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How to Get Student Loan Forgiveness

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Students throwing graduation hats

According to a recent CNBC article, 24% of millennials expect to receive forgiveness for their outstanding student loan debt balances. It’s a good thing, then, that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau estimates that 25 percent of American workers could be eligible for student loan repayment forgiveness programs.

Here’s more good news: there are many ways of taking action to get a student loan forgiven. You can seek out programs that are career-based, meaning they provide aid for those in certain professions. Or you can look into plans based on your income level. Most of these are sponsored by the Federal government in one way or another (though some colleges do assist a select few of the students they graduate).

Those suffering the burden of student loans may qualify for one (or more) of the nine types of forgiveness programs listed below.

Public Service Student Loan Forgiveness

There are many programs available to help mitigate Federal student loan burdens — especially if you’re working in a public service position.

Specifically, employees of the government, non-profit organizations, and other public workers may qualify for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program. You need to be employed full-time by a public service organization. You also are required to make 120 payments on your loans before being eligible for forgiveness.

Note that as long as you’re employed by an eligible public service organization, you’re covered. In other words, you probably qualify as a teacher — and you may also qualify if you work in a public school as an administrative staff member.

[17 Jobs That Don’t Qualify For Student Loan Forgiveness Programs]

Getting a Loan Forgiven Based on Income

Another way to get Federal student loans forgiven is to see if you qualify for an income-based program.

According to Sophia Bera, CFP and founder of Gen Y Planning, there are three income-driven programs:

  • Pay As You Earn Repayment Plan (PAYE Plan) – This plan is the newest option for those with student loan debt. It’s designed to help recent students entering the job market for the first time during the recession years, and provides an alternative to the Income-Based Repayment Plan and lower payments. The remaining balances will be forgiven after 20 years of qualifying payments and an interest subsidy. PAYE is only available for federal Direct Loans. Eligibility is often a result of student loans that are higher than a person’s annual discretionary income or makes up a significant portion of his or her annual income. So, $10,000 in student loans with a $60,000 annual salary would like make an individual ineligible for the plan. In addition, individuals are only eligible for the PAYE plan if:
    • He or she is new borrower as of Oct. 1, 2007,
    • Received a disbursement of a Direct Loan on or after Oct. 1, 2011.
  • Income-Based Repayment Plan (IBR Plan) – This is the original plan that was designed to help those who held student loan debt that equaled more than their annual income, or a “significant portion” of annual income. Eligibility includes demonstrating a partial financial hardship. Loans will be forgiven after 25 years of qualifying payments, five years longer than the PAYE plan. Like the PAYE plan, this IBR also offers an interest subsidy.

Keep in mind: for both IBR and PAYE, your payments are based on your adjust gross income (AGI). If you file joint taxes with a spouse, then your AGI will include your spouse’s income and impact your payments.

[Read more about taxes and student loans here.]

  • Income-Contingent Repayment Plan (ICR Plan) – This plan intends to help those who purposely chose low-income jobs but graduated with high levels of student loan debt. It provides another option for those who can’t qualify for either the Pay As You Earn Plan or the IBR Plan and is open to anyone with eligible federal student loans. Like with the IBR, the monthly payments are based on income and family size, however, the payments will likely be higher than those with IBR or PAYE. The ICR plan also forgives an outstanding balance after 25 years of qualifying payments. The debt discharged is treated as taxable income, so borrowers need to be prepared to pay taxes to the IRS.

[How to Set Up Income-Driven Repayment Programs]

While each of these programs has various stipulations, requirements, and limits, they all have one thing in common: they’re designed to help those with low incomes and excessive amounts of student loan debt.

They’re also a little different from the public service programs. While those in public service positions can have student loan debt forgiven after 10 years, these programs forgive loans after 20 or 25 years.

However, like the public service loan forgiveness program, these income-driven programs do require you to pay every payment on time – or you’ll be disqualified from the program. You also may need to pay taxes on the portion of your loans that are forgiven.

Use this calculator to see exactly what will happen with your payments and how much of your student loans may be forgiven.

Student Loan Forgiveness Programs for Professionals

Many student loan forgiveness programs are based on the career you choose after graduation. For those with professional degrees – think doctors, lawyers, and teachers – you have several options when it comes to shedding that student loan debt without paying it out-of-pocket and in full.

Doctors can look into the NIH Loan Repayment Program. This can help repay 25% of a doctor’s student loan balance per year with a $35,000 maximum. That’s limited to doctors conducting research and who meet certain eligibility requirements.

[Learn more about Medical Student Loan Forgiveness here.]

Lawyers can look into Equal Justice Works. This provides a list of law schools that offer loan repayment assistance programs. Afam Onyema graduated from Harvard University and Stanford Law School, and was able to decline corporate law job offers in order to establish a charitable organization thanks to repayment programs.

“I can afford to do this work only because of Stanford Law School’s uniquely generous Loan Repayment Assistance Program (LRAP),” explains Onyema. “The school is systematically paying off and forgiving 85% of my $150,000+ debt.”

[Learn more about Lawyer Student Loan Forgiveness here.]

Teachers can qualify for PSFL programs, they might also want to look into Teacher Loan Forgiveness. To get into this program, you need to teach at specifically designated elementary and secondary schools for five consecutive years to be eligible.

If you began teaching after 2004, you’re eligible for up to $5,000 in loan forgiveness if you were a “highly qualified” teacher, and you can receive up to $17,500 if you’re a “highly qualified” math or science teacher in a secondary school, or special education teacher.

Other Options

Don’t qualify for any of the above? Don’t despair yet. You have a few more options:

Volunteer programs: These qualify under public service student loan forgiveness: Options include working with AmeriCorps and serving 12 months or volunteering as part of their VISTA program, or joining the Peace Corps.

Enrolling in the military: Some branches of the US military offer student loan forgiveness programs. Stafford and Perkins loans are eligible (among others), and the Army and Navy will “repay the maximum allowed by law for non-prior service active duty enlistments.”

The Army will pay up to $20,000 for Reserve enlistments, and that includes the Army National Guard. If you’re interested in joining the Air Force, that branch can repay up to $10,000 for non-prior service, active duty enlistments.

Both the Air Force and the Navy require a minimum of four years of service. With the Army, the minimum service is three years, and the Army and Navy Reserves and Army and National Guard require six years.

The Pitfalls Associated with Getting a Student Loan Forgiven

If you’re having trouble making your student loan payments on time and in full, it’s worth your time to do some homework and research your options. Getting a student loan forgiven isn’t always the best answer or the only solution, and you need to proceed with caution.

Let’s be clear. “Forgiveness” doesn’t mean you sit back and let someone else take care of 100% of your loan. Nor does it mean getting to completely walk away from the financial responsibilities of borrowing that money in the first place.

You’ll first need to make sure you meet all the qualifications listed out in the fine print. As we’ve seen, that can mean fitting into very specific circumstances and stipulations. And short of drastic action like declaring bankruptcy – which is not the ideal solution – you may not qualify for any of the programs on student loan forgiveness out there.

In fact, even declaring bankruptcy doesn’t always work. According to Leslie Tayne, Esq. of Tayne Law Group, P.C., “Student loans are rarely dischargeable in bankruptcy and getting a student loan forgiven is a very particular process.”

“For Federal student loans, there is a way to get your loan forgiven,” she explains. “The public service forgiveness program may forgive the balance of your loans after 10 years working in a qualified public service job.

“Once your forgiveness is approved, you will not be required to make any more payments on the loan; however it is important to note that you may be subject to a 1099 by the IRS and thus have to pay taxes on the amount forgiven.” As Tayne notes, that could have an even worse affect on your finances.

Bera provided this example: “If you had $100,000 in Federal student loans and [use a forgiveness program], after 25 years of on-time payments the balance on your student loans might be $50,000. If the government forgives this amount, you’ll have to pay the tax on $50,000 of income in addition to your normal salary or wages for that year.”

If someone only makes $40,000 annually and suddenly his or her income increases to $90,000 in a given tax year, they’ll likely owe thousands of dollars to the government.

All this isn’t said to discourage you, but to make sure you’re in tune with the realities of the situation. If you have student loans and want to look into getting involved with a student loan forgiveness program, start by familiarizing yourself with what’s available to you and your situation. Once you’ve done a bit of research you can contact your loan provider to start taking action.

Interested in Refinancing Your Student Loans? Look at our Student Loan ReFi Marketplace.

Kali Hawlk
Kali Hawlk |

Kali Hawlk is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Kali at Kali@magnifymoney.com

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College Students and Recent Grads

The Best Ways to Pay for Grad School in 2017

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: iStock

Graduate school funding is a bit trickier than undergrad funding. Your options for loans and grants become more limited, and while work-study opportunities may be attainable and provide great experience, they often eat up a lot of time but offer low compensation.You do have options, though — whether you’re a grad student or a parent. This guide will take you through them all in detail.

Part I: Financing Options for Grad School

As a grad student, you have three federal student loan options: Direct Unsubsidized Loans, Direct PLUS Loans, and Perkins Loans. Each financing option looks different, and you may need a combination of these loans to fully fund your education.

Federal loan options and programs

Eligibility requirements

In order to qualify for any federal student aid, you must meet certain requirements. You must:

  • Have a high school diploma, home-school high school education, GED, or other certification of equivalency.
  • Be a U.S. citizen, national, or permanent resident.
  • Have a Social Security number. This requirement is waived if you are from the Marshall Islands, Palau, or Micronesia.
  • Register with the Selective Service if you’re a male age 18-25. If you do not do so during this time frame, it can impact your ability to access federal financial aid later in life.
  • Be enrolled or accepted into a school with the aim of obtaining a degree, certificate, or other recognized educational credential.
  • Maintain good grades. Standards for this requirement vary from school to school.
  • Certify that you aren’t currently in default on any federal student loans, that you owe money back on a grant, and that you will only use the money for educational endeavors. This certification happens on the FAFSA application.

If you meet all of these requirements, you now have to look at specific qualifications for each type of student loan.

Direct Unsubsidized Loans

In order to qualify for a Direct Unsubsidized Loan, you must be attending a participating educational institution at least half-time. You must also be enrolled at least half-time in a program that will lead to a degree or certificate. There is no need to demonstrate financial need in order to qualify for a Direct Unsubsidized Loan.

Direct PLUS Loans

Direct PLUS Loans have very specific credit standards. In order to qualify, you must meet the following requirements:

  • Must be pursuing a degree or certificate at the graduate or professional level and going to school at least half-time — or be the parent of a student who is doing so.
  • Cannot have a debt that is currently 90 days delinquent with a balance of over $2,085.
  • Cannot have an item worth over $2,085 sent to collections or written off in the two years prior to your application.
  • Cannot have any of the following appear on your credit report in the past five years: default determination, bankruptcy, foreclosure, tax lien, repossession, wage garnishment, or a write-off of other student loan debt.

These standards apply to both student and parent borrowers. If you cannot meet them, you can still borrow money by finding a co-signer who does meet these standards.

You may also be able to qualify if you can prove the blip on your credit report was caused by extenuating circumstances. In order to qualify in this way, you’ll need to complete credit counseling to the satisfaction of the PLUS program.

Perkins Loans

Perkins Loans are reserved for those with exceptional financial need. You prove this need by filling out the FAFSA as you normally would.

If you are eligible based on need, you need to get in touch with your financial aid office because your school is the actual lender. Not all schools participate, and not every school has sufficient funding for this program to offer the full $8,000 grad students may be eligible for. It’s important to fill out the FAFSA early and to approach your school about these loans as soon as you get your results.

Pros & cons of federal student loans

There are times when taking out federal loans will be advantageous to you as a grad student and times when other options may make more sense. Let’s drill down into the pros and cons.

Pros:

  • Aside from Perkins Loans, federal student loans give you access to a number of repayment options, including options that allow you to adjust monthly payments based on your current income.
  • Depending on the private lender, credit requirements are typically more lax than they will be in the private sector.
  • Interest rates on Perkins Loans are competitive — if your school participates and if your financial situation is considered dire enough to qualify.

