save even more money. They are only subject to the $54,000 annual limit that combines all employee and employer contributions made to a 401(k)..
  2. These contributions can be rolled over into a Roth IRA, when you leave your company or even while you’re still working there. And once the money is in a Roth IRA, the entire balance, including the earnings, grows completely tax-free. This contribution rollover process has been coined the Mega Backdoor Roth IRA, and it can be an effective way for high-income earners to stash a significant amount of tax-free money for retirement.

How to Maximize Your 401(k) Employer Match

With an understanding of the types of 401(k) contributions available to you, it’s time to start maximizing them. And the very first step is making sure you’re taking full advantage of your employer match.

Simply put, your 401(k) employer match is almost always the best investment return available to you. Because with every dollar you contribute up to the full match, you typically get an immediate 25%-100% return.

You won’t find that kind of deal almost anywhere else.

Here’s everything you need to know about understanding how your employer match works and how to take full advantage of it.

How a 401(k) Employer Match Works

While every 401(k) matching program is different, and you’ll learn how to find the details of your program below, a fairly typical employer match looks like this:

  • Your employer matches 100% of your contribution up to 3% of your salary.
  • Your employer also matches 50% of your contribution above 3% of your salary, up to 5% of your salary.
  • Your employer does not match contributions above 5% of your salary.

To see how this works with real numbers, let’s say that you make $3,000 per paycheck and that you contribute 10% of your salary to your 401(k). That means that $300 of your own money is deposited into your 401(k) as an employee contribution every time you receive a paycheck, and your employer matching contribution breaks down like this:

  1. The first 3% of your contribution, or $90 per paycheck, is matched at 100%, meaning that your employer contributes an additional $90 on top of your contribution.
  2. The next 2% of your contribution, or $60 per paycheck, is matched at 50%, meaning that your employer contributes an additional $30 on top of your contribution.
  3. The next 5% of your contribution is not matched.

All told, in this example, your employer contributes an extra 4% of your salary to your 401(k) as long as you contribute at least 5% of your salary. That’s an immediate 80% return on investment.

That’s why it’s so important to take full advantage of your 401(k). There’s really no other investment that provides such an easy, immediate, and high return.

How to Find Your 401(k) Employer Matching Program

On a personal level, taking full advantage of your 401(k) employer match is simply a matter of contributing at least the maximum percent of salary that your employer is willing to match. In the example above that would be 5%, but the actual amount varies from plan to plan.

So your job is to find out exactly how your 401(k) employer matching program works, and the good news is that it shouldn’t be too hard.

There are two main pieces of information you’re looking for:

  1. The maximum contribution percentage your employer will match – This is the amount of money you’d need to contribute in order to get the full match. For example, your employer might match your contribution up to 5% of your salary as in the example above, or it could be 3%, 12%, or any other percentage. Whatever this maximum percentage is, you’ll want to do what you can to contribute at least that amount so that you get the full match.
  2. The matching percentage – Your employer might match 100% of your contribution, or they may only match 50%, or 25%, or some combination of all of the above, and this has a big effect on the amount of money you actually receive. For example, two companies might both match up to 5% of your salary, but one might match 100% of that contribution, and one might only match 25% of it. Both are good deals, but one is four times as valuable.

With those two pieces of information in hand, you’ll know how much you need to contribute in order to get the full match and how much extra money you’ll be getting each time you make that contribution.

As for where to find this information, the best and most definitive source is your 401(k)’s summary plan description, which is a long document that details all the ins and outs of your plan. This is a great resource for all sorts of information about your 401(k), but you can specifically look for the word “match” to find the details on your employer matching program.

And if you have any trouble either finding the information or understanding it, you can reach out to your human resources representative for help. You should be able to find their contact information in the summary plan description.

Two Big Pitfalls to Avoid When Maximizing Your 401(k) Employer Match

Your 401(k) employer match is almost always a good deal, but there are two pitfalls to watch out for: vesting and front-loading contributions. Both of these could either diminish the value of your employer match or cause you to miss out on getting the full match.

Pitfall #1: Vesting

Clock time deadline

Employer contributions to your 401(k) plan, including matching contributions, may be subject to something called a vesting schedule.

A vesting schedule means that those employer contributions are not 100% yours right away. Instead, they become yours over time as you accumulate years of service with the company. If you leave before your employer contributions are fully vested, you will only get to take some of that money with you.

For example, a common vesting schedule gives you an additional 20% ownership over your 401(k) employer contributions for each year you stay with the company. If you leave before one year, you will not get to keep any of those employer contributions. If you leave after one year, you will get to keep 20% of the employer contributions and the earnings they’ve accumulated. After two years it will be 40%, and so on until you’ve earned the right to keep 100% of that money after five years with the company.

Three things to know about vesting:

  1. Employee contributions are never subject to a vesting schedule. Every dollar you contribute and every dollar that money earns is always 100% yours, no matter how long you stay with your company. Only employer contributions are subject to vesting schedules.
  2. Not all companies have a vesting schedule. In some cases you might be immediately 100% vested in all employer contributions.
  3. There is a single vesting clock for all employer contributions. In the example above, all employer contributions will be 100% vested once you’ve been with the company for five years, even those that were made just weeks earlier. You are not subject to a new vesting period with each individual employer contribution.

A vesting schedule can decrease the value of your employer match. A 100% match is great, but a 100% match that takes five years to get the full benefit of is not quite as great.

Still, in most cases it makes sense to take full advantage of your employer match, even if it’s subject to a vesting schedule. And the reasoning is simply that the worst-case scenario is that you leave your job before any of those employer contributions vest, in which case your 401(k) would have acted just like any other retirement account available to you, none of which offer any opportunity to get a matching contribution.

However, there are situations in which a vesting schedule might make it better to prioritize other retirement accounts before your 401(k). In some cases, your 401(k) employer contributions might be 0% vested until you’ve been with the company for three years, at which point they will become 100% vested. If you anticipate leaving your current employer within the next couple of years, and if your 401(k) is burdened with high costs, you may be better off prioritizing an IRA or other retirement account first.

You may also want to consider your vesting schedule before quitting or changing jobs. It certainly shouldn’t be the primary factor you consider, but if you’re close to having a significant portion of your 401(k) vest, it may be worth waiting just a little bit longer to make your move.

You can find all the details on your 401(k) vesting schedule in your summary plan description. And again you can reach out to your human resources representative if you have any questions.

Pitfall #2: Front-Loading Contributions

In most cases, it makes sense to put as much money into your savings and investments as soon as possible. The sooner it’s contributed, the more time it has to compound its returns and earn you even more money.

But the rules are different if you’re trying to max out your 401(k) employer match.

The reason is that most employers apply their maximum match on a per-paycheck basis. That is, if your employer only matches up to 5% of your salary, what they’re really saying is that they will only match up to 5% of each paycheck.

For a simple example, let’s say that you’re paid $18,000 twice per month. So over the course of an entire year, you make $432,000.

In theory, you could max out your annual allowed 401(k) contribution with your very first paycheck of the year. Simply contribute 100% of your salary for that one paycheck, and you’re done.

The problem is that you would only get the match on that one single paycheck. If your employer matches up to 5% of your salary, then they would match 5% of that $18,000 paycheck, or $900. The next 23 paychecks of the year wouldn’t get any match because you weren’t contributing anything. And since you were eligible to get a 5%, $900 matching contribution with each paycheck, that means you’d be missing out on $20,700.

Now, most people aren’t earning $18,000 per paycheck, so the stakes aren’t quite that high. But the principle remains the same.

In order to get the full benefit of your employer match, you need to set up your 401(k) contributions so that you’re contributing at least the full matching percentage every single paycheck. You may be able to front-load your contributions to a certain extent, but you want to make sure that you stay far enough below the annual $18,000 limit to get the full match with every paycheck.

Now, some companies will actually make an extra contribution at the end of the year to make up the difference if you contributed enough to get the full match but accidentally missed out on a few paychecks. You can find out if your company offers that benefit in your 401(k)’s summary plan description.

But in most cases you’ll need to spread your contributions out over the entire year in order to get the full benefit of your employer match.

When to Contribute More Than Is Needed for Your Employer Match

Maxing out your 401(k) employer match is a great start, but there’s almost always room to contribute more.

Using the example from above, the person with the $3,000 per-paycheck salary would max out his or her employer match with a 5% contribution. That’s $150 per paycheck. Assuming 26 paychecks per year, that individual would personally contribute $3,900 to his or her 401(k) over the course of a year with that 5% contribution.

And given that the maximum annual contribution for 2017 is $18,000 ($24,000 if you’re 50+), he or she would still be eligible to contribute an additional $14,100 per year. In fact, this individual would have to set his or her 401(k) contribution to just over 23% in order to make that full $18,000 annual contribution.

3 big questions to answer:

  1. Do you need to contribute more in order to reach your personal goals?
  2. Can you afford to contribute more right now?
  3. If the answer is yes to both #1 and #2, should you be making additional contributions to your 401(k) beyond the employer match, or should you be prioritizing other retirement accounts?

Questions #1 and #2 are beyond the scope of this guide, but you can get a sense of your required retirement savings here and here.

Question #3 is what we’ll address here. If you’ve already maxed out your employer match and you want to save more money for retirement, should you prioritize your 401(k) or other retirement accounts?

Let’s dive in.

What Other Retirement Accounts Are Available to You?

Your 401(k) is almost never the only retirement account available to you. Here are the other major options you might have.

IRA

An IRA is a retirement account that you set up on your own, outside of work. You can contribute up to $5,500 per year ($6,500 if you’re 50+), and just like with the 401(k) there are two different types:

  1. Traditional IRA – You get a tax deduction on your contributions, your money grows tax-free inside the account, and your withdrawals are taxed as ordinary income in retirement.
  2. Roth IRA – You do not get a tax deduction on your contributions, but your money grows tax-free and can be withdrawn tax-free in retirement.

You can read more about making the decision between using a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA here: Guide to Choosing the Right IRA: Traditional or Roth?

The big benefit of IRAs is that you have full control over the investment company you use, and therefore the investments you choose and the fees you pay. While some 401(k)s force you to choose between a small number of high-cost investments, IRAs give you a lot more freedom to choose better investments.

The only catch is that there are income limits that may prevent you from being allowed to contribute to an IRA or to deduct your contributions for tax purposes. If you earn more than those limits, an IRA may not be an option for you.

Health Savings Account

Health savings accounts, or HSAs, were designed to be used for medical expenses, but they can also function as a high-powered retirement account.

