Tag: DEBT

Advertiser Disclosure

News

7 Research-Proven Strategies That Can Help You Finally Get Out of Debt

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Digging out of debt is a fairly common New Year’s resolution. The average consumer racked up $1,054 worth of debt during the 2017 holiday shopping season, according to a recent MagnifyMoney survey.

Even if you didn’t use credit to fund your holiday festivities, you may still have other types of debt you plan to finally get rid off in 2018 — like auto debt, student loan debt, or even that new iPhone you might have financed.

Becoming debt-free often requires a lot of effort and discipline. But it’s not impossible, especially if you find a good strategy for your needs. Here are some practical, research-proven tips you can use to make reaching your goal of being debt-free more attainable in the new year.

Tip #1: Pay off one account at a time

In a 2016 study published in the Journal of Consumer Research, a team of four researchers found that focusing on one debt at a time helped consumers pay off their debt more quickly than those who paid multiple debts at once.

The researchers tested the efficacy of paying one account at a time. Consumers were divided into two groups: one whose payments were distributed equally among their debts, while the other paid one account at a time.

They found that participants who used the concentrated repayment strategy “worked harder than those who dispersed their repayments” and repaid their debt 15% faster. Participants who used the concentrated strategy felt more motivated as well, as they “perceive greater progress toward their goal of getting out of debt,” which boosted the desire to succeed.

Tip #2: Start paying down debts with the smallest balance first

The same research also helped to finally settle the debate between two well-known debt repayment strategies — the debt snowball and the debt avalanche. Both methods agree on the concept of paying one balance off at a time but diverge on how to prioritize the debts.

The debt avalanche strategy advises debtors to prioritize debts by interest rate, focusing on paying down debts with the highest interest rate first. Hypothetically, by using this approach, the borrower saves the most money over time simply because they’re avoiding higher interest charges.

However, researchers found the debt snowball strategy works better in the long run. Borrowers are advised to order their debts from the smallest to largest amount and tackle the lower debt first. The portion of the balance debtors succeed in paying off has the largest impact on their perception of progress, so people are more motivated when they begin with the smallest debt.

“To the extent that a consumer’s debt accounts have similar interest rates, he or she should concentrate repayments first on the cards or accounts with the smallest debts, paying off those first,” wrote Boston University researcher Remi Trudel in a 2016 Harvard Business Review article.

Trudel goes further to suggest consolidating multiple debts into one may actually weaken motivation and could slow repayment progress. However, debt consolidation may be helpful overall if consumers are able to greatly lower the interest paid on all of their debts through consolidation.

Tip #3: Set a no-plastic rule for transactions over $20.

A 2017 joint study completed by Urban Institute, D2D Fund, and the Arizona Federal Credit Union, and funded by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), found that by using cash for purchases under $20, consumers were able to lower the amount of credit card debt they carried over month to month. We’ve shared this tip with you before.

Revolving credit card debt can have a huge impact on your credit score and the cost of credit in general. The less month-to-month credit debt you carry, the better. Learn more about achieving an excellent credit score here.

You can borrow the CFPB’s rule as well. You don’t necessarily have to use the $20 limit, but it’s a solid starting place. Try keeping a $20 bill on you to prevent yourself from accumulating more debt while you work on paying it off. If a transaction falls under $20, you can use cash instead of swiping a credit card.

Urban Institute researchers monitored the habits of nearly 14,000 Arizona Federal Credit Union account holders identified as credit card revolvers — those who had carried a balance on their credit card for at least two out of the six months before the start of the study.

Researchers used two rules of thumb:

  • Don’t swipe the small stuff: Use cash when it’s under $20
  • Credit keeps charging: It adds approximately 20% to the total

The participants either received one of the two rules to follow, or they were placed in a control group. They were then reminded of the rule they were to follow via email, web portal banners, and refrigerator calendar magnets for six months in 2015.

They found participants who followed the first rule saw on average a 2% decrease in their Arizona Federal Credit card balances, compared to those in the control group.  After six months, the $20 rule followers’ balances were on average $104 lower than they were prior to the study.

Tip #4: Set up accountability reminders

Getting someone (or something) to send you helpful reminders to pay down your debt can help you become more motivated to pay it off, according a 2015 study by Clarifi, a nonprofit organization that provides consumers low-cost access to financial products and services.

