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7 Signs You’re Working With a Shady Credit Repair Firm

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7 Signs You're Working With a Shady Credit Repair Firm

It’s natural to want a quick fix for your credit problems, but be wary of any practice that seems deceptive — even if it could work in your favor.

In September 2016, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau filed a lawsuit against Prime Marketing Holdings, a credit repair firm based in Van Nuys, Calif. In its complaint, the CFPB alleged the company charged customers advance fees “totaling hundreds of dollars” and misled customers about their ability to remove negative items from their credit reports.

The case is still active, but it’s just one example of the proliferation of credit repair abuse in the U.S. And it gives rise to the question: How do I know if a credit repair company is legitimate or just another scam?

We’ve put together a litmus test of seven signs you could be working with a shady credit repair company.

1. They ask you to pay before they start working.

One of the biggest red flags in the credit repair business is requiring an upfront fee before any services are rendered. Under the Credit Repair Organizations Act (CROA), credit repair companies can’t charge advance fees before rendering services.

In some cases, advance fees can be only a couple of hundred dollars. But some companies have been found to ask for thousands of dollars upfront. In 2011, the Federal Trade Commission sued Doug and Julie Parker, owners of a Texas-based credit repair firm called RMCN Credit Services, Inc. The FTC claimed the couple charged customers a staggering $2,000 retainer fee before they completed any work. In the end, the Parkers were fined $400,000 by the federal watchdog.

2. They try to give you a new “credit identity.”

Another dodgy credit repair practice is when a company tries to convince clients to create a “new credit identity.” To establish this identity, the firm may offer to issue the client a nine-digit “credit profile number” or even prompt them to apply for an employer identification number with the IRS. With the new number in place, the firm could them encourage the client to apply for new credit and stop using their real Social Security number.

Don’t be fooled — this practice is completely illegal. An EIN is only used to identify businesses, and it is not a substitute for a Social Security number. Additionally, that credit profile number could easily be someone else’s stolen Social Security number. “These companies may be selling stolen Social Security numbers, often those taken from children,” the FTC warns. If you fall for this trap, you are essentially committing identity theft.

3. They ask you to lie on credit applications.

Some credit repair organizations may also ask you to lie on credit applications in order to qualify for more credit. For example, they may ask you to report more income than you earn. It’s illegal to make false statements on credit applications.

4. They dispute correct information on your credit report.

Yet another way credit repair companies try to manipulate the system is by misinforming consumers about the rules surrounding credit reports. They may tell consumers that they can fight every single item on their credit report — even if the item is accurate.

This is not true. If there is a negative item on your credit report that you feel is an error, you absolutely can fight to have it removed. But if it’s negative because you were, indeed, late on your bill, or did, in fact, file for bankruptcy, you cannot file to have it removed by claiming it is inaccurate.

5. They promise to get you a perfect credit score.

When a company promises they can improve your credit score or even get your score up to a specific number, don’t believe their hype.

In 2015, the FTC filed suit against a company called FTC Credit Solutions for making exactly these types of claims. The company's representatives told customers they would get their credit score into the 700s and promised any negative credit report information could be removed. On top of that, they also charged advance fees before rendering any services. The case was settled very quickly to the tune of a $2.4 million penalty against the defendants.

6. They claim they are affiliated with a government agency.

Some repair firms fraudulently claim they are affiliated with the FTC or another government agency. If you are filing bankruptcy, it is true that you’ll be required to get some kind of credit counseling. But that counseling must be from a government-approved organization. There’s a full list of approved credit counseling firms on the U.S. Trustee Program website. If you’re thinking of working with a firm that isn’t on that list, you might want to reconsider.

7. They don’t want you to contact the credit bureaus on your own.

Don’t believe a company that tells you they are the only way to contact the credit bureaus. By law, any consumer can contact credit bureaus directly without a third party. You also have the right to access your credit report from each of the three credit bureaus once per year for free. If you’ve been rejected for anything for credit-related reasons, you have 60 days to request a free copy of your report. This enables you to keep potential creditors honest.

If a company ever tells you that you are not allowed to contact the credit bureaus on your own, walk away — fast.