In fact, health savings accounts are the only investment accounts that offer a triple tax break:

  1. Your contributions are deductible.
  2. Your money grows tax-free inside the account.
  3. You can withdraw the money tax-free for qualified medical expenses.

On top of that, many HSAs allow you to invest the money, your balance rolls over year to year, and as long as you keep good records, you can actually reimburse yourself down the line for medical expenses that occurred years ago.

Put all that together with the fact that you will almost certainly have medical expenses in retirement, and HSAs are one of the most powerful retirement tools available to you.

The catch is that you have to be participating in a qualifying high-deductible health plan, which generally means a minimum annual deductible of $1,300 for individual coverage and $2,600 for family coverage.

If you’re eligible though, you can contribute up to $3,400 if you are the only individual covered by such a plan, or up to $6,750 if you have family coverage.

Backdoor Roth IRA

If you’re not eligible to contribute to an IRA directly, you might want to consider something called a Backdoor Roth IRA.

The Backdoor Roth IRA takes advantage of two rules that, when combined, can allow you to contribute to a Roth IRA even if you make too much for a regular contribution:

  1. You are always allowed to make non-deductible traditional IRA contributions, up to the annual $5,500 limit, no matter how much you make.
  2. You are also allowed to convert money from a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA at any time, no matter how much you make.

When you put those together, high-earners could make non-deductible contributions to a traditional IRA, and shortly after convert that money to a Roth IRA. From that point forward the money will grow completely tax-free.

There are some potential pitfalls, and you can review all the details here. But if you are otherwise ineligible to make IRA contributions, this is a good option to have in your back pocket.

Taxable Investment Account

While dedicated retirement accounts offer the biggest tax breaks, there are plenty of tax-efficient ways to invest within a regular taxable investment account as well.

These accounts can be especially helpful for nearer term goals, since your money isn’t locked away until retirement age, or for money you’d like to invest after maxing out your dedicated retirement accounts.

How to Decide Between Additional 401(K) Contributions and Other Retirement Accounts

With those options in hand, how do you decide whether to make additional 401(k) contributions, beyond the amount needed to max out the employer match, or to contribute that money to other accounts?

There are a few big factors to consider:

  • Eligibility – If you’re not eligible to contribute to an IRA or HSA, a 401(k) might be your best option by default.
  • Costs – Cost is the single best predictor of future investment returns, with lower cost investments leading to higher returns. You’ll want to prioritize accounts that allow you to minimize the fees you pay.
  • Investment options – You should prioritize accounts that allow you to implement your preferred asset allocation, again with good, low-cost funds.
  • Convenience – All else being equal, having fewer accounts spread across fewer companies will make your life easier.

With those factors in mind, here’s a reasonable guide for making the decision:

  1. Max out your employer match before contributing to other accounts.
  2. If your 401(k) offers low fees and investments that fit your desired portfolio, you can keep things simple by prioritizing additional contributions there first. This allows you to work with one account, at least for a little while, instead of several.
  3. If your 401(k) is high-cost, or if you’ve already maxed out your 401(k), a health savings account may be the next best place to look. If you can pay for your medical expenses with other money, allowing this account to stay invested and grow for the long term, that triple tax break is hard to beat.
  4. An IRA is likely your next best option. You can review this guide for a full breakdown of the traditional versus Roth debate.
  5. If you’re not eligible for a direct IRA contribution, you should consider a Backdoor Roth IRA.
  6. If you maxed out your other retirement accounts because your 401(k) is high-cost, now is probably the time to go back. While there are some circumstances in which incredibly high fees might make a taxable investment account a better deal, in most cases the tax breaks offered by a 401(k) will outweigh any difference in cost.
  7. Once those retirement accounts are maxed out, you can invest additional money in a regular taxable investment account.

The Bottom Line: Maximize Your 401(k)

A 401(k) is a powerful tool if you know how to use it. The tax breaks make it easier to save more and earn more than in a regular investment account, and the potential for an employer match is unlike any opportunity offered by any other retirement account.

The key is in understanding your 401(k)’s specific opportunities and how to take maximum advantage of them. If you can do that, you may find yourself a lot closer to financial independence than you thought.

Matt Becker
Matt Becker |

Matt Becker is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Matt at matt@magnifymoney.com

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Life Events

Guide to Liability Insurance: What It is and Why You Need It

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

When it comes to protecting yourself financially, things like an emergency fund, health insurance, and life insurance are typically some of the first topics that come up. And rightfully so, given that each is an important part of a secure financial foundation.

Liability insurance is a protection that often gets overlooked. If you have an auto, homeowners, or renters insurance policy, then you likely already have some level of liability insurance in place. But it may not be enough to fully protect you, and in this guide you’ll learn how to make sure you have the right coverage for your needs.

What Is Liability Insurance and Why Is It Important?

Liability insurance protects you financially in case you accidentally injure someone or damage their property. Common situations include:

  • You’re at fault in a car accident, and the other party experiences neck pain as a result.
  • Someone slips and falls in your driveway and breaks their tailbone.
  • You accidentally back your car into someone else’s mailbox.
  • Your dog bites someone while you’re out for a walk.

Each of those situations are accidents in which someone else experiences either an injury or property damage that will cost them money to fix. And in each case, they could legally hold you responsible for paying those bills.

That’s where liability insurance kicks in. Instead of having to spend your own money, your insurance company would cover the bill as long as it fell within the limits of your coverage. Any costs beyond those limits would be yours to bear.

And truth is that some of these situations could be very expensive. Imagine, for example, a car accident in which multiple other passengers are seriously injured.

That kind of situation isn’t fun to think about. But it could happen, and at the very least you can protect yourself from the financial impact. Otherwise, you could be on the hook for:

  1. Medical bills.
  2. Fixing or replacing the other person’s property.
  3. Lost income if the other person is forced to miss work.
  4. Legal bills for both you and the other person if there is any disagreement about who is at fault.

That’s why liability insurance is so valuable. It ensures that even if the financial impact of an accident is high — such as someone being forced to miss work for an extended period of time — you won’t be on the hook for the cost.

Who Needs Liability Insurance?

Just about everyone should have some level of liability insurance, but the truth is that the more money you have, the more likely you are to need it.

The simple reason is that if you have either a sizable income or a significant amount of savings and investments, there’s more for the other party to go after. They know that you can afford it, so they’re more likely to push for getting it.

On the the other hand, if you don’t have much savings and you don’t earn much money, there’s less potential for the other party to get a financial benefit, and they may therefore be less likely to pursue it.

Still, you can be held financially liable for your actions no matter how much money you have, and in certain situations you can even be required to pay a part of your income to the injured party. Plus, with liability insurance in place, you get the benefit of an insurance company handling all the procedural aspects of dealing with a claim, which can make the entire process a lot easier.

So again, just about everyone should have some base level of liability insurance. But if you’re a high-earner, and especially if you have significant assets, you’ll probably want to make sure you have at least enough coverage to protect your entire net worth.

Four Major Types of Liability Insurance

There are four major types of liability insurance policies, two of which are simply part of insurance policies you may already have in place.

1. Auto Insurance

You typically face the greatest risk of financial liability when driving. The simple reality is that driving is risky, accidents are common, and even careful drivers make mistakes that could leave them financially liable for fixing someone’s car and paying their medical bills.

Most states require you to have a minimum amount of liability coverage as part of your auto insurance policy, typically covering the following things:

  1. Property damage
  2. Per person bodily injury
  3. Per accident bodily injury (for when more than one person is injured)

Some states also require you to have uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage, which actually covers you and other passengers in your car if you’re in an accident and the other driver is at fault, but either doesn’t have liability coverage or doesn’t have enough to satisfy your claim.

For example, the minimum coverage requirements in New York currently look like this:

  • $10,000 for property damage
  • $25,000 bodily injury and $50,000 for death per person
  • $50,000 bodily injury and $100,000 for death per accident
  • $25,000 uninsured motorist coverage per person
  • $50,000 uninsured motorist coverage per accident

The minimum required coverage is often enough to cover the most common scenarios, but typically doesn’t provide sufficient protection in the case of major accidents. When you consider the medical bills and potential lost income in an accident involving multiple people, the total cost could be much higher than even the amounts listed above.

And given that the main value of your coverage is the protection against financially ruinous outcomes, it often makes sense to increase your coverage above the minimum. Most auto insurers allow you to get up to $250,000 of coverage per person and $500,000 per accident.

Unfortunately, it can be fairly expensive to secure liability coverage through your auto insurance policy, ranging anywhere from a couple of hundred dollars per year to $1,000 or more at the upper limits. The cost depends on the amount of coverage you want and on your driving history, so a clean record could lead to lower premiums.

2. Homeowners or Renters Insurance

Like auto insurance, liability coverage is a standard part of both homeowners and renters insurance policies, although it’s not always required. And the good news is that it usually provides broad coverage at a relatively low cost.

First, it covers any accidents that happen while someone is on your property, from falling down the stairs to tripping over your toddler’s walker. If someone is injured while at your house, your liability insurance has you covered.

Second, it covers non-auto-related accidents that happen away from your home as well. If your dog bites someone while you’re out for a walk, you accidentally bump into your neighbor’s ladder while they’re cleaning the gutters, or your child damages someone’s property, your liability insurance has you covered.

And all of that coverage comes at a relatively low cost too, with even several hundred thousand dollars of coverage typically only costing a couple of hundred dollars per year.

Most homeowners and renters insurance policies start with $100,000 of liability coverage, though you can typically increase it to $300,000.

3. Umbrella Liability Insurance

An umbrella insurance policy provides additional liability coverage above the limits in your auto and homeowners or renters insurance policies. And you typically have to do two things before you can get a policy:

  1. Secure your auto insurance and homeowners or renters insurance with the same company you’re getting your umbrella policy with. Not all insurers require this, but most do.
  2. Increase the liability coverage in both your auto insurance and homeowners or renters policies to a minimum level set by your umbrella policy insurer, which is often $300,000 for homeowners or renters insurance and $250,000/$500,000 for auto insurance. This is to make sure that your umbrella coverage only covers situations in which there are extraordinarily significant damages.

Because of that second point, umbrella liability insurance is typically more than most people need. Unless your income is high enough or you have more than $500,000 in net worth, it’s probably not worth considering this additional coverage. Your auto and homeowners or renters policies are likely enough.

But if you have significant income or assets to protect, an umbrella policy can provide substantial coverage at a small cost. Coverage typically starts at $1 million, and according to the Insurance Information Institute typically costs $150-$300 per year for the first $1 million in coverage and increases by $50-$75 per year for every additional $1 million in coverage.