Researchers worked with clients to test the effects of text messaging and peer support programs on their financial outcomes. The researchers randomly selected individuals to receive peer support, reminder text messages, or both.

Those offered peer support choose one to two peers to monitor their progress on a debt management plan. The peers they chose received updates on their progress and a notification when they missed a scheduled debt payment.

Participants who received text message reminders were subscribed to a messaging service they could opt out of. They received either task-oriented or goal-oriented messages, either bi-weekly (high frequency) or once a month (low frequency) and a week before each debt management payment was due.

Researchers found those who received bi-weekly task-oriented reminder messages were 6% more likely to be on track with their debt management plan and 8% more likely to have met their scheduled payment amount or completed the debt management plan in any given

month than clients who received no reminder messages.

You can mimic this effect by setting up bill pay reminders on your recurring monthly bills. You can download the mobile app for most banks, for example, and set a reminder to alert you when your bill is coming up or when a transaction is charged to your account. You can also use a number of mobile apps, like Clarity Money or Mint that will alert you if you are overspending in areas of your budget.

Tip #5: Treat all money the same

According the mental accounting theory held among behavioral economists, when people treat money differently depending on how they receive it.

And that could be ultimately hurting your progress toward paying down debt.

For example, let’s say you always consider your tax refund as a means to pay for your annual vacation. Even if you have some credit card debt to pay down, you’re mentally designating your tax refund toward your vacation spending, overlooking the fact that you might be better off using that money to pay down your debt instead.

Or, you may not even consider taking your annual bonus and using it to pay off your auto loan, but instead, use the cash to buy yourself a new gadget because it seems like the kind of treat a bonus should be used for. You may be current on your auto payments and in no rush to pay off your vehicle, but that money could have been used to pay off the auto loan and save yourself a chunk of interest payments.

The trick is not to mentally allocate that money toward spending when it may be more beneficial to allocate it toward debt, considering what the debt would cost you.

In short, treating all of your dollars with a holistic approach, asking yourself how you can use them in the best possible way to improve your total financial outlook, may help you pay off your debts faster.

Try it now. Think of money you’ll receive soon like a bonus, a refund, or reimbursement. Have you already decided what you’ll spend it on? If you have, think before you spend. Can that money better serve another area of your life If you haven’t spent the incoming money (in your head) already, good work. Now, weigh your options. Look at all of your accounts and consider your financial goals, then choose to put the money to use where it makes the most fiscal sense.

Tip #6:  Practice money mindfulness

Keeping track of where and how you are spending your money could help you spend less of it, and use those savings toward your debt, according to a 2009 study on the intersection of mindfulness and financial well-being.

Researchers looked into whether practicing mindfulness — a state of receptive attention to present events and experience —would promote more modest wealth-related desires.  They found mindfulness was associated with a smaller financial desire discrepancy, meaning those who practiced mindfulness were less likely to experience discrepancies between what they have financially and what they want.  Mindful money managers consequently experience a higher level of subjective well-being.

In the study, Knox College psychology department chair Tim Kasser argues mindfulness can better a consumer’s relationship with money. Since they would learn to be content with the money and assets they currently have, mindfulness practice could reduce the influence of advertising and materialist motivations to swipe a credit card.

Making an effort to stay on top of when, how, and why you are spending or saving money may help you notice your feelings, strengths, and weaknesses related to financial management. In turn, practicing mindfulness could help you pay off and stay out of debt.

Stopping to consider if a purchase less than $20 is worth swiping your credit card is one way to practice mindful spending. You could also make an effort to pause before a purchase and ask yourself if it is a need or a want. If the purchase is no a ‘need,’ then you may be better off waiting a couple of days, or deciding not to make the purchase at all. Switching to using cash-only for day-to-day purchases is an easy and quick way to bring awareness to your spending, too, since you can see and feel the money being spent as opposed to using a credit or debit card.

The Joy app, launched by behavioral finance company Happy Money, specifically uses psychology to encourage money mindfulness. The app tracks spending and has users rate each transaction with a smiley face or frowning face, then shows the user their spending stats based on what they input over time.

