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Credit Cards

Live Richer Challenge: The MagnifyMoney Guide to Secured Credit Cards

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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If you have a low credit score or no credit history, it can be difficult to get approved for a line of credit. One of the best ways to build up your credit score is to sign up for a secured credit card. Secured cards are a way to prove to a lender you can be responsible with credit.

How Secured Credit Cards Work

With a secured card, you have to put down a deposit with your own money. When you give the bank your deposit, they’ll issue you a line of credit that will most likely be equal to the amount you deposited. Sometimes, however, your secured card limit may be a bit higher than your deposit. Think of that deposit as collateral. If you stop making payments on your card, the bank will simply keep your deposit.

How Should I Use a Secured Card?

Your goal with the secured card is to demonstrate how responsible you can be. This will in turn improve your credit score. You should focus on (1) keeping your credit utilization low and (2) making full, on-time payments each month. Those two factors alone make up 60% of your credit score.

  • Use the secured card. If you don’t use the card, it won’t improve your score by much. Charge a small amount to the card each month and pay it off in full. Aim to carry a balance that is no more than 20% of your available credit limit. That keeps your utilization low and will in turn help your score.
  • Pay your balance in full each month. You can make sure you do this by signing up for automatic monthly payments. This also helps you avoid accruing interest by carrying a balance each month.
  • Sign up for a credit monitoring service such as Credit Karma, Discover’s credit scorecard, or another service that lets you check your report monthly, for free. You can also get a free annual credit report from all three bureaus at AnnualCreditReport.com.
  • Check your credit report monthly to make sure the bank is reporting your secured card behavior to the credit bureaus. If the bank doesn’t report your behavior to the bureaus, you’re missing out on the main benefit of having a secured card.
use secured card

How Long Until I See Results?

No matter what your reason for using a secured card, you should understand that the credit-building process will be slow. It may take a year or longer to lift your score by 100 points.

Choosing the Right Secured Card

The secured card you choose will ultimately depend on a personal assessment of your fiscal habits and a careful review of the card’s terms. Your best bet will be to look for a card with no annual fee, a low minimum deposit, and the lowest annual percentage rate (APR).

What to Watch Out For

The Interest Rate

Interest rates on secured credit cards tend to be much higher than standard credit card rates. So long as you pay your statement balance in full and on time every month, the interest rate doesn’t matter. Your goal with a secured card is to build your score over time with responsible behavior, so the interest rate shouldn’t matter.

The Deposit

Find out how much you have to put down to get the limit that you want. Sometimes the deposit is only a fraction of the card’s credit limit. If you get a card with a limit that is higher than your deposit, have a heart-to-heart with yourself to be certain that you can manage the limit responsibly.

You’d also want to know how long the bank will keep your deposit after you close the secured card as it might not give it back to you right away. Some banks will keep the deposit to cover any charges to the card for a couple of months after you close the account.

Fees and Charges

Like credit cards, secured cards can also come loaded with hidden fees and other charges. These can eat away at your security deposit and your card limit if you’re not careful. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has a great example of a credit card agreement that highlights what you should look out for. A couple of the most important items to check are if the card has an annual fee and if it has a period after which the interest rate you’re paying will increase.

Perks

Most secured credit cards don’t offer any rewards, but a few, like the Discover it® Secured Card – No Annual Fee, let you earn rewards for your purchases. You shouldn’t focus solely on the perks when choosing a card, but they are nice to have.

There are a few reasons Discover is our top recommendation. First, there is no annual fee. Second, you get to see your credit score for free. And (most importantly), Discover starts automated monthly reviews of your account after 8 months to see if you can be transitioned to an account with no security deposit. Also, if you have previously filed bankruptcy, Discover will still consider your application.

MagnifyMoney Recommends

Our top three secured card recommendations are the

Each card carries a $0 annual fee.

Use our comparison tool to find the best secured credit cards.

Transitioning from Secured Card to Credit Card

After you demonstrate dependability by making full, consistent, on-time payments for a given amount of time — usually about a year or so — your credit score should have improved greatly.
Once you are ready to move on from the secured card, you can close your account and you will be given back your security deposit.

You’ll likely be in a position at that time to apply for a regular credit card. You can apply for a regular card with the same bank that issued your secured card, but you don’t have to.

There’s a decent chance that the bank will want to keep you as a customer and may offer to upgrade your secured card to a regular credit card. But in some cases you’ll have to ask for an upgrade.

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Average Household Credit Card Debt in America: 2017 Statistics

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Even as household income and employment rates are ticking up in the U.S., credit card balances are approaching all-time highs. What’s behind the growth of credit card spending among consumers? In a new report on credit card debt in America, MagnifyMoney analyzed credit debt trends in the U.S. to find out exactly how much credit debt consumers are really taking on and, crucially, how they are managing their growing reliance on plastic.

Key Insights:

  • While credit balances are increasing, the amount of debt that households are carrying from month to month is actually much lower than it was leading up to the 2008 financial crisis. As of December 2016, households with credit card debt owed an average of $8,158, down 22.9 percent compared to October 2008, when household credit card debt peaked at $10,588.
  • Credit card balances and credit card debt are not the same thing. The 73 million Americans who pay their bill in full each month have credit card balances reported to the major credit reporting bureaus.
  • Assessing financial health means focusing on credit card debt trends rather than credit card use trends.

Credit Card Debt in the U.S. by the Numbers

Credit Card Use

Number of Americans who use credit cards: 201 million1

Average number of credit cards per consumer: 2.32

Number of Americans who carry credit card debt: 125 million3

Credit Card Debt

The following figures only include the credit card balances of those who carry credit card debt from month to month.

Total credit card debt in the U.S.: $527 billion4

Average credit card debt per person: $4,2055

Average credit card debt per household: $8,1586

Credit Card Balances

The following figures include the credit card statement balances of all credit card users, including those who pay their bill in full each month.

Total credit card balances: $784 billion as of January 2017, an increase of 7.4 percent from the previous year.7

Average balance per person: $3,9058

Who Pays Off Their Credit Card Bills?

42 percent of households pay off their credit card bills in full each month

31 percent of households carry a balance all year

27 percent of households sometimes carry a balance10

Understanding Household Credit Card Balances vs. Household Debt

At first glance, it may seem that Americans are taking on near record levels of credit debt. Forty-two percent of American households11 carry credit card debt from month to month, and, if you look at the total credit card balances among U.S. households, the figure appears astronomical — $784 billion. But that figure includes households that are paying their credit debt in full each month as well as those that are carrying a balance from month to month.

While credit balances are increasing, the amount of debt that households are carrying from month to month is actually much lower than it was leading up to the 2008 financial crisis. The total of credit card balances for households that actually carry debt from month to month is $527 billion.

As of the second quarter of 2017, households with credit card debt owed an average of $8,158.3 That is a decrease of 22.9 percent compared to October 2008, when household credit card debt peaked at $10,588.12b

And as household incomes have risen in recent years, this has helped to lower the ratio of credit card debt to income. Today, indebted households with average debt and median household incomes have a credit card debt to income ratio of 14.4 percent.13 Back in 2008, the ratio was 19.1 percent.

Per Person Credit Card Debt

Once we adjust for these effects, we see that an estimated 125 million Americans carry $527 billion of credit card debt from month to month. Back in 2008, 5 million fewer Americans carried debt, but total credit card debt in late 2008 hovered around $631 billion.16 That means people with credit card debt in 2008 had more debt than people with credit card debt today.

Average credit card debt among those who carry a balance today is $4,205 per person2 or $8,158 per household.3 Back in 2008, credit card debtors owed an average of 23.7 percent more than they do today. In late 2008, the 115 million17 Americans with credit card debt owed an average of $5,567 per person12a or $10,689 per household.12b

Delinquency Rates

Credit card debt becomes delinquent when a bank reports a missed payment to the major credit reporting bureaus. Banks typically don’t report a missed payment until a person is at least 30 days late in paying. When a consumer doesn’t pay for at least 90 days, the credit card balance becomes seriously delinquent. Banks are very likely to take a total loss on seriously delinquent balances.

In the second quarter of 2010, serious delinquency rates on credit cards were 13.74 percent of all balances owed, nearly twice as what they are today. Today, credit card delinquency rates are down to 7.38 percent.14

Our Method of Calculating Household Credit Card Debt

Credit card debt doesn’t appear on the precipice of disaster, but the recent growth in balances is cause for some concern. Still, our estimates for household credit card debt remain modest.

In fact, MagnifyMoney’s estimates of household credit card debt is two-thirds that of other leading financial journals. Why are our estimates comparatively low?

A common estimate of household credit card debt is:

This method overstates credit card debt. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York/Equifax Consumer Credit Panel (CCP) does not release a figure called credit card indebtedness. Instead, they release a figure on national credit card balances. Representatives of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and the Philadelphia Federal Reserve Bank both confirmed that the CCP includes the statement balances of people who go on to pay their bill in full each month.

To find a better estimate of credit card debt, we found methods to exclude the statement balances of full paying households from our credit card debt estimates. Statement balances are the balances owed to a credit card company at the end of a billing cycle. Even though full payers pay off their statement balance each month, their balances are included in the CCP’s figures on credit card balances.

To exclude full payer balances, we turned to academic research outside of the Federal Reserve Banks. The paper, Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards, by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang, found full payers had mean statement balances of $3,412. We used this figure, multiplied by the estimated number of full payers to find the statement balances of full payers.

Our credit card debt estimate is:3

Credit Card Debt: Do We Know What We Owe?

Academic papers, consumer finance surveys, and the CCP each use different methods to measure average credit card debt among credit card revolvers. Since methodologies vary, credit card debt statistics vary based on the source consulted.

MagnifyMoney surveyed these sources to present a range of credit card debt statistics.

Are We Paying Down Credit Card Debt?

A Pew Research Center study25 showed that Americans have an uneasy relationship with credit card debt. More than two-thirds (68 percent) of Americans believe that loans and credit card debt expanded their opportunities. And 85 percent believe that Americans use debt to live beyond their means.

Academic research shows the conflicting attitude is justified. Some credit card users aggressively pay off debt. Others pay off their bill in full each month.

However, a substantial minority (44 percent)26 of revolvers pay within $50 of their minimum payment. Minimum payers are at a high risk of carrying unsustainable credit card balances with high interest.

In fact, 14 percent of consumers have credit card balances above $10,000.27 At current rates, consumers with balances of $10,000 will spend more than $1,400 per year on interest charges alone.28

Even an average revolver will spend between $58130 and $59731 on credit card interest each year.

Credit Debt Burden by Income

Those with the highest credit card debts aren’t necessarily the most financially insecure. According to the Survey of Consumer Finances, the top 10 percent of income earners who carried credit card debt had nearly twice as much debt as average.

However, people with lower incomes have more burdensome credit card debt loads. Consumers in the lowest earning quintile had an average credit card debt of $3,000. However, their debt-to-income ratio was 21.7 percent. On the high end, earners in the top decile had an average of $11,200 in credit card debt. But debt-to-income ratio was just 4.9 percent.

Although high-income earners have more manageable credit card debt loads on average, they aren’t taking steps to pay off the debt faster than lower income debt carriers. In fact, high-income earners are as likely to pay the minimum as those with below average incomes.32 If an economic recession leads to job losses at all wage levels, we could see high levels of credit card debt in default.

Generational Differences in Credit Card Use

  • Boomer consumers carry an average credit card balance of $6,889.
  • That is 24.1 percent higher than the national average consumer credit card balance.34
  • Millennial consumers carry an average credit card balance of $3,542.
  • That is 36.1 percent lower than the median consumer credit card balance.35

With average credit card balances of $6,889, baby boomers have the highest average credit card balance of any generation. Generation X follows close behind with average balances of $6,866.

At the other end of the spectrum, millennials, who are often characterized as frivolous spenders who are too quick to take on debt, have the lowest credit card balances. Their median balance clocks in at $3,542, 36.1 percent less than the national median.