How to Repair Your Credit All by Yourself

The MagnifyMoney team highly recommends taking simple steps to improve your credit on your own, without the risk of working with a shady credit repair firm.

Read MagnifyMoney’s full, in-depth guide to repairing your own credit.

Start by getting a copy of your free credit report from each of the credit bureaus. The simplest way to do this is by requesting copies at AnnualCreditReport.com, which is a government-sponsored website.

From there, look over your information to make sure everything is accurate. If there are late payments listed, did you actually pay late? Does it show closed accounts accurately? Do you recognize all of the accounts?

Sometimes reports do have errors. If you find one, consider the fact that you may be a victim of identity theft and take appropriate steps as necessary.

If you’re instead the victim of an honest mistake, contact the credit bureaus directly. You will have to do so online and via written letter. You will also have to contact the entity that incorrectly reported the line item. You can get a sample letter here.

Be sure to keep copies of all of your paperwork and follow up on your dispute. The credit bureaus have 30 days to investigate. If all turns out well, they will remove the item, which could result in a higher credit score.

If they do not find in your favor, you can request that a copy of the dispute be attached to your credit report moving forward, but you will have to pay a fee to do so. While this will not improve your credit score, it could potentially alert future creditors to the fact that you do not agree with the negative item.

There are also rare cases where you can attempt to get an accurate item removed from your credit report. If you were not aware of a debt, but you quickly paid it off once you were properly notified, the creditor may be willing to remove the item from your report. This kindness may also be extended if you were experiencing a temporary illness or life emergency. These removals are rare, but are most often rewarded when you are an otherwise responsible steward of your debts.

To make your case to your creditor, you will need to write them a letter of goodwill. In it, explain that you understand why the item is on your report, but also explain why you temporarily were unable to fulfill your obligation. Stress the fact that you are an otherwise responsible borrower, and point out specific instances in your business relationship where this has proven to be true.

It’s also a good idea to appeal to their human side. Explain what the removal of the debt would mean for you. Is there a major milestone coming up, such as a job interview or a mortgage application? Thank them sincerely for the time they’re taking to review your case and cross your fingers. Goodwill letters do not have a high success rate, but you will have a zero percent success rate if you don’t try.

Read MagnifyMoney’s full guide on letters of goodwill.

Finding Legitimate Solutions

Even though there are a lot of scammers out there, it’s good to remember that there are legitimate credit repair organizations, too. However, before you pay a company to help you repair your credit, read our guide on repairing your credit on your own and our guide on credit counseling. At the very least, properly vet a credit repair firm before you sign up for their services — and watch out for the warning signs we covered before.

Another potentially safer way to go about credit repair is by working with a not-for-profit credit counselor. These organizations have a lower rate of deceptive practices and can work with you in a more holistic manner to resolve not just your credit report woes but also your current debt situation.

Brynne Conroy
Brynne Conroy |

Brynne Conroy is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brynne at brynne@magnifymoney.com

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How to Successfully Repair Your Credit All By Yourself

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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“Poor credit? No problem!” claim the credit repair scammers on TV. Scammers and shady businesses swindle away millions of dollars by claiming to have the silver bullet for credit repair, but these companies make promises that they can’t deliver.

Improving your credit score requires thoughtful financial management, but you can improve your credit score on your own. This guide will teach you how to improve your credit score, the right way.

What Is Negative Credit Information?

Negative credit information is any action that causes creditors to consider you a riskier borrower. It includes late payments, accounts in collections, foreclosures, bankruptcy, and tax liens. Once negative credit information is introduced into your credit history, you cannot remove it on your own. However, time heals all wounds. The longer it’s been since the negative information was introduced, the less it will affect your credit score. In time, negative information falls off your credit history.

This list details the length of time that negative credit information affects your credit score:

Late payments: 7 years
Bankruptcies: 7 years for completed Chapter 13 bankruptcies and 10 years for Chapter 7 bankruptcies
Foreclosures: 7 years
Collections: Generally, about 7 years, depending upon the age of the debt being collected
Public record: Generally, about 7 years, although unpaid tax liens can remain indefinitely (always pay the tax man first!)