Tip #7:  Nudge yourself along the way

The power of “nudges,” as coined by Nobel Prize-winning behavioral economist Richard H. Thaler, received a lot of attention in 2017.

“A nudge, as we will use the term, is any aspect of the choice architecture that alters people’s behavior in a predictable way without forbidding any options or significantly changing their economic incentives,” described Thaler in “Nudge – Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth and Happiness.”

Nudges are different from financial rules of thumb (like saving 10% of your income for retirement, or six months’ worth of expenses for emergencies). Nudges are not rules but rather simple interventions. For example, placing gum and candy at the checkout counter nudges you to add these items to your purchase, or putting your keys by the door in your house nudges you to remember to grab them on the way out.

Nudges make it easy for you to not think about doing what the nudge wants you to do.

You can create nudges to pay down debt as well. Put your money-tracking, credit card, and other banking apps on your cellphone’s home screen, so that you are more likely to check on your funds.

Hide your cards from yourself (or literally freeze them) so that they are out of sight and  thus not your first payment option. If you're a serial online shopper and you’ve memorized your card information, order a replacement credit card and tuck it away.

If you know you spend more money when you walk up and down the grocery store aisles in person, order the groceries you need online and pick them up at the store with a service like Instacart. You save time, and avoid paying delivery fees and overspending.

The key is simple: Know thyself, and make it more difficult to become the version of you who is stuck in revolving debt.

Brittney Laryea
Brittney Laryea |

Brittney Laryea is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brittney at brittney@magnifymoney.com

TAGS: , , , ,

Advertiser Disclosure

College Students and Recent Grads, Pay Down My Debt

7 Best Options to Refinance Student Loans – Get Your Lowest Rate

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Updated: January 1, 2018

Are you tired of paying a high interest rate on your student loan debt? You may be looking for ways to refinance your student loans at a lower interest rate, but don’t know where to turn. We have created the most complete list of lenders currently willing to refinance student loan debt. We recommend you start here and check rates from the top 7 national lenders offering the best student loan refinance products. All of these lenders (except Discover) also allow you to check your rate without impacting your score (using a soft credit pull), and offer the best rates of 2018:

LenderTransparency ScoreMax TermFixed APRVariable APRMax Loan Amount 
SoFiA+

20


Years

3.25% - 7.25%


Fixed Rate*

2.58% - 6.82%


Variable Rate*

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
Learn more Secured
earnestA+

20


Years

3.25% - 6.32%


Fixed Rate

2.57% - 5.87%


Variable Rate

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
Learn more Secured
commonbond A+

20


Years

3.18% - 7.25%


Fixed Rate

2.57% - 7.07%


Variable Rate

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
Learn more Secured
lendkey A+

20


Years

3.15% - 7.82%


Fixed Rate

2.90% - 6.64%


Variable Rate

$125k / $175k


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
Learn more Secured
A+

20


Years

3.50% - 6.99%


Fixed Rate

2.99% - 6.42%


Variable Rate

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
Learn more Secured
A+

20


Years

3.35% - 8.24%


Fixed Rate

3.11% - 8.46%


Variable Rate

$90k / $350k


Undergraduate /
Graduate
Learn more Secured
A+

20


Years

5.24%-8.24%


Fixed Rate

4.12%-7.37%


Variable Rate

$150k


Undergraduate /
Graduate
Learn more Secured

You should always shop around for the best rate. Don’t worry about the impact on your credit score of applying to multiple lenders: so long as you complete all of your applications within 14 days, it will only count as one inquiry on your credit score.

We have also created:

But before you refinance, read on to see if you are ready to refinance your student loans.

Can I Get Approved?

Loan approval rules vary by lender. However, all of the lenders will want:

  • Proof that you can afford your payments. That means you have a job with income that is sufficient to cover your student loans and all of your other expenses.
  • Proof that you are a responsible borrower, with a demonstrated record of on-time payments. For some lenders, that means that they use the traditional FICO, requiring a good score. For other lenders, they may just have some basic rules, like no missed payments, or a certain number of on-time payments required to prove that you are responsible.