Better Consumer Behavior Driving Bank Profitability

You may think that lower balances spell bad news for banks, but that isn’t the case. Credit card lending is more profitable than ever thanks to steadily declining credit card delinquency. Credit card delinquency is near an all-time low 2.34 percent.14

Despite better borrowing behavior, banks have held interest on credit cards steady between 13% and 14%37 since 2010. Today, interest rates on credit accounts (assessed interest) is 14%. This means bank profits on credit cards are at all-time highs. In 2015, banks earned over $102 billion dollars from credit card interest and fees.38 This is 15 percent more than banks earned in 2010.

How Does Your State Compare?

Using data from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York Consumer Credit Panel and Equifax, you can compare median credit card balances and credit card delinquency. You can even see how each generation in your state compares to the national median.

Median Credit Card Balance by Age (All Consumers) by State

Footnotes:

  1. Source: Survey of Consumer Expectations, © 2013-2015 Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY). “The SCE data are available without charge at www.newyorkfed.org and may be used subject to license terms posted there. FRBNY disclaims any responsibility or legal liability for this analysis and interpretation of Survey of Consumer Expectations data.”The October 2016 Survey of Consumer Expectations shows 75.02 percent of people with credit reports had balances on credit cards. The August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit showed 268 million adults with credit reports. For a total of 201 million credit card users.
  2. August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit , Page 4, Q1 2017, 453 million credit card accounts. 459 million credit card accounts / 201 million credit card users1 = 2.3 credit cards per person.
  3. The 2015 Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households reports 58 percent of credit card users carried a balance in 2015. 201 million1 * 58% = 116 million people with credit card debt.Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang shows that 67 percent of credit card users were not “full payers.” This results in a high estimate of 135 million people with credit card debt.

    Average estimate is 125 million with credit card debt.

  4. Using data from the 2015 Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households, 201 million credit card users * (58 percent not full payers) * $4,262 per individual5 = $496 billion in credit card debt.Using data from Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang, we calculate 201 million credit card users * (67 percent not full payers) * $4,148 per individual5 = $558 billion in credit card debt.

    Average estimated total credit card debt is $527 billion.

  5. The August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit shows $784 billion in outstanding credit card debt. Table A-1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang shows an average balance of $3,412 for “full payers.” Using their estimate of 33 percent full payers, we calculate:[$784 billion – ($3,412 (full payer balance) * 33% full payer * 201 million credit card users1)] / (201 million credit card users * (100% – 33% not full payers)) = $4,148

    Using their estimate of 42 percent full payers, from the 2015 Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households and the $3,412 full payer balance from Table A-1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang, we calculate:

    [$784 billion – ($3,412 (full payer balance) * 42% full payer * 201 million credit card users1)] / (201 million credit card users * (100% – 42% not full payers)) = $4,262

    Average estimated credit card debt per person is $4,205.

  6. Average per person credit card is $4,2055 and the average household contains 1.94 adults over the age of 18. $4,205 * 1.94 = $8,158.
  7. August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit, Compare Q2 2016 to Q2 2017, outstanding credit card debt (Page 3).
  8. August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit, Page 3, Q2 2017, credit card debt $784 billion / 201 million1 = $3,905.
  9. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Balances on Credit Cards, Experian, Accessed May 24, 2017. National Balance on Bankcards — average of $5,551.
  10. Page 30, 2015 Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households.
  11. 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances reports 37.1 percent of U.S. households carry credit card debt. There are 125.82 million U.S. households.Meta Brown, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, and Wilbert van der Klaauw reported that 46.1 percent of U.S. households carried a balance the month prior to the Survey of Consumer Finances.

    Between 48 million14 and 58 million15 households carry credit card debt. Using the average of the two estimates, we believe 53 million households out of 125.82 million households carry credit card debt.

  12. a. CCP data shows 76.6 percent of people with credit reports had balances on credit cards in September 2008. The May 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit showed 240 million adults with credit reports in Q3 2008. For a total of 183 million credit card users.The August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit shows $866 billion in outstanding credit card debt in Q3 2008. Table A-1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang shows an average balance of $3,412 for “full payers.” Using their estimate of 33 percent full payers, we calculate:

    [$866 billion – ($3,412 (full payer balance) * 33% full payer * 183 million credit card users)] / (183 million credit card users * (100% – 33% not full payers)) = $5,365

    U.S. Census Bureau, Survey of Income and Program Participation, 2008 Panel, Wave 4shows 44.5 percent of all households with a credit report have credit card debt. Using this along with the $3,412 full payer balance from Table A-1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang, we calculate:

    [$866 billion – ($3,412 (full payer balance) * (100% – 44.5%) full payer * 240 million people with credit reports)] / (240 million people with credit reports * (44.5% not full payers)) = $5,769

    Average estimated credit card debt per person is $5,567.

    b. Average per person credit card is $5,56712a and in 2008, the average household contained 1.92 adults over the age of 18. $5,567 * 1.92 = $10,689.

  13. U.S. Bureau of the Census, Real Median Household Income in the United States [MEHOINUSA672N], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/MEHOINUSA672N, September 6, 2017.
  14. August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit , Page 12, % of Total Balance 90+ Days Delinquent, Credit Cards
  15. Statement balances are the balances owed to a credit card company at the end of a billing cycle. Full payers will pay off the entirety of their statement balance each month. Finding an estimate of full payers” statement balances was not an easy task. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York does not provide estimates of full payers compared to people who carry a balance.In order to get our estimates, we turned to academic research outside of the Federal Reserve Banks. In the paper, Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang, we found robust estimates of the statement balances of “full payers.” According to their analysis (see Table 1-A), full payers had mean statement balances of $3,412 (when summarized across all credit cards) before they went on to pay off the debt.

    We multiplied $3,412 by the estimated number of full payers to get the estimated balances of full payers.

  16. CCP data shows 76.6 percent of people with credit reports had balances on credit cards in September 2008. The May 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit shows 240 million adults with credit reports in Q3 2008. For a total of 183 million credit card users.The May 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit shows $866 billion in outstanding credit card debt in Q3 2008. Table A-1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang shows an average balance of $3,412 for “full payers.” Using their estimate of 33 percent full payers, we calculate:

    $866 billion – ($3,412 (full payer balance) * 33% full payer * 183 million credit card users) = $659 billion

    U.S. Census Bureau, Survey of Income and Program Participation, 2008 Panel, Wave 4shows 44.5 percent of all households with a credit report have credit card debt. Using this along with the $3,412 full payer balance from Table A-1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang, we calculate:

    $866 billion – ($3,412 (full payer balance) * (100% – 44.5%) full payer * 240 million people with credit reports) = $587 billion

    Estimated credit card debt is $623 billion.

  17. Source: Survey of Consumer Expectations, © 2013-2015 Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY). “The SCE data are available without charge at www.newyorkfed.org and may be used subject to license terms posted there. FRBNY disclaims any responsibility or legal liability for this analysis and interpretation of Survey of Consumer Expectations data.”The October 2016 Survey of Consumer Expectations Shows 75.02 percent of the adult population uses credit cards. The August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit shows 267 million adults with credit reports. For a total of 201 million credit card users. Page 30, 2015 Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households shows that 58 percent of households with credit cards sometimes or always carry a balance.

    201 million * 58% = 116 million people with credit card debt

  18. Source: Survey of Consumer Expectations, © 2013-2015 Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY). “The SCE data are available without charge at www.newyorkfed.org and may be used subject to license terms posted there. FRBNY disclaims any responsibility or legal liability for this analysis and interpretation of Survey of Consumer Expectations data.”The October 2016 Survey of Consumer Expectations Shows 75.02 percent of the adult population uses credit cards. The August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit shows 267 million adults with credit reports. For a total of 201 million credit card users. Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang shows that 67 percent of credit card users were not “full payers.”

    201 million * 67% = 135 million people with credit card debt

  19. The 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances reports 37.1 percent of U.S. households carry credit card debt. There are 125.82 million U.S. households.
  20. Meta Brown, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, and Wilbert van der Klaauw reported that 46.1 percent of U.S. households carried a balance the month prior to the Survey of Consumer Finances.
  21. The 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances reports a median credit card debt of $2,300 per household with credit card debt.
  22. Meta Brown, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, and Wilbert van der Klaauw used CCP data and determined a more realistic median credit card debt of $3,500 per household. Two-person households systematically underreported their debt.
  23. The 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances reports a median credit card debt of $5,700 per household with credit card debt.
  24. Meta Brown, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, and Wilbert van der Klaauw used CCP data and determined a more realistic average credit card debt of $9,600 per household.
  25. The Complex Story of American Debt, Page 9.
  26. Table 1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards.
  27. Recent Developments in Consumer Credit Card Borrowing.
  28. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US), Commercial Bank Interest Rate on Credit Card Plans, Accounts Assessed Interest [TERMCBCCINTNS], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/TERMCBCCINTNS, September 7, 2017.May 2017 interest rate on accounts assessed interest 14%: $10,000 * 14% = $1,400.
  29. Table 1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards.
  30. $4,1482 * 14%28 = $581
  31. $4,2622 * 14%28 = $597
  32. Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards.
  33. 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances.
  34. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Balances on Credit Cards, Experian, Accessed May 24, 2017. Average credit card balance for baby boomers is $6,889 compared to a national average of $5,551.
  35. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Balances on Credit Cards, Experian, Accessed May 24, 2017. Average credit card balance for millennials is $3,542 compared to a national average of $5,551.
  36. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US), Commercial Bank Interest Rate on Credit Card Plans, Accounts Assessed Interest [TERMCBCCINTNS], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/TERMCBCCINTNS, September 7, 2017.
  37. U.S. Bureau of the Census, Sources of Revenue: Credit Card Income from Consumers for Credit Intermediation and Related Activities, All Establishments, Employer Firms [REVCICEF522ALLEST], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/REVCICEF522ALLEST, September 7, 2017.
  38. CCP data shows 76.6 percent of people with credit reports had balances on credit cards in September 2008. The May 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit shows 240 million adults with credit reports in Q3 2008. For a total of 183 million credit card users.The May 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit, Page 3, Q3 2008, credit card debt $886 billion / 183 million = $4,720
  39. State Level Household Debt Statistics 1999-2016, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, May, 2017. All average credit card debt balances are calculated using the following formula:(Total Credit Card Balancea – Balance of Population Not Carrying Debtb) / Population Carrying Credit Card Debtc
    1. Total Credit Card Balance = (Average Credit Card Debt Per Capita * Population)
    2. Balance of Population Not Carrying Debt = Average Credit Card Debt Per Capita * Population * % of Population Using a Credit Card
    3. Population * % of Population Using a Credit Card * (1 – .375)
  40. State Level Household Debt Statistics 1999-2016, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, May, 2017.
  41. Data from Consumer Credit Explorer.
Hannah Rounds
Hannah Rounds |

Hannah Rounds is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Hannah at hannah@magnifymoney.com

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Credit Cards, Reviews

PayPal Launches a 2% Cash Back Rewards Card: Double is the New Rewards Standard

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: iStock

PayPal’s new Cashback Mastercard, launched Aug. 30, is packed with features that pin it head to head with the current highest no-fee flat-rate cash back credit card on the market.

The PayPal Cashback Mastercard® is a no-fee rewards card that offers users a flat 2 percent cash back upfront on all eligible purchases made using the credit card. The offer is a step up from the current leading cash back card, the Citi® Double Cash Card, which credits 1 percent upfront and another 1 percent on what cardholders pay off each billing cycle.

The digital and mobile payment company partnered with Synchrony Bank to launch the Cashback Mastercard, which grants users benefits exclusive to PayPal and Mastercard members.

Although it boasts a generous cash back offer, the PayPal Cashback Mastercard® has its drawbacks.

“The 2 percent cash back rate is a solid offer. But the PayPal Cashback Mastercard® falls short in three main ways: no sign-up bonus, high APR and no 0% introductory period,” says Chris Mettler, president of our sister site CompareCards.com.

How the PayPal Cashback Mastercard® works

PayPal is clearly targeting PayPal users with this new cash back rewards card. The application for PayPal’s new credit card is only open to existing PayPal customers. Access to the application is granted after users submit a username and password to log in to a PayPal account.

They are then redirected to an application on the Synchrony Bank website. After filling in sensitive information, applicants have the option to set the card as a default payment option in their PayPal wallet and purchase Synchrony Bank’s card security program before submitting the form.