Cons:

  • The fact that there are origination fees on Direct Unsubsidized Loans and Direct PLUS Loans is a major negative as it will cost you money to borrow the money in the first place.
  • Interest rates on Direct PLUS Loans are not competitive if you have a good credit history. You may be able to save money by moving to the private sector in specific circumstances.
  • Direct Unsubsidized Loans and Direct PLUS Loans require at least half-time enrollment. If you are pursuing a graduate-level degree while working a day job, this may present a problem depending on how many credits you are able to take on at once.

Federal grant and programs for grad school

While loans are money you will have to pay back, grants and work-study programs are sources of funding that you won’t have to repay. It’s essentially free money. At the graduate level, you have a few federal options.

TEACH Grants

The Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant is a program that pays for part of your education as long as you promise to use your degree in a high-need, low-income area for four of the eight years following the completion of your education. You can also teach at a Bureau of Indian Education school during this time period to qualify.

High-need fields include:

If your grant was disbursed today, the maximum grant amount you could qualify for would be $3,724. If it isn’t disbursed until after October 1, 2017, the maximum amount awarded jumps to a potential $3,736.

Your school will have to participate in the TEACH program, and your school will have specified which programs qualify for the grant. Get in touch with your financial aid office to find out if your program is eligible.

While you’re there, make sure you are eligible by checking your school’s academic requirements for qualification.

After you have confirmed with your school that you are enrolled in an eligible program, you will need to fill out the FAFSA. You will also need to sign a letter of agreement and complete program-specific counseling.

Pell Grants

It is extremely rare for a grad student to qualify for a Pell Grant. In fact, for eligibility purposes, you’re not allowed to be pursuing a graduate degree.

The only time Pell Grants are available after undergrad work is when you are pursuing a postbaccalaureate teaching certificate. Even then, your certificate program must meet the following requirements:

  • It does not lead to a degree.
  • It is a prerequisite in your state in order to work as a primary or secondary school teacher.
  • It comes from a school that does not offer a bachelor’s degree in education.
  • It must be a postbaccalaureate program.

For your part as a student, you must meet the following requirement as well, if you’re going to qualify:

  • Enrolled at least half-time.
  • Pursuing your initial teacher certification/licensure within your state.

For the 2017-2018 school year, the maximum award you can receive is $5,920. The amount you receive will be based on financial need.

To apply for a Pell Grant, all you have to do is fill out the FAFSA.

If a financial need is demonstrated when you fill out the FAFSA, you may be offered a work-study position. If your school participates, you’ll be given an hourly or salaried job where you are paid at least monthly. Your financial need will determine the number of hours you receive.

The kind of job you are assigned will depend largely on your school. You may find yourself in one of these fields:

  • Community service
  • Positions at your school
  • Fields relevant to your course of study

If you end up with a position on campus, you’ll likely be working for the school. If you are working off-campus, you’re more likely to be assigned to a position serving the public good or working in a position relevant to your future career.

You’ll make at least minimum wage, though as a grad student you may have some desirable skills that could land you a position with a pay boost.

Your school is obligated to issue you a paycheck at least once per month. The money will come directly to you unless you set up ACH payments, or you are applying your earnings toward tuition, fees, or room and board.

Grants are a form of financial aid that you don’t have to pay back under most circumstances. However, if you don’t hold up your end of the educational bargain, you may have to return money that was paid to your school, or money you received as a refund check from your school.

You could end up owing money back for your federal grant if:

  • You don’t meet TEACH program guidelines as outlined above.
  • You drop out of school partway through the semester.
  • You reduce the amount of credits you are taking after the grant has been issued.

If you are disappointed by your FAFSA options, you should know that there are other ways to find funding for your graduate-level education. Be sure to review theses resources prior to taking out loans.

Federal grants at the graduate level are admittedly thin. If you’re looking for other ways to pay for school that don’t involve student loans, here are some additional federal agencies outside the Department of Education. They may be able to help.

ROTC scholarships

ROTC scholarships will pay for your education. You’ll also get a stipend for the time you spend at drill on weekends and may have your books covered as well.

In exchange for all of this money, you will be obligated to serve either on active duty or in the reserves after you have completed your education. Because you have a college education, you will enter the military as an officer.

Post-9/11 GI Bill

If you served in the military for at least 36 consecutive months after September 10, 2001, or were honorably discharged due to disability after serving 30 consecutive days after the same date, the Post-9/11 GI Bill may cover your tuition and fees.

If a smaller portion of your service happened after September 10, 2001, you may be eligible for prorated benefits.

All in-state tuition and fees will be paid at public schools, and up to $22,805.34 will be paid at private schools. This number changes annually.

If you still have a gap between how much the school charges and how much the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will pay under the latest version of the GI Bill, check to see if your school has opted in to the Yellow Ribbon Program. Schools that do so reduce the tuition of veterans to meet the maximum VA payout, leaving you with a bill of zero dollars.

Yellow Ribbon schools may also provide funding equivalent to a Basic Allowance for Housing in addition to a stipend for books.

In certain cases, benefits may be transferrable to minors, so if you are a parent who has unused GI Bill benefits, you may be able to transfer them to your child as they enter grad school.

AmeriCorps

AmeriCorps is a volunteer opportunity with some perks for college students. When you volunteer, you earn money for school through the Segal AmeriCorps Education Award. The amount of money you earn depends on how time-intensive your service is.

For example, currently if you volunteer in an approved position for more than 1,700 hours over a 12-month period, you would qualify for an education credit worth $5,920 for the 2017-18 school year. You can only earn up to two full-time education credits. You can find further examples of how much you can earn on the Segal Award Eligibility page.

As a member of AmeriCorps, you may find yourself in one of the following positions or one like them:

  • Relief efforts after a natural disaster
  • Tutoring K-12 students
  • Building affordable housing
  • Working with local nonprofits and community groups

If you have served as an AmeriCorps member after October 1, 2009, at the age of 55+, you may have accrued educational benefits that you can pass on to your child, stepchild, or grandchildren. You can learn more program specifics here.

Other sources of federal grants for grad school

Higher education agencies in your state

Another great place to look for funding is the agency that handles higher education in your state. These state-level organizations typically offer grants. You’ll likely be prompted to visit your state’s website at the end of your FAFSA application, but if you want to learn more about available programs now, you can find yours here.

Your school’s financial aid office

Your school likely has endowments and partner employers — both of whom are likely to offer scholarship and/or grant opportunities. To find out what may be available at your school, schedule an appointment with the financial aid office.

Industry and professional organizations

Many industry and professional organizations offer some type of scholarship program for those studying in the field. Applying for these scholarships won’t just help you pay for school if you’re awarded — if you win one, it will look phenomenal on your future resume.

Some of these organizations will require membership prior to application. While membership fees can be expensive in some organizations, many provide student-level memberships at a steep discount.

Private loan options for grad school: A last resort?

Private student loans are issued directly by lending institutions without the backing of the U.S. Department of Education. You can look to banks, credit unions, or online marketplace lenders to access these loans.

Pros & cons

Pros:

  • If you have a good credit history, you may be able to obtain a loan with lower rates than those currently offered via federal programs.
  • You may be able to access more capital than you would with federal loans, depending on your credit history and the type of federal loan.
  • You can shop around for different options. Some lenders don’t charge origination fees, and some are even willing to work with you in cases of hardship.

Cons:

  • You will not have access to advantaged repayment programs like PAYE, REPAYE, IBR, ICR, and PSLF, which are all covered in sections below.
  • If you do not have a good credit score, interest rates may be higher than federal loans, or you may not be able to get a private loan at all, depending on the severity of content in your credit report.
  • You have to shop around for different options. Some lenders will not work with you in cases of hardship, and factors like variable versus fixed interest rates may throw you for a loop if you’re not careful.

Questions to ask before you borrow private loans for grad school

Before you take out any student loans, you’ll want to get answers to these questions.

This may vary, depending on your income and credit history.

This will typically be a range. If you have good credit, you may qualify for the best rates. If you don’t, you’ll be looking at the higher end of the spectrum.

Variable interest rates start out lower. They may even stay lower for a set amount of time. But after that, they adjust to the market. You may get lucky and have rates go down, but rates are already so low at the moment that you’re almost sure to see them go up instead.

Fixed rates start out higher than variable rates but stay stable throughout the course of your loan term.

Shorter loan terms sometimes mean higher monthly payments, but you’ll usually end up paying less in the long term because of the way interest accrues over time.

If you can’t afford the monthly payments, though, you could end up paying late fees or damaging your credit. Longer loan terms may mean paying more interest by the time you’re through, but they also have the potential to lower your monthly payments.

Some lenders provide payment plans that allow you to defer payments until after graduation. Other payment plans start your payments immediately. Still others require interest-only payments while you’re in school, with principal payments being added after graduation.

Common fees to take note of are:

  • Application fees
  • Origination fees
  • Late fees
  • Prepayment penalty fees

Eligibility requirements to inquire about include credit requirements, citizenship/naturalization requirements, and income requirements.

Does the lender offer any type of deferment in times of economic hardship? Some lenders will even work with you to help you find a new job or temporarily reduce monthly payments while you are in specific employment conundrums.

Compare private sector graduate school loan options here. >

Part II: Repaying Grad School Debt

There are a slew of different repayment options depending on which type of loan you take out. Whether you start repayment during your studies or after, there are some things you can do to prepare.

Federal grad school debt

Students are not required to make payments until six months after their graduation — or nine months if you have a Perkins Loan. Just because you don’t have to make payments during this time period doesn’t mean you shouldn’t.

When to start repaying your federal grad school loan debt

The types of federal loans available to you as a graduate student accrue interest while you’re in school and during your grace period/deferment. You are not required to pay that interest immediately, but the unpaid interest will be added to your principal balance.

By making interest-only payments while you’re in school, you prevent these interest rates from multiplying upon themselves, saving you money.

You can pay toward the principal while you are in school as well, if you so choose, as there is no prepayment penalty on federal student loans.

Parents who have PLUS loans are typically required to start repaying immediately after the loan is disbursed. You can, however, request a deferment for the period during which your child is in school. It would be wise to make interest-only payments during this period if you choose to go this route.

Federal loan forgiveness and repayment assistance programs

Federal loans give you access to many advantaged repayment and forgiveness programs. Keep in mind that while advantaged repayment plans are designed to make your monthly payment lower, they have the potential to cost you more over the course of your loan — especially if they don’t end in forgiveness — as interest will be charged over a longer period of time.

Income-Based Repayment (IBR)
If you took out your first student loan prior to July 1, 2014, and your student loan payments are more than 15 percent of your discretionary income, this program allows you to pay a maximum of 15 percent of your discretionary income for 25 years. After that point, your remaining debt is forgiven.

If you took out your first student loan after July 1, 2017, the capped percentage is 10 percent, and you will only have to pay it for 20 years.

Learn more about IBR here.

Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR)

If you opt into the ICR Plan, you would make payments for 25 years. After 25 years, your remaining debt would be forgiven.

Your monthly payments would be the lesser of these two options:

  • 20 percent of your discretionary income.
  • What you would pay on a repayment plan with a fixed payment over the course of 12 years, adjusted according to your income.

Learn more about ICR here.

Pay As You Earn (PAYE)

Take your income and subtract 150 percent of the poverty level in your state. If your monthly student loan debt payments are more than 10 percent of the difference, you may qualify for PAYE. Use this calculator to see if you qualify.

Your monthly payments will be limited to 10 percent of your income and will never exceed what you would pay on a 10-year Standard Plan. After 20 years, the remainder of your debt will be forgiven.

You only qualify for this plan if your first student loan was disbursed after October 1, 2007, and you have received at least one disbursement since October 1, 2011.

Learn more about PAYE here.

Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE)

REPAYE does not have the same timing restrictions of PAYE. In fact, the date you took out your loans is irrelevant. There are also no income restrictions.

However, while you will only have to pay 10 percent of your discretionary income, there is no protection stating that your payments will not exceed those of a 10-year Standard Plan. You could end up paying more with this program — especially with a higher income.

Remaining balances on graduate school loans will be forgiven after 25 years.

Learn more about REPAYE here.

Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF)

The future of this program is uncertain, but it is currently still open.