LenderMinimum credit scoreEligible degreesEligible loansAnnual income
requirements
Employment
requirement
 
SoFi

Good or Excellent
score needed

Undergraduate
& Graduate

Private, Federal,
& Parent PLUS

None

Yes


(or signed job offer)
Learn more Secured
earnest

660

Undergraduate
& Graduate

Private, Federal,
& Parent PLUS

None

Yes


(or signed job offer)
Learn more Secured
commonbond

660

Undergraduate
& Graduate

Private, Federal,
& Parent PLUS

None

Yes


(or signed job offer)
Learn more Secured

680

Undergraduate
& Graduate

Private & Federal

$24K

Yes

Learn more Secured

Not published

Undergraduate
& Graduate

Private, Federal,
& Parent PLUS

None

Yes


(or signed job offer)
Learn more Secured

680

Undergraduate
& Graduate

Private, Federal,
& Parent PLUS

$24K

Yes

Learn more Secured

Not published

Undergraduate
& Graduate

Private & Federal

None

Yes

Learn more Secured

If you are in financial difficulty and can’t afford your monthly payments, a refinance is not the solution. Instead, you should look at options to avoid a default on student loan debt.

This is particularly important if you have Federal loans.

Don’t refinance Federal loans unless you are very comfortable with your ability to repay. Think hard about the chances you won’t be able to make payments for a few months. Once you refinance, you may lose flexible Federal payment options that can help you if you genuinely can’t afford the payments you have today. Check the Federal loan repayment estimator to make sure you see all the Federal options you have right now.

If you can afford your monthly payment, but you have been a sloppy payer, then you will likely need to demonstrate responsibility before applying for a refinance.

But, if you can afford your current monthly payment and have been responsible with those payments, then a refinance could be possible and help you pay the debt off sooner.

Is It Worth It?

Like any form of debt, your goal with a student loan should be to pay as low an interest rate as possible. Other than a mortgage, you will likely never have a debt as large as your student loan.

If you are able to reduce the interest rate by refinancing, then you should consider the transaction. However, make sure you include the following in any decision:

Is there an origination fee?

Many lenders have no fee, which is great news. If there is an origination fee, you need to make sure that it is worth paying. If you plan on paying off your loan very quickly, then you may not want to pay a fee. But, if you are going to be paying your loan for a long time, a fee may be worth paying.

Is the interest rate fixed or variable?

Variable interest rates will almost always be lower than fixed interest rates. But there is a reason: you end up taking all of the interest rate risk. We are currently at all-time low interest rates. So, we know that interest rates will go up, we just don’t know when.

This is a judgment call. Just remember, when rates go up, so do your payments. And, in a higher rate environment, you will not be able to refinance to a better option (because all rates will be going up).

We typically recommend fixing the rate as much as possible, unless you know that you can pay off your debt during a short time period. If you think it will take you 20 years to pay off your loan, you don’t want to bet on the next 20 years of interest rates. But, if you think you will pay it off in five years, you may want to take the bet. Some providers with variable rates will cap them, which can help temper some of the risk.

Diving Deeper: The Best Places to Consider a Refinance

If you go to other sites they may claim to compare several student loan offers in one step. Just beware that they might only show you deals that pay them a referral fee, so you could miss out on lenders ready to give you better terms. Below is what we believe is the most comprehensive list of current student loan refinancing lenders.

You should take the time to shop around. FICO says there is little to no impact on your credit score for rate shopping as many providers as you’d like in a single shopping period (which can be between 14-30 days, depending upon the version of FICO). So set aside a day and apply to as many as you feel comfortable with to get a sense of who is ready to give you the best terms.

Here are more details on the 7 lenders offering the lowest interest rates:

1. SoFi: Variable Rates from 2.58% and Fixed Rates from 3.25% (with AutoPay)*

SoFi

SoFi (read our full SoFi review) was one of the first lenders to start offering student loan refinancing products. More MagnifyMoney readers have chosen SoFi than any other lender. Although SoFi initially targeted a very select group of universities (it started with Stanford), now almost anyone can apply, including if you graduated from a trade school. The only requirement is that you graduated from a Title IV school. You need to have a degree, a good job and good income in order to qualify. SoFi wants to be more than just a lender. If you lose your job, SoFi will help you find a new one. If you need a mortgage for a first home, they are there to help. And, surprisingly, they also want to get you a date. SoFi is famous for hosting parties for customers across the country, and creating a dating app to match borrowers with each other.