4. Business Liability Insurance

If you run a business, even if it’s a small side hustle, the insurance policies listed above will not cover those business activities. You will need to get a separate policy.

The tricky part here is that liability coverage varies from profession to profession, so it’s not as easy as going out and getting a generic liability insurance policy like it is on the personal side of things.

Business liability insurance is beyond the scope of this guide, but if you’re in a business where you could be held financially liable for your mistakes, getting the right liability coverage in place could be well worth your time and money.

Business liability insurance can vary so much profession to profession. For example, doctors have a completely different type of liability insurance than lawyers. And even within those professions, it will vary by specialty. So it’s pretty difficult to give a price range or even offer general resources.

Three Ways to Get Liability Insurance

When it comes to actually getting liability insurance in place, you have three main options

1. Your Current Auto and Homeowners or Renters Insurance Policies

If you already have auto insurance in place, then you already have some amount of liability insurance. You just need to check your policy to see how much you have, and ask your insurer about the cost of increasing your coverage if you’d like more.

The same is true if you have homeowners or renters insurance. Check what you have in place now, and, if necessary, ask your insurer what the cost would be to either add liability coverage or increase it.

If you’re renting and you don’t already have renters insurance, you can check with your auto insurance company about adding it. You can also refer to this guide to help you find a policy that meets your needs: Guide to Renters Insurance: When You Need it and When You Don’t.

2. Shop Around

While sticking with your current insurance company is the easiest way to secure liability insurance, it may not be the most cost-effective. You could save a lot of money by shopping around, especially if you’d like to add an umbrella policy, which would likely require you to have all three insurance policies with the same company.

Here’s a process you can follow, borrowed from the renters insurance guide mentioned above:

  1. Google “auto insurance” plus your city/state. Almost every company that offers auto insurance also offers homeowners, renters, and umbrella insurance, so this will give you a solid list to start with.
  2. Get a phone number for each of the major insurers providing coverage in your state.
  3. Call each insurance company directly and ask for quotes for both auto insurance and either homeowners or renters insurance, making sure to include the amount of liability coverage you’d like to have for each.
  4. If you are looking for umbrella liability coverage, make sure to ask for a quote on that policy as well.
  5. If you have any possessions that are particularly valuable, such as jewelry or artwork, ask how much it would cost to get additional coverage for those possessions in your homeowners or renters policy.
  6. Make sure to ask if they offer a multi-policy discount and, if so, to get the premiums quoted with that discount applied.
  7. If there are any particular threats in your region, such as flooding or earthquakes, ask about their coverage of those specific threats.
  8. Compare the coverage and cost from each insurance company, including your current insurer. If you can get a better deal elsewhere, it should be relatively easy to switch.

3. Independent Insurance Agent

A good independent insurance agent will be able to help you evaluate your need for coverage and find that coverage at the best possible price given your needs and situation.

To find one in your area, you can Google “independent property and casualty insurance agents” + your city/state.

It won’t cost you any extra to work with an agent, but you should be aware that some agents may try to direct you to higher levels of coverage than you need, simply because it provides them a better commission. You should interview a few to make sure you find someone you trust.

The Forgotten Insurance

Unless you’re running a high-risk business, liability insurance probably doesn’t need to be at the top of your list of financial priorities.

But it provides valuable protection, and it’s something that shouldn’t be forgotten. It’s typically easy to add or increase the coverage you have through your existing policies, and doing so ensures that no accident will put you in a situation where you can’t reach your other financial goals.

Matt Becker
Matt Becker |

Matt Becker is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Matt at matt@magnifymoney.com

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Life Events

The Ultimate Guide to Creating an Estate Plan

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Estate planning is probably the last thing you want to think about as you start your family.

You’re bringing life into the world, which is joyous and happy. But estate planning is all about what happens when life ends, which is morbid and depressing.

You may also think that estate planning is only for rich people. If you haven’t yet built up much savings, or if you’re still working your way out of debt, you might wonder whether it’s actually important to tell people what to do with your money.

The truth is that estate planning is both important and empowering, no matter how much money you have. And that’s especially true when you have young children, because your estate plan is how you ensure that your family will always be taken care of, no matter what.

In this guide you’ll learn everything you need to know about estate planning so that you can make sure your family’s future is secure.

Why You Need an Estate Plan

The main reason to create an estate plan is to make sure that your family will be taken care of both physically and financially after you’re gone.

Physically, you get to decide ahead of time who would take care of your children — and other dependents — if you and your spouse or partner are no longer able to do it yourselves.

Financially, you get to make sure that there’s money available for your children, and you get to decide who would be in charge of managing that money until they’re old enough to do it themselves.

In other words, your estate plan is how you get to keep being a parent after you die. Your kids will continue to be taken care of because you set it all up ahead of time.

And if that isn’t enough, Bomopregha Julius, an estate planning attorney in New York City, suggests two other reasons to create an estate plan:

  1. It’s really for your family, not for you. Whether you have an estate plan or not, your surviving family members will have to figure out what financial assets you have and what to do with them, all at a point in time when they’ll be grieving your death. By creating an organized estate plan, you give them the tremendous gift of making that process as easy as possible.
  2. Build generational wealth. An estate plan is how you break the cycle of poverty and build generational wealth. By being intentional about leaving money behind to the people you care about, you create a stronger foundation for the next generation to build upon.

With that as your motivation, let’s talk about what goes into a good estate plan.

8 Key Components of a Solid Estate Plan

1. Your Will

A will serves two main purposes.

First, and most important, it’s the only place where you can name guardians for your children. This is why a will is essential for all young families, regardless of your financial situation.

Second, your will is how you pass on assets and possessions that don’t allow you to designate a beneficiary (more on beneficiaries below). Things like cars, furniture, and jewelry can all be passed down through a will.

The downside of a will is that it has to go through a process called probate. Probate is the court process of reviewing and executing your will, and it can be time-consuming and expensive. Family and friends can also challenge your will during probate, with the final decision up to the judge, which can lead to outcomes that may not be exactly what you intended.

For that reason, it’s usually a good idea to pass on as much of your money and possessions as possible through other avenues. Which brings us to…

2. Your Beneficiary Designations

Many bank and investment accounts, as well as life insurance policies, allow you to name beneficiaries or make payable on death designations. These designations allow you to specify who the money in those accounts would go to upon your death.

The benefit of these designations is that they allow the money to be transferred without going through probate, which means your family can get the money quicker, easier, and with more certainty.

You just need to be aware that these designations take precedence over anything you have in your will. That’s what allows them to skip probate, but it also means that updating your will often isn’t enough to keep your estate plan up to date. You need to make sure you keep your beneficiary designations current as well.

3. Life Insurance

Life insurance is one of the best ways to make sure that there will always be enough money for your surviving family members. This is particularly true when you have young children, since there is a long time between now and the point at which they’ll be able to support themselves.

Typically, both working and non-working parents should have at least some amount of life insurance.

For working parents, it primarily serves to replace lost income. For non-working parents, it helps the family pay to replace all of the duties they perform. And in all cases it can help the surviving family members navigate a challenging transition period without worrying about how they’ll pay their bills

Term life insurance is the type that most people need, but you can get a detailed breakdown of the options available to you here: Term vs Whole Life Insurance.

4. Financial Power of Attorney

A financial power of attorney designates someone to handle your finances in the situation where you’re temporarily incapacitated. This could, for example, allow someone to access your checking account and pay your bills.

You could set this up as a permanent right or you could make it conditional upon certain medical diagnoses. You can also limit which accounts the person is able to access and which actions he or she is able to perform.

Regardless, this ensures that your financial obligations can be handled even when you’re not able to do it yourself.

5. Health Care Power of Attorney

A health care proxy is essentially the same as a financial power of attorney, but for health care instead of finances.

It designates someone to be in charge of your medical decisions in case you’re ever not able to make them for yourself. Designating someone you trust as your health care proxy will make it easier for your doctors to care for you in a way that aligns with your personal values.

6. A Living Will

Your living will allows you to decide ahead of time how you’d like end-of-life decisions to be made. That might sound pretty morbid, but this helps ensure that you’re treated the way you want to be treated AND takes some of the responsibility off the shoulders of your family members to make some of those difficult decisions for you.

7. List of All Your Important Accounts

One of the most difficult jobs for surviving family members is often simply finding and accessing your bank and investment accounts. If they don’t know where they are, it’s pretty challenging to claim the money.

So at the very least, making a list that details which accounts you have at which institutions can eliminate a lot of the struggle. For some accounts, it may also make sense to securely share your username and password so that there’s always someone who can access them if needed.

8. A Written Summary of Your Wishes

While your estate plan should always be laid out formally using the tools above, it can also be helpful to provide a written summary of what you want to happen.

While it won’t be legally binding, it can help to explain your wishes in an easily understood format, which could make it easier for your survivors to execute your plan correctly.

When to Consider a Living Trust

While the eight items above are essential for any good estate plan, some people might also benefit from creating a revocable living trust.

A revocable living trust is a legal entity that you create and control. You can then transfer ownership of certain assets to the trust, and those assets are then bound by the terms of the trust, which specify how those assets should be disbursed upon your death.

For example, it’s common for spouses to create a living trust in which they are both trustees, meaning that they both have full access to all the assets owned by the trust and can modify the terms of the trust at any time.

Then they will transfer checking accounts, savings accounts, and non-retirement investment accounts to the trust. They can also name the trust as the beneficiary of their life insurance policies. And because they are trustees, they can manage those assets in the exact same way as if they owned them individually, with the difference being that those assets will now automatically pass to surviving family members according to the terms of the trust.

That might sound like a lot, and it may also sound redundant with the purpose of your will and your beneficiary designations. But there are two big benefits to this approach.

The first is that all assets owned by the trust skip probate. Probate can be a long and expensive process, and skipping it means that your money is passed on to your family members quicker, at a smaller cost, and with less chance for your desires to be overturned.

The second is that you have more control over certain decisions, such as when your children get access to your money. Instead of them inheriting your life insurance proceeds at age 18, for example, you can stipulate that they wouldn’t receive the money until age 25, when they might be better prepared to handle it. You can even put in provisions that protect the money from a messy divorce or from creditors. Trusts are flexible tools with a lot of room for you to set them up as you please.

The Cost

The big downside is the upfront cost. A will and all the other documents might cost anywhere from $50 to a few hundred dollars to set up, while a living trust will usually cost a couple of thousand dollars. The flip side is that it may actually save your family money in the long run by cutting out most of the probate process, but that doesn’t make it any easier to afford the bill now.