Under PSLF, you make payments for 10 years while you’re working 30+ hours per week and considered a full-time employee by your employer. This job must be in a position of service, and the remainder of your loan balance will be forgiven. Your 10 years of payments should be made under IBR, ICR, PAYE, or REPAYE.

Qualifying public service jobs include positions at:

  • Governmental organizations
  • 501(c)(3) organizations
  • Non-501(c)(3) organizations providing one of these services:
    • Public or school library services
    • Emergency management
    • Service on behalf of the U.S. military
    • Public education
    • Early childhood education
    • Law enforcement
    • Public interest legal services
    • Public services for the disabled or elderly
    • Public health

Learn more about PSLF here.

State programs

States have regional needs in a number of different fields, including medicine, education, social work, veterinary sciences, law, and more. Across the country there are programs offering to pay off portions of your debt if you agree to live and work in high-need communities.

Repaying private grad school debt

Different lenders will require different repayment terms from their borrowers. Be sure to understand what is expected of you before signing on the dotted line. Ask questions like:
Will I be required to make payments while I am in school?

  • If so, are they interest-only payments?
  • Will there be a grace period after graduation?
  • Do you have any deferment options in case of economic hardship?
  • What is the maximum time allowed for deferment?

When you should start repaying private grad school debt

The sooner you can pay off debt, the better. If your loan requires you to make principal and interest payments, make them without delinquency.

Before you make any payments prior to their due date, make sure there is no prepayment penalty. Otherwise a good portion of the money you think you’re throwing at your debt could end up going toward fees instead.

Learn more: Refinancing grad school debt

If you can get a lower interest rate on your student loans by refinancing, you may be able to save money as long as you pay off your debt in the same amount of time.

In order to avoid ruining your credit score, you may also want to refinance if you cannot afford your monthly payments.

Brynne Conroy
Brynne Conroy |

Brynne Conroy is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brynne at brynne@magnifymoney.com

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College Students and Recent Grads, Reviews, Student Loan ReFi

SoFi Parent PLUS Loan Refinance Review

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Senior Couple Talking To Financial Advisor At Home

Updated August 21, 2017

Are you a parent who wanted to help your child finance his or her education, and ended up taking out more loans than anticipated? Many parents find themselves in a precarious situation as they try to plan for retirement and while balancing student loan debt.

If you’re looking to save on the amount of interest you’re paying, SoFi’s Parent PLUS loan refinance program may be right for you.

Details of the Parent PLUS Loan

You can refinance a minimum of $5,000 under SoFi. Fixed rates range from 3.35% to 6.75% APR and variable rates range from 2.815% – 6.490% APR (these rates assume you enroll in autopayment).

Terms of 5, 7, 10, and 15 years are available. Variable rates on terms of 5, 7, and 10 years are capped at 8.95%, while the 15 year term is capped at 9.95%.

An example payment looks like this: if you refinance $10,000 on a 5 year term with a fixed APR of 5.49%, your monthly payment will be $190.97 and you’ll pay a total of $11,457.93 over the life of the loan. If you refinance $10,000 on a 5 year term with a variable APR of 4.2%, your monthly payment will be $185.07 and you’ll pay a total of $11,104.43.

How Does the Parent PLUS Loan From SoFi Compare to a Federal PLUS Loan?

The interest rate for Federal Direct PLUS Loans disbursed on or after July 1st, 2015 and before July 1st, 2016 is 6.84%. During much of the 2000s, interest rates were higher. Currently, interest rates are fixed – variable rates are unavailable.

Most people are looking to refinance to save money, and SoFi offers very competitive rates compared with the Direct PLUS Loan, especially on variable rates.

While there are no fees to refinance, you should calculate your estimated savings before going through the process. Be aware if you do refinance, you’ll lose out on certain benefits that come with having Federal student loans, such as deferment, forbearance, and various repayment options.

PLUS loans made to parents are eligible for the Graduated or Extended Repayment Plans, and Direct PLUS loans are also eligible for forgiveness. In some cases, PLUS loans can be discharged due to the death of the borrower (or student).

Private loans often don’t extend these same benefits. In fact, SoFi explicitly states on its legal page that this loan “is not discharged in the event of death or permanent disability of the borrower or student on whose behalf the loan is taken out.”

Eligibility Requirements

You must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident and employed to be approved. SoFi is unable to lend in Nevada, and variable rates aren’t offered in Illinois, Ohio, or Tennessee. The loans must have been used to obtain at least a Bachelor’s degree with an eligible school as well.

There are no specific credit score requirements as SoFi tries to take a broader view of borrowers. It focuses on income and credit history instead.

Application Process and Documents Needed

The application process to refinance a PLUS Loan with SoFi is easy and can be done completely online. The application takes around 15 minutes to complete, and you’ll know whether or not you qualify by going through the pre-approval process first. During this portion of the application, a soft credit inquiry is used. If you decide to move forward with the loan offered to you, a hard credit inquiry will be used.

You’ll be asked to upload a few documents, so it’s a good idea to have the following ready to go:

  • Proof of residence – ID with matching address, otherwise a utility bill dated within the last 60 days is okay
  • Proof of income – most recent pay stubs
  • Proof of citizenship – a passport or birth certificate can be provided
  • Verification of loans – most recent loan statements for the loans you’re refinancing

Once you submit this documentation, SoFi’s review team gets to work on evaluating your loan. If no other documentation is needed, reviews can take anywhere from 2 to 3 weeks to complete.

The Fine Print

There isn’t an origination fee or application fee, and there are no prepayment penalties. Rates are determined on a number of factors, including the term you choose, your income, and your credit history.

There are late fees associated with the loan. The Parent PLUS Refinance program is currently offered through SoFi’s lending partner, Mohela, and it assesses any fees owed. When you receive the paperwork for the loan, the fees can be found under the disclosures.

Repayment Assistance Options

If you’re struggling to repay the loan after refinancing with SoFi, we recommend you contact a representative and make them aware of the situation. The worst thing you can do with any loan is not make a payment.

SoFi offers unemployment protection on a case-by-case basis, during which payments can be paused for a period of 3 to 12 months.

Pros and Cons of SoFi Parent PLUS Loan

Pro: SoFi offers much better rates than the 6.84% fixed rate that comes with Direct PLUS loans. If you have a higher interest rate – around 8% – you’ll stand to benefit even more.

Con: As we mentioned, refinancing means losing out on benefits associated with Federal student loans. If you’re not as concerned about needing repayment assistance, the savings might be enough to make refinancing worthwhile.

Pro: SoFi also offers variable interest rates, whereas the most recent Direct PLUS loans don’t. Variable rates can be tricky, though – SoFi says rates may change on a monthly basis. If you value stability and peace of mind, variable rates may not be for you. If you’re trying to pay off your balance quicker, and a lower interest rate would help, then it might be worth considering this option. 

Con: You may have to extend the repayment term to get a lower monthly payment, as SoFi offers terms up to 15 years. Unfortunately, this increases the amount of interest you’ll pay over the life of the loan. It’s important to use a calculator to estimate how much your savings will be to make sure refinancing is worth it. For example, if you have less than 5 years remaining on your loan, refinancing may not save you a lot of money.

Pro: SoFi offers unemployment protection, and you can also take advantage of SoFi’s career assistance program. If you or your child is experiencing trouble finding employment, it will connect you with its network of alumni and give you tools and tips to succeed in your job search.

SofiLogo

 *referral link

Other Parent PLUS Refinance Alternative

If you don’t qualify with SoFi, you can try these lenders that also offer refinancing options:

CommonBond: Fixed APRs range from 3.35% to 6.74%, and variable APRs range start at 2.80%, and terms offered are 5, 10, 15, and 20 years. CommonBond also has hybrid APRs. Only a 10 year term is offered with this choice; it starts off as fixed for 5 years, and changes over to variable for 5 years. There are no origination fees or application fees, no prepayment penalty, and CommonBond actually allows you to transfer your loan to your child (which isn’t allowed with Federal loans). You can borrow a maximum of $110,000.

CommondBondbank

 

 

Citizens Bank: Citizens Bank refinances Parent PLUS and Direct PLUS loans through its Education Refinance program. The minimum amount you can refinance is $10,000 and up to $90,000 for Bachelor’s degrees and below, $130,000 for graduate and doctoral degrees, and $170,000 for professional degrees. For a Bachelor’s degree and above, you must have made 3 consecutive monthly payments to refinance. For anything less than a Bachelor’s degree, you must have made 12 consecutive monthly payments. The loan you’re refinancing must be in repayment status and can’t be enrolled in an Income-Based Repayment plan. Fixed APRs start at 6.24%. Terms of 5, 10, 15, or 20 years are offered. You need a minimum income of $24,000 to qualify.

citizens-bank

 

Be sure to shop around as there are other lenders out there that will refinance PLUS loans – you want to make sure you’re getting the best rates and terms available to you so you can save the most. Shopping around within 30 days will only count as one credit inquiry, so your credit won’t get penalized heavily. Take advantage of this and lessen the burden of student loan payments so you can focus on saving for your future.

We’ll receive a referral fee if you click on the “Apply Now” buttons in this post. This does not impact our rankings or recommendations You can learn more about how our site is financed here.

Erin Millard
Erin Millard |

Erin Millard is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Erin at erinm@magnifymoney.com

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College Students and Recent Grads, Pay Down My Debt

19 Options to Refinance Student Loans in 2017 – Get Your Lowest Rate

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

19 Options to Refinance Student Loans - Get Your Lowest Rate

Updated: August 21, 2017

Are you tired of paying a high interest rate on your student loan debt? You may be looking for ways to refinance your student loans at a lower interest rate, but don’t know where to turn. We have created the most complete list of lenders currently willing to refinance student loan debt.

You should always shop around for the best rate. Don’t worry about the impact on your credit score of applying to multiple lenders: so long as you complete all of your applications within 14 days, it will only count as one inquiry on your credit score. You can see the full list of lenders below, but we recommend you start here, and check rates from the top 4 national lenders offering the lowest interest rates. These 4 lenders also allow you to check your rate without impacting your score (using a soft credit pull), and offer the best rates of 2017:

LenderTransparency ScoreMax TermFixed APRVariable APRMax Loan Amount 
SoFiA+

20


Years

3.35% - 7.125%


Fixed Rate*

2.815% - 6.740%


Variable Rate*

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
apply-now
earnestA+

20


Years

3.35% - 6.39%


Fixed Rate

2.81% - 6.19%


Variable Rate

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
apply-now
commonbondA+

20


Years

3.35% - 6.74%


Fixed Rate

2.80% - 6.73%


Variable Rate

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
apply-now
lendkeyA+

20


Years

3.25% - 7.26%


Fixed Rate

2.67% - 6.06%


Variable Rate

$125k / $175k


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
apply-now

We have also created:

But before you refinance, read on to see if you are ready to refinance your student loans.

Can I Get Approved?

Loan approval rules vary by lender. However, all of the lenders will want:

  • Proof that you can afford your payments. That means you have a job with income that is sufficient to cover your student loans and all of your other expenses.
  • Proof that you are a responsible borrower, with a demonstrated record of on-time payments. For some lenders, that means that they use the traditional FICO, requiring a good score. For other lenders, they may just have some basic rules, like no missed payments, or a certain number of on-time payments required to prove that you are responsible.

If you are in financial difficulty and can’t afford your monthly payments, a refinance is not the solution. Instead, you should look at options to avoid a default on student loan debt.

This is particularly important if you have Federal loans.

Don’t refinance Federal loans unless you are very comfortable with your ability to repay. Think hard about the chances you won’t be able to make payments for a few months. Once you refinance, you may lose flexible Federal payment options that can help you if you genuinely can’t afford the payments you have today. Check the Federal loan repayment estimator to make sure you see all the Federal options you have right now.

If you can afford your monthly payment, but you have been a sloppy payer, then you will likely need to demonstrate responsibility before applying for a refinance.

But, if you can afford your current monthly payment and have been responsible with those payments, then a refinance could be possible and help you pay the debt off sooner.

Is it worth it?

Like any form of debt, your goal with a student loan should be to pay as low an interest rate as possible. Other than a mortgage, you will likely never have a debt as large as your student loan.

If you are able to reduce the interest rate by re-financing, then you should consider the transaction. However, make sure you include the following in any decision:

Is there an origination fee?