GO TO SITE Secured

on SoFi’s secure website

2. Earnest: Variable Rates from 2.57% and Fixed Rates from 3.25% (with AutoPay)

Earnest

Earnest (read our full Earnest review) offers fixed interest rates starting at 3.25% and variable rates starting at 2.57%. Unlike any of the other lenders, you can switch between fixed and variable rates throughout the life of your loan. You can do that one time every six months until the loan is paid off. That means you can take advantage of the low variable interest rates now, and then lock in a higher fixed rate later. You can choose your own monthly payment, based upon what you can afford (to the penny). Earnest also offers bi-weekly payments and “skip a payment” if you run into difficulty.

GO TO SITE Secured

on Earnest’s secure website

3. CommonBond: Variable Rates from 2.57% and Fixed Rates from 3.18% (with AutoPay)

CommonBond

CommonBond (read our full review) started out lending exclusively to graduate students. They initially targeted doctors with more than $100,000 of debt. Over time, CommonBond has expanded and now offers student loan refinancing options to graduates of almost any university (graduate and undergraduate). In addition (and we think this is pretty cool), CommonBond will fund the education of someone in need in an emerging market for every loan that closes. So not only will you save money, but someone in need will get access to an education.

GO TO SITE Secured

on CommonBond’s secure website

4. LendKey: Variable Rates from 2.90% and Fixed Rates from 3.15% (with AutoPay)

Lendkey

LendKey (read our full LendKey review) works with community banks and credit unions across the country. Although you apply with LendKey, your loan will be with a community bank. If you like the idea of working with a credit union or community bank, LendKey could be a great option. Over the past year, LendKey has become increasingly competitive on pricing, and frequently has a better rate than some of the more famous marketplace lenders.

GO TO SITE Secured

on Lendkey’s secure website

5. Laurel Road: Variable Rates from 2.99% and Fixed Rates from 3.50% (with AutoPay)

Laurel Road

Laurel Road is a division of Darien Rowayton Bank that offers a highly competitive product when it comes to student loan refinancing. As a lender, Laurel Road prides itself on offering personalized service while leveraging technology to make the student loan refinancing process a quick and simple one. Consider checking out their low-rate student loan refinancing product, which is offered in all 50 states.

GO TO SITE Secured

on Laurel Road’s secure website

6. Citizens Bank: Variable Rates from 3.11% and Fixed Rates from 3.35% (with AutoPay)

Citizens Bank

Citizens Bank offers student loan refinancing for both private and federal loans through its Education Refinance Loan. The Education Refinance Loan is a good one to consider, especially if you are looking to stick with a traditional banking option. Consider looking into the competitive rates that Citizens Bank has to offer.

GO TO SITE Secured

on Citizens Bank’s secure website

7. Discover Student Loans: Variable Rates from 4.12% and Fixed Rates from 5.24% (with AutoPay)

Discover Student Loans

Discover, with an array of competitive financial products, offers student loan refinancing for both private and federal loans through their private consolidation loan product. If you’re looking for a well-established bank to refinance your student loans, Discover may be the way to go. Just keep in mind that if you apply for a student loan refinance with Discover, they will do a hard pull on your credit.

GO TO SITE Secured

on Discover Bank’s secure website

Additional Student Loan Refinance Companies

In addition to the Top 7, there are many more lenders offering to refinance student loans. Below is a listing of all providers we have found so far. This list includes credit unions that may have limited membership. We will continue to update this list as we find more lenders:

Traditional Banks

  • First Republic Eagle Gold. The interest rates are great, but this option is not for everyone. Fixed rates range from 1.95% – 2.95% APR. You need to visit a branch and open a checking account (which has a $3,500 minimum balance to avoid fees). Branches are located in San Francisco, Palo Alto, Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, Newport Beach, San Diego, Portland (Oregon), Boston, Palm Beach (Florida), Greenwich or New York City. Loans must be $60,000 – $300,000. First Republic wants to recruit their future high net worth clients with this product.
  • Wells Fargo: As a traditional lender, Wells Fargo will look at credit score and debt burden. They offer both fixed and variable loans, with variable rates starting at 4.49% and fixed rates starting at 5.24%. You would likely get much lower interest rates from some of the new Silicon Valley lenders or the credit unions.