In general though, a living trust is a good idea if you can afford the upfront cost without sacrificing your basic financial security. It makes things quicker, easier, less expensive, and more certain for your surviving family members.

And remember that even if you don’t have much in the way of savings, your children might stand to inherit significant life insurance money. A living trust can make sure that that money is managed properly by the right people until your children are old enough to manage it themselves.

Hiring an Estate Planning Attorney vs. Doing It Yourself

Armed with all that information, there’s still one big question left to answer: how should you get it all in place?

It used to be that you had to go through an estate planning attorney, but as the world turns digital there are now a number of online tools that can help you get these documents in place quickly and inexpensively.

So which route should you take? Let’s look at the pros and cons of each approach.

The Pros and Cons of Doing It Yourself

There are a number of websites now that offer guided, DIY estate planning packages with all the essential documents. Some of the biggest are Nolo, LegalZoom, and Rocket Lawyer.

The biggest appeal of these tools is typically the cost. They currently range from $54.99 to $149 per person, which in some cases could be significantly cheaper than working with an attorney.

They’re also quick. Working with an attorney likely requires at least one in-person meeting, and often more to get everything handled, while the online tools might allow you to complete everything in just a couple of hours.

And for simple situations, many attorneys use a template similar to what these tools offer anyway, so you may not be getting a much different product.

The biggest downside is that you don’t get the guidance that comes from working with a good estate planning attorney. Given the importance of getting your estate plan right, that could be costly.

The DIY tools aren’t great for more complicated situations either, such as setting up a living trust or creating a plan for a second marriage. Those situations have more moving parts, and that’s where an experienced attorney can be very helpful.

The Pros and Cons of Hiring an Estate Planning Attorney

Working with an estate planning attorney has essentially the opposite set of pros and cons.

The biggest downside is simply the cost. It’s typically at least a few hundred dollars to work with an attorney, and it may be upward of $1,000. It really depends on where you live though, and even then there’s often a wide range, so it’s worth calling around.

The main reason to work with an estate planning attorney is for the guidance they offer. A good attorney will take the time to get to know you, to understand what’s important to you, and to explain all of the options available to you. The decisions you’re making are not always simple or easy to understand, so that kind of guidance can be invaluable.

Along with that comes the confidence of knowing that your plan is done right, both in terms of being set up the way you want and in terms of adhering to specific state laws that the online tools may or may not be aware of.

Similarly, your surviving family members may be in a better position to carry out everything with the guidance of the attorney who helped you create your plan and knows exactly what you wanted and how everything should work. Again, anything you can do to make things easier for your family is a huge gift.

Finally, working with an attorney may make it easier for you to make changes and updates as you move along, since he or she will already be familiar with your plan and have all the documents you originally created. So if you have a child, get divorced or remarried, or want to update the guardians in your will, your attorney can help you make those changes efficiently within the context of your overall estate plan.

Questions to Ask Before You Hire an Estate Attorney

Can you afford the cost of the attorney without sacrificing your financial security?

Can you find an attorney who cares about getting to know you personally and helping you craft a personal estate plan?

If the answer to both of those questions is yes, the cost of hiring an attorney is well worth it. Otherwise, the DIY tools are probably sufficient as long as your situation is relatively simple.

How to Find an Estate Planner

  1. You may have access to discounted legal services through your employee benefits.
  2. The National Association of Estate Planners & Councils has a search tool you can use.
  3. WealthCounsel is another organization that offers a helpful search tool.
  4. You can always simply Google “estate planning attorney” + your city/state to find one near you.

Where to Keep Your Estate Planning Documents

Once you have your estate planning documents in place, there’s still one big question to answer: where should you keep them?

This may sound trivial, but it’s actually pretty important. Remember, these documents tell everyone else how your family and your money should be cared for after you die, meaning you won’t be around to help them figure it out. So your main goals here are two-fold:

  1. Ensuring that there are always up-to-date copies stored somewhere.
  2. Making it easy for your surviving family and friends to access those documents if needed.

Here are a few options.

1.Your Attorney

If you work with an attorney, he or she will usually be able to keep a copy of all of your important documents on hand. This is a great way to make sure that those documents will always be available, even if something happens to your copies.

It’s also a good way to make sure that someone who knows what they’re doing is leading the way. Your attorney will already know who’s in charge of what and should be able to guide everyone else to make sure that things run smoothly.

2. A Safe

Even if you’re relying on an attorney, you’ll walk away with a number of physical copies of all your documents that you should hold onto in case originals are eventually needed. And it may be a good idea to keep them in a fireproof and waterproof safe, just to make sure they won’t get damaged in an accident.

3. With Friends and/or Family

Throughout the estate planning process, you’ll be naming a number of people who would be in charge of taking care of your children and handling your financial affairs if you die. You should already be talking these decisions through with them so that they know what’s expected of them, and it may also be a good idea to give them a copy of important documents so that they’re easily accessible if the need arises.

4. Digital File Share

Storing your files digitally using a service like Google Drive or Dropbox is a great way to make sure you always have backup copies, and it also makes sharing those documents with others easy.

You could also looked into a paid service like Everplans, which is specifically designed for storing and sharing sensitive estate planning documents. They also offer some customer support that may be helpful if you need a little guidance.

The Gift of a Good Estate Plan

If you’re like most people, you’ll probably procrastinate on putting your estate plan in place. It’s not an enjoyable topic, and it’s a cost that’s not easy to take on when you’re already paying for child care and everything else.

But a good estate plan is a gift, both to you and your family.

You get the gift of knowing that your family will be taken care of, no matter what. And your family gets the gift of having the transition period after your death be as easy as possible, giving them space to grieve and get their lives together without worrying about the financial side of things.

That’s the value of a good estate plan.

Matt Becker
Matt Becker |

Matt Becker is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Matt at matt@magnifymoney.com

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Health, Life Events

The Complete Guide to Disability Insurance

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Quick quiz: What’s the most valuable financial asset you own as a young professional and a provider for your family?Here are some hints: It’s not your home. It’s not your 401(k). And it’s definitely not your car.

The answer? It’s your future income. The money you earn in the years to come will allow you to pay your bills, save for the future, and create a secure financial foundation for you and your family.

Really, all the plans you’re making both for today and the future rely on the assumption that you’ll continue earning money. Which is exactly why it’s so important to protect that income and make sure you receive it no matter what.

That’s where disability insurance comes in.

Disability insurance ensures that you’re able to continue paying your bills and putting food on the table even if your health prevents you from working for an extended period of time. By sending you a monthly check that replaces some or all of your income, it protects your biggest financial asset from those worst-case scenarios.

It’s something that just about every working parent should have, but it’s a complicated product that can be difficult to understand and get right.

So in this post you’ll learn all about how disability insurance works and what kind of policy you should be looking for.

Why You Need Disability Insurance

Disability insurance is often ignored both because the prospect of becoming disabled seems remote and because the premiums can be hard to swallow, especially for young families who are already struggling to pay for child care and all the other expenses that come with having young kids.

But extended disability is a lot more common than most people think.

According to WebMD, your odds of becoming disabled before you retire are about 1 in 3.

The leading causes of disability include:

  • Arthritis
  • Back pain
  • Heart disease
  • Cancer
  • Depression
  • Diabetes

For the most part it’s chronic illness that causes disability, not the kind of major accident that typically comes to mind. And the odds of it happening before you’re financially independent are fairly high, though there are some situations in which your personal odds may be lower.

So the big question is this: If you’re one of the 33% of people who faces an extended disability, where would the money come from to pay your bills and put food on the table? How long would your savings be able to support you, and what would you do if you needed help past that point?

Most people would struggle to make it more than a few months, which is exactly why disability insurance is so valuable. By replacing your income for potentially years at a time, it ensures that you’ll be able to continue taking care of your family no matter what.

Short-term disability insurance vs. long-term disability insurance

There are two main types of disability insurance: short-term and long-term.

Both can be helpful, but they play very different roles in your financial plan. Here’s an overview of each.

Short-Term Disability Insurance

Short-term disability insurance only offers benefits for a relatively limited amount of time. Most short-term disability insurance policies cover you for 3-6 months, though they can provide coverage for up to two years.

There is typically a waiting period of up to 14 days before the insurance kicks in to prevent it from covering minor illness and injury. After that waiting period, it will typically start to pay 50%-100% of your regular income until you either return to work or your coverage period ends.

One of the most common uses of short-term disability insurance is during maternity leave. Many, though not all, short-term disability policies cover the latter parts of pregnancy and the period after childbirth, which can help replace your income while staying home with your newborn.

Most short-term disability insurance policies are offered as an employer benefit, and in some cases that coverage may even be free. Private coverage is also an option if you aren’t able to get coverage through work, though those policies can be expensive. For example, a healthy 38-year-old male might pay a $2,300 annual premium for a $5,000 monthly benefit and 12 months of coverage.

One alternative to short-term disability insurance is building an emergency fund. A 3-6 month emergency fund would provide the same protection as a 3-6 month short-term disability insurance policy, with the added benefit of not having a monthly premium.

Long-Term Disability Insurance

Long-term disability insurance is where you typically find the most value. Because while a short-term disability could be covered by a healthy emergency fund, an extended disability is much more likely to deplete your family’s savings and put you in a difficult position unless you have some way of replacing your lost income.

Long-term disability insurance picks up where your emergency fund or short-term disability insurance leaves off. There’s typically a 3-6 month waiting period during which you would have to replace your income by other means.

But once you’re past that waiting period, your long-term disability insurance would start replacing your monthly income and would continue to do so for years at a time, as long as you remain disabled.

This is a big potential benefit. A long-term disability policy that replaces $5,000 per month in income will potentially pay you $60,000 per year for as long as you’re disable. That would go a long way toward keeping your family on the right track.

Given that potential value, it’s usually more important for families to secure long-term disability insurance than short-term disability insurance. For that reason, the rest of this guide will focus primarily on long-term disability insurance.

10 Questions To Ask When Shopping for a Long-Term Disability Insurance Policy

Long-term disability insurance is a complicated product with a lot of terms and conditions that vary policy to policy. Finding a good, independent disability insurance agent who isn’t beholden to any particular insurance company can help you secure the right policy at the right price for your specific situation.

But whether you’re looking on your own or with the help of an agent, there are 10 key features you’ll want to evaluate.