Many lenders have no fee, which is great news. If there is an origination fee, you need to make sure that it is worth paying. If you plan on paying off your loan very quickly, then you may not want to pay a fee. But, if you are going to be paying your loan for a long time, a fee may be worth paying.

Is the interest rate fixed or variable?

Variable interest rates will almost always be lower than fixed interest rates. But there is a reason: you end up taking all of the interest rate risk. We are currently at all-time low interest rates. So, we know that interest rates will go up, we just don’t know when.

This is a judgment call. Just remember, when rates go up, so do your payments. And, in a higher rate environment, you will not be able to refinance to a better option (because all rates will be going up).

We typically recommend fixing the rate as much as possible, unless you know that you can pay off your debt during a short time period. If you think it will take you 20 years to pay off your loan, you don’t want to bet on the next 20 years of interest rates. But, if you think you will pay it off in five years, you may want to take the bet. Some providers with variable rates will cap them, which can help temper some of the risk.

Places to Consider a Refinance

If you go to other sites they may claim to compare several student loan offers in one step. Just beware that they might only show you deals that pay them a referral fee, so you could miss out on lenders ready to give you better terms. Below is what we believe is the most comprehensive list of current student loan refinancing lenders.

You should take the time to shop around. FICO says there is little to no impact on your credit score for rate shopping as many providers as you’d like in a single shopping period (which can be between 14-30 days, depending upon the version of FICO). So set aside a day and apply to as many as you feel comfortable with to get a sense of who is ready to give you the best terms.

Here are more details on the 5 lenders offering the lowest interest rates:

1. SoFi: Variable Rates from 2.815% and Fixed Rates from 3.35% (with AutoPay)*

SoFi

SoFi (read our full SoFi review) was one of the first lenders to start offering student loan refinancing products. More MagnifyMoney readers have chosen SoFi than any other lender. Although SoFi initially targeted a very select group of universities (it started with Stanford), now almost anyone can apply, including if you graduated from a trade school. The only requirement is that you graduated from a Title IV school. You need to have a degree, a good job and good income in order to qualify. SoFi wants to be more than just a lender. If you lose your job, SoFi will help you find a new one. If you need a mortgage for a first home, they are there to help. And, surprisingly, they also want to get you a date. SoFi is famous for hosting parties for customers across the country, and creating a dating app to match borrowers with each other.

GO TO SITE Secured

on SoFi’s secure website

2. Earnest: Variable Rates from 2.81% and Fixed Rates from 3.35% (with AutoPay)

Earnest

Earnest (read our full Earnest review) offers fixed interest rates starting at 3.35% and variable rates starting at 2.81%. Unlike any of the other lenders, you can switch between fixed and variable rates throughout the life of your loan. You can do that one time every six months until the loan is paid off. That means you can take advantage of the low variable interest rates now, and then lock in a higher fixed rate later. You can choose your own monthly payment, based upon what you can afford (to the penny). Earnest also offers bi-weekly payments and “skip a payment” if you run into difficulty.

3. CommonBond: Variable Rates from 2.80% and Fixed Rates from 3.35% (with AutoPay)

CommonBond

CommonBond (read our full CommonBond review) started out lending exclusively to graduate students. They initially targeted doctors with more than $100,000 of debt. Over time, CommonBond has expanded and now offers student loan refinancing options to graduates of almost any university (graduate and undergraduate). In addition (and we think this is pretty cool), CommonBond will fund the education of someone in need in an emerging market for every loan that closes. So not only will you save money, but someone in need will get access to an education.

4. LendKey: Variable Rates from 2.67% and Fixed Rates from 3.25% (with AutoPay)

Lendkey

LendKey (read our full LendKey review) works with community banks and credit unions across the country. Although you apply with LendKey, your loan will be with a community bank. If you like the idea of working with a credit union or community bank, LendKey could be a great option. Over the past year, LendKey has become increasingly competitive on pricing, and frequently has a better rate than some of the more famous marketplace lenders.

In addition to the Top 4 (ranked by interest rate), there are many more lenders offering to refinance student loans. Below is a listing of all providers we have found so far. This list includes credit unions that may have limited membership. We will continue to update this list as we find more lenders. This list is ordered alphabetically:

  • Alliant Credit Union: Anyone can join this credit union. Interest rates start as low as 4.25% APR. You can borrow up to $100,000 for up to 25 years.
  • Citizens Bank: Variable interest rates range from 2.77% APR – 8.62% APR and fixed rates range from 4.74% – 8.24%. You can borrow for up to 20 years. Citizens also offers discounts up to 0.50% (0.25% if you have another account and 0.25% if you have automated monthly payments).
  • College Avenue: If you have a medical degree, you can borrow up to $250,000. Otherwise, you can borrow up to $150,000. Fixed rates range from 4.65% – 7.50% APR. Variable rates range from 4.01% – 7.01% APR.
  • Credit Union Student Choice: If you like credit unions and community banks, we recommend that you start with LendKey. However, if you can’t find a good loan from a LendKey partner, this tool could be helpful. Just check to see if you or an immediate family member belong to one of their featured credit union and you can apply to refinance your loan.
  • Laurel Road (formerly known as DRB) Student Loan: Laurel Road offers variable rates ranging from 2.99% – 6.42% APR and fixed rates from 3.95% – 6.99% APR. Rates vary by term, and you can borrow up to 20 years.
  • Eastman Credit Union: Credit union membership is restricted (see eligibility here). Fixed rates start at 6.50% and go up to 8% APR.
  • Education Success Loans: This company has a unique pricing structure: your interest rate is fixed and then becomes variable thereafter. You can fix the rate at 4.99% APR for the first year, and it is then becomes variable. The longest you can fix the rate is 10 years at 7.99%, and it is then variable thereafter. Given this pricing, you would probably get a better deal elsewhere.
  • EdVest: This company is the non-profit student loan program of the state of New Hampshire which has become available more broadly. Rates are very competitive, ranging from 3.94% – 7.54% (fixed) and 3.16% – 6.76% APR (variable).
  • First Republic Eagle Gold. The interest rates are great, but this option is not for everyone. Fixed rates range from 2.35% – 3.95% APR. You need to visit a branch and open a checking account (which has a $3,500 minimum balance to avoid fees). Branches are located in San Francisco, Palo Alto, Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, Newport Beach, San Diego, Portland (Oregon), Boston, Palm Beach (Florida), Greenwich or New York City. Loans must be $60,000 – $300,000. First Republic wants to recruit their future high net worth clients with this product.
  • IHelp: This service will find a community bank. Unfortunately, these community banks don’t have the best interest rates. Fixed rates range from 4.65% to 8.84% APR (for loans up to 15 years). If you want to get a loan from a community bank or credit union, we recommend trying LendKey instead.
  • Navy Federal Credit Union: This credit union offers limited membership. For men and women who serve (or have served), the credit union can offer excellent rates and specialized underwriting. Variable interest rates start at 3.42% and fixed rates start at 4.00%.
  • Purefy: Only fixed interest rates are available, with rates ranging from 3.95% – 6.75% APR. You can borrow up to $150,000 for up to 15 years. Just answer a few questions on their site, and you can get an indication of the rate.
  • RISLA: Just like New Hampshire, the state of Rhode Island wants to help you save. You can get fixed rates starting as low as 3.49%. And you do not need to have lived or studied in Rhode Island to benefit.
  • UW Credit Union: This credit union has limited membership (you can find out who can join here, but you had better be in Wisconsin). You can borrow from $5,000 to $60,000 and rates start as low as 2.76% (variable) and 4.04% APR (fixed).
  • Wells Fargo: As a traditional lender, Wells Fargo will look at credit score and debt burden. They offer both fixed and variable loans, with variable rates starting at 4.49% and fixed rates starting at 6.24%. You would likely get much lower interest rates from some of the new Silicon Valley lenders or the credit unions.

You can also compare all of these loan options in one chart with our comparison tool. It lists the rates, loan amounts, and kinds of loans each lender is willing to refinance. You can also email us with any questions at info@magnifymoney.com.

Nick Clements
Nick Clements |

Nick Clements is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Nick at nick@magnifymoney.com

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College Students and Recent Grads

The Ultimate Guide to Paying off Dental School Debt

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Part I: Dental School Debt in the U.S.

How much debt do dental students have?

The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) shares numerous statistics about dental school debt and the profound impact it can make on new dentists’ lives. According to the agency, the average dental school debt for indebted dental school graduates from the class of 2016 reached $262,119. Large debt loads were reported at both public schools and private schools — $238,582 and $291,668, respectively.

Even more startling is the fact that more than 30% of indebted dental graduates from the class of 2016 reported debt loads of more than $300,000.

These statistics show just how expensive dental school can be, but they also make us wonder if dental school is truly worth the cost. This guide was created to show how a dental education can pay off with proper loan and money management. If you’re considering a future in dental school and worrying about the high price tag, keep reading to learn more.

Is dental school worth it?

Before anyone can gauge whether dental school is worth it, it’s crucial to consider the level of income one can expect in this career. According to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics, dentists earned an annual mean wage of $173,860 nationally as of May 2016. It is important to note, however, that the bottom 10% of earners brought in only $67,690 that year, while the bottom 25% of earners made an average of $106,180.

The key to deciphering dentist income is figuring out how much you might earn after you gain some experience and the type of dentistry role you might take on. It’s only natural to expect dentists to earn more as they progress through their careers, but the industry they work in can also impact their earnings.

As the BLS reports, some industries paid dentists considerably more in 2016, including residential intellectual and developmental disability, mental health, and substance abuse facilities ($184,620) and offices of dentists ($176,470).

Location matters, too, of course. Some states reported consistently higher incomes for dentists that year, including Delaware ($236,130), North Carolina ($236,020), Alaska ($234,240), New Hampshire ($220,480), and Nevada ($210,690).

With these salaries in mind, it’s easier to see how one might overcome $200,000+ in educational debt compared to workers in other, lower-paying industries.

Still, it’s important to note that dental school debt can still make a big impact on any dentist’s finances after graduation. A dentist with the average debt load of $262,119 at 6% APR would need to fork over a minimum of $2,910.06 per month if they chose standard, 10-year loan repayment after graduation per LendingTree’s loan calculator. Because of this, some dentists choose alternative repayment options that allow them to pay smaller monthly payments for a lengthier timeline. How long it takes a dental graduate to repay their debt depends on whether they choose standard, 10-year repayment or opt for an alternative repayment plan instead.

Is dental school right for you?

Part II: How to Pay for Dental School

If you answered “yes” to all or most of the questions above, considering a dental education could be a smart move. Still, it’s important to learn more about the different ways to pay for dental education and the debt repayment options that may be available to you. We’ll cover these concepts and more in this section.

Federal vs. Private Student Loans for Dental School

Federal student loans for dental school

Federal loans can be valuable for students who need to borrow money for dental education. Several different types of student loans are available, each having their own benefits and drawbacks. Federal student loans are often a good option for dental students since they offer relatively low interest rates and help students qualify for federal perks like income-driven repayment and student loan forgiveness programs.

Pros of federal student loans:

  • Fixed and competitive interest rates
  • Access to federal loan repayment and student loan forgiveness programs
  • The government can pay your interest while you’re in college if you qualify for subsidized loans
  • Flexible repayment plans
  • Access to student loan forbearance and deferment (if you qualify)
  • You don’t need a credit check to qualify for most federal student loans
  • You can defer repayment until you graduate college or drop down to half-time

Cons of federal student loans:

  • Borrowing caps that limit the amount of federal loans you can take out
  • You may need to take out more loans to cover the costs of dental school
  • The government can garnish your wages if you miss many payments

When to consider federal student loans:

  • You are gearing up for dental school and want a low, fixed-interest rate
  • You haven’t surpassed borrowing limits on federal loans yet
  • You want options in terms of deferment, forbearance, and income-driven repayment in the future

Private student loans for dental school

Private loans offer an alternative option for dental students to use instead of, or in addition to, federal student loans. Private student loans are offered through private lenders, which means their rates and repayment terms vary. Many dental students wind up taking out private student loans once they have borrowed as much federal aid as they could receive.