If approved, customers are charged one of three variable interest rates — 16.99%, 24.99% or 27.99% — based on creditworthiness and other factors like income. PayPal doesn’t charge cardholders an annual fee.

Cardholders can earn an unlimited, flat 2 percent cash back on all eligible purchases made using the PayPal Cashback Mastercard®. The cash back rewards are credited directly to the user’s digital wallet on PayPal. The money stored on PayPal wallet can be used to make purchases where PayPal is accepted, sent to peers, or cashed out to a bank account.

Cardholders don’t need to wait for a physical card to show up in the mail before they can start earning rewards. Users have immediate access to the line of credit through their PayPal account. PayPal’s Cashback Mastercard will show up right away in their PayPal wallet, where it can be used to make purchases or pay bills online.

How to qualify for the PayPal Cashback Mastercard®

Borrowers with good or excellent credit scores are most likely to qualify for the PayPal Cashback Mastercard, but those working to better a poor credit score may qualify for a card, too.

Applicants are approved for one of three interest rates, based on creditworthiness and other factors. The lowest rate, 16.99%, is offered to applicants with the best scores, whereas the highest rate, 27.99%, is reserved for applicants who are a greater credit risk.There is a 24.99% APR that’s likely to go to anyone that falls in between.

What we like about the PayPal Cashback Mastercard®

2 percent cash back on all eligible purchases

PayPal’s Cashback Mastercard® is now the highest, no-fee rewards card on the market. The 2 percent cash back feature is the greatest value to credit card users who want a simple, straightforward way to earn rewards. This cash back card is ideal for users who make most of their everyday purchases on a credit card and pay off the card’s balance each month.

Cardholders will get 2 percent cash back on all eligible purchases made at Paypal.com, eBay.com and anywhere Mastercard is accepted using the PayPal Cashback Mastercard®.

Automatically added to PayPal Wallet

The credit card is automatically linked and added to the PayPal wallet, a digital wallet that lets users pay for purchases online with linked bank accounts, credit and debit cards, or money on the account balance. That means users opening the card to make a purchase can gain access to the line of credit and earn rewards for spending right away.

Redeem cash rewards to PayPal balance

To use any cash back earned, users must transfer the money to their PayPal balance. Once in the digital wallet, that money can be used to complete online purchases, pay bills, or send money to peers all over the world.

No cash back restrictions

PayPal doesn’t cap the amount of cash back users can earn or set a minimum on the amount of cash back a user can redeem. Plus, cash back rewards won’t expire, so users aren’t pressured to use the money or lose it by a certain date.

Mastercard benefits

PayPal Cashback Mastercard® users also gain exclusive Mastercard cardholder benefits. They include doubling the length of warranty coverage on purchases up to one year, 60-day price protection, and Mastercard’s identity theft protection service.

What we don’t like about the PayPal Cashback Mastercard®

For PayPal customers only

You must have a PayPal account in order to apply for a PayPal Cashback Mastercard® account and keep the account open to maintain the credit account.

If your PayPal account is closed, or you unlink the card from your PayPal account, your card account will be closed. If you have cash back available, you won’t be able to redeem those awards, and they will be forfeited.

If your PayPal account is suspended for any reason, you won’t be able to redeem cash back to your PayPal balance until the account is back in good standing.

No sign-up bonus

The PayPal Cashback Mastercard® misses an opportunity to offer users even more value by omitting a sign-up bonus. If users are looking to earn a boost in credit rewards after a few months of use, they may have more luck with a cash back card like Chase Freedom®, which offers 1 percent back on all purchases and a $150 signing bonus after cardholders spend $500 in the first three months the account is open.

No interest-free period

The card’s benefits also exclude an interest-free period. So while users can make a purchase with the line of credit immediately after opening the account using the PayPal wallet, they should avoid making large purchases as interest will begin to accrue right away.

Credit users should instead use a credit card with an interest-free period like the Discover it Cash Back® credit card, so they have more time to pay off the balance of the purchase before interest kicks in. The card offers an 0% introductory APR for 14 months on purchases and balance transfers.

A high APR

Cardholders should be careful not to carry a balance on this card to avoid getting hit with interest charges. For borrowers with a poor credit rating, the card charges a super high 27.99% APR, which trumps any 2 percent cash back earned that period. To avoid paying interest and make the most of the Cashback Mastercard, cardholders should make sure to pay off the card balance each period.

3 percent foreign transaction fee

It costs cardholders 3 percent to swipe the PayPal Cashback Mastercard® overseas. Even with 2 percent cash back, users end up paying 1 percent to make foreign purchases.

Who the PayPal Cashback Mastercard® is best for

The PayPal Cashback Mastercard® is best for existing PayPal customers who want a straightforward way to earn cashback on all of their everyday purchases.

If a cardholder is a heavy online shopper, the Cashback Mastercard may also be a good choice because they can easily earn cash back from using the card as a payment option when they pay online using PayPal, then credit the cash back to their PayPal balance for future purchases.

PayPal Cashback Mastercard<sup>®</sup>

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Alternatives to the PayPal Cashback Mastercard

PayPal Extras MasterCard

If you prefer to earn credit card rewards in points instead of cash back, you can apply for PayPal’s other no-fee credit rewards option, the PayPal Extras MasterCard®. This card has a traditional points reward structure. It awards cardholders three times points on each dollar spent at gas stations and restaurants, double points on purchases made through PayPal or eBay, and one point per dollar spent everywhere else.

Unlike the cash back card, rewards earned on the PayPal Extras Mastercard expire® within two years if unused or if no purchases are made using the card for one year.

Citi® Double Cash Card

PayPal’s 2 percent Cashback Mastercard is only for PayPal account holders. If the benefits and 2 percent cash back upfront aren’t enough to rope you into creating a PayPal account, the Citi Double Cash Card® is a good alternative.

The card rewards 2 percent cash back on all purchases, but not all at once like PayPal’s Cashback Mastercard® does. Cardholders earn 1 percent cash back when they spend, and then 1 percent cash back when they pay, instead of awarding the entire 2 percent upfront. The Citi® Double Cash Card also omits an interest-free period for purchases and a sign-on bonus. However, it does offer a 0% introductory 18-month balance transfer.

PayPal Cashback Mastercard® FAQ

Cardholders receive 2 percent cash back on all eligible purchases made at Paypal.com, eBay.com and anywhere Mastercard is accepted using the PayPal Cashback Mastercard®.

No, cash back rewards don’t expire and can be redeemed to your PayPal balance at any time.

If you are unable to pay off your statement balance in full, you will be charged a variable interest rate of either 16.99%, 24.99% or 27.99% on purchases made in the billing period and be required to make a minimum payment.

Cardholders can redeem cash back by transferring the cash back balance to their PayPal account balance. The funds can then be used to make purchases anywhere PayPal is accepted or transfer money to peers using PayPal.

Use a cash back credit card that fits your day-to-day spending needs best, pay your bill in full each month, and spend only what you can afford to pay off.

Brittney Laryea
Brittney Laryea |

Brittney Laryea is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brittney at brittney@magnifymoney.com

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Credit Cards

What’s the Difference Between a Charge Card and a Credit Card?

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: iStock

If you’re shopping around for your next credit card, chances are you might come across a charge card. It can sometimes be difficult to know the difference unless you know the telltale signs. And if you choose the wrong kind and don’t use it correctly, you could end up in a world of financial trouble.

Charge cards aren’t too much different from credit cards, but there are a few key things you need to know.

What is a charge card?

As with a credit card, you use a charge card to make purchases and pay the balance off later. Here’s the biggest difference: Unlike credit cards, which let you keep a revolving balance from month to month, a charge card requires you to pay off the balance in full by your bill’s due date. You cannot make a big purchase and pay it off over time.

Charge cards also have no preset spending limit. This doesn’t mean that it has no spending limit. Rather, your actual spending limit can change quite often depending on how much you’re using the card, if you have any late payments on your record, etc.

At MagnifyMoney, we recommend you always pay off your credit card statement balance in full each month. If that’s something you already do, you’d find using a charge card is pretty much the same as using a credit card. However, there are a few differences that might make you want to choose one type of card over the other.

Pros and cons of using a charge card

Pro: You’re required to pay off the balance in full

One of the biggest advantages of a charge card is that you are required to pay it off in full each month. If you’re the type of person who has a hard time maintaining the discipline to do this normally, using a charge card might force you to develop this good habit. And because you will pay off the balance in full each month, you’ll never pay any interest charges and you won’t rack up any debt.

Con: You’re required to pay off the balance in full

Paying off your bill in full each month is a huge advantage, but it can also be a disadvantage. Yes, it’ll keep you out of debt, and you won’t have to pay interest charges, but if you’re relying on the card as a source of emergency funds, you’ll be better served with a credit card that’ll let you carry a balance from month to month if a very expensive emergency pops up.

Pro: Many charge cards come with a smokin’ hot rewards program

For example, as of this writing, the Platinum Card® from American Express gives you $15 in Uber credits each month (plus a $20 bonus in December), a $200 airline credit each calendar year, and a 60,000-point sign-up bonus if you spend $5,000 within the first three months, among numerous other perks. There are, of course, credit cards that offer similarly attractive rewards.

Con: Charge cards often carry high fees

Again, we’ll use the Platinum Card® from American Express as an example: It carries a $550 annual fee. The cheapest card from Amex is the American Express® Green Card that has a $95 annual fee, though Amex waives it the first year. And if you make a late payment or fail to pay your bill in full? You could be slapped with a late fee of (up to $38 on the aforementioned Platinum Card), and it’ll go down as a negative mark on your credit report.

Con: There aren’t a lot of charge-card options

You may be sensing a trend — American Express is among the last major credit card issuers to offer charge cards. That means your choices of charge cards are already limited — you can choose from just three cards: American Express® Green Card, the Premier Rewards Gold Card from American Express, and the Platinum Card® from American Express. American Express isn’t as widely accepted as Visa or Mastercard, so you’ll want to make sure you have a backup when you’re out shopping, just in case it isn’t accepted.

Pro: A charge card helps you build credit

Charge cards can also help you build credit, and you don’t need to go into debt to do it. As long as you pay on time, the account will be listed on your credit report as an example of your positive payment history — the most important aspect of your credit score. And for newer scoring models, charge cards won’t affect your credit utilization ratio — the second most important factor in determining your credit score. That’s because American Express reports its charge cards as “open” lines of credit, as opposed to a revolving line of credit, and FICO does not factor open lines of credit into its credit utilization calculation.

But that’s not always the case. Rod Griffin, the director of public education at Experian (one of the major credit reporting agencies), said some credit scores treat open credit lines like revolving accounts. “Newer scoring systems are more likely to differentiate between the two than older credit scoring systems,” he said. “Your credit report almost certainly will not show a zero balance for the charge card if you use it and could affect your utilization rate.”

With newer scoring models that don’t factor open credit lines into your credit utilization ratio, that means making a big purchase (and paying it off at the end of the month) won’t have any effect on your credit score, nor will it lower your credit utilization ratio if you have other credit card debt. (A credit card also helps you build credit, but you may find yourself tempted to carry a balance.) Checking your credit score regularly will help you understand how your charge card use affects your credit standing.

Con: A changing spending limit can be bothersome

If you want to make a big purchase or it’s getting toward the end of the month, the only way to know for sure if you have any credit left is to log in to your account and check. Still, you shouldn’t be using your charge card willy-nilly to buy Learjets and mansions anyway, so as long as you keep your spending under control, it’s unlikely you’ll go over your limit.

The bottom line

Charge cards do have their quirks. But as long as you keep your spending within a reasonable range for your lifestyle and pay off your bill in full each month (as you should do with a normal credit card anyway), a charge card can be a useful tool in your financial arsenal.

Lindsay VanSomeren
Lindsay VanSomeren |

Lindsay VanSomeren is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Lindsay here

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Best of, Credit Cards

Best Credit Cards for Fair Credit September 2017

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Having fair credit doesn’t mean you’re ineligible for great credit cards. We’ve rounded up the top credit cards with the best offers in a range of different categories that you’re still likely to be approved for, even with fair credit. These credit cards can help you build credit as long as you use them wisely. In this guide, we’ll show you the best credit cards for fair credit scores as well as how to use them to boost your credit score even higher.