1. Your Monthly Benefit

Your monthly benefit is the amount of money your long-term disability insurance policy would pay you each month in the event of disability. And there are a few key factors that go into deciding how big a benefit you need:

  1. What are the monthly expenses you would have to cover if you lost your income? Consider the fact that you may be able to cut back on certain discretionary expenses, but also that you may have additional medical expenses in order to treat the disability.
  2. What other income sources do you have? You can factor in your spouse or partner’s income, your savings, and possibly even help from family.
  3. Would your benefit be taxable or tax-free? The benefit from an individual policy you purchase on your own would almost certainly be tax-free. The benefit you get from an employer policy would likely be taxable. The difference affects how much money you would actually have available to spend.

2. How They Define ‘Disability’

Believe it or not, there is no one way of defining disability. There are a lot of variations, but most policies fall into one of three main groups:

  • Any occupation – This is the most restrictive of the three definitions. It defines disability as the inability to perform any job, no matter what it is or how much it pays. It’s hard to qualify for benefits under this definition.
  • Own occupation – This is the broadest of the three definitions. It defines disability as the inability to perform the main duties of your current job. It’s easiest to qualify for benefits under this definition.
  • Modified own occupation – This is a middle ground that defines disability as the inability to perform a job for which you are reasonably suited based on education, training, and experience. In other words, not just any job will do. You have to be able to work in a job that fits your level of experience and expertise before benefits stop.

Understanding your policy’s definition of disability is key to understanding the protection you’re actually receiving. A big benefit with a strict definition of disability may be less valuable than a smaller benefit with a definition that’s easier to meet.

3. The Elimination Period

The elimination period is that amount of time you have to be disabled before you can start to collect your benefit.

Typical elimination periods range from 60 to 180 days, with longer elimination periods leading to a smaller premium. You should consider how long your savings and/or short-term disability insurance would cover you when deciding how long an elimination period to choose.

4. The Benefit Period

This is the maximum amount of time you would be able to collect benefits as long as you continue to meet the policy’s definition of disability.

Many long-term disability insurance policies pay out until age 65 or 67 to coincide with the standard Social Security retirement age. Other policies will only pay benefits for 5-10 years.

Longer benefit periods are more valuable, but also more expensive. You should consider the likelihood of being able to replace your income in other ways, such as transitioning to a different job, when deciding how long you’d like your benefit period to last.

5. What isn’t Covered

Most long-term disability insurance policies will exclude certain types of conditions from coverage. For example, mental health conditions are often not covered or are subject to a shorter benefit period.

Sometimes the exclusions will only last for a period of time, such as the first two years of the policy being in place. Sometimes they last for the life of the policy. You should evaluate these exclusions in relation to your personal and family health history to understand how likely you might be to run into them.

6. Premium Guarantee

Some long-term disability insurance policies are non-cancelable, which means that you are guaranteed a fixed premium until your coverage period ends. The insurance company cannot cancel your coverage and cannot raise your premium.

Other policies are guaranteed renewable, which means that the insurance company can’t cancel your policy, but they can increase the premium as long as they increase the premium for all policies across an entire class of policyholders (such as all policyholders in a given state or all policyholders in a given occupation category).

If you don’t have either of those guarantees, it means that your premium could increase each and every year and that those changes are at the discretion of the insurance company.

7. Residual Benefit

A residual benefit feature means that you could receive partial benefits if you return to work at a reduced salary.

This feature can help you build your workload over time, making for an easier and smoother transition.

8. Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA)

Policies that come with a cost-of-living adjustment will increase your benefit each year based on the rate of inflation. This is meant to ensure that you are able to pay for the same amount of goods and services each year, even as the cost of those things increase over time.

Some COLA riders have a maximum annual increase and/or a limited amount of time for which they are applied. For example, a policy might cap the annual increase at 3%, and it may only increase the benefit for a certain number of years before leveling off.

9. Future Purchase Option

Many long-term disability insurance policies guarantee you the right to increase your coverage in the future if your income increases, without any medical underwriting. This is a valuable benefit because it eliminates the risk that a decline in health could prevent you from getting more coverage when you need it.

10. Insurer’s Financial Rating

Finally, you should make sure that the insurer is in good financial condition. The last thing you want is to have the insurance company flake out on you when it’s time to collect.

You can look up an insurer’s rating through any of the following companies: A.M. Best, Fitch Ratings, Moody’s, and Standard & Poor’s.

The Pros and Cons of Group Disability Insurance

There are two ways you can get long-term disability insurance:

  1. Through your employer as an employee benefit (referred to as group disability insurance)
  2. On your own through an insurer of your choice

Both have their pros and cons. Here’s a breakdown.

The Pros of Group Coverage

1. Cost

Group disability insurance is often less expensive, and the premiums are typically tax-deductible. Many employers even offer a base level of long-term disability insurance coverage for free.

The lower premium can come with some negative trade-offs, as you’ll see below, but in the best cases it simply makes the insurance easier to afford.

2. No Medical Underwriting

Your ability to get group coverage is in no way affected by your current health. Eligibility is solely dependent on your employment status with the company.

This can be an especially big benefit if you have significant health issues that would make individual coverage either prohibitively expensive or impossible to get.

3. Simplicity

Group coverage is easy to get in place. All you have to do is sign up during open enrollment, choose the level of coverage you’d like, and you’re done.

The Cons of Group Coverage

1. Benefits Are Taxed

In most cases, your group disability insurance premiums are tax-deductible, and the benefits you receive are taxed. Which means that you won’t actually receive the full benefit.

So while group long-term disability insurance can be affordable on the front end, sometimes that comes at the cost of smaller benefits on the back end.

2. May Not Cover You Completely

In addition to the benefits being taxable, your employer may not offer enough coverage to meet your full need to begin with. You may need to get an additional policy if you want to be fully insured.

3. Lack of Control

Your group disability insurance policy is what it is, and you don’t have much, if any, say in the features it offers.

Sometimes this won’t matter, since the policy will have everything you want. But sometimes it will be lacking in certain areas, which could leave you with weaker coverage than you’d like.

4. Can’t Take It with You

You typically can’t take your group disability insurance coverage with you when you leave the company, and your employer could also choose to stop offering it at any time.

All of which means that you could find yourself without coverage somewhere down the line. And if your health status has declined or your next employer doesn’t offer group coverage, you may find it hard to get affordable disability insurance elsewhere.

The Pros and Cons of Individual Disability Insurance

The Pros of Individual Coverage

1. Portability

Individual long-term disability insurance policies are portable, meaning that they’re yours as long as you continue to pay the premiums, even if you change jobs. This is crucial to making sure that you always have coverage when you need it.

2. Definition of Disability

With an individual disability insurance policy, you have the opportunity to choose a broader definition of disability that increases your chances of receiving benefits. This can be particularly helpful if you work in a highly specialized field where having an own occupation definition would be beneficial.

3. Tax-Free Benefits

Individual disability insurance premiums are not tax-deductible, but the upside is that any benefits you receive are tax-free. This ensures that you get as much money as possible when you really need it.

4. Control over Other Features

You have a lot more control over all the policy features when you buy individual coverage. You can often pick and choose whether you want residual benefits, cost-of-living adjustments, and the like, allowing you to customize your coverage to your specific needs.

The Cons of Individual Coverage

1. Cost

Individual disability insurance is typically more expensive than group coverage, particularly if you have pre-existing medical conditions or you work in a high-risk occupation.

While it can vary greatly depending on the specifics of your circumstances, a reasonable rule of thumb is to expect $2-$2.50 in monthly benefits for every $1 in annual premium.

2. Complexity

Long-term disability insurance is a complicated product, and unfortunately, it’s hard to shop around and get a true apples-to-apples comparison of policies.

Your best bet is to look for a truly independent disability insurance agent who isn’t tied to any particular insurance company, and who can guide you through the process and help you understand the pros and cons of the various policies offered by different companies.

3. Medical Underwriting

Applying for individual long-term disability insurance includes a medical exam and a review of your medical history, after which the insurance company may ask more questions to get a better understanding of your current medical condition.

This can be time-consuming, can feel invasive, and in some cases can lead to a more expensive policy or even a denial of coverage altogether. It can also lead to an attractive offer if you’re in good health, but regardless, it’s a cumbersome process you have to go through.

A Quick Note on Social Security Disability Coverage

While Social Security does offer long-term disability coverage, it’s generally not a good idea to rely on it.

The main reason is that it has a strict definition of disability, requiring you to be unable to work in any job for at least one year. It only pays out under the most extreme of circumstances.

You also need to have worked long enough to qualify for any coverage at all, and even if you do qualify, it often won’t meet your full benefit need.

All of which is to say that if you truly want financial protection from disability, getting some combination of group and individual coverage is likely the way to go.

Are You Protected?

No one likes to think about the possibility of being sick or disabled, but protecting your income is a crucial part of building true financial security.

Disability insurance can be an effective way to get that protection. When it’s done right, it ensures that you’ll have money coming in no matter what, allowing you to continue providing for your family even in the most difficult of circumstances.

Matt Becker
Matt Becker |

Matt Becker is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Matt at matt@magnifymoney.com

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Life Events

Guide to Renters Insurance: When You Need it and When You Don’t

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

If you’re currently renting, you may not have given much thought to buying insurance for your place. After all, your landlord is the one who owns it. Shouldn’t he be the one buying insurance?

The truth is that while your landlord almost certainly does have insurance, it doesn’t cover all the risks that you personally face. And that’s where renters insurance comes in.

Renters insurance is inexpensive and provides a number of financial protections you can’t get elsewhere. It’s something that just about every renter should consider, and in this guide we’ll cover the following:

  • What Is Renters Insurance?
  • What Does Renters Insurance Cover?
  • How to Get Renters Insurance

What Is Renters Insurance?

If there was a fire in your place, or if someone broke in and stole something, who would be responsible for the damages?

Your landlord almost certainly has an insurance policy that would cover the cost of repairing the apartment itself. His insurance would pick up the tab for fixing or replacing the walls, floors, ceilings, and other structural components of the apartment. He would restore it to the empty apartment that existed before you moved in.

But, of course, you don’t live in an empty apartment. You own most of what’s inside it, furniture, clothes, your laptop, and everything else.

That’s where renters insurance comes in. Renters insurance covers the financial loss you could personally face if your apartment was damaged or burglarized.

Specifically, renters insurance covers:

  1. The cost of replacing your possessions.
  2. The cost of living somewhere else if your rental becomes temporarily unlivable.
  3. Your financial liability if someone gets injured while at your apartment, or if you accidentally injure someone or their property while you’re away from your apartment.

And the good news is that all of that coverage comes pretty cheap. According to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, renters insurance premiums average just $15-$30 per month, though your specific premium will depend on where you live and what you’re covering.