Rather than despair over negative information, take action to improve your score.

The best way to improve your score is to have good behavior reported every single month. For example, you can take out a secured credit card and use it monthly. Charge no more than 10% of the available credit limit, and pay the balance in full and on time every month. Your credit score will improve as your negative information ages and your credit report fills with positive information.

How to Spot a Credit Repair Scam

Credit repair scammers prey on people who are desperate to remove negative credit information and improve their credit score. Engaging with these scammers won’t improve your credit and may also lead you into legal hot water.

The signs below indicate that a credit repair company is a scam:

  • The company wants you to pay before it provides a service.
  • The company recommends that you don’t contact any credit reporting agencies directly.
  • The company tells you that it can get rid of negative credit information in your credit report, even if that information is accurate.
  • The company advises you to dispute all information in your credit report, regardless of its accuracy or timeliness.
  • The company suggests that you create a new credit identity.

Companies that want you to lie about credit history or create a new credit identity can get you into legal trouble. Companies that provide “new” identifying information use stolen Social Security numbers, and if you use this number then you are committing fraud. Likewise using an Employee Identification Number or Credit Profile Number provided by these companies is a crime. Rather than committing fraud, take the steps below to improve credit on your own.

Assess Your Credit History for Free

You are entitled to receive one free credit report from each of the three major credit reporting bureaus (Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion) every year. These credit reporting agencies keep detailed records of your credit history that you can use to assess your credit. Assessing your credit involves three simple steps:

  1. Download a free copy of all three credit reports.
  2. Review the credit report to find errors.
  3. Prepare a list of items that you need to dispute.

Download free credit reports

AnnualCreditReport.com is a website sponsored by the three major credit reporting bureaus, and they are required to provide you with a full credit report every year. The first time that you assess your credit history, download a report from each of the major credit bureaus by following these steps.

Step one: Visit AnnualCreditReport.com and click on the “Request yours now!” link.

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Step two: Follow the step-by-step instructions on the website. Download credit reports from all three bureaus because a mistake may only be listed at one bureau.

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Once you’ve filled out the form and requested reports from all three bureaus, you’ll fill out some security questions and be directed into your report, one agency at a time. If the security questions trip you up, the website will lock you out of your report, but it will offer a phone number that you can call to get your credit report via mail. If you get locked out, request the report via mail.

After the bureau authenticates you, you’ll be directed to your credit report. In the next step, we’ll show you what you need to review.

Review your credit report

Review every credit reporting agency's credit report in detail. Each report has the following sections: Credit Summary, Accounts (includes payment history), Inquiries, and Negative Information. Reviewing each section can help you understand the source of a poor credit score, and it can help you identify if your report contains errors.

When you review your credit report, you will need to visit each section of your credit report, and keep notes about erroneous information. Remember, there are three bureaus, so you need to repeat this process for all three reports.

The next section details what you should should note.

Take notes

As you review your report, these are the things you should note.

Accounts section
The accounts section contains a detailed history of all accounts (open and closed), your balance, and your payment history associated with each account. You should be able to see month-by-month payment information for 7 years of history. Each month will have a symbol next to it that indicates whether the account was paid as expected or if it was late.

Review each account, the balance, and the payment history, and ask these questions:

  • Do you recognize all of the accounts on your credit report?
  • Are all your closed accounts noted as closed?
  • Does each account have the appropriate account balance listed?
  • Is your payment history accurate?

If you see missed payments that shouldn’t have been there, write it down. Your credit score is negatively impacted when you are 30 days or more past due. If you see a balance on a card that you haven’t used in years, it could be because the account has been stolen. Misinformation in the accounts section harms your credit score, so make a note of all incorrect information.

For your own records you should also take note of the following:

  • What is my current balance relative to my available credit (credit utilization)?
  • Do I have any open accounts that have associated late payments?

Resolving these issues can help you improve your credit score moving forward.

Credit inquiries

Credit inquiries are records of new credit that you’ve applied for. For example, if you apply for a new credit card, a car loan, or a mortgage, you will see records of credit inquiries.