Here are some of the products we will be discussing today:

Check If You’re Pre-qualified

Before applying for any credit card it’s helpful to check if you’re pre-qualified from a variety of institutions. The soft credit check the institutions perform does not harm your credit score and allows you to compare credit options. Sites such as CreditCards.com provide good tools that can match you to offers from multiple credit card companies without impacting your credit score. You can read our complete guide to getting pre-qualified for a credit card here.

Build Credit with Secured Cards

A great approach to rebuilding credit is to get a secured credit card. In order to get the card, you will have to deposit money that will be your line of credit. To effectively rebuild your credit, you must use the card, and we recommend not charging more than 20% of your credit line. For example, if you have a $500 credit line, you should not charge more than $100. Then, pay off your balance in full every single month. You can even build credit with $10 a month on a secured card and see your credit score rise.

After you’ve consistently managed your secured card well over a period of time, you may be able to increase your credit line beyond your initial deposit or migrate to an unsecured credit card.

We’ve reviewed the best secured cards in the market and found our top pick — the Discover it® Secured Card. This card has no annual fee, a reasonable security deposit and offers an easy transition to an unsecured card. In addition, Discover offers a rewards program and free access to your FICO score. These reasons are why we recommend the Discover it® Secured Card for people with fair credit.

Build Credit with Secured Cards

Discover it® Secured Card - No Annual Fee

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Discover it® Secured Card - No Annual Fee

Annual fee
$0 For First Year
$0 Ongoing
Minimum Deposit
$200
APR
23.99% APR

Variable

Credit required
bad-credit
Bad

Best for Cash Back

If you have fair credit and want a cash back card the QuicksilverOne® Rewards credit card from Capital One® is a good option. As a consumer with fair credit you may not qualify for all cash back cards, but you may qualify for the QuicksilverOne® Rewards card since it is made for those with fair credit. With this card you will earn unlimited cash back, with no changing categories, and the rewards never expire.

However, this card comes with a high APR and annual fee. To earn enough cash back rewards to pay for the card itself each year you’ll need to spend $2,600 annually ($217 per month). To net a cash back of $50 you need to spend $5,933 in a year ($494 per month). This card may be an option for you if you want to earn more than 1% cash back.

Best for Cash Back

QuicksilverOne® Rewards from Capital One

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on Capital One’s secure website

QuicksilverOne® Rewards from Capital One

Annual fee
$39 For First Year
$39 Ongoing
Cashback Rate
up to 1.5%
APR
24.99%

Variable

Credit required
fair-credit

Average

Best Low Ongoing APR

No one wants to carry a balance on their credit cards, but if you must, it’s best to get a card with a low ongoing APR. Many lenders charge high APRs around 25%, but you can potentially qualify for an APR as low as 9.15%. This card will charge you less money on your debt than the typical credit card, which can save you big dollars in the long run.

Best Low Ongoing APR

MasterCard Platinum from Aspire FCU

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on Aspire Credit Union’s secure website

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MasterCard Platinum from Aspire FCU

Intro Rate
0%

promotional rate

Intro Fee
2%
APR
8.90%-18.00%

Variable

Duration
6 months
Credit required
fair-credit

Average

Best for Small Business Owners

Running a business is hard. Small business credit cards can make it a bit easier for you by giving you rewards for everyday purchases. Nevertheless, be aware: Business credit cards forego certain protections that personal credit cards have under the Credit CARD Act. For example, card issuers can change the payment due date or interest rate without giving you prior notice.

Still, small business cards can be a great option for you to build your credit and save money, even if you don’t have a traditional brick-and-mortar business. You can apply for these cards with just a DBA or even your own name, if you’re a freelancer.

Best for Small Business Owners

Spark Classic for Business from Capital One

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Spark Classic for Business from Capital One

Annual fee
$0 For First Year
$0 Ongoing
Cashback Rate
1% on all spend
APR
23.99%
Credit required
fair-credit

Average

Best for Students

You may have a fair credit score because you are a student. Student cards provide a great way for you to build your credit score and establish good credit history. The Discover it® for Students card is made with students in mind and offers ways to help you build credit and also earn rewards.

Best for Students

Discover it® for Students

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on Discover’s secure website

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Discover it® for Students

Annual fee
$0 For First Year
$0 Ongoing
Cashback Rate
up to 5%
APR
13.99%-22.99%

Variable

Credit required
fair-credit
Fair

FAQ

There’s a lot of math that goes into computing your credit scores, but at the end of the day, a fair credit score is defined as being between 649 and 699. Here’s how a fair credit score sits in relation to other credit scoring classes:

  • Excellent: Above 760
  • Good: 700-759
  • Fair/Average: 649-699
  • Poor: 600-648
  • Very Poor: Under 599

You can check your credit score for free on sites like Credit Karma, Chase Credit Journey, or AnnualCreditReport.com.

Having a good or excellent credit score unlocks a lot of advantages, such as lower interest rates and better approval odds for high-value credit cards and other financial products. These advantages will result in more dollars in your wallet at the end of the day. For example, having a high credit score can save you tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars in interest payments over your lifetime, especially for big-ticket loans like a home mortgage.

But if you have a fair credit score, don’t fret! There is a reason that your score is less than optimal, and thus there are real, concrete steps you can take to boost your credit score into the good and excellent range.

If you play your cards right, you can even join the exclusive 800+ credit score club (unfortunately, it’s not an official club, and you don’t get a shower of balloons and confetti once you reach it — but you will get access to some of the most exclusive financial products).

There can be many reasons why your credit score is below 700. Here are some of the most common ones:

  • You have late payments on your credit report. Having even just one late payment on your credit report can seriously harm it because payment history makes up 35% of your credit score. Unfortunately, unless it’s an error, you’ll just need to wait for it to drop off of your credit report in seven years. To prevent this from happening, make sure all of your debt payments are set up on autopay. That way, you won’t have to worry about it.
  • You have a lot of credit card debt. Credit utilization ratio is one of the biggest factors in calculating your credit score — it affects 30% of the final score. It’s simply how much you owe relative to how much you are allowed to spend. For example, let’s say you have two credit cards with a $5,000 limit each, and you owe $2,000. Your credit utilization ratio is 20% because you owe $2,000 out of a possible $10,000. Luckily, this is one of the easiest factors to correct that will boost your credit score big time in the short run: Pay off your balance, and your score will bump up immediately.
  • You don’t have a long credit history. Although credit history doesn’t factor into the calculation of your credit score as much as the credit utilization ratio and payment history, it still makes up a sizable chunk at 15%. There’s not much you can do about this one: Simply wait for your accounts to age.
  • You have a lot of credit inquiries. Banks don’t like to see you applying for credit like an out-of-control spender in Las Vegas. Each time you apply for credit or a loan, it’s recorded on your credit report as a credit inquiry, and it stays there for two years. To minimize the number of credit inquiries you have, always shop around and make sure creditors use a soft pull credit check unless you’re absolutely ready to apply for the line of credit. This factor makes up just 10% of your credit score, but it’s an easy one you can affect as long as you’re careful about applying for credit.
  • You don’t have a wide variety of account types. You may be an ace at handling your student loans, but creditors also want to know you can handle other types of credit like mortgages and credit card debt, too. The more types of credit accounts you have on file, the better. However, we don’t recommend taking out a loan just for the sake of boosting your credit score — that costs money, and you’ll only receive a modest benefit from it because credit mix only makes up 10% of your credit score.

As you can see, you do have a lot of options when it comes to fine-tuning your credit score into the good or excellent category. We recommend the helpful credit score simulator at Chase Credit Journey to check your current score and see how these adjustments can potentially change your credit level. It’s available whether you’re a Chase customer or not. Give it a try!

Applying for a credit card is easy. You’ll need some basic information like name, address, and Social Security number. You’ll also need employment and income information. Simply enter it into the online form on the credit card company’s website, visit a branch of the bank (if they have one), or call the credit card company directly. You’ll usually receive instant notification if you’ve been approved or not.

There are many ways for you to increase your credit score. Ultimately practicing responsible credit behavior is the best way to see your score rise. Here are a few ways you can increase your credit score:

  • Have someone add you as an authorized user: If you have a willing (and very trusting) friend or family member with better credit, you can ask them to add you as an authorized user onto one or more of their credit cards. Their credit will not be harmed by this (as long as you don’t rack up charges or missed payments), and the credit card will show up on your credit report just as if you had applied for it — boosting your credit utilization ratio, number of accounts, and account age if you keep it for a long time.
  • Increase your credit history length: Unfortunately, you can’t go back in time, but you can still affect your credit history length. Your credit score is partially based off of average credit history length, and the more old accounts you have, the better. If you already have credit cards open, consider keeping them open so your average credit history won’t decrease and ding your credit. Each new credit card you get will drop your average account age, and it’ll take longer to boost this portion of your score.
  • Maintain a low credit utilization: Credit utilization (the percentage of available credit you’re using) is one of the biggest factors in calculating your credit score. The lower, the better. To decrease your utilization ratio, simply pay off your credit card. You can also request a credit limit increase from your credit card issuer to lower your credit utilization ratio — just make sure not to rack up a balance again with that extra credit or you’ll be back to square one.

Missing a payment can single-handedly cause your credit score to drop by 100 points or more. To avoid this, simply set up your credit card on autopay for the minimum amount due — that way you’ll never have to worry about missing a payment.

You can always apply for a personal loan if you need some cash right now for something. You can use this tool to shop around for the best interest rates without hurting your credit score. It’s smart to avoid hard inquiries until you’re ready to actually apply for a personal loan so that your credit isn’t dinged with multiple inquiries.

Each credit card is different, so you’ll need to check the fine print. Usually, though, you’ll need to both charge a purchase and pay off your bill before you’re eligible for those cash back rewards. Then, they’ll tally up this amount and periodically either send you a check, or offer a statement credit.

If you’re running a small business, it’s often easy to mix your personal and business accounts, especially if you’re self-employed. This creates an accounting nightmare to sort through, so it’s recommended (but not required) that you have a separate business banking account and credit card, if you need one.

Lindsay VanSomeren
Lindsay VanSomeren |

Lindsay VanSomeren is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Lindsay here

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Best of, Credit Cards

Best Credit Cards for Bad Credit September 2017

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

If you have bad credit, it can be difficult to get approved for loans and credit cards. But it is not impossible. Even people with bad credit have options – which we will now explain.

What exactly is a bad credit score? When we’re talking about obtaining credit via credit cards, the magic number is somewhere between 620 and 650. If your credit score falls below 650, you’re going to have a difficult time obtaining credit from some of the larger lending institutions, and if it’s below 620, you’re going to have a difficult time obtaining credit from anyone — including smaller financial institutions like credit unions and independent marketplace lenders.

There are, however, some products for which you’ll have an easier time qualifying. Before you apply, make sure you’re prepared to be responsible with your new line of credit so you can boost your score and credit history rather than damaging it further. The best way to do this is to spend within your means by creating a budget and sticking to it. Here are some helpful tools to help you do just that. Remember to always pay your bill off in full on or before the due date each month to establish good credit.

Here are the products and topics we’ll be discussing today:

Check if You’re Pre-qualified

Before you apply for a credit card check if you’re pre-qualified from a variety of institutions. This does not hurt your credit score. Sites such as CreditCards.com provide good tools that can match you to offers from multiple credit card companies without impacting your credit score. This is a good first step when looking to apply for credit. You can read our complete guide to getting pre-qualified for a credit card here.

Build Credit with Secured Credit Cards

If you are trying to rebuild your credit, one of the best approaches is to get a secured credit card. In order to get the card, you will have to write a check to deposit with the credit card company. This money will be your line of credit.

In order to effectively rebuild your credit, you must actually use the card, and we recommend not charging more than 20% of your credit line. For example, if you have a $500 credit line, you should not charge more than $100. Then, pay off your balance in full every single month. You can even build credit with $10 a month on a secured card and see your credit score rise.