So, how exactly do each of those protections work? Let’s dig in.

Renters insurance only protects you from certain kinds of damages. These are called named perils, and while every policy differs, here’s a list of common perils that are covered:

  • Fire and lightning
  • Windstorm or hail
  • Accidental discharge or overflow of water or steam
  • Earthquake
  • Explosion
  • Smoke
  • Aircraft
  • Vehicles
  • Collapse of building
  • Theft
  • Vandalism and malicious mischief
  • Riot and civil commotion
  • Falling objects
  • Sudden and accidental tearing apart, cracking, burning, or bulging
  • Freezing
  • Sudden and accidental damage from artificially generated electrical current
  • Volcanic eruption

This is just a generic list, and your specific policy may name different perils or define them slightly differently. Whatever your named perils are though, your renters insurance will only cover damages that result from one of those perils that is specifically listed in the policy. If damage results from some other cause, it will not be covered.

Certain types of perils, like flooding, may not be covered by your base policy but could be covered by an additional policy. You’ll have to review the details of your policy to see what is specifically covered, and what, if any, additional perils you may want to insure against.

Now let’s get into the specific protections that renters insurance offers.

Protection #1: Your Property

While you don’t own your home, you do own most of what’s inside of it. And when you add up the value of all your clothes, furniture, electronics, dishes, appliances, and everything else, you probably own a significant amount of property.

If any of that property was damaged or stolen, your renters insurance would help pay to replace it. Your landlord’s insurance would not.

When you buy renters insurance, you buy a certain amount of personal property coverage. For example, you might get $30,000 of coverage, in which case your renters insurance would reimburse you up to $30,000 for damage caused to your personal property. Without that coverage, you would have to foot the bill yourself.

Wisconsin’s Office of the Commissioner of Insurance offers a Personal Property Home Inventory form that can help you determine how much personal property coverage you need and create a record that can be used if you ever need to file a claim. Keeping photos of particularly valuable items is also a good idea, just in case your insurance company asks for more proof.

It’s worth noting that most renters insurance policies have coverage limits for certain types of property like jewelry and artwork. For example, it’s common for the policy to limit its jewelry coverage to $1,000 per item.

In that case, you can add a rider that covers specific pieces of property that exceed those limits. So if you have a $5,000 engagement ring, you would have to ask the insurance company to add coverage specifically for that item, which would come with a small increase in premium.

You will also likely have a deductible on your policy, which is the amount of money you would have to pay out of pocket before your insurance kicks in. For example, a $500 deductible means that you would be responsible for paying the first $500 in damages, and your renters insurance would reimburse you past that amount, up to your total personal property limit.

Protection #2: Your Cost of Living

Let’s say that there was a fire and your home became temporarily uninhabitable. While you wouldn’t be responsible for repairing the house or apartment, you would be responsible for finding somewhere else to live in the meantime.

This is the second big area where your renters insurance would kick in.

Renters insurance has something called loss of use coverage that would provide payments to help you cover that cost. Essentially, it would pick up the tab for any excess expense above what you would normally pay while living in your home.

For example, let’s say that your rent is $1,500 per month and you’re temporarily forced to stay in a hotel that charges $150 per night. That’s an excess cost of about $3,000 per month, which would be covered by your loss of use coverage.

You may also face additional food, utility, and transportation expenses, which could all be reimbursed under that same coverage.

Typically there’s a maximum dollar amount that will be paid out under this coverage and a maximum time limit for payments, and your insurer will likely also set limits on what constitutes reasonable additional expenses.

Payments will end once your home is habitable, once you find a new place to live, or once you’ve hit your coverage limits.

Protection #3: Your Liability

In addition to protecting your property and making sure you can afford a place to live, renters insurance can provide a substantial amount of liability coverage.

Liability coverage protects you from the financial consequences of accidentally injuring someone or damaging their property. And your renters insurance coverage protects you both against incidents that happen in your home and against certain incidents that happen away from it.

For example, imagine that your landlord sends someone to fix your refrigerator and that person trips over your child’s walker and seriously injures himself. That could be a significant financial loss for him, both in terms of medical bills and missed work, and he would have the right to seek reimbursement from you. In that case, the liability coverage on your renters insurance policy would kick in to pay the financial damages and to pay any legal costs you might face.

As another example, maybe you’re out for a walk with your dog and he bites someone. Again, you could be financially responsible for the consequences, and your renters insurance would be there to pick up the bill.

While the odds of something like this leading to a major financial liability are likely pretty small, the potential costs could be high. And with renters insurance you can get several hundred thousand dollars of liability protection for an average of $15-$30 per month.

It’s inexpensive coverage that protects you from the risk of a big financial loss.

How to Get Renters Insurance

If you don’t have renters insurance, how can you go about getting it?

If you already have auto insurance, the easiest way to get renters insurance is through that same company. They will almost certainly provide renters insurance as well, and you may be able to get a discount for having multiple policies with the same company.

But getting renters insurance is a good opportunity to shop around. Because you may be able to get a better deal on both your renters insurance AND your auto insurance by switching insurance companies. We have some recommendations for the best renters insurance, but if you really want to be thorough, you’ll want to do even more homework.

Here’s how to do it:

  1. Google “renters insurance STATE”, replacing STATE with your state of residence.
  2. Get a phone number for each of the major insurers providing coverage in your state.
  3. Call each insurance company directly and ask for quotes for both renters insurance and auto insurance. You should have a copy of your current auto insurance policy on hand so that you can get a quote for the same level of coverage.
  4. If you have any possessions that are particularly valuable, such as jewelry or artwork, ask how much it would cost to get additional coverage for those possessions.
  5. Make sure to ask if they offer a multi-policy discount and, if so, to get the premiums quoted with that discount applied.
  6. If there are any particular threats in your region, such as flooding or earthquakes, ask about their coverage of those specific threats.
  7. Compare the coverage and cost from each insurance company, including your current insurer. If you can get a better deal elsewhere, it should be relatively easy to switch.

Other than the work needed to shop around, getting renters insurance should be relatively quick and easy.

Are You Covered?

Renters insurance is one of those things you hope you never need but could pay off significantly if you did. In a worst-case scenario, it would help you replace all of your possessions and maintain a place to live without depleting your savings or resorting to debt.

It’s big protection at a small cost.

Matt Becker
Matt Becker |

Matt Becker is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Matt at matt@magnifymoney.com

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Investing, Life Events, Strategies to Save

Guide to Choosing the Right IRA: Traditional or Roth?

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Guide to Choosing the Right IRA: Traditional or Roth?

The Roth IRA versus traditional IRA debate has raged on for years.

What many retirement savers may not know is that most of the debate about whether it’s better to contribute to a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA is flawed.

You’ve probably heard that young investors are better off contributing to a Roth IRA because they’ll likely be in a higher tax bracket when they’re older. You’ve probably also heard that if you’re in the same tax bracket now and in retirement, a traditional IRA and Roth IRA will produce the same result.

These arguments are part of the conventional wisdom upon which many people make their decisions, and yet each misses some important nuance and, in some cases, is downright incorrect.

The Biggest Difference Between Traditional and Roth IRAs

There are several differences between traditional and Roth IRAs, and we’ll get into many of them below.

The key difference is in the tax breaks they offer.

Contributions to a traditional IRA are not taxed up front. They are tax-deductible, meaning they decrease your taxable income for the year in which you make the contribution. The money grows tax-free inside the account. However, your withdrawals in retirement are treated as taxable income.

Contributions to a Roth IRA are taxed up front at your current income tax rate. The money grows tax-free while inside the account. And when you make withdrawals in retirement, those withdrawals are not taxed.

Whether it’s better to get the tax break when you make the contribution or when you withdraw it in retirement is the centerpiece of the traditional vs. Roth IRA debate, and it’s also where a lot of people use some faulty logic.

We’ll debunk the conventional wisdom in just a bit, but first we need to take a very quick detour to understand a couple of key tax concepts.

The Important Difference Between Marginal and Effective Tax Rates

Don’t worry. We’re not going too far into the tax weeds here. But there’s a key point that’s important to understand if you’re going to make a true comparison between traditional and Roth IRAs, and that’s the difference between your marginal tax rate and your effective tax rate.

When people talk about tax rates, they’re typically referring to your marginal tax rate. This is the tax rate you pay on your last dollar of income, and it’s the same as your current tax bracket. For example, if you’re in the 15% tax bracket, you have a 15% marginal tax rate, and you’ll owe 15 cents in taxes on the next dollar you earn.

Your effective tax rate, however, divides your total tax bill by your total income to calculate your average tax rate across every dollar you earned.

And these tax rates are different because of our progressive federal income tax, which taxes different dollars at different rates. For example, someone in the 15% tax bracket actually pays 0% on some of their income, 10% on some of their income, and 15% on the rest of their income. Which means that their total tax bill is actually less than 15% of their total income.

For a simple example, a 32-year-old couple making $65,000 per year with one child will likely fall in the 15% tax bracket. That’s their marginal tax rate.

But after factoring in our progressive tax code and various tax breaks like the standard deduction and personal exemptions, they will only actually pay a total of $4,114 in taxes, making their effective tax rate just 6.33% (calculated using TurboTax’s TaxCaster).

As you can see, the couple’s effective tax rate is much lower than their marginal tax rate. And that’s almost always the case, no matter what your situation.

Keep that in mind as we move forward.

Why the Conventional Traditional vs. Roth IRA Wisdom Is Wrong

Most of the discussion around traditional and Roth IRAs focuses on your marginal tax rate. The logic says that if your marginal tax rate is higher now than it will be in retirement, the traditional IRA is the way to go. If it will be higher in retirement, the Roth IRA is the way to go. If your marginal tax rate will be the same in retirement as it is now, you’ll get the same result whether you contribute to a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA.

By this conventional wisdom, the Roth IRA typically comes out ahead for younger investors who plan on increasing their income over time and therefore moving into a higher tax bracket or at least staying in the same tax bracket.

But that conventional wisdom is flawed.

When you’re torn between contributing to a traditional or Roth IRA, it’s almost always better to compare your marginal tax rate today to your effective rate in retirement, for two reasons:

  1. Your traditional IRA contributions will likely provide a tax break at or near your marginal tax rate. This is because federal tax brackets typically span tens of thousands of dollars, while your IRA contributions max out at $5,500 for an individual or $11,000 for a couple. So it’s unlikely that your traditional IRA contribution will move you into a lower tax bracket, and even if it does, it will likely be only a small part of your contribution.
  2. Your traditional IRA withdrawals, on the other hand, are very likely to span multiple tax brackets given that you will likely be withdrawing tens of thousands of dollars per year. Given that reality, your effective tax rate is a more accurate representation of the tax cost of those withdrawals in retirement.