Pros of private student loans:

  • Rates can be lower than federal loans if you have excellent credit and/or a co-signer
  • Loan limits can be high enough to cover your entire cost of admission
  • The application process and loan disbursement may happen faster than federal student loans

Cons of private student loans:

  • You typically need good or excellent credit to qualify
  • You may need a co-signer
  • Interest rates can be fixed or variable
  • You don’t qualify for federal student loan forgiveness, income-driven repayment, or federally sponsored deferment or forbearance
  • You may need to make payments or pay interest while still in school

When to consider private loans:

  • You’ve tapped out your federal student loan limits but still need to borrow money
  • You qualify for a lower interest rate
  • You don’t want to take advantage of federal plans or protections on your student loans

Grants & fellowships for dental students

The Dr. Ray Bowen Student Research Award is a financial award open to dental students who seek to “undertake novel research relevant to contemporary operative dentistry.”

  • Award amount: The award provides up to $6,000 for research and up to $1,000 to defray the costs of attending a conference to accept the award.
  • Qualifications: This is open to all dental students considering research.
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: The award is offered every other year, with the next application period opening in mid-2018.

This program is offered through the Dr. Anthony Volpe Research Center and is open to 1-2 dental students per year. The goal is to help students apply classroom and lab experiences to real-world scenarios students will find in the field of dentistry.

  • Award amount: Award varies.
  • Qualifications: You must be a dental student to qualify.
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: Application period opens in late December and closes in late January.

This award was created to encourage dental students to conduct important research in their field by creating a financial incentive. The goal of the award is to promote advances in preventative dentistry.

  • Award amount: A $5,000 grant is awarded to one student each year.
  • Qualifications: According to the American Dental Association Foundation, dental students pursuing this grant must be in pursuit of one of the following dental degree programs at an eligible institution: D.D.S. or D.M.D., D.D.S./D.M.D. and Ph.D. dual degree, Ph.D. or equivalent, or M.P.H., M.S. or equivalent.
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: The application period opens the first Friday of each April and closes the last Friday of each June.

The Intel International Science and Engineering Fair Special Awards is a partnership between the Society for Science & the Public and the Intel Foundation. Students in high school can win a variety of prizes including scholarships, summer internships, equipment grants, and educational trips.

  • Award amount: Cash prizes total $3,500 for outstanding projects related to dentistry and oral health. The American Dental Association Foundation sponsors these awards.
  • Qualifications: The award is open to any student presenting at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair.
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: Winners are selected among those who present at the fair.

Scholarships for dental students

This ADA Foundation scholarship helps select students defray the overwhelming costs of dental education and is meant to apply to academically gifted students.

  • Award amount: Scholarships up to $2,500 are available.
  • Qualifications: Students must be in their second year of school, must be enrolled full time, must demonstrate financial need, and must have a GPA of at least 3.25. References and minority status are also required.
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: Applications open the first Friday in September and close the second Friday in November.

This program offers two $5,000 awards to dental students who are nominated by someone else after demonstrating leadership skills in pursuit of their dental education.

  • Award amount: Two $5,000 awards are granted each year.
  • Qualifications: Students must be nominated and be in the process of earning a D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree from a dental school accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation. Students must also be under the age of 40 and a student, graduate student, or resident in their first five years of residency.
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: The nomination period begins the first Friday in April and ends the last Friday in June.

This scholarship is open to 27 dental students nominated by the dean of their school.

  • Award amount: Awards come in the form of $5,000 scholarships.
  • Qualifications: Students must be nominated by the dean of their school and must be in the class of 2018 or class of 2019 at a dental school accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation. Students must also demonstrate financial need.
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: The deadline to apply for a 2017 scholarship was May 17, 2017. A 2018 deadline will be announced soon.

The TYLENOL Future Care Scholarship is open to U.S. students who are actively seeking a degree that will help them treat patients.

  • Award amount: Scholarships are awarded in both $5,000 and $10,000 amounts.
  • Qualifications: Students must be in pursuit of a degree that leads to a career treating patients. Students must also have at least one year left in school.
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: The application period opens in May and ends at the end of June for the following school year.

This scholarship, which was created to commemorate Senator Barry Goldwater, is open to students who pursue research careers in natural sciences, mathematics, and engineering.

  • Award amount: Scholarships of up to $7,500 per year are available.
  • Qualifications: You must be a full-time sophomore or junior student pursuing a dental degree or a degree at a four-year or two-year school. Medical research must be a central part of your career goals.
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: Application period opens the first Tuesday in September and ends the last Friday in January.

Part III: How to Pay Back Dental School Debt

Due to the many federal and private loan programs available, students entering dental school have plenty of options to compare and contrast. Since dental school funds borrowed need to be repaid eventually, however, it’s important for students to educate themselves on their many repayment options as well.

Repayment programs to consider

Here are the repayment programs students can choose as they wrap up their dental degrees.

Income-Driven Repayment Plans

For federal student loan borrowers, there are several different income-driven repayment programs, each with their own stipulations and intended audience. The following table highlights each program and how it works.

Is an income-driven repayment plan right for you?

Income-driven repayment may be a good option for dental students who want to make lower monthly payments than they would with standard, 10-year repayment plans. These plans are also a good option for students who want their loans forgiven after 20-25 years. Keep in mind, however, that forgiven loan amounts are considered taxable income in the year they are forgiven.

How to apply

Apply for income-driven repayment programs using the U.S. Department of Education website.

Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program

The Public Service Loan Forgiveness Plan offers students the opportunity to have their student loans forgiven after 10 years provided they work in an approved public service position during that time. Once a student finds eligible employment and starts working, they can have their loans forgiven after 10 years and 120 months of timely loan payments.

While this program can be advantageous for dental graduates, it’s important to note that changes to this program could be on the way. It still works as promised for the time being, but budget cuts of the future could bring this program to an end or bring on considerable changes to benefits.

Who is eligible?

Dentists who agree to work in government-approved public service positions may be eligible for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program. You can learn more about qualifying employment here.

Is this program right for you?

This program can work well for dentists who want to work in public service or in an area with a high need for dentists and other health care workers. After 10 years, your loan balances will be forgiven, and you are free to move on to other employment if you wish.

How to apply

Fill out an application for PSLF with the U.S. Department of Education as soon as you can.

Army Dental Corps Program

This program offers tuition assistance up to 100% for individuals who serve in the U.S. Army while working on their degree. The Army will pay your tuition, your required books, and most academic fees while offering a monthly stipend of up to $2,000.

Who is eligible?

Dental students who qualify to serve in the U.S. Army may qualify for this program. You must be 21-42 years of age, be a U.S. citizen, and meet prescribed medical standards.

How to apply

For additional information, contact your local Army recruiter, call 1-800-USA-Army, or visit Healthcare.GoArmy.com.

National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment Program

This program offers tax-free loan repayment assistance for individuals entering qualified health care careers. Licensed health care providers may earn up to $50,000 for a two-year commitment to NHSC-approved employment in a high-need area.

Who is eligible?

Dentists who agree to work in an NHSC-approved career for at least two years can qualify for this assistance.

How to apply

Contact the National Health Service Corps to apply. You can also explore the NHSC website for tips on the application process.

State Loan Repayment Programs for Dentists

5 tips to pay off your student loans faster

While loan repayment programs can help you whittle away your student loans, there are several strategies that can help you reduce the amounts you owe whether you sign up for special programs or not. Here are five tips to pay your loans off faster no matter your situation or how much you owe:

#1: Start paying right away.

According to the U.S. Department of Education’s blog, paying your loans right away – whether you have to or not – can be a smart move. While student loan payments may not be required until you graduate, you can reduce the amount of interest you’ll pay over time by paying any amounts you can toward your loans as you can.

#2: Refinance your loans to a lower rate.

Refinancing student loans into a new loan product with a lower interest rate and better terms can help you save money on interest over the long haul. This is especially true with private student loans since rates tend to be competitive and can change over time. Keep in mind, however, that refinancing federal student loans with a private lender can cause you to miss out on certain federal perks and protections including income-driven repayment, deferment, or forbearance.

Here are a few student loan refinancing companies that can help:

Signing up for automatically debited payments can take the stress out of repaying your student loans. By setting up automatic bank drafts, you can rest assured your loan payment is taken care of and you won’t face late fees or penalties. Some lenders also offer an interest rate reduction for enrolling in their automatic payment plan. This is where savings come into play since a lower interest rate means less of your payment goes toward interest over time.

#3: Sign up for automatic payments.

Signing up for automatically debited payments can take the stress out of repaying your student loans. By setting up automatic bank drafts, you can rest assured your loan payment is taken care of and you won’t face late fees or penalties. Some lenders also offer an interest rate reduction for enrolling in their automatic payment plan. This is where savings come into play since a lower interest rate means less of your payment goes toward interest over time.

#4: Pay more than the minimum payment.

This tip might seem obvious, but it’s extremely important. Whether you start paying your loans off right away or wait until you graduate and have to start making payments, paying more than the minimum will let you pay off your loans faster. The more you can pay toward the principal of your loan balance, the more you save on interest and the faster your loans will disappear.

#5: Consider a loan repayment program.

Some of the programs we listed above (such as the PSLF Plan or state loan repayment assistance programs) can help you get out of debt faster while gaining valuable work experience. These programs typically require you to work in a specific shortage area for a predetermined length of time, so they’re not for everyone. If you do qualify and apply, however, you could have your loans forgiven completely or earn tens of thousands of dollars in loan repayment assistance.

Frequently Asked Questions: Paying for Dental School

Determine your current interest rate and compare it to the new rate you could qualify for. If the difference is substantial, refinancing can make a lot of financial sense. With a lower interest rate, you could save money and pay off your debts faster. However, it’s important to remember that you’ll lose federal student loan benefits if you refinance federal loans with a private lender.

The amount you’ll save depends on the amount you owe, your old interest rate, and your new rate and loan terms. A student loan calculator can give you a general idea of your savings.

One of the best ways to reduce the amount of money you owe for dental school is to spend less on your education to begin with. As you consider dental schools, make sure to compare program details such as the price of tuition, room, and board. How much you pay for school has a direct correlation to how much you’ll need to borrow.

Start by filling out a FAFSA form, or Free Application for Federal Student Aid. This form helps schools determine how much federal aid you might qualify for. You should also contact the financial aid office at your dental school. They can point you toward applicable school-based scholarships and grants you may not even know about.

While the amount of time it takes dental students to find employment varies, the ADEA reports that dental school graduates typically enter the workforce much faster than colleagues in many other health professions.

According to the ADEA, any college major that offers a well-rounded education or fosters a foundation in science is appropriate for future dental students. This goes against the common wisdom that a major in biology or a similar subject is required.

The ADEA reports that both designations mean the same thing – that the dentist graduated from an accredited dental school. Universities determine which degree they award, and it has no bearing on employment opportunity or earnings.

Holly Johnson
Holly Johnson |

Holly Johnson is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Holly here

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With the Fate of Public Service Loan Forgiveness Uncertain, Here are Tips for Confused Borrowers

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: iStock

More than half a million Americans are working toward Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF), a program that eliminates federal student loan debt for people with jobs in the public sector. But the proposed 2018 White House budget reportedly calls for ending PSLF for future borrowers — and even current participants’ status could be in doubt, with a lawsuit claiming the government has reversed previous assurances given to certain borrowers that their employment qualifies.

Final decisions have not yet been made in either scenario. But even with this uncertainty, there are steps both current borrowers and interested potential future PSLF participants can take to make themselves as secure as possible.

First, a quick primer on PSLF: The program began in October 2007 under George W. Bush, and it wipes clean the remaining federal student debt for qualifying borrowers who have made 120 payments, or 10 years’ worth (more information is available at StudentAid.gov/publicservice). So the earliest any public service worker could receive loan forgiveness under PSLF is October 2017.

“The idea is to avoid making debt a disincentive to choosing public service,” explains Mark Kantrowitz, a student loan expert and publisher at college scholarship site Cappex.com. “Think about a public defender. They might make $40,000 a year, but they’ll incur $120,000 in debt for law school. That debt-to-income ratio is impossible, so PSLF makes that career path possible — and attracts people who might have otherwise taken high-paying private-sector jobs.”