After you’ve consistently managed your secured card well over a period of time, you may be able to increase your credit line beyond your initial deposit or migrate to an unsecured credit card. With most companies, this is a tedious process that you’ll have to initiate. You also aren’t guaranteed to get results even after you’ve made a request.

Discover operates differently than most companies in this realm, making it our number one pick for secured cards.

Discover it Secured Card

If you’re looking for a secured credit card, look no further than Discover it Secured card. On top of being great for people with a bad credit score, Discover will also accept applicants who have no credit history at all. Discover offers great ways for you to rebuild your credit and be on the way to an unsecured card.

Build Credit with Secured Cards

Discover it® Secured Card - No Annual Fee

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Discover it® Secured Card - No Annual Fee

Annual fee
$0 For First Year
$0 Ongoing
Minimum Deposit
$200
APR
23.99% APR

Variable

Credit required
bad-credit
Bad

Also Consider Also Consider

OpenSky Secured Visa

This card does not do a credit check, and no bank account is needed to apply. This is beneficial for those with low credit scores or no access to a bank account. If you’ve filed for bankruptcy, you’re in luck because they don’t care to know, unlike other institutions. However, OpenSky charges a $35 annual fee, which Discover does not. This can be a deal breaker if you don’t want to pay a fee, since there are many secured cards without fees.

Read MagnifyMoney’s full Secured Credit Card Guide.

Our Credit Union Favorite

If you’re looking to open a credit card with bad credit, it can be hard to find a card you qualify for. That’s where credit unions come in. They are sometimes more accepting of your credit history and have cards especially designed for people with low credit scores — helping your approval chances.

Georgia’s Own Visa Classic

Georgia’s Own Credit Union offers a variety of credit cards all with low interest. Their Visa Classic unsecured card is positioned toward those who need to rebuild credit and boasts a low APR. When you apply for a credit card on Georgia’s Own website you are directed toward an application that is for all credit cards they offer. This means that depending on your creditworthiness, you may not be directed to the Visa Classic as an option. Therefore, if you want to apply directly for the card, the best bet is to speak with a loan officer who will tell you if you’re pre-approved for the Visa Classic card.

Our Credit Union Favorite

Visa® Classic from Georgia's Own Credit Union

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on Georgia's Own Credit Union’s secure website

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Visa® Classic from Georgia's Own Credit Union

Annual fee
$0 For First Year
$0 Ongoing
APR
12.99%-17.99%

Fair Variable

Credit required
bad-credit
Bad

Best for Cash: Personal Loans

If you’re looking to get some cash in your pocket, credit cards in general aren’t your best answer. Cash advances are not ideal, and putting a purchase you can’t currently afford onto a credit card with a high interest rate attributable to your not-so-great credit score is going to be an expensive venture.

Instead, you’ll want to consider personal loans. They’re admittedly a little more work up front with the application process, but the savings can be worth it. YOu can check to see if you are prequalified without impacting your credit score at most lenders. And LendingTree (the parent company of MagnifyMoney) has created a tool that lets you compare rates from dozens of lenders at once, without impacting your score.

LendingTree

LendingTree offers a one-stop tool that can help borrowers find numerous personal loan offers. After entering some basic information, you can receive offers from lenders in a matter of minutes. If you prefer to go directly to the lender’s site you can use one of the options listed below.

LEARN MORE Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website

LendingTree

Loan Amount
up to $35,000
Term
up to 60 Months
APR Range
5.99%-35.99%
Origination Fee
Varies
Credit Required
Bad or Could be Better/Average/Good/Excellent
Soft Pull
You can get your rate without hurting your score.

Pros Pros

  • Check Multiple Offers at OnceYou can check personal loan offers from a wide range of lenders including Avant, LendingClub and Best Egg. The entire process happens online for free and is fast and easy.
  • Soft Pull on Your CreditLendingTree performs a soft pull on your credit in order to give you accurate loan offers. This does not affect your credit score and can give you a good picture of what to expect if you're approved for a loan.

Cons Cons

  • Need to Create and Account to View OffersThe only way to view your personal loan offers is to create and account at LendingTree. This is a minor step, but it does allow you the ease of saving your offers so you can review them later.
Bottom line

Bottom line

LendingTree offers a great tool that lets you easily check your rates for a variety of lenders, all in a matter of minutes. This is a great way for you to see what rates you may get and allows you to shop around for the best offer, without the hassle of going to multiple websites.

Avant

Avant offers personal loans even to those with less-than-desirable credit. Because there is no prepayment penalty, you can pay off your loan before the end of your term without consequence.

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Avant

Loan Amount
up to $35,000
Term
up to 60 Months
APR Range
9.95%-35.99%
Origination Fee
0.95%-4.75%
Soft Pull
You can get your rate without hurting your score.

Pros Pros

  • Apply Online The entire Avant application process happens online. This saves you the hassle of filling out paperwork and visiting a local branch.
  • Find Your Interest Rate Before You Apply Avant allows you to preview the interest rate you would be offered with a soft pull on your credit. This will not impact your credit score. This is helpful if you’re shopping around for different rates and gives you a realistic picture of what to expect should you choose Avant.
  • Could Save Money over Subprime Credit Cards Depending on the interest rate and upfront fee percentage you are offered, a personal loan from Avant could save you money over putting purchases on a subprime credit card. The ability to preview your interest rate can also help you compare between personal loans and other possible options.

Cons Cons

  • High Interest Rates Because you’re a subprime borrower, you’re not likely to qualify for the lowest interest rate offered. You’re more likely to be offered something closer to the 35.99% rate. This is a very high rate, and it’s important that you make all of your payments on time to avoid paying interest and damaging your credit score.
Bottom line

Bottom line

While there’s only one con for Avant’s personal loans, it’s a pretty big one. The interest rate can be extremely high, so do your math before deciding if this is a good product for you. And be sure to take advantage of the fact that they’ll let you check your interest rate before officially submitting your application. Use this feature to shop around for best offers and check if you qualify for a better loan

OneMain Financial

Avant is easier to apply for as the application process will take place online, but if you’re willing to go somewhere in person, you can also apply with OneMain. Its application is also online, but in order to be approved, you’ll have to show up at a local branch with documentation backing the information you submitted at home.

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OneMain Financial

Loan Amount
up to $25,000
APR Range
25.10%-36.00%
Origination Fee
No origination fee
Credit Required
Average/Good/Excellent

Pros Pros

  • Talk to a Loan Officer At OneMain you have the benefit of talking to a loan officer and explaining your personal situation. This is a positive experience that can help you explain anything that can’t be seen on an application.
  • Receive Money Same Day If you apply online before noon, you usually will receive the loan the same day. This is helpful if you need money quickly. After the loan is approved, you have 14 days to change your mind and return the loan proceeds. If you do that, you will not be responsible for any of the accrued interest.

Cons Cons

  • High Interest Rates Accrued Daily Even though the interest rates may be more reflective of your situation, they are still high. Interest accrues daily, which could add years to your loan if you don’t pay on time. Be sure to make your payments on time each month to avoid paying high interest rates.
  • Must Meet in Person You have to physically bring your paperwork into a OneMain branch after applying online. You will also have to complete an interview with a loan officer. This can be a tedious process if there is no OneMain branch located near you.
  • Must Borrow a Minimum of $1,500 Depending on how much cash you need, the $1,500 minimum may be too high if you only need a couple of hundred dollars. There is no maximum loan amount offered.
Bottom line

Bottom line

OneMain locations can be a good choice if you want to have your loan the day you apply. If you’re okay meeting someone in person and have the transportation to get to your closest branch, this may be an option worth exploring. Make sure you decide if this offer is right for you and if you need a loan over $1,500. Check to see if you’re pre-qualified for a better offer from other institutions.

Last Resort: Subprime Credit Cards

Subprime credit cards are those that lending institutions issue to those with “bad” credit. They are not a good solution to your credit woes. They almost always come with high interest rates and a litany of fees — both of which make it difficult to use this product responsibly.

For example, First Premier makes a business out of lending to subprime borrowers with bad credit. Most of their applicants are only awarded a $300 line of credit. That’s after they pay a $95 fee just to apply (which is not a common practice in the credit card industry) and a $75 annual fee. If you are approved for a higher credit limit, your annual fee for the first year may be higher ($79-$125). In the second year, the annual fee drops ($45-$49), but at this point you are charged a $6.25-$10.40 account servicing fee every single month.

The cherry on top? The card’s APR is 36%. Heaven forbid you are ever late on a payment — your balance will skyrocket with the insanely high interest rate. Don’t forget about the late payment fee — up to $38.

Another example is Credit One Bank — not to be confused with Capitol One Bank, though their logos do look eerily similar. Not every Credit One Bank credit card comes with outrageous fees. In fact, there are 26 separate possible card agreements. But if you are a subprime borrower, you’re likely to qualify for higher rates.

Your credit may not be great, but that doesn’t make subprime credit cards a “fair” product. You may qualify for other, better options that aren’t as laden with fees. That’s why we recommend you first check if you’re pre-qualified for offers then look at store cards and personal loans before choosing a subprime credit card.

Bad Credit FAQs

Store cards can be used as payment anywhere the credit card company, such as MasterCard or Visa, is accepted. Private label cards can only be used at the branded company’s store. For example, if you get a private label card for New York & Company, you can only use it for purchases at New York & Company. You would not be able to use it at any other store.

Your best bet is to ask. If you are applying online, pick up the phone and call or use the company’s online chat if available.

If you have a physical card in front of you, you’ll notice that store cards always have the associated credit card company shown on the front, whether that be Visa, American Express, MasterCard, or another.

Private label cards tend not to display this information, though a major financial institution that a lot of companies work with for their private label cards is Comenity. If you have a card associated with Comenity Bank, it is likely a private label card.

No. Most businesses have an online application for their store cards.

Personal loans are typically issued by more reputable lenders who aspire to more transparency than those in the payday loan space. Payday loans are often advertised as having interest rates somewhere between 10% and 30%, but that interest is charged over a short period of time, making their effective APR (annual percentage rate) much higher. Some payday loans have an effective APR of 400% or more.

The lender isn’t likely to tell you that, though. Many businesses in this space are predatory. Payday loans also tend to come with outrageous fees.

While rates and fees on personal loans for those with bad credit aren’t ideal, they’re more than substantially lower than those of payday loans. Make no mistake about it: despite enticing advertising promises of deceptive payday lenders, personal loans are an infinitely better option.

Borrowing cash from your credit card company often comes with a fee of 1%-5%. That may not seem terrible when you look at the upfront fees of many personal loans, but you also have to account for interest.

Unlike purchases you charge to your card, interest on cash advances starts accruing immediately. You do not get to wait for your next statement to be issued. The interest rate for cash advances is also often higher than that of regular purchases.

A personal loan is an installment loan with a balance that will go down if you pay the minimum payment each month. This makes it far easier to manage than debt accrued via a cash advance. If you only pay the minimum payment on a cash advance each month, your balance will go up at a quick pace, potentially spiraling out of control.

First of all, the less you charge, the easier it will be to pay back. Since you have a bad credit score, you may have had issues with charging too much in the past and being unable to pay it off.

Secondly, around 30% of your credit score is made up of your credit utilization ratio. You find this ratio by dividing the amount of credit extended to you by the amount you have borrowed. By borrowing only 20% of your available credit, you reduce the risk of having your current balance negatively impacting your credit score.

It can sometimes take a year or more to see your score improve by 100 points if you are doing everything correctly and responsibly.

Yes, but only if you use them responsibly, paying the balance off in full every month. Keep in mind your credit utilization ratio here, too.

Potentially. Ten percent of your credit score is made up of something called “credit mix.” You don’t need to have every single type of credit in your credit report, but you should have more than one type. Here are the five that count:

  • Credit cards
  • Installment loans
  • Retail accounts
  • Finance company accounts
  • Mortgage loans

Conceivably, if you have a mortgage or business debt tied to your Social Security number or EIN, you might be able to get away with rebuilding your score through a personal loan (which is an installment loan). The key is to manage all of those debts well — and to do so consistently — especially since you already have bad credit.

No. Transactions on prepaid debit cards do not get reported to the credit bureaus. Also, it’s important to remember than many prepaid cards come with a ton of fees.