And when you look at it this way, comparing your marginal tax rate today to your effective tax rate in the future, the traditional IRA starts to look a lot more attractive.

Let’s run the numbers with a case study.

A Case Study: Should Mark and Jane Contribute to a Traditional IRA or a Roth IRA?

Mark and Jane are 32, married, and have a 2-year-old child. They currently make $65,000 per year combined, putting them squarely in the 15% tax bracket.

They’re ready to save for retirement, and they’re trying to decide between a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA. They’ve figured out that they can afford to make either of the following annual contributions:

  • $11,000 to a traditional IRA, which is the annual maximum.
  • $9,350 to a Roth IRA, which is that same $11,000 contribution after the 15% tax cost is taken out. (Since Roth IRA contributions are nondeductible, factoring taxes into the contribution is the right way to properly compare equivalent after-tax contributions to each account.)

So the big question is this: Which account, the traditional IRA or Roth IRA, will give them more income in retirement?

Using conventional wisdom, they would probably contribute to the Roth IRA. After all, they’re young and in a relatively low tax bracket.

But Mark and Jane are curious people, so they decided to run the numbers themselves. Here are the assumptions they made in order to do that:

  • They will continue working until age 67 (full Social Security retirement age).
  • They will continue making $65,000 per year, adjusted for inflation.
  • They will receive $26,964 per year in Social Security income starting at age 67 (estimated here).
  • They will receive an inflation-adjusted investment return of 5% per year (7% return minus 2% inflation).
  • At retirement, they will withdraw 4% of their final IRA balance per year to supplement their Social Security income (based on the 4% safe withdrawal rate).
  • They will file taxes jointly every year, both now and in retirement.

You can see all the details laid out in a spreadsheet here, but here’s the bottom line:

  • The Roth IRA will provide Mark and Jane with $35,469 in annual tax-free income on top of their Social Security income.
  • The traditional IRA will provide $37,544 in annual after-tax income on top of their Social Security income. That’s after paying $4,184 in taxes on their $41,728 withdrawal, calculating using TurboTax’s TaxCaster.

In other words, the traditional IRA will provide an extra $2,075 in annual income for Mark and Jane in retirement.

That’s a nice vacation, a whole bunch of date nights, gifts for the grandkids, or simply extra money that might be needed to cover necessary expenses.

It’s worth noting that using the assumptions above, Mark and Jane are in the 15% tax bracket both now and in retirement. According to the conventional wisdom, a traditional IRA and Roth IRA should provide the same result.

But they don’t, and the reason has everything to do with the difference between marginal tax rates and effective tax rates.

Right now, their contributions to the traditional IRA get them a 15% tax break, meaning they can contribute 15% more to a traditional IRA than they can to a Roth IRA without affecting their budget in any way.

But in retirement, the effective tax rate on their traditional IRA withdrawals is only 10%. Due again to a combination of our progressive tax code and tax breaks like the standard deduction and personal exemptions, some of it isn’t taxed, some of it is taxed at 10%, and only a portion of it is taxed at 15%.

That 5% difference between now and later is why they end up with more money from a traditional IRA than a Roth IRA.

And it’s that same unconventional wisdom that can give you more retirement income as well if you plan smartly.

5 Good Reasons to Use a Roth IRA

The main takeaway from everything above is that the conventional traditional versus Roth IRA wisdom is wrong. Comparing marginal tax rates typically underestimates the value of a traditional IRA.

Of course, the Roth IRA is still a great account, and there are plenty of situations in which it makes sense to use it. I have a Roth IRA myself, and I’m very happy with it.

So here are five good reasons to use a Roth IRA.

1. You Might Contribute More to a Roth IRA

Our case study above assumes that you would make equivalent after-tax contributions to each account. That is, if you’re in the 15% tax bracket, you would contribute 15% less to a Roth IRA than to a traditional IRA because of the tax cost.

That’s technically the right way to make the comparison, but it’s not the way most people think.

There’s a good chance that you have a certain amount of money you want to contribute and that you would make that same contribution to either a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA. Maybe you want to max out your contribution and the only question is which account to use.

If that’s the case, a Roth IRA will come out ahead every time simply because that money will never be taxed again.

2. Backdoor Roth IRA

If you make too much to either contribute to a Roth IRA or deduct contributions to a traditional IRA, you still might be eligible to do what’s called a backdoor Roth IRA.

If so, it’s a great way to give yourself some extra tax-free income in retirement, and you can only do it with a Roth IRA.

3. You Might Have Other Income

Social Security income was already factored into the example above. But any additional income, such as pension income, would increase the cost of those traditional IRA withdrawals in retirement by increasing both the marginal and effective tax rate.

Depending on your other income sources, the tax-free nature of a Roth IRA may be helpful.

4. Tax Diversification

You can make the most reasonable assumptions in the world, but the reality is that there’s no way to know what your situation will look like 30-plus years down the road.

We encourage people to diversify their investments because it reduces the risk that any one bad company could bring down your entire portfolio. Similarly, diversifying your retirement accounts can reduce the risk that a change in circumstances would result in you drastically overpaying in taxes.

Having some money in a Roth IRA and some money in a traditional IRA or 401(k) could give you room to adapt to changing tax circumstances in retirement by giving you some taxable money and some tax-free money.

5. Financial Flexibility

Roth IRAs are extremely flexible accounts that can be used for a variety of financial goals throughout your lifetime.

One reason for this is that your contributions are available at any time and for any reason, without tax or penalty. Ideally you would be able to keep the money in your account to grow for retirement, but it could be used to buy a house, start a business, or simply in case of emergency.

Roth IRAs also have some special characteristics that can make them effective college savings accounts, and as of now Roth IRAs are not subject to required minimum distributions in retirement, though that could certainly change.

All in all, Roth IRAs are more flexible than traditional IRAs in terms of using the money for nonretirement purposes.

3 Good Reasons to Use a Traditional IRA

People love the Roth IRA because it gives you tax-free money in retirement, but, as we saw in the case study above, that doesn’t always result in more retirement income. Even factoring in taxes, and even in situations where you might not expect it, the traditional IRA often comes out ahead.

And the truth is that there are even MORE tax advantages to the traditional IRA than what we discussed earlier. Here are three of the biggest.

1. You Can Convert to a Roth IRA at Any Time

One of the downsides of contributing to a Roth IRA is that you lock in the tax cost at the point of contribution. There’s no getting that money back.

On the other hand, contributing to a traditional IRA gives you the tax break now while also preserving your ability to convert some or all of that money to a Roth IRA at your convenience, giving you more control over when and how you take the tax hit.

For example, let’s say that you contribute to a traditional IRA this year, and then a few years down the line either you or your spouse decides to stay home with the kids, or start a business, or change careers. Any of those decisions could lead to a significant reduction in income, which might be a perfect opportunity to convert some or all of your traditional IRA money to a Roth IRA.

The amount you convert will count as taxable income, but because you’re temporarily in a lower tax bracket you’ll receive a smaller tax bill.

You can get pretty fancy with this if you want. Brandon from the Mad Fientist, has explained how to build a Roth IRA Conversion Ladder to fund early retirement. Financial planner Michael Kitces has demonstrated how to use partial conversions and recharacterizations to optimize your tax cost.

Of course, there are downsides to this strategy as well. Primarily there’s the fact that taxes are complicated, and you could unknowingly cost yourself a lot of money if you’re not careful. And unlike direct contributions to a Roth IRA, you have to wait five years before you’re able to withdraw the money you’ve converted without penalty. It’s typically best to speak to a tax professional or financial planner before converting to a Roth IRA.

But the overall point is that contributing to a traditional IRA now gives you greater ability to control your tax spending both now and in the future. You may be able to save yourself a lot of money by converting to a Roth IRA sometime in the future rather than contributing to it directly today.

2. You Could Avoid or Reduce State Income Tax

Traditional IRA contributions are deductible for state income tax purposes as well as federal income tax purposes. That wasn’t factored into the case study above, but there are situations in which this can significantly increase the benefit of a traditional IRA.

First, if you live in a state with a progressive income tax code, you may get a boost from the difference in marginal and effective tax rates just like with federal income taxes. While your contributions today may be deductible at the margin, your future withdrawals may at least partially be taxed at lower rates.

Second, it’s possible that you could eventually move to a state with either lower state income tax rates or no income tax at all. If so, you could save money on the difference between your current and future tax rates, and possibly avoid state income taxes altogether. Of course, if you move to a state with higher income taxes, you may end up losing money on the difference.

3. It Helps You Gain Eligibility for Tax Breaks

Contributing to a traditional IRA lowers what’s called your adjusted gross income (AGI), which is why you end up paying less income tax.

But there are a number of other tax breaks that rely on your AGI to determine eligibility, and by contributing to a traditional IRA you lower your AGI you make it more likely to qualify for those tax breaks.

Here’s a sample of common tax breaks that rely on AGI:

  • Saver’s credit – Provides a tax credit for people who make contributions to a qualified retirement plan and make under a certain level of AGI. For 2017, the maximum credit is $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for couples.
  • Child and dependent care credit – Provides a credit of up to $2,100 for expenses related to the care of children and other dependents, though the amount decreases as your AGI increases. Parents with young children in child care are the most common recipients of this credit.
  • Medical expense deduction – Medical expenses that exceed 10% of your AGI are deductible. The lower your AGI, the more likely you are to qualify for this deduction.
  • 0% dividend and capital gains tax rate – If you’re in the 15% income tax bracket or below, any dividends and long-term capital gains you earn during the year are not taxed. Lowering your AGI could move you into this lower tax bracket.

Making a Smarter Decision

There’s a lot more to the traditional vs. Roth IRA debate than the conventional wisdom would have you believe. And the truth is that the more you dive in, the more you realize just how powerful the traditional IRA is.

That’s not to say that you should never use a Roth IRA. It’s a fantastic account, and it certainly has its place. It’s just that the tax breaks a traditional IRA offers are often understated.

It’s also important to recognize that every situation is different and that it’s impossible to know ahead of time which account will come out ahead. There are too many variables and too many unknowns to say for sure.

But with the information above, you should be able to make a smarter choice that makes it a little bit easier to reach retirement sooner and with more money.