  • Do you recognize all of the inquiries on your credit report?

If someone steals your identity and tries to apply for new credit in your name, an unrecognizable credit inquiry is usually the first sign of a problem. Make a note of any unrecognizable credit inquiries.

You will also want to take note if you see many credit inquiries where you did not receive the line of credit you wanted. Credit inquiries have a slight negative effect on your credit score, so if you’re applying for a lot of credit, you may need to slow down until your credit score improves.

Negative information

Negative information includes negative accounts, collections, or public records. Negative information has the biggest impact on your credit score.

  • Do you recognize all of the negative information on your credit report?

If the negative information in your account is not accurate, you will need to contact the credit bureaus to correct it.

Negative information hurts your credit score, but as it gets older the effect lessens. Take note of all accurate negative information, so you can follow our strategy to avoid it in the future.

Next steps

If all the information in your credit report is correct, then learn how to monitor your credit score for free and how to improve your score.

On the other hand, if you don’t recognize all the information, you will need to take steps to remove incorrect information. And, if your identity has been stolen, there will be even more steps required.

Resolve Incorrect Information on Your Report

Incorrect information appears on your report for four reasons:

  • Someone stole your identity and opened new accounts in your name.
  • Someone stole one of your existing accounts, and started using it.
  • The bank made an error and reported a delinquency or default that never happened.
  • A collection agency made an error and reported a collection item on debt that was never yours.

If someone stole your identity

Incorrect information due to identity theft is a serious issue that you need to resolve as soon as possible. You may not know whether the incorrect information in your report is due to identity theft, but these are some common symptoms of identity theft:

  • You don’t get your bills or other mail because someone has changed the mailing address on your accounts
  • Debt collectors call you about debts that aren’t yours.
  • Medical providers bill you for services you didn’t use.
  • Your health plan rejects your legitimate medical claims because records show you’ve reached your benefits limit.
  • The IRS notifies you that more than one tax return was filed in your name.
  • You are arrested for a crime someone else allegedly committed in your name.

Warning: A common form of identity theft is when a family member steals your Social Security number and uses it to apply for credit.

You can start to resolve identity theft issues by visiting www.identitytheft.gov to report identity theft and get a recovery plan. This is an excellent, free website created by the Federal Trade Commission. In addition to reporting identity theft, you will receive a free action plan, and you’ll gain free access to people who can guide you through the identity resolution process.

Below we detail some important action items you can take.

  1. Place a fraud alert on your account with the credit reporting agencies by calling each credit bureau (numbers below).
    • Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
    • Experian: 1-888-397-3742
    • TransUnion: 1-800-680-72892
  2. Put a credit freeze on your credit reports. A freeze blocks potential creditors from getting access to your credit report, making it less likely an identity thief can open new accounts in your name. Follow the directions in this article to place a credit freeze on your credit reports.
  3. Create an Identity Theft Report by submitting a complaint about the theft to the FTC and filing a police report.

If someone stole your account

If someone stole the account information of an existing account, you should immediately contact your bank or credit card company. Once you report your card as lost or stolen, the bank will typically reissue a new card and correct information on the credit report directly.

Dispute Credit Report Errors

If you do not think you were the victim of identity theft, but believe that there is incorrect information on your credit report, you can dispute the information directly with the credit reporting agencies. We will explain how.

Disputing incorrect information involves three steps:

  • Dispute the item online with each credit reporting agency.
  • Write a letter to each credit reporting agency, and keep copies of your correspondence.
  • Write a letter to each organization (bank, collection agency, credit union, etc.) that submitted incorrect information, and keep copies of those letters.

When you dispute incorrect information, you must keep a copy of your mailed correspondence in case the issue does not get resolved right away. Keeping copies of your correspondence will allow you to get help from the Consumer Federal Protection Bureau if necessary. Your dispute should include all of the following:

  • A copy of your report.
  • Specific information about what is incorrect.
  • Any documents that support your position.
  • An explicit request to remove or correct incorrect information.

If you need to dispute information, download the following step-by-step instructions and letter templates that will make disputing incorrect information as pain free as possible.