Brynne Conroy
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Brynne Conroy is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brynne at brynne@magnifymoney.com

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Best of, College Students and Recent Grads, Credit Cards

Best Student Credit Cards September 2017

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Getting a credit card while you’re in college might seem dangerous or confusing. But if you are able to use a student credit card responsibly, you do not need to be afraid, and you can set yourself up for financial success after you leave school.

Fortunately, learning how to choose and use the right student credit card is relatively simple. Make sure you avoid annual fees and go with a bank or credit union you can trust. When you get the card, make sure you use it responsibly and pay the balance in full and on time every month. If you do these things consistently over time, you can leave school with an excellent credit score. And if you want to rent an apartment or buy a car, having a good credit score is very important.

Our Top Pick

Discover it® for Students

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Discover it® for Students

Annual fee
$0 For First Year
$0 Ongoing
Cashback Rate
up to 5%
APR
13.99%-22.99%

Variable

Credit required
fair-credit
Fair

Best for Commuter Students

Discover it® chrome for Students

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Discover it® chrome for Students

Annual fee
$0 For First Year
$0 Ongoing
Cashback Rate
up to 2%
APR
13.99%-22.99%

Variable

Credit required
fair-credit
Fair Credit, New to Credit

Best Flat-Rate Card

Journey Student Credit Card from Capital One

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Journey Student Credit Card from Capital One

Annual fee
$0 For First Year
$0 Ongoing
Cashback Rate
up to 1.25%
APR
24.99%

Variable

Credit required
fair-credit

Average Credit

Best Intro Bonus

Wells Fargo Cash Back College℠ Card

Annual fee
$0 For First Year
$0 Ongoing
Cashback Rate
up to 3%
APR
11.90%-21.90%

Variable

Credit required
fair-credit
Fair Credit

Best Credit Union Card

Altra Federal Credit Union Student Visa

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Altra Federal Credit Union Student Visa

Annual fee
$0 For First Year
$0 Ongoing
APR
14.90%

Fixed

Credit required
zero-credit
New to Credit

Also Consider Also Consider

Golden 1 Platinum Rewards for Students

Golden 1 Credit Union Platinum Rewards for Students:

This credit card offers a snazzy rewards program: rather than accumulate points, you’ll get a cash rebate instead. All you have to do is make a purchase. At the end of the month, you’ll get a rebate of 3% of gas, grocery, and restaurant purchases, and 1% of all other purchases deposited back into your Golden 1 savings account at the end of the month. You can join Golden 1 by joining the Financial Fitness Association for $8 per year and keeping at least $5 in a savings account.

What should I look for in a student credit card?

The most important thing to consider when looking for a student credit card is that it charges no annual fee. You should never have to pay to build your credit score. Fortunately, most student cards don’t charge you an annual fee, but it’s still something to watch out for.

The second most important thing you should keep an eye out for are tools that help you learn about credit or even promote good credit-building habits. For example, some student credit cards will give you a free monthly FICO score update. You can use this freebie to see in real time how your credit score changes as you build credit history by keeping the card open, or paying down your credit card balance, for example.

The last thing you should be considering when picking out a student credit card is the rewards program. I know, I know, it seems counterintuitive. But stick with me — I’ll show you why in the next question.

Why shouldn’t I be concerned about maximizing my rewards while in college?

Rewards cards are nice to have. But if you’re a college student, here’s the truth: you probably won’t spend enough to earn meaningful rewards.

Why? With a good rewards program, you can earn points or cash back. A small percentage of your monthly spending can add up quickly. However, given the tight budget that most college students live on, it will probably take a while to earn meaningful rewards. For example, if you earn 1.25% cash back and spend $300 a month on your card, you would earn $45 of cash back during the year.

College students are very good at making good use of $45. And our favorite card offers a great cash back rewards program. Just don’t expect to earn a lot of cash back, given the tight budget of a college student.

Why should I get a credit card as a college student?

There are a lot of great reasons why you should get a credit card, as long as you can commit to using it responsibly.

The single biggest reason why you should get a credit card as a college student is because you can start establishing a credit history now. When you graduate from college, you will need a good credit score to get an apartment. And your future employer will likely check your credit report. Building a good credit history while still in college will help prepare you for life after graduation.

Getting a credit card while in college can also train you to develop good credit habits now. But you need to be honest with yourself. If you find that you can’t avoid the temptation of maxing out your credit card, you might want to switch to a debit card or cash.

Finally, getting a credit card now can be the motivation you need to start learning about credit. These skills aren’t hard to learn, and they could save you thousands or even hundreds of thousands of dollars later in life (when you want a mortgage, for example).

What is the CARD Act and why should I care about it?

Many years ago, credit card companies would market on college campuses. You could get a free beer mug or t-shirt in exchange for a credit card application. And you would be able to qualify for a credit card without having any income. The Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure (CARD) Act was signed into law in May 2009 to change a number of practices.

How did the CARD Act change student credit cards?

The CARD Act made a lot of changes in how credit card issuers do business with students. One of the biggest changes was requiring students to be able to demonstrate an ability to pay. If you are under 21 and do not have sufficient income (a campus job, for example), you would need to get a co-signer.

In addition, colleges must now limit the amount of credit card marketing on campus. The days of free t-shirts and pizzas in exchange for credit card applications are gone. But that doesn’t mean it is impossible for a college student to get a credit card. Some highly reputable banks and credit unions still offer student cards. And building a good credit score while still in college is still highly recommended.

How can I protect myself from racking up debt?

When used properly, credit cards are a very convenient method of repayment. However, when not used properly, you can end up deep in credit card debt. It is important to establish a healthy relationship to credit now, with your first credit card.

You should try to ensure that you pay off your credit card bill in full and on time every month. Ideally, you should set up an automatic monthly payment. And to keep yourself on track, take advantage of alerts offered by most credit card companies. You can even get daily text messages reminding you of your balance.

How can I automate my credit card usage?

If all of this sounds confusing, don’t worry. There’s actually a way you can automate your payments so you never even have to bother with the hassle of using a credit card. All it takes is a few minutes of upfront work.

First, you’ll need at least one recurring monthly bill of the same amount, such as Netflix or Spotify. Log in to your account and set up an automatic payment each month using your credit card. Make a note of how much your monthly bill costs.

Next, log in to your bank account. Set up a second automatic payment to go to your credit card each month for the same amount as the bill. If your bank doesn’t offer the option to set up automatic payments, you may also be able to set up your credit card to automatically withdraw the amount of the bill from your bank.

Because you know this bill will be for the same amount each month (barring any price increases), you can literally just leave this running in the background each month on autopilot. You don’t even have to carry your credit card in your wallet if you don’t want to. Then, when you graduate, you’ll automatically have an improved credit score!

What happens to my student credit card when I graduate?

Congratulations! You’ve made it to the finish line. But what about your student credit card? You will have a few options once you graduate.

First, you can simply keep it. You will want to keep the credit card open, because it helps you build a long credit history. However, you might want to call your credit card company and ask if you can migrate to a standard (non-student) credit card.

But if you have been using your credit card properly, you will have an excellent credit score when you graduate – and you will be able to get any credit card that you want.

Here is a summary of our favorite cards:

Credit cards
Best for
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Lindsay VanSomeren is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Lindsay here

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Credit Cards, Reviews

FS Build Card Review: Build Credit With This Payday Loan Alternative

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: iStock

Credit cards for people with poor credit scores are few and far between, but FS Card is looking to change that with its first product, the Build Card, an unsecured credit card designed specifically for borrowers with subprime credit scores.

If you’re in need of a couple of hundred dollars and your credit score falls below 600, you’re not likely to get approved for an unsecured credit card. You’re considered a subprime borrower — a lending risk to banks, who worry they won’t get their money back.

But when banks refuse to lend to risky borrowers, those consumers turn to more expensive short-term borrowing options like payday loans, auto title loans, and pawn products. Annual interest rates on those products often exceed 300%, according to research from the Pew Charitable Trusts. Paying a high interest rate and a number of additional fees attached to those short-term products can trap consumers in a cycle of debt.

What is FS Card?

FS Card was founded by former Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Assistant Director of Card and Payment Markets Marla Blow in 2014 to fill what she says was a gap in the credit card industry. Blow says she began FS Card when she noticed — after the housing market crashed in 2008 — banks began “pulling back from subprime consumers in a very directed way,” because they were wary of tougher regulations on the financial industry. As a result, those consumers turned to more expensive products like payday loans, she says.

“I wanted to be able to put that consumer into a place where, rather than having to go out and get a payday loan, they could use a credit card,” Blow says. She designed the Build Card to offer subprime consumers access to something that “a lot of our economy assumes is already present” — a rotating line of credit.

Build Card overview

The Build Card is an unsecured credit card for borrowers with subprime FICO credit scores in the 550 to 600 range (on a scale of 300 to 850). The invite-only card charges a variable 29.9% APR. The rate is high for a credit card but about 10 times less expensive than some payday loans. However, it’s not a card you’d want to open unless you are seriously in need of the funds and are looking to build your credit score.

What we like about the Build Card

Payday loan alternative

Ideally, a payday loan is used to meet short-term borrowing needs — to hold you over until you receive your next paycheck. However, Pew research shows the average borrower uses them for five months at a time on average and has to pay an average $55 fee ($95 online) each time they extend the loan, which is what makes these loans so expensive. That’s $275 spent renewing a loan that’s on average $375. Furthermore, Pew research found seven in 10 borrowers use them for everyday expenses like groceries, rent, and utilities.

With access to a rotating line of credit, borrowers can extend the amount of time they have to repay borrowed money without having to pay renewal fees for a payday loan.

Unsecured credit card for subprime consumers

The Build Card is a rare unsecured credit card for those with poor credit scores. Most cards you can qualify for with a score lower than 600 are secured cards, which require a deposit to secure a credit line. For people who have a few hundred dollars on hand, a secured card is a great way to get access to credit, but many low-income Americans are not in a position to spend that kind of money.

Build your credit score

FS Card reports your activity to national credit bureau TransUnion so you can use the Build Card to improve your credit score if you maintain good credit management habits. Negative activity — like late payments and high credit card balances — will also be reported, so be sure to pay your balance on time and in full each month for best results.

Quick and easy approval process

Because you must be invited to apply for the Build Card, you are prequalified for approval. There is an excellent chance you will be approved for the Build Card, unless something on your credit report has drastically changed between the time FS Card mailed your invitation and when you apply.

No foreign transaction fees

The Build Card doesn’t charge you for using it overseas, so you don’t need to worry about racking up fees for swiping your credit card on vacation.

What we don’t like about the Build Card

Invite-only

As of this writing, the Build Card is invitation only and has more than 50,000 cardholders, Blow says. You’ll have to wait to receive a code in the mail before you can apply for the card online, which is unfortunate for anyone who is in need of short-term funds now.

FS Card selects borrowers using an algorithm to prequalify borrowers with subprime credit scores and sends invitations to potential customers monthly. The algorithm sifts through consumer credit reporting data to identify consumers who have recently done something that reflects better borrowing habits like paying off a payday loan or an account in collections.

Blow tells MagnifyMoney FS Card will offer an open application for Build Card in 2018.

Many fees

This card carries a lot of fees. If you’re trying to build your credit and have the funds to get a secured credit card that doesn’t charge an annual fee or has an interest-free period, you’re better off going that route, as it will be significantly less expensive.

  • Startup & membership fees: It costs Build Card customers $125 simply to open the account. FS Card charges the initial start-up fee ($53) and annual membership fee ($72) on your first statement. Although the card begins accruing interest immediately, Blow tells MagnifyMoney FS Card does not charge Build Card users interest on the start-up fees assessed to the credit card.After the first year, the annual membership is paid in $6 monthly installments, charged to the Build Card.
  • Authorized user fee: If you authorize another person to use your Build Card, you’ll be charged a $12 fee per authorized user.
  • Late/returned payment fee: Don’t miss a payment on this credit card, or you’ll be charged a whopping $35 fee.
  • Cash advance fee: Try your best not to take cash from this credit line — in addition to paying 29.9% interest, you’ll be charged the greater of $10 or 3% of the amount you take.