Public Service Loan Forgiveness — on the chopping block?

At this time, the biggest threat to the future of PSLF is President Donald Trump’s 2018 White House education budget proposal. The budget proposal would eliminate PSLF — citing costs — and replace all current income-based repayment/forgiveness plans with a single income-driven system. While existing borrowers would be grandfathered into PSLF, any new students who take out their first federal loans on or after July 1, 2018, would not qualify. Still, all of this can happen only if Congress passes the budget — and it remains to be seen whether this section will pass as currently written in the proposal.

If you’re one of the more than 550,000 borrowers who is already working toward forgiveness — that is, you have already taken out at least one federal loan and/or you’ve completed school and are working in public service — the proposed cancellation of PSLF won’t affect you. Again, if the program is cut, it will impact only students who take out their first federal loans on or after July 1, 2018.

But even existing borrowers working toward PSLF can’t fully relax. As first reported by The New York Times, the Department of Education added a serious wrinkle by sending letters to people saying their employment was no longer eligible for PSLF, after the borrowers had confirmed with their loan servicer that they qualified. Four borrowers and the American Bar Association have filed a lawsuit against the department, and the case is currently in progress.

That may leave many workers questioning whether or not they will ultimately be eligible for loan forgiveness after all — even if they work in the nonprofit or public sector. MagnifyMoney has spoken to experts and reviewed the rules of the program to help.

How Can I Be Sure I Qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness?

Qualifying for PSLF depends on meeting several specific requirements, so the first step in determining your eligibility is to make sure your loans and employment check all the boxes.

1. Your student loan must qualify for forgiveness.

PSLF provides forgiveness only for federal Direct Loans:

  • Direct Subsidized Loans
  • Direct Unsubsidized Loans
  • Direct PLUS Loans—for parents and graduate or professional students
  • Direct Consolidation Loans

Note that loans made under other federal student loan programs may become eligible for PSLF if they’re consolidated into a Direct Consolidation Loan, but only payments toward that consolidated loan will count toward the 120-payment requirement. And, according to ED, parents who borrowed a Direct PLUS Loan “may qualify for forgiveness of the PLUS loan, if the parent borrower—not the student on whose behalf the loan was obtained—is employed by a public service organization.”

2. You must be enrolled in the right type of repayment plan.

You must be enrolled in one of the Direct Loan repayment plans, some of which are income-based. The umbrella term for these plans is income-driven repayment plans, which include the Pay As You Earn and Income-Based Repayment plans. While payments under other types of Direct Loan plans, like the 10-year Standard Repayment Plan, do qualify and count toward your 120 payments, you’ll want to switch to an income-driven plan as soon as possible — because if you stick with a standard 10-year repayment, you’ll have paid off your loan in full after 10 years with nothing left to be forgiven under PSLF. Check the official PSLF site for more details. And note that private loans, including bank loans that are “federally guaranteed,” do not qualify.

3. You must make 120 on-time payments while employed full time by an eligible employer.

If you drop to part-time work, those payments won’t qualify. You must also be employed full time in public service at the time you apply for loan forgiveness and at the time the remaining balance on your eligible loans is forgiven. After you make your 120th payment you’ll need to submit the forgiveness application, which the Department of Education says will be available in September 2017.

4. Your employer must count as a public service organization.

This is the big one, and the most complicated step of the process for some borrowers to figure out. While the Education Department does address types of employers that fit under the PSLF program, there are some gray areas. Broadly, the types of employers that qualify include governmental groups, not-for-profit tax-exempt organizations known as 501(c)(3)s, and private not-for-profits. That last category includes military; public safety, health, education, and library services; and more.

Pro tip: Certify that your employer is included in the program every year.

Each year and whenever you change employers, you should fill out and send an Employment Certification form to FedLoan Servicing. The form isn’t required to be submitted on an annual basis, but it’s highly recommended to fill it out annually so there are no unhappy surprises down the road. It also helps you keep track of progress toward your 120 payments and gives you a chance to find out whether there is any change to your eligibility status.

What if you fear your job’s eligibility is unclear?

The validity of that FedLoan Servicing certification form is at the center of the lawsuit against the Department of Education. Although it’s important to have your employer’s eligibility certified by the department, the Education Department has said the form isn’t necessarily binding and the eligibility of employers can possibly change. As The New York Times put it, the department’s position implies “that borrowers could not rely on the program’s administrator to say accurately whether they qualify for debt forgiveness. The thousands of approval letters that have been sent … are not binding and can be rescinded at any time, the [DOE] said.”

That puts existing borrowers in a tough spot, says Joseph Orsolini, CFP and president of College Aid Planners: “[PSLF] is sort of an all-or-nothing in that you can’t apply for the forgiveness until you’ve already done your 120 payments. So to have someone choose this career path and work for years only to be told, ‘never mind, you no longer qualify even though we said you did,’ it would be hard for them not to see that as reneging on a deal.”

That possibility is “terrifying” for Frances Harrell, 35, a preservation specialist who works for a nonprofit that supports small and medium-size libraries in caring for their collections. She completed a library graduate school program in 2013 and emerged with a total of about $125,000 in debt, including her undergraduate loans.

“Everyone I know is in public service, and we all saw the Times article [about the PSLF lawsuit] and flipped out,” says Harrell, who currently lives in Gainesville, Fla. “I felt like I had been dropped in a bucket of ice. We’re making life decisions based on this understanding, and it feels so precarious not to have any true confirmation that we’ll get the forgiveness in the end.”

Christopher Razo, 22, who this month will begin classes at Chicago’s John Marshall Law School, plans to take advantage of PSLF while working toward his dream of becoming a state attorney. (Photo courtesy of Christopher Razo)

Harrell has also dealt with confusion from loan servicers and other experts — and based on incorrect advice, she nearly consolidated her loans in a way that would have reset the clock on her years of payments.

Christopher Razo, 22, who this month will begin classes at Chicago’s John Marshall Law School, is relieved that he is enrolling before the 2018 uncertainty begins. Razo is one of Orsolini’s clients, and he plans to take advantage of PSLF while working toward his dream of becoming a state attorney.

“[PSLF] is complex as it is, so my initial thought was, ‘Wow, great timing for me that I’m starting in 2017,’” Razo says. “But I understand the program affects way more than just me. [PSLF] gives you comfort to pursue public-service goals without having to make your employment about the money. I’m optimistic that [lawmakers] will see the good in the program so it can continue.”

When in doubt: Follow the ‘3 phone call rule’

While borrowers may think their loan servicer has all of the answers, Harrell’s situation isn’t uncommon, says Orsolini. He recommends “the three phone call rule”: Call three times and ask the same question, documenting whom you spoke to and when.

“These programs are complicated — which is one of the issues that critics [of PSLF] bring up — and you don’t always get the right information,” Orsolini says. “Before you plan your whole life around the [first] answer you get, you have to double- and triple-check that it’s right.”

If you’re taking out your first qualifying loan on or after July 1, 2018, Orsolini says “there’s not much to do besides hurry up and wait” to see what happens with the White House budget as it relates to PSLF.

“The important thing to remember is that a proposal is just a proposal, and these don’t always see the light of day,” Orsolini adds. “It doesn’t do any good to be overly worried, but you’ll want to keep a close eye on the news.”

Other types of loan forgiveness, cancellation, or discharge:

PSLF isn’t the only option. But not all types of federal student loans offer the same forgiveness, cancellation, or discharge options. See the chart below and check out StudentEd.gov pages here and here for more details.

Still, borrowers should know Trump’s desire to streamline federal programs into a single option means some of these loan types and forgiveness plans could be changed or canceled as well.

Julianne Pepitone
Julianne Pepitone |

Julianne Pepitone is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Julianne here

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How to Master the College Enrollment Process and Beat ‘Summer Melt’

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

As many as 40 percent of college-bound students never make to campus their freshman year thanks to a phenomenon called “Summer Melt.” The term was coined by researcher Karen Arnold in 2009 to describe what happens when high school seniors get accepted into postsecondary institutions but still fail to enroll.

Students susceptible to summer melt, many of whom are often low-income and first generation college students, may get stuck on one or more of the steps required to complete enrollment. These steps can be as simple as filling out housing applications, taking placement tests and attending summer orientation — but the most common culprit behind summer melt is the financial aid process.

“A lot of the reason why students struggle over the summer is wrapped up in the process of accessing financial aid and following through with the financial aid that they are offered,” says researcher Lindsay Page , who co-authored the book, “Summer Melt: Supporting Low-Income Students Through the Transition to College”.

Making a mistake on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, or missing important financial aid deadlines could mean little or no scholarship or grant money for at-risk low-income students, who may not be able to attend attend school without the aid.

Here are a few steps students and their families can take to make sure they don’t fall prey to summer melt.

Reach out to school counselors and nonprofits for help

Dejah Morales, 19, could easily have fallen into the summer melt trap. As a first generation college student, the East Boston, Mass. teen told MagnifyMoney she wasn’t sure how to navigate the college matriculation process. But rather than giving up, she sought help from nonprofit organizations with experts on hand to guide her.

“I wanted to go find help because I knew all of the paperwork that is filled out needs to be done correctly because it affects how much [money] you get for financial aid and anything that has to do with you living on campus,” Morales said.

She started by contacting her high school college admissions counselor, who turned her on to a program offered by Bottom Line, a Boston, Mass.-based nonprofit that helps low-income and first-generation students get through the college application process and provides additional support when students are in school. Bottom Line made sure she correctly completed the application process in order to become a student. The nonprofit also has offices in Chicago, New York City, and Worcester, Mass.

For first generation college students like Dejah Morales, 19, (pictured above) getting accepted to college is only half the battle. Completing the enrollment process is the next hurdle. Photo courtesy of Dejah Morales.

When it came to sorting outout the nitty-gritty details of securing financial aid, Dejah turned again to her high school’s resources. All Boston-area high schools are staffed with a counselor from uAspire, a nonprofit that helps college-bound students get the information and resources they need to complete the college admissions and financial aid process.

“Submitting your actual [income verification] paperwork to the school was the hard part. And then having to get my parents tax information was always a struggle especially my dad since he wasn’t living with me,” says Morales. The uAspire counselor assisted her through the entire process.

Even if your school doesn’t have dedicated college counselors on staff, there are many free programs dedicated to helping students navigate the college financial aid process. Check out national non-profits like the College Goal Sunday Program hosted by the National College Action Network, or Reach4Succes. Also, students and families can contact their school counselor’s office for access to local resources.

Know your national AND state FAFSA deadlines — and submit your forms early

In order to get access to financial aid — that includes federal grants like the Pell grant and federal student loans — students and families absolutely MUST fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

That’s why it is so crucial to stay on top of deadlines to submit your FAFSA. If you miss the deadline, your options for financing school become incredibly limited.

Check out our guide on how to get through the FAFSA smoothly >

What’s more, federal grants and scholarships — ‘free’ money for school that you don’t have to pay back — are typically doled out on a first come, first serve basis. That means the later you wait to submit the FAFSA application, the less likely those funds will be available to you — even if you qualify for the aid.

There are two deadlines to keep in mind: the national FAFSA deadline and your state FAFSA deadlines.

State FAFSA Deadlines:

Your state may have set a different FAFSA submission deadline to qualify for state-specific aid. Check here to find your state’s deadline.

Get your parents on board early

Joe Orsolini, CFP and founder of College Aid Planners, says the majority of financial aid issues he sees occur just weeks before the fall semester begins are a result of parents not getting involved early on. Even small mistakes, like entering an incorrect social security number or miscalculating a parent’s income, could mean delays in receiving aid.

“The parents never really sat down with the kid and asked, ‘Hey. where is the rest of this money coming from?’” says Orsolini.

You’ll need to have important documents like your parent’s taxes and income from the past two years and your social security number on hand to complete the FAFSA form. Those can be difficult to get hold of when you don’t live with one or both your parents or if your parents don’t fully understand what they are being asked to provide.

Easy mistakes that can throw off your FAFSA submission

Incomplete e-signature. The FAFSA can also trip you up on seemingly-easy steps, like providing an e-signature. If you don’t provide the e-signature correctly, or think you hit ‘submit’ but didn’t, you may waste valuable time waiting for an email that won’t come until you sign the form properly.