Download Now

Reporting to debt collections agencies can be trickier since collection agents are more aggressive in their tactics. The Consumer Federal Protection Bureau has a letter template that you can use to make it clear that you do not owe the debt.

Download Letter Template Now

After you dispute the incorrect information, you will need to follow up to be sure that the information gets resolved.

If following the steps above seems daunting, some organizations specialize in paid credit repair services. Most of the services require a monthly subscription fee between $60-$100 per month, and most reviews report that the negative items are completely removed within 3-5 months. Despite the high cost, legitimate companies provide a valuable service if you’ve been the victim of identity theft and you want someone else to do the work for you.

Of the major credit repair organizations, only Lexington Law has received an A rating from the Better Business Bureau. The Credit People and CreditRepair.com received high ratings from their consumers online, but are not rated by the Better Business Bureau. These companies don’t do anything you can’t do yourself, but they may be worth your money if you’ve got a lot of negative information to remove.

Follow Up on Disputes

Once you register your dispute with the credit reporting agencies, they must investigate the item in question within 30 days, and they must forward all the relevant data you provide about the inaccuracy to the organization that provided the information.

If the information provider finds the disputed information is inaccurate, it must notify all three nationwide credit reporting companies so they can correct the information in your file.

When the investigation is complete, the credit reporting company must give you the results in writing and a free copy of your report if the dispute results in a change. This free report does not count as your annual free report.

If you ask, the credit reporting company must send notices of any corrections to anyone who received your report in the past six months. You can have a corrected copy of your report sent to anyone who received a copy during the past two years for employment purposes.

What if my dispute isn’t resolved?

If an investigation doesn’t resolve your dispute with the credit reporting company, you can request that a statement of the dispute be included in your file and in future reports. You can also ask the credit reporting company to provide a statement to anyone who received a copy of your report in the recent past. You can expect to pay a fee for this service, and a dispute on your credit report does not improve your credit score.

Do I have any other options?

If you are unhappy with the way your case was investigated by the credit reporting agencies, you do not have to give up. Instead, you can complain to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) on their website (www.consumerfinance.gov).

When you complain to the CFPB, you can should provide copies of all of your correspondence to prove your case. The CFPB will reach out to the credit reporting agencies on your behalf and try to help get your situation resolved. At MagnifyMoney, we have worked with many people who have had good outcomes working with the CFPB.

Monitoring Your Credit Score

In order to catch issues, and stay on top of your credit score, you should implement a credit monitoring strategy. The best, free way to monitor your credit is with Credit Karma, which gives you access to two out of three credit reports.

If you prefer more monitoring and additional credit protection, you can pay a fee for services that provide daily three-bureau credit monitoring, resolution assistance if your identity is stolen, and insurance if you have to engage in a legal battle. This guide ranks the top identity theft protection services.

Whether you choose a free or paid version, credit monitoring is a great service. As soon as you detect suspicious activity, you can take action. The sooner you work to deal with issues in your credit report, the less damage can be done.

Improve Your Credit Score

Once you resolve issues on your credit report, it’s time to implement a strategy to start improving your credit score. The single best thing that you can do to improve your credit score is to pay current accounts on time and in full every single month. You can picture it as burying negative information under a mountain of positive credit information.

Your top priority should be keeping accounts current. Continue to pay whatever account has the most positive information.

Your next priority should be keeping accounts out of collections. If you owe late payments, work to pay them back before the item goes into collections. Once these accounts are current, they will start to work positively toward your score.

Next, work on paying down your debt to provide positive information, and in time improve your score. Likewise, paying off installment credit (like mortgages and car loans) will add good information to your credit report.

If you have no current accounts, consider taking out a secured credit card and using less than 10% of the available credit each month to add positive information to your report.

The last thing you should do is attempt to resolve debts in collections. Once an item is in collections, paying it off will not improve your credit score.

Going forward, take care to avoid taking on more debt than you can handle, and implement a strategy to pay down your debt quickly. Once you start making positive changes, your credit score will improve, and within a few years, you’re likely to have good credit again.

Hannah Rounds
Hannah Rounds |

Hannah Rounds is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Hannah at hannah@magnifymoney.com

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