A $500 limit

If you need to borrow more than $500, you’re out of luck with this card. Everyone who opens a Build Card account starts off with a $500 limit. But remember, that limit is immediately reduced to $375 once you open the card and are charged $125 in fees. That also doesn’t leave you a lot of room to spend, considering it’s bad for your credit score to carry a balance close to your credit limit. Blow says the company may soon offer starting lines above and below $500.

Right now, FS Card checks every month to see if you’re managing the card wisely (read: making payments on time). If you are, you could qualify for a credit line increase to $750 in as soon as seven months. Blow says 59% of Build Card customers have gotten increases so far.

No 0% interest period

This card doesn’t come with an interest-free grace period. It will begin charging a 29.9% APR to your purchases immediately.

No balance transfer

The Build Card doesn’t come with a balance transfer offer, so you won’t be able to use the card as a debt consolidation tool. If you are in a large amount of credit card debt, you could try applying for a personal loan through online lenders like Lending Club or Prosper, which offer personal loans to people with credit scores below 600.

Who is the Build Card best for?

The Build Card is worth opening if you:

  • have a credit score between 550 and 600,
  • are ready to start rebuilding your credit score, and
  • want an alternative to payday loans in the event of an emergency but don’t have the cash on hand to open a secured credit card.

Beware: If your poor credit history resulted from poor spending habits like spending more than you could afford or making late payments, ask yourself if you’re ready to make a change. Opening this credit line won’t help your credit score any in the long run if you don’t.

How to apply for Build Card

You must be selected to apply for the Build Card. When you receive your invitation to apply, you’ll be given an offer code and application ID to enter into the application form on the Build Card website. Enter that information, your ZIP code, and the last four digits of your Social Security number to apply for approval. You should know if you’re approved or not within a few minutes.

Source: thebuildcard.com

Alternatives to the Build Card

Brittney Laryea
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Brittney Laryea is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brittney at brittney@magnifymoney.com

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Credit Cards

Bank of America Premium Rewards® Credit Card Review: Rewards for High Spenders with a BofA Relationship

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Bank of America is joining the premium rewards card category with the new Bank of America Premium Rewards® credit card. This card boasts a 50,000-point sign-on bonus and a much lower annual fee ($95) than comparable cards, making it a great way for consumers to earn rewards at a low yearly cost. There are additional perks for Bank of America account holders that will allow you to earn a higher rewards rate, making this card a great choice if you have an account with Bank of America and are looking for a premium rewards card.

We believe that everyone should be able to earn at least 2% cash back, without paying a fee (thanks to Citi Double Cash). If you have over $20,000 in a Bank of America checking, savings, or investment account, you will be able to earn more than 2%. If you have less (or no relationship balance), it gets more complicated.

Key insights

  • This card only works if you have a deep relationship with Bank of America. If you don’t have other assets (either in a savings account or investment account), you are better off with a flat-rate cash back card, such as the Citi® Double Cash Card
  • This card is probably not for you:
    1. If you have less than a $50,000 relationship with Bank of America and spend less than $2,000 a month on the card.
    2. If you spend a lot in travel and dining but have less than a $20,000 total relationship balance with Bank of America.
  • This card is for you – and you can earn more than 2%:
    1. If you spend at least $2,000 a month and have at least a $50,000 relationship balance with Bank of America
    2. If you have a relationship balance between $20,000 and $50,000 and spend a lot on travel and dining.
  • The biggest winners are people who have more than $100,000 at BofA (and that can include an IRA at Merrill Edge) and spend more than $3,000 a month on the card. People with this profile can earn up to 3% – which is hard to beat.

How the card works

This card charges a $95 annual fee, which is much less than competing premium rewards cards that have annual fees around $450. But this card competes on value (the amount of cash back you can earn) rather than luxury (you will not get access to swanky Amex lounges, for example).

There is a 50,000-point intro bonus offer, available for qualifying customers. Customers must make at least $3,000 in purchases in the first three months of opening to earn the bonus. This is a feasible amount if you typically charge $1,000 a month.

The amount you earn depends upon your relationship with the bank. Your total relationship includes:

  • How much you have deposited in a checking and savings account. (But beware: interest rates are very low at BofA. Find the best savings account rates here).
  • How much you have invested at Merrill Lynch, which includes Merrill Edge (the self-directed brokerage account that has very competitive fees and commission).

As a cardholder you will automatically earn 2 points per dollar spent on travel and dining and 1.5 points per dollar spent on all other purchases. The more assets you have at BofA, the more points you can earn. Account holders must enroll in Bank of America’s Preferred Rewards program to benefit from these higher rewards levels. See the breakdown below.

We like the concept: BofA is trying to reward their most loyal customers with the best rewards.

The Bank of America Premium Rewards credit card is most beneficial to those who have $20,000 or more in a Bank of America account. This is a lot of cash for a savings or checking account with low interest rates. However, it’s possible to earn a higher interest rate from your Bank of America account if you roll over your IRA or 401(k) into a Merrill Edge® account. You can learn more here.

The table below shows your effective annual cash back rate depending on your monthly spending and relationship with Bank of America. This first table demonstrates the cash back rate earned for cardholders who are not big spenders in the bonus categories of travel and dining. Monthly spending was allocated at 40% toward travel and dining and 60% on all other purchases. The effective annual cash back rate deducts the annual fee, but does not factor in the sign-on bonus.

As you can see from the table, you won’t see significant return until you have at least a $50,000 relationship with Bank of America and spend over $2,000 a month. This will allow you to earn an effective annual cash back rate of over 2%. From this point on, you will start to see higher cash back earning potential.

Now if you’re a big spender in the bonus categories of travel and dining, you will see higher cash back earning potential at lower relationship levels. For the table below, monthly spending was allocated at 80% toward travel and dining and 20% on all other purchases. Again, the effective annual cash back rate deducts the annual fee, but does not factor in the sign-on bonus.

As you can see from this table, having at least a $20,000 relationship with Bank of America and spending over $3,000 a month allows you to earn an effective annual cash back rate of over 2%. From this point on, you will start to see substantial cash back earning potential.

In conclusion, the Bank of America Premium Rewards card is a good option if you are an affluent account holder at Bank of America and prefer to open a premium rewards credit card from the same bank as your savings account. If you plan on moving your IRA or 401(k) to Merrill Edge®, you will benefit from a higher interest rate.

How to qualify

To qualify for this card you will need excellent credit. The higher rewards levels for Bank of America checking, savings, and investment accounts with large amounts of money target affluent customers. Therefore, you will also need to have a steady job, which will show that you are responsible and can pay your bills.

What we like about the card

Large sign-on bonus

This card offers a 50,000-point sign-on bonus when you spend $3,000 in your first three months of account opening. This a reasonable amount of money to earn the large sign-on bonus, and lower than competing cards.

Reasonable annual fee

This card charges an annual fee that is significantly lower than competitors who can charge upward of $450 a year. The low annual fee allows you to enjoy more of the rewards you earn.

Bonus for Bank of America account holders

If you have a checking, savings, or investment account with Bank of America, you will benefit greatly from the additional points you earn. Higher tier points depend on the amount of money you have in your account and can increase your rewards potential significantly.

Unlimited higher rewards rates

You will benefit from the higher rewards rate for travel and dining without any caps. This means you don’t have to worry about hitting a predetermined dollar value and then being downgraded to a lower rewards rate.

What we don’t like about the card

Must be a Bank of America account holder for higher rewards rates

To earn more points per dollar spent you need to be a Bank of America account holder with a checking, savings, or investment account. If you don’t have an account, you will still earn the 2 points per dollar on travel and dining and 1.5 points per dollar on all other purchases, but can find a better deal with a flat-rate card such as the Citi® Double Cash.

Who the card is best for

This card benefits affluent Bank of America account holders with a checking, savings, or retirement account balance over $20,000 at the bank. If you fall in this category, your loyalty to Bank of America will be rewarded with the higher tiered rewards levels that allow for high rewards earning potential. In addition, this card has one of the lowest annual fees for premium rewards cards on the market and offers a large intro bonus.

Alternatives

There are multiple combinations of savings accounts and credit cards that you can use to maximize your savings. In the table below we compared the Citi® Double Cash Card, the Chase Sapphire Reserve® card, and the Citi ThankYou® Premier card paired with a typical online bank savings account to the Bank of America Premium Rewards credit card.

Note that the Citi ThankYou® Premier card waives the annual fee in year one. Also, we listed the effective annual fee for the Chase Sapphire Reserve® card; assuming you spend $300 in travel a month, the $450 annual fee would be an effective $150.

*.06% interest may be available if you roll over an IRA or 401(k) into a Merrill Edge® account.

From this table we can draw several conclusions:

  • The Citi® Double Cash Card paired with a typical online bank savings account will earn you the most money at year’s end.
  • A typical online bank earns you the most interest compared to the other savings accounts.
  • The Bank of America Premium Rewards credit card will earn you the most cash back, but coupled with the low interest rate from the Bank of America savings account, you will fall short of earning as much money at year’s end as Citi® Double Cash or Chase Sapphire Reserve® cards paired with a typical online bank  savings account.

To sum it all up, if you want to earn the most money at year’s end, the best option would be the Citi® Double Cash Card paired with a typical online bank  savings account. The high interest rate that a typical online bank offers coupled with the card’s flat-rate cash back rewards are what make this the most profitable pairing. The Bank of America Premium Rewards credit card lures consumers in with the higher tier rewards levels for affluent account holders, but offers a low interest rate for those accounts that ultimately hinders your year-end earning potential. However, if you transfer your IRA or 401(k) to Merrill Edge, you will earn a higher interest rate than a typical Bank of America savings account and can make up some of the difference.

Here’s an overview of the alternative cards:

Citi® Double Cash Card

Annual fee

$0 For First Year

$0 Ongoing

Cashback Rate

-

APR

14.49%-24.49%

Variable

The Citi® Double Cash Card is a flat-rate cash back card that will earn you a consistent cash back rate. You will earn 1% when you make a purchase and an additional 1% when you pay your bill. This card has no annual fee unlike the Bank of America Premium Rewards credit card or the other alternatives. Keep in mind this is a cash back card, so you will not be earning points that can be redeemed for travel. Cash back comes in the form of a statement credit, deposit, check, or gift card. Paired with a typical online bank savings account, this card will earn you the most money at the end of the year (excluding year one), beating the Bank of America Premium Rewards card by $177 in subsequent years. Refer to our chart above for a detailed comparison.

 Chase Sapphire Reserve<sup>SM</sup>

Annual fee

$450 For First Year

$450 Ongoing

Rewards

3X points on travel and dining, 1 point on everything else

APR

16.99%-23.99%

This card comes with several great perks that make it a stand-out favorite among frequent travelers. Each account anniversary year, Chase automatically gives you $300 in statement credits as reimbursement for travel purchases you make throughout the year on your card. This lowers the $450 annual fee to an effective $150. You will also benefit from a 50% rewards boost when you redeem for airfare, hotels, car rentals, and cruises through Chase Ultimate Rewards®. For example, 50,000 points are worth $750 toward travel. The Chase Sapphire Reserve® is a great alternative if you are a frequent traveler and want a higher redemption value for your rewards.

Citi ThankYou® Premier Card

Annual fee

$0 For First Year

$95 Ongoing

Rewards

3X on travel, 2X on dining and entertainment, 1X on all other purchases

APR

15.49%-24.49%

This card is a good alternative if you want a card that offers a high rewards rate for travel, dining, and entertainment. If you’re not a Bank of America account holder, you will earn a higher rewards rate on travel and entertainment with the Citi ThankYou® Premier card. Citi also charges an annual fee, but this is waived the first year. Keep in mind that you will fall short of earning as much money at the end of the year with this card compared to the Bank of America Premium Rewards card (by approximately $63 in year one and $158 in subsequent years). Refer to our chart above for a detailed comparison.

FAQ

This card will be released in September 2017.

Yes, anyone can apply for this card. Keep in mind, an excellent credit score is needed to have the highest approval odds.

No, there are no limits to the amount of points you can earn in each category. That means you will consistently earn the higher rate for travel and dining, regardless how much you spend.