Missing mistakes on your Student Aid Report. About two weeks after you submit the form, you should receive a Student Aid Report which gives you basic information about your eligibility for federal student aid along with your Expected Family Contribution – what your family is expected to pay. The SAR also includes a four-digit Data Release Number (DRN), which you’ll need to allow your school to change certain information on your FAFSA.The SAR also lists your responses to the questions on your FAFSA, so be sure to review it and correct any mistakes.

Income verification notifications. After you receive your SAR, check to see if you’ve been flagged for ‘income verification’ as about 1/3 of students are required to verify their parent’s income with additional proof to complete the FAFSA process. The government usually follows up on students who are more likely to qualify for the federal Pell grant or other grant-based aid, Page says. If flagged for income verification, you’ll have to submit verification to each school you apply to, and the schools may have different paperwork and processes.

Missing deadlines in e-mail. When you create and submit the FAFSA, you give the Education Department your email address. The Education Department will email you, so you need to check the inbox of the email address you provided for correspondence. Create your FAFSA account using an email account you check regularly. Turn on your email notifications on your devices so you won’t miss any emails reminding you to submit your FAFSA form or letting you know if something went wrong somewhere in the process.

Formally accept your financial aid awards

After submitting your FAFSA, you will receive a student aid award letter from your college. But your work isn’t done there. You’ll have to sign online to officially accept the aid (student loans, grants, work-study programs, etc). Typically, that will be facilitated through your college’s website.

If you applied for federal work-study, this is when you’ll decide if accepting it is best for your circumstances. Work with a financial aid counselor at the college if you need help weighing the pros and cons of accepting or denying any aid you’ve been offered.

Don’t forget to sign your Master Promissory Note. In order to receive federal student loans, you must sign a Master Promissory Note. The MPN is a legal document you must sign saying you promise to repay your loan(s) and any accrued interest and fees to the U.S. Department of Education. If you miss this final step, you won’t actually get any of the federal loans you’ve been assigned.

Log into your school’s student portal ASAP

Income freshman likely have access to a student portal provided by their college or university. There, you’ll likely find a checklist of important steps to complete before you can officially enroll.

The list may include important financial aid actions like accepting grants and scholarships or signing your Master Promissory Note.

Contact your school’s financial aid counselors early

If you’re not sure what your next steps should be in the financial aid process, you should reach out to the school you’re planning to attend. Call or send an email to the financial aid or admissions offices at your school if you are concerned about receiving the aid you need or get stuck completing all of the steps in the process.

In the future, your college may be the one reaching out to you first, as Georgia State University did with it’s Fall 2016 freshman class. The school experimented using a “chatbot” to send a control group of incoming freshmen alerts about the enrollment process.

The chatbot ‘nudged’ students to remind them of things they needed to do, like signing their MPN, or accepting scholarships, but it could also respond to students’ questions or help them get in contact with a human if asked or if it couldn’t answer the question.

“We saw our melt rate drop from 18% to 14%,” says Scott Burke, the school’s’ Associate Vice President and Director of Undergraduate Admissions. “That was 300 more students in our freshman class in fall 2016 than in fall 2015.”

Don’t forget your high school resources

Like Morales, high school seniors can still ask their high school counselors for help after they’ve graduated. Don’t hesitate to reach out with questions you may have about your transcripts or other parts of the financial aid process.

High school counselors, like Morales’ uAspire counselor, are usually equipped to answer many of the questions you may have about the financial aid process or with the FAFSA, but they may not be able to answer more college-specific questions. For example, your high school counselor could help you navigate your way through Loan Entrance Counseling, but may not be able to explain the process you need to go through to accept any awarded scholarships or grants from the university.

If a high school counselor can’t answer your questions, they generally direct you to the proper entity or person who can.

Brittney Laryea
Brittney Laryea |

Brittney Laryea is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brittney at brittney@magnifymoney.com

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LendKey Student Loan Refinance Review

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

LendKey Student Loan Refinance Review

Updated August 8, 2017

Could you imagine trying to find the best student loan refinancing rate from community banks and credit unions on your own? How would you do it? Would you call every bank and credit union and ask for help? What a nightmare.

LendKey has relationships with 300+ community banks and credit unions all over the United States. LendKey* can issue loans to residents in any of the 50 states. This keeps you from having to pound the pavement by your lonesome. LendKey’s website will show you the best rate for refinancing your student loans.

Since 2007, LendKey has been a one stop shop for student loan refinancing. It also offers other types of loans. But for the sake of this review we’ll be focusing on how LendKey takes care of graduates looking to improve their debt situation. Fixed APRs range from 3.25% – 7.26%. Variable rates start as low as 2.67%. (All of these rates include the auto-pay discount). LendKey is one of the top four lenders in MagnifyMoney’s survey of where to refinance your student loan.

Who can benefit from using LendKey? Anyone hoping to refinance their student loans should consider LendKey. It is easy to apply:

If you’re on the fence about refinancing, here are some of the benefits to be gained:

Lower Payments

Refinance your way to a more manageable monthly payment.

Lower Rates

Spend less on interest by getting a lower rate than the aggregate of all individual student loans.

Simplified Finances

Making payments on multiple loans to multiple institutions at different times of the month can be quite the hassle. It’s much easier to remember just one payment. Many lenders even let you consolidate both private and federal loans.

Different Repayment Options

Different lenders offer different repayment options. It’s wise to explore all the options to determine what makes the most sense for your particular situation.

Pros of Using LendKey

A Unified Application Process

This is hugely important. With LendKey, you’re not shuffled through tons of screens on different domains – all using different logons and different (confusing!) user interfaces. Within 5 minutes, a person can navigate through LendKey’s application process. This means after 5 minutes, you can see how much you can save by refinancing. You can even choose what loan you want.

Cosigner Release Available

Yes, you can secure a low interest rate and then cut loose your cosigner. Once you prove you are responsible – LendKey no longer needs a cosigner tied to your account. This may help convince a cosigner to work with you initially. They won’t need to be on the hook for long. Once you’ve made 12 full and consecutive on-time payments, your cosigner may be released. LendKey does a credit check and examines your income to see if you are free to go it alone.

No Origination Fee

This is helpful since it means you are free to shop around without feeling committed.

Further Interest Rate Reduction

1% interest rate reduction once 10% of the loan principal is repaid during the full repayment period. This is subject to the floor rate.

0.25% ACH Interest Rate Reduction

Many lenders reduce interest rates by a quarter percent for borrowers who agree to automatic payments.

Federal and Private Loans Can Be Consolidated Together

However, you lose some federal benefits in doing so. Things like free insurance (provided with federal loans if you are killed or severely disabled), public service forgiveness and military service forgiveness as well as income-based repayment plans. Grace periods will likely be omitted when writing the new consolidated loan.

Over 40,000 Borrowers Serviced

As of January 2016, 40,000 people have used LendKey’s services.

Excellent Customer Support

According to cuStudentLoans (which LendKey owns so take this with a grain of salt), 97% of customers are satisfied. Customer support comes out of New York and Ohio. Phone support is available each day from 9AM to 8PM EST.

For what it’s worth, I called into support 5 times at random. The support I received from the sales team was really great. Even the gentleman with only 6 months of experience was quite knowledgeable.

Eligible Schools

This list of eligible schools is 2,200 and growing. Chances are your school is on the list. However, LendKey doesn’t encourage students to submit eligibility requests as other student loan refinancers do.

Return Policy

Yes, you can ‘return’ your loan. LendKey offers a 30 day no-fee return policy to allow you to cancel the loan within 30 days of disbursement without fees or interest. That’s pretty incredible.

Cons

LendKey Doesn’t Give You the Complete Picture

LendKey doesn’t help a lot with stacking institutions against each other. I suppose this is meant to not to play favorites. However, it would be nice to be able to read about each institution within the LendKey interface. I’d still advise opening up another tab to research the banks you are considering.

The Fine Print You May Miss

Since LendKey is a loan matchmaker, there isn’t a lot of fine print on the site. This means a person still needs to review the fine print of each institution before finalizing his or her loan as mentioned before. LendKey does a fantastic job of getting you 90% of the way. But that last 10% of fine print is between you and your lending institution. Read through everything before signing up for a new loan.

I read the Better Business Bureau complaint log for LendKey. There are only 11 complaints in the past 3 years. SoFi (a competitor) has 18 and another competitor, Earnest, has no complaints. These complaints were mostly small misunderstandings between the LendKey support team and the borrowers.

The Application Process

There are four steps to the simple application process. Step 1 is for estimating monthly payments for a private student loan. It’s simple. You identify the amount you’d like to borrow and fill in a radio button indicating your credit is fair, good, or excellent. The last part is where you enter which state you live in. This is because many programs are state specific. Step 1 takes 1 minute.

Step 2 takes 2 minutes. This is the step where you compare the rates and offers available to you. Choose what works best for your unique situation.

Step 3 again only takes 1 minute. This is the actual application. As mentioned earlier in this article, this process is done through the LendKey interface. And don’t worry, information inputted into LendKey is safe (privacy policy).

Step 4 takes 10 minutes. This is the step where a person verifies identity, school, and income (screenshots/pictures work so there’s no hassle with scanning!). You will know if you are approved during this step.

As with any company, there are competitors. Here are two worthy rivals also worth considering:

Alternatives to LendKey

SoFi

SoFi stands out with a job placement programs, free wealth management for borrowers and even a dating app. More importantly, SoFi has low interest rates, with variable rates starting at 2.815% and fixed rates starting at 3.35%.

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Earnest

If you have a low credit score but have potential to earn a good income, Earnest will treat you well. Earnest looks beyond a simple credit score. The application process examines employment history, future earning potential and overall financial situation.

Earnest seems to take a very personal approach to each customer. A customer states an amount they can pay each month and Earnest will give them a loan, accordingly. Earnest also lets borrowers skip a payment each year. This could come in handy if money gets tight around the holidays. Just keep in mind, this can increase your future payments to compensate for the missed on.

Fixed interest rates start at 3.35% and variable interest rates start at 2.81%.

However, Earnest isn’t available for all US residents.

Final Thoughts

LendKey runs a fantastic student loan refinancing division. The company offers many, many customizable options with very few downsides. With no application fee, it’s worth seeing what this student loan refinancing powerhouse can do for you.

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Will Lipovsky
Will Lipovsky |

Will Lipovsky is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Will at will@magnifymoney.com

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College Students and Recent Grads

Sallie Mae Graduate School Loans vs. Direct PLUS Loans

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Taking out a federal Direct PLUS Loan for grad school may not be a bad idea if you need to borrow money for your education. Federal repayment options such as Income-Based Repayment, Revised Pay As You Earn, and Public Service Loan Forgiveness can make Direct PLUS Loans an attractive option for student borrowers.

However, these loans currently come with a high interest rate of 7%. On top of that, you will have to pay an origination fee between 4.264% and 4.267% just to take out the loan in the first place.

Recently, Sallie Mae put a new line of loans on the market that may outperform what is available to grad students through the federal government. While there are some negatives, like not qualifying for the aforementioned repayment programs, there are some major positives, like no origination fees and potentially lower interest rates, which could save students a lot of money over the long haul.

In this review, we’ll see how Sallie Mae grad school loans compare to federal Direct PLUS loans.

Sallie Mae vs. Direct PLUS Loan

Sallie Mae’s recent releases include three classes of loans: one for MBA programs, one for dental and medical school students, and a separate loan program for other health care professionals.

In order to qualify for any one of these loan programs, you must be enrolled in a program at a degree-granting institution with the intent of getting a degree. These loans are not for certificate programs or continuing education.

It is worth noting that you do not have to be enrolled half-time to qualify, which differs from the standards for federal PLUS loans.

Interest rates and terms

With any one of these loans, you can borrow between $1,000 and the maximum your school charges for your degree — as long as you qualify either on your own or with a co-signer. Interest rates and loan terms will vary depending on which loan you take out, though.

In the table below, we’ve compared rates for Sallie Mae’s grad school loans against the current rates for the Direct PLUS Loan program.