Matt Becker
Matt Becker |

Matt Becker is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Matt at matt@magnifymoney.com

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Term vs Whole Life Insurance

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Term vs Whole Life Insurance

If you’re shopping for life insurance, there are two main types you’ll likely encounter: term life insurance and whole life insurance.

Depending on who you talk to, you’ll hear different arguments for and against both types, which can make it difficult to figure out which type of life insurance will provide the right protection for you and your family.

This guide breaks it all down so that you can make the best decision for your specific situation.

What Is the Purpose of Life Insurance?

Before getting into the debate over term versus whole life insurance, let’s take a step back and remind ourselves why life insurance is important to begin with.

While there are some rare exceptions, life insurance primarily serves one main purpose: to provide financial protection to people who are financially dependent upon you.

In other words, life insurance makes sure that there will always be money available for the people who depend on you financially, even if you’re no longer there to provide for them.

A good example of this is a couple with young children. A toddler obviously cannot support herself financially, and life insurance makes sure that there would be financial resources to care for her no matter what happens to the parents.

Other examples of financial dependents might include a spouse who would struggle to handle all the bills on his or her own, or parents who have co-signed for your student loans.

So before you start thinking about which type of life insurance you need, ask yourself the following two questions to better understand why you’re getting life insurance at all:

  1. Is there anyone who would struggle financially without your support? If not, you probably don’t need life insurance.
  2. If so, for how long will they be dependent upon you? Is it a fixed time period or is it relatively permanent?

Your answers to those questions will help you sort through the term versus whole life insurance debate with a clearer, more personal viewpoint.

The Basics of Term Life Insurance

Term life insurance is coverage that lasts for a set amount of time, typically 5-30 years. Once that period is up, the policy expires and your coverage ends.

That expiration may sound like a problem, but it’s actually similar to most other types of insurance. Things like auto insurance and homeowners insurance are typically annual policies that have to be renewed each year, and you would cancel your coverage if you no longer had a need. Similarly, term life insurance is meant to provide coverage only for as long as you actually need it.

Let’s look at the pros and cons.

The Benefits of Term Life Insurance

It’s Inexpensive

Term life insurance is typically the most cost-effective way to get the protection you need. In fact, it’s often 10 times less expensive than whole life insurance for the same amount of coverage, especially if you’re relatively young and healthy.

The main reason for the price difference is that term life insurance eventually expires, meaning it has a smaller chance of paying out. And again, that may look like a downside, but…

The Coverage Period Lines Up with Your Need

Most people only have a temporary need for life insurance. Your kids will eventually grow up and be self-sufficient. Your spouse can eventually rely on retirement savings and Social Security income. Your joint debt will eventually be paid off.

Term life insurance provides financial protection for the amount of time that you need it and no more. You should hope it doesn’t pay out, because that just means that you didn’t die early. Like your car insurance, it’s good to have in case of an emergency, but the best case scenario is never having to file a claim.

In addition, if for some reason your situation changes and you no longer need life insurance, you can simply cancel your term life insurance policy and be done with it. Again, it’s coverage for as long as you need it and no more.

It’s Easy to Shop Around

Term life insurance policies are fairly simple and therefore pretty generic. As long as you’re looking at insurance companies with a strong financial rating, you can largely shop on price alone.

My two favorite sites for comparison shopping for term life insurance policies are PolicyGenius and Term4Sale, both of which only list policies from reputable companies.

For example, using the Term4Sale quote engine, a 34-year-old nonsmoking male in New York City with “Preferred” health status could get a $1 million 30-year term life insurance policy for as little as $939.98 per year or as much as $1,255.30 per year. And again, because term life insurance is fairly generic, you can compare those premiums with the confidence that your policy would be just as good either way.

You Can Typically Convert to Whole Life

What happens if you end up needing life insurance coverage longer than you originally thought? Since term life insurance eventually runs out, wouldn’t that be a problem?

It is a risk, but most term life insurance policies allow you to convert your policy to whole life insurance without medical underwriting as long as you do it before the policy expires. Your premium would increase significantly upon such a conversion, reflecting the increased liability the insurance company is taking on by providing permanent coverage. And if for some reason your policy did require medical underwriting at the time of conversion, there would be the risk of an even bigger premium increase if your health has declined since you originally got the policy.

Not all policies have this conversion feature, but those that do remove the risk that you wouldn’t be able to get permanent coverage later on if you need it.

The Downsides of Term Life Insurance

It’s More Expensive as You Get Older

Term life insurance is typically inexpensive if you’re relatively young, but it gets more expensive as you get older, especially if you’re looking at policies with longer terms. And the reason is simply that your odds of dying increase as you age, which means the insurance company faces a bigger risk.

For example, a 54-year-old male looking for the same $1 million, 30-year term life insurance policy we mentioned above is looking at an annual premium of $5,894 to $6,780 per year.

If you’re in your 50s or above and looking for life insurance, a term policy may or may not end up being a cost-effective way to get it.

It May Not Last as Long as You Need

Life is hard to predict, and it’s certainly possible that you end up needing life insurance for longer than you originally expected. If that happens, your term life insurance policy likely won’t have a lot of flexibility that allows you to extend it, beyond converting it to whole life.

There are also some insurance needs for which permanent protection is simply better. Those are rare, but we’ll talk about them below.

The Basics of Whole Life Insurance

Whole life insurance has two primary features:

  1. It provides permanent coverage, meaning that it will never expire as long as you continue to pay the premiums.
  2. It includes a savings component that builds up over time and can eventually be used for a variety of purposes.

There are several types of whole life insurance that have slightly different features and serve different purposes, like universal life insurance, variable life insurance, and equity-indexed life insurance. For the purposes of this article we’ll focus on the basic whole life insurance that most people will come across, and for the most part, all of the following pros and cons would apply no matter which type you’re talking about.

The Benefits of Whole Life Insurance

It Can Handle a Permanent Need

If you have a permanent or indefinite need for life insurance, whole life insurance is the way to get it.

For example, if you have a child with special needs who will likely be dependent upon others for his or her entire life, whole life insurance may make sense. Or if you will have multiple millions of dollars to pass on to your heirs, whole life insurance can help with estate taxes and preserve your family’s wealth.

Most people don’t have these kinds of permanent needs, but if you do, then whole life insurance can be valuable.

It Can Be a Form of Forced Savings

For people who struggle to consistently save money, whole life insurance can be a way to force yourself to build long-term savings while also providing financial protection.

It may not be the most efficient savings account, as we’ll talk about below, but having some savings is better than having none, and the savings you do accumulate can be withdrawn for any reason. Taxes are also deferred while the money is inside the account, which can be a benefit for high-income earners who have already maxed out their other tax-advantaged savings accounts.

It’s Can Be Structured to Meet Your Goals

If you work with a life insurance professional who really knows what they’re doing, you can specially structure a whole life insurance policy to serve specific purposes.

For example, if your main goal is permanent life insurance protection, you can structure it to minimize the savings component and make that protection as cheap as possible. If your main goal is to build savings, you can structure it to minimize other costs and front-load your contributions to grow your savings as quickly as possible.

If you can find a life insurance agent who’s willing to work with you in a fiduciary capacity, meaning they put your interests ahead of their own, you can get fairly creative and structure your whole life insurance policy to meet your specific needs.

The Downsides of Whole Life Insurance

It’s Expensive

Whole life insurance is an expensive way to get the financial protection you need. For example, remember the 34-year-old male who would pay $939.98 per year for a $1 million 30-year term life insurance policy? According to LLIS, a team of independent insurance advisers, a $1 million whole life insurance policy for the same individual would be $11,240 per year. That’s 12 times more expensive for the same amount of coverage. (Though, to be fair, for a longer coverage period.)

There are also a lot of hidden fees that add to the cost, from the sizable commission paid to the agent who sells you the policy to the management fees associated with the policy’s savings account.

Unless you truly have a permanent need for coverage, whole life insurance is probably not the most cost-effective way to get it.

Most People Don’t Have a Permanent Need

The simple fact is that most people don’t have a need for permanent life insurance coverage. As your children age and your savings grow, the financial impact of your death decreases until there’s little to no risk.

It might be nice to know that whole life insurance will eventually pay out, but is that something you need? And if not, is it worth paying those big premiums over all those years instead of putting that money elsewhere?

Don’t be fooled into thinking that your insurance has to pay out for it to be valuable. If you don’t have the need for permanent coverage, you shouldn’t pay for it.

It’s Not an Efficient Savings Vehicle

The savings component of whole life insurance might sound attractive, but the truth is that it’s not an especially efficient way to save money.

It takes a long time for the cash value to build up. It’s often 7-10 years just to break even, and even over long periods of time in the best of circumstances the return is likely to be low.

Not only that, but withdrawals from your account are actually loans, meaning you’re typically charged interest for the right to use your own money. Can you imagine if your savings account at the bank charged you interest each time you took money out?

Finally, unlike other savings accounts where you can simply decide to pause or decrease your contributions for a while if you hit a rough patch, your whole life insurance premiums are due like clockwork no matter what. Your policy can lapse if you fail to pay your premiums, losing you both the protection you need and the savings you’ve built up.

The truth is that unless you’ve already maxed out all your other tax-advantaged savings accounts — like your 401(k), IRAs, health savings accounts, and 529 accounts — the tax benefits of saving within a life insurance policy likely aren’t worth it. And even then you may be better off using a taxable brokerage account, depending on your specific goals and circumstances.

Which Type of Life Insurance Is Right for You?

If you’re purely looking for the financial protection that life insurance provides, and if your need is temporary, then term life insurance is likely the best option for you. It’s the cheapest way to get the protection you need, leaving more room in your budget for your other goals and obligations.

And for most people, quite honestly, that’s the end of the discussion. Most people don’t have a need for permanent coverage and will be better off putting their savings elsewhere, like regular savings accounts for short-term needs and dedicated retirement accounts for long-term investments.

But there are a few situations in which some kind of whole life insurance can make sense.

If you have a truly permanent need for life insurance, such as a child with long-term special needs, then a whole life insurance policy specially designed to provide the protection you need at the lowest cost possible may be well worth it.

And if your income is very high and you’re already maxing out all other tax-advantaged investment accounts, a whole life insurance policy can be a way to get some additional tax-deferred savings. Again, you’d ideally want it to be specially designed to minimize fees and maximize the amount that goes toward savings.

In any case, remember to focus on the reason why you’re getting life insurance in the first place and to make decisions around that need. The right type of life insurance will likely be pretty clear as long as you keep your personal goals at the forefront.

Matt Becker
Matt Becker |

Matt Becker is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Matt at matt@magnifymoney.com

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