Alexandria White
Alexandria White |

Alexandria White is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Alexandria at alexandria@magnifymoney.com

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Credit Cards, Reviews

Chase Sapphire Reserve Review: Is the Annual Fee Worth It?

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Looking for a travel rewards card with a big bang for your buck? Chase Sapphire Reserve may be right for you.It comes with a litany of benefits for frequent travelers including:

  • 3 points per dollar spent on travel and dining.
  • 1 point per dollar spent on anything else.
  • Your points are worth 50% more when you redeem through the Chase Ultimate Rewards portal.
  • Ability to transfer your points on a 1:1 basis to major airline and hotel rewards programs.
  • $100 statement credit after you pay for your TSA PreCheck or Global Entry application.
  • The first $300 you spend on travel during each 12-month period measured by your sign-up date will be automatically reimbursed through statement credits.
  • Currently, you can get 50,000 bonus points when you spend $4,000 within three months of opening your card.

These benefits do come at a cost. The card has a $450 annual fee — and it is not waived in the first year. While the benefits are top-notch, they’re only accessible to those who can float the $450 in upfront costs.

 Chase Sapphire Reserve<sup>SM</sup>

APPLY NOW Secured

on Chase’s secure website

Chase Sapphire ReserveSM

Annual fee
$450 For First Year
$450 Ongoing
Rewards
3X points on travel and dining, 1 point on everything else
APR
16.99%-23.99%
Credit required
excellent-credit

Excellent


The information related to the Chase Sapphire Reserve and Preferred has been collected independently by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or approved by the issuer.

How to earn points

The best way to earn points with Chase Sapphire Reserve is by placing all of your travel and dining purchases on this card exclusively. These purchases will get you 3 points for every dollar spent on travel or restaurant dining, while all other purchases will get you a less competitive return of 1 point per every dollar spent.

What, exactly, qualifies as a travel purchase? The obvious things, like hotels and car rentals, are included. But don’t forget merchants like Airbnb, Expedia, or even your state DOT when you drive on toll roads.

Certain travel-related expenses do not count as travel purchases. Amusement park tickets, excursions purchased directly through tour companies, and that Starbucks latte you purchased at the airport will not be counted as a 3-point-per-dollar travel expense, for example.

If you’re making a big purchase, but you’re not sure if it will qualify as a travel expense, it’s worth it to call the company you will be purchasing from. You want to find out how they are coded to credit card companies. Do they come through as “travel” or is the business classified into another category? Finding the answer to this question can help you decide if you should make the purchase on your Chase Sapphire Reserve or if you should charge it somewhere else where you’ll get more than one measly point per dollar.

Best ways to redeem points

Whether you’re purchasing a plane ticket for a work trip or booking your next family vacation, you want to make sure you’re maximizing all those points you’ve earned.

One of the best ways to redeem your points at booking is by using the Chase Ultimate Rewards portal. Here, you’ll be able to find flights, hotels, and more with no blackout dates. Because you’re a Chase Sapphire Reserve holder, your points will be worth 50% more here. That means that instead of your 50,000-point bonus being worth $500, it will actually be worth $750.

Another potentially great way to book is by transferring your points to one of Chase’s partner airline or hotel rewards programs. This can be done in real time on a 1:1 basis. Sometimes, it may even be a better deal than booking through Chase’s Ultimate Rewards portal.

For example, a flight from New York City to Tokyo may run you $1,200. If you booked within the Chase Ultimate Rewards portal, that would cost you 80,000 points.

However, if you transferred your points to United MileagePlus miles, you could score a flight for 70,000 points if you booked at the “Saver Award” level in economy class. There is limited seating at this award level, so you would want to book far ahead, but doing so would save you 10,000 points.

Chase Ultimate Rewards has several transfer partners aside from United. The full list includes:

  • British Airways Avios
  • Flying Blue (Air France/KLM)
  • Korean Airlines Skypass
  • Singapore Airlines Krisflyer
  • Southwest Airlines Rapid Rewards
  • United MileagePlus
  • Virgin Atlantic Flying Club
  • Hyatt Gold Passport
  • IHG Rewards
  • Marriott Rewards/Ritz Carlton Rewards

How to qualify

Those with the best chance of qualifying for Chase Sapphire Reserve will have a credit score of 700 or above without a history of chronically late payments. Those with a credit score below 650 are unlikely to qualify.

This card is only for people with excellent credit. In general, that means your score should be above 700. In addition, Chase (and other credit card issuers) have been cracking down on people who go from one bonus offer to the next. If you apply for a lot of credit cards, don’t be surprised if you are declined.

What we like about the card

There are a lot of reasons to love Chase Sapphire Reserve if you’re big on travel.

The bonus is nothing to laugh at.

Fifty thousand points is on the high end of standard spending bonuses for credit cards, but when you book through the Ultimate Rewards portal, Chase’s offer is even more stellar.

Your annual fee is effectively lowered to $150 every year.

Because you will receive up to $300 in statement credits for travel reimbursements per year, the $450 annual fee is effectively lowered to $150 — as long as you actually spend $300 on travel.

Rewards points are generous on dining and travel purchases.

Three points per dollar is a large multiplier in the world of travel rewards credit cards.

No foreign transaction fees.

When you’re traveling, the last thing you want to deal with is foreign transaction fees. They can quickly eat away at any value you’re getting with your rewards points, so we’re glad to see that this card doesn’t have any.

Additional $100 statement credit specifically for Global Entry or TSA PreCheck.

Both of these programs can save you a ton of time and hassle, especially if you travel frequently. The $100 statement credit reduces or even eliminates the application fees, depending on which product you pursue.

Plentiful travel protection benefits. When you book your travel with your Chase Sapphire Reserve card, you automatically have a lot of coverage as long as 100% of the purchase goes on the card. Coverage includes:

  • Auto rental collision damage waiver. You won’t have to purchase collision insurance from your rental company as physical damages to the vehicle will be covered by this waiver provided via Chase.
  • Roadside assistance. You’re covered up to $50, four times per year. Covered services include locksmiths, tows, tire changes, jump-starts, and gas.
  • Baggage delay insurance. If the airline has issues locating your luggage at your destination airport for six hours or more, this insurance policy will reimburse you for essential purchases, like shampoo or slacks. The policy maxes out at $100 per day over the course of five days.
  • Lost luggage reimbursement. What if the airport never finds your bag? Or damages your belongings? Chase will reimburse the value of your belongings up to $3,000.
  • Trip cancellation/interruption insurance. Certain emergencies, such as severe weather or illness, will merit a reimbursement of up to $10,000 if they force you to cancel or cut your trip short.
  • Trip delay reimbursement. If your flight is delayed for over six hours and the airline is offering little to nothing in the way of reimbursement, Chase will pay you back $500 per ticket to cover things like food and hotel stays.
  • Emergency coverages. Chase provides coverage for emergency evacuations, emergency medical and dental services, and accidental death or dismemberment while you’re on a trip that you’ve paid for 100% with your Chase Sapphire Rewards card.

What we don’t like about the card

While Chase Sapphire Reserve’s rewards are out of this world, they do come at a steep price.

The annual fee is colossal.

A $450 annual fee is huge—especially since it is not waived in the first year. This limits the number of people who will even be able to afford to open a card, nonetheless justify the expense.

Rewards points are scant on everyday purchases.

While this card is generous with rewards points for dining and travel, purchases in every other category only earn 1 point per dollar. Even when you account for the 50% bonus when booking through the Ultimate Rewards portal, it would be wise to put these purchases on one of many other cards on the market that will earn you more points.

Travel hackers will have a hard time qualifying.

Banks (and not just Chase) are making it more difficult for people to jump from bonus offer to bonus offer. If that sounds like you, it will probably be difficult to get approved.

Who the Chase Sapphire Reserve best for

Those who travel frequently, spending a good portion of their budget on related purchases including dining, will benefit most from this card. These applicants have a solid credit history and score and are more likely to have a higher income as they have the funds available to front the $450 annual fee without hurting their budget. Their travels enable them to get the most out of not only the rewards points but also the statement credits that make this offer so attractive.

Chase Sapphire Reserve vs. Chase Sapphire Preferred

If you have the $450 to spend up front, and know that you will be able to take advantage of the annual $300 travel reimbursement, Chase Sapphire Reserve is likely a better card for you than the Chase Sapphire Preferred.

While the Preferred’s annual fee of $95 is waived for the first year, in subsequent years its annual fee is only $55 less than the Reserve’s effective $150 fee after travel reimbursements.

For an additional $55, your Reserve points are worth 1.5 points each when you book through the Ultimate Rewards portal versus the Preferred’s 1.25 points. Let’s look back at our trip from New York City to Tokyo. With the Reserve, you would need 80,000 points to book your $1,200 flight. With the Preferred, you would need 96,000 points. That’s a 16,000-point difference. In order to make up the difference, you’d have to spend $6,400 on travel or dining on your Preferred card.

Fifty-five dollars starts to look like a deal.

You also earn 3 points instead of the Preferred rate of 2 points on each dollar you spend on travel and dining.

Given the increased point values, making up the $55 difference is easy. Having the income to support opening the Reserve in the first place is the challenge. Not only do you need to have $450 on hand up front, but you’ll also need to have an income that justifies a credit line of $10,000+. If you will have trouble achieving either of these things, the Preferred may be a better card for you.

Alternatives

While Chase Sapphire Reserve offers fantastic benefits, it’s not for everyone. If you want a credit card that offers travel rewards without such large impositions, you do have other options.

 Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

Annual fee

$0 For First Year

$95 Ongoing

Rewards

2 points on travel and dining, 1 point on all other spending

APR

16.99%-23.99%

Variable

Chase Sapphire Preferred is much like the Reserve option, except its $95 annual fee is waived for the first year. It doesn’t have all the same perks, but it does offer 2 points per dollar spent on dining and travel while offering 1 point on all other purchases. When you redeem points in the Ultimate Rewards portal, they’ll be worth 25% more instead of Reserve’s 50% incentive.

Barclaycard Arrival Plus® World Elite Mastercard<sup>®</sup>

Annual fee

$0 For First Year

$89 Ongoing

Rewards

2X miles on all purchases

APR

16.99%-23.99%

Variable

While the bonus in the Ultimate Rewards portal is attractive, earning 1 point per dollar spent on everyday purchases is not. The Barclaycard Arrival Plus® World Elite Mastercard® offers 2 miles per dollar spent on any purchase, which may make it more valuable for those planning one or two trips per year rather than getting away every other month for work or leisure. The annual fee is waived in the first year, and it currently comes with a 40,000-mile bonus when you spend $3,000 in the first 90 days. Barclaycard also gives you back 5% of the miles you redeem. For example, if you redeem 40,000 miles, you’ll get 2,000 back.

Venture® from Capital One®

Annual fee

$0 For First Year

$59 Ongoing

Rewards

2 miles per dollar spent

APR

13.99%-23.99%

Variable

Similar to the Barclaycard Arrival Plus® World Elite Mastercard®, the Capital One Venture card offers 2 miles per dollar spent on any purchase, with each mile worth one cent when redeemed against a past travel purchase. The annual fee is waived in the first year, and the current sign-up bonus is 40,000 miles when you spend $3,000 in the first three months.

FAQ

Yes, though you should keep in mind the credit requirements above. If you currently have Chase Ultimate Rewards points, it’s wise to transfer them to the Reserve so you can take full advantage of the 1.5-point redemption rate in the Ultimate Rewards portal.

Yes. As long as you share the same address, you will be able to transfer points one to another instantaneously. You cannot combine or share points with a family member who lives at a different address.

No. Once you transfer points to another program, you cannot convert them back to Ultimate Rewards points. Be sure you understand the redemption process for each program before you transfer to ensure you’re getting the maximum value for your points.

No. As long as you keep your account open, your points will not expire. If you have other Chase cards that are eligible for the Ultimate Rewards program, you could close your Reserve account and transfer them to your other card, but as of today Reserve offers the best redemption rate in the Ultimate Rewards portal, so this may not be the best move.

Brynne Conroy
Brynne Conroy |

Brynne Conroy is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brynne at brynne@magnifymoney.com

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