Credit Unions

  • Alliant Credit Union: Anyone can join this credit union. Interest rates start as low as 4.50% APR. You can borrow up to $100,000 for up to 25 years.
  • Eastman Credit Union: Credit union membership is restricted (see eligibility here). Fixed rates start at 6.50% and go up to 8% APR.
  • Navy Federal Credit Union: This credit union offers limited membership. For men and women who serve (or have served), the credit union can offer excellent rates and specialized underwriting. Variable interest rates start at 3.55% and fixed rates start at 4.00%.
  • Thrivent: Partnered with Thrivent Federal Credit Union, Thrivent Student Loan Resources offers variable rates starting at 3.25% APR and fixed rates starting at 3.74% APR. It is important to note that in order to qualify for refinancing through Thrivent, you must be a member of the Thrivent Federal Credit Union. If not already a member, borrowers can apply for membership during the student refinance application process.
  • UW Credit Union: This credit union has limited membership (you can find out who can join here, but you had better be in Wisconsin). You can borrow from $5,000 to $150,000 and rates start as low as 3.04% (variable) and 3.99% APR (fixed).

Online Lending Institutions

  • Education Loan Finance:This is a student loan refinancing option that is offered through SouthEast Bank. They have competitive rates with variable rates ranging from 2.69% - 6.01% APR and fixed rates ranging from 3.09% - 6.69% APR. Education Loan Finance also offers a "Fast Track Bonus", so if you accept your offer within 30 days of your application date, you can earn $100 bonus cash.
  • EdVest: This company is the non-profit student loan program of the state of New Hampshire which has become available more broadly. Rates are very competitive, ranging from 4.29% – 7.89% (fixed) and 3.50% – 7.10% APR (variable).
  • IHelp : This service will find a community bank. Unfortunately, these community banks don’t have the best interest rates. Fixed rates range from 4.75% to 9.00% APR (for loans up to 15 years). If you want to get a loan from a community bank or credit union, we recommend trying LendKey instead.
  • Purefy: Purefy lenders offer variable rates ranging from 3.11%-6.93% APR and fixed interest rates ranging from 3.35% – 8.24% APR. You can borrow up to $150,000 for up to 15 years. Just answer a few questions on their site, and you can get an indication of the rate.
  • RISLA: Just like New Hampshire, the state of Rhode Island wants to help you save. You can get fixed rates starting as low as 3.49%. And you do not need to have lived or studied in Rhode Island to benefit.

You can also compare all of these loan options in one chart with our comparison tool. It lists the rates, loan amounts, and kinds of loans each lender is willing to refinance. You can also email us with any questions at info@magnifymoney.com.

Nick Clements
Nick Clements |

Nick Clements is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Nick at nick@magnifymoney.com

TAGS: , ,

Advertiser Disclosure

Best of

20 Credit Cards with No Cash Advance Fees

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Credit Cards with No Cash Advance Fees

If you have a credit card, your financial institution has likely mailed you checks for cash advance purposes. Understanding this aspect of your available credit is incredibly important, as it can be much more expensive than simply making a purchase.

Taking a cash advance gives you money now in cases where you can’t use a credit card (perhaps paying rent), or have otherwise maxed out your purchasing power. Many financial institutions will charge you a fee between 1% and 5% just for making this transaction.

But some cards have no fees for cash advances.

The catch is, interest starts accruing immediately on cash advances, meaning that even if you pay your statement balance in full by the due date, you will still incur interest charges in the interim. So if you do a cash advance, try to pay it off as quickly as possible, even before the due date, to minimize the interest you pay.

Best Cards with No Cash Advance Fees

These credit unions offer no cash advance fees on all their credit cards. While you'll pay interest from the day you take out the cash, as a last resort it's a better bet than paying an upfront fee. These are all credit unions anyone can join, but many of them require excellent credit to qualify for a card.

 

PenFed Credit Union

PenFed Credit Union-CDs Pentagon Federal Credit Union, commonly known as PenFed, offers five different credit cards with no cash advance fees. None of them charge a foreign transaction fee, and all interest rates are the same for purchases and cash advances.

Anyone can join PenFed Credit Union simply by making a one-time donation of $17 to either Voices for America’s Troops or the National Military Family Association.

  • PenFed Platinum