Keep in mind that variable rates may be lower at first, but have the potential to change significantly over the course of repayment. Fixed rates, on the other hand, tend to start out higher, but will stay stable and predictable for the course of your loan.

None of the loans come with origination fees, and you can pay them off early without incurring a penalty.

3 options to repay your Sallie Mae grad school loan

When you take out any one of these three loans, you can pick how you’ll repay. You have three options:

  1. Deferred Repayment. With this option, you make zero payments while you’re in school and during the six months following graduation — the time frame known as the “grace period.” While it’s nice that you won’t have to shell out any money while you’re focused on your studies, you will accrue interest to be paid later. This option also gives you the highest interest rate of the three options.
  2. Fixed Repayment. Maybe you can’t afford to make full monthly payments while you’re in school, but you can afford to throw a little bit of money at the interest. During your education and grace period, you’ll make nominal, interest-only payments. You will still have back interest applied to your account when your grace period is over, but the amount will be less than if you chose the Deferred Repayment plan.
  3. Interest Repayment. When you choose this plan, you’ll get the lowest interest rate that your credit history and income qualify you for, but you’ll have to make full, interest-only payments while you’re in school through your grace period. After that, you’ll start making interest-plus-principal payments just like the other two options, but your payments will be smaller as there won’t be any back interest to tack on.

Graduated Repayment Period

Worried that you’ll struggle to find a job immediately after graduation? Sallie Mae does offer a principal deferment option called Graduated Repayment Period. For the first 12 months following graduation, you have the option of making interest-only payments, but it’s not automatic. You have to opt in, and there is only a small time frame where you’ll be allowed to do so. Your monthly billing statement will alert you when you’re eligible. Start looking for the notification beginning two months before your grace period is over.

Residency and internship deferment

If you have a Dental and Medical School Loan or a Health Professions Graduate Loan, you may qualify for deferment for the entirety of your residency or internship. If you chose Deferred Repayment, you won’t have to pay anything during this time, though interest will still accrue. If you chose Fixed Repayment, you’ll continue making nominal interest payments, and if you chose Interest Repayment, you’ll continue to make full interest payments while you’re completing this necessary step.

In order to qualify for this deferment option, your residency or internship must meet one of the following three criteria:

  1. Require a bachelor’s degree.
  2. Be a supervised program that leads to a degree or certificate.
  3. Be a supervised program that is required for entry into your field.

How to qualify for a Sallie Mae grad school loan

To qualify for one of Sallie Mae’s graduate-level student loans, you must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, or be a nonresident with an American co-signer. U.S. citizens and permanent residents can use the loan to study abroad, but all studies for nonresidents must be completed in the U.S. at American institutions.

If you have any other Sallie Mae loans, you must be current on them in order to qualify. That includes not being in forbearance or deferment. You won’t meet this requirement if you’re on a modified payment plan.

Sallie Mae grad school loans vs. federal PLUS loans

Pros and cons of Sallie Mae grad school loans

This new set of graduate school loans from Sallie Mae has a lot of good things going on, but as with any financial product, there are both pros and cons.

Pros

  • You could potentially score a lower interest rate than federal PLUS loans.
  • No origination fees.
  • Ability to pay back early without penalty.
  • Quite a few options for repayment — including deferment options after graduation.
  • The 20-year repayment term on the Dental and Medical School Loan gives you a more realistic timeline for paying back your debt.
  • You can take out a loan even if you’re taking a credit-by-credit approach. Federal student loans require you to attend at least half-time.

Cons

  • There is the potential of getting an even higher interest rate than you’d find on a PLUS loan, though you’d still have no origination fees. This is most likely to impact those with a spotty credit history — especially if they opt for the Deferred Repayment option.
  • Dental and medical school students should take note that while a 20-year term is attractive, you will end up paying more over the course of your loan than if you had a shorter repayment term. Take advantage of the fact that there is no early repayment penalty, if at all possible.
  • Because these are private loans, you will not qualify for advantaged repayment options like the Department of Education’s REPAYE, IBR, or PSLF. Direct PLUS Loans do qualify for these programs.
  • The window for enrolling in Graduated Repayment is short. You may miss it if you’re not paying attention.

How to apply

You can complete the application process online. Before you start, make sure you’re armed with this information:

  • Your address
  • Your Social Security number
  • The name of your school
  • Your enrollment status
  • Your intended degree/course of study
  • How much money you want to borrow
  • Information on any other financial aid you’re receiving
  • Current employer information
  • Current salary information
  • Bank account information
  • Monthly mortgage/rent payments
  • Contact information of two personal references

If you’re a permanent resident, you’ll have to furnish some additional paperwork. Be prepared with either your Alien Registration Receipt Card, or its conditional counterpart accompanied by INS Form I-751. If you don’t have either of those, you can also furnish an unexpired foreign passport with an unexpired stamp certifying employment, or a Permanent Resident card.

If you’re a nonresident, you’ll need to provide an unexpired passport, an unexpired student visa, or an Employment Authorization card. You’ll also need all of the above bulleted information for your co-signer.

There is a separate application page for each loan type: Health Professions Graduate Loan, MBA Loan, and Dental and Medical School Loan.

Who are Sallie Mae’s new grad school loans best for?

Sallie Mae’s new student loans have an extremely targeted audience. If you’re studying in one of the specified fields, they can be a good option for you if you have a good credit history and can qualify for an interest rate lower than the one offered on PLUS loans. Just be mindful that while the repayment options are plentiful, they’re not quite as generous as some federal student loan programs that allow you to repay based on your income or even forgive a large portion of your debt after dedicating a portion of your career to public service.

Brynne Conroy
Brynne Conroy |

Brynne Conroy is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brynne at brynne@magnifymoney.com

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College Students and Recent Grads, Pay Down My Debt, Reviews

CommonBond Student Loan Refinance Loan Review

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

CommonBond Grad Student Loan Refinance Loan Review

Updated August 2, 2017

CommonBond was founded by three Wharton MBAs who felt the sting of student loans after they graduated. The founders decided to provide a better solution for graduates, as they thought the student loan system was broken and in need of reform. As a result, they strive to make the refinance (and borrowing) process as simple and straightforward for graduates as possible.

CommonBond* began by servicing students from just one school, and has rapidly expanded. Today, CommonBond loans are available to graduates of over 2,000 schools nationwide. Although the company traditionally offered loan refinancing to undergraduate and graduate students, CommonBond recently started offering loans for current students as well (both undergraduates and graduates).

CommonBond is one of the top four lenders identified by MagnifyMoney to refinance student loans.

As you might be able to tell by the name, CommonBond thinks of its community as family. There is a network of alumni and professionals within the community that want to help borrowers. This alone sets it apart from other lenders, as members often meet for events.

While these are all great things, we know you’re more interested in how CommonBond might be able to help you make your student loans more affordable. Let’s take a look at what terms and rates they offer, eligibility requirements, and how they compare against other lenders.

Refinance Terms Offered

CommonBond offers low variable and fixed rate loans. Variable rates range from 2.80% – 6.73% APR, and fixed rates range from 3.35% – 6.74% APR.

Note that these rates take a 0.25% auto pay discount into consideration.

There is no maximum loan amount. CommonBond will lend what you can afford to repay. CommonBond offers fixed and variable rates with terms of 5, 7, 10, 15, and 20 years.

The hybrid loan is only offered on a 10 year term – the first 5 years will have a fixed rate, and the 5 years after that will have a variable rate.

CommonBond has a great chart listing repayment examples based off of borrowing $10,000, which can be found on its rates and terms page.

To pull an example from that, if you borrow $10,000 at a fixed 4.74% APR on a 10 year term, your monthly payment will be $104.80. The total amount you will pay over the 10 year period will be $12,575.90.

The Pros and Cons

CommonBond is available to graduates of 2,000 universities. While that is a very long list, not all colleges and universities are included.

One pro to consider is the hybrid loan option available. It might seem a little confusing at first – why would someone want a variable rate down the road?

If you’re confident you’ll be able to make extra payments on your loan and pay it off before the 5 years are up, you might be better off going with the hybrid option (if you can get a better interest rate on it).

This is because you’ll end up paying less over the life of the loan with a lower interest rate. If you were offered a 10 year loan with a fixed rate of 6.49% APR, and a hybrid loan with a beginning rate of 5.64%, the hybrid option would be the better deal if you’re intent on paying it off quickly.

What You Need to Qualify

CommonBond doesn’t list many eligibility requirements on its website, aside from the following:

  • You must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident
  • You must have graduated

CommonBond doesn’t specify a minimum credit score needed, but based on the requirements of other lenders, we recommend having a score of 660+, though you should be aiming for 700+. The good news is CommonBond lets you apply with a cosigner in case your credit isn’t good enough.

Documents and Information Needed to Apply

CommonBond’s application process is very simple – it says it takes as little as 2 minutes to complete. Initially, you’ll be asked for basic information such as your name, address, and school.

Once you complete this part, CommonBond will perform a soft credit pull to estimate your rates and terms.

If you want to move forward with the rates and terms offered, you’ll be required to submit documentation and a hard credit inquiry will be conducted. CommonBond lists the following as required:

  • Pay stubs or tax returns (proof of employment)
  • Diploma or transcript (proof of graduation)
  • Student loan bank statement
  • ID, utility bills, lease agreement (proof of residency)

CommonBond also notes it can take up to 5 business days to verify documents submitted, so the loan doesn’t happen instantaneously.

Once your documents are approved, you electronically sign for the loan, and CommonBond will begin the process of paying off your previous lenders. It notes this can take up to two weeks from the time the loan is accepted.

Who Benefits the Most from Refinancing Student Loans with CommonBond?

Borrowers who are looking to refinance a large amount of student loan debt will benefit the most from refinancing with them.

Keeping an Eye on the Fine Print

CommonBond does not have a prepayment penalty, and there are no origination fees nor application fees associated with refinancing.

As with other lenders, there is a late payment fee. This is 5% of the unpaid amount of the payment due, or $10, whichever is less.

If a payment fails to go through, you’ll be charged a $15 fee.

It’s also noted that failure to make payments may result in the loss of the 0.25% interest rate deduction from auto pay.

Transparency Score

Getting in touch with a representative is simple and there is a chat and call option right on the homepage. Some lenders have this hidden at the bottom, or they don’t offer a chat option at all.

CommonBond also lets borrowers know they can shop around within a 30 day period to lessen the impact on their credit.

It does not list its late fees on its website, unlike other lenders. However, after making a chat inquiry, the question was answered promptly.

CommonBond does offer a cosigner release and is ranked with a A+ transparency score.

Alternative Student Loan Refinancing Lenders

The student loan refinancing market continues to get more competitive, and it makes sense to shop around for the best deal.

One of the market leaders is SoFi. It’s always worth taking a look to see if SoFi* offers a better interest rate.

The two lenders are very similar – CommonBond offers “CommonBridge,” a service that helps you find a new job in the event you lose yours. SoFi offers a similar service called Unemployment Protection.

SoFi’s variable rates are currently 2.815% – 6.740% APR with autopay, and its fixed rates are currently 3.35% – 7.125% APR, which is in line with what CommonBond is offering.

SoFi also doesn’t have a limit on how much you can refinance with them.

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Another lender to consider is Earnest. There is no maximum loan amount, and Earnest has a very slick application process. Interest rates start as low as 2.81% (variable) and 3.35% (fixed).

Lastly, you could check out LendKey. It offers student loan refinancing through credit unions and community banks, but only offers variable rates in most states and fixed rates in a select few. The maximum amount to refinance with an undergraduate degree is $125,000, and the maximum amount to refinance with a graduate degree is $175,000.

All three of these options provide forbearance in case of economic hardship and offer similar loan options (5, 10, 15 year terms).

Don’t Forget to Shop Around

As CommonBond initially conducts a soft pull on your credit, you’re free to continue to shop around for the best rates if you’re not happy with the rates it can provide. As the lender states on its website, if you apply for loans within a 30 day period, your credit won’t be affected as much.

Since CommonBond does have strict underwriting criteria, you should continue to shop around and don’t be discouraged if you are not approved. The market continues to get more competitive, and a number of good options are out there.

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Erin Millard
Erin Millard |

Erin Millard is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Erin at erinm@magnifymoney.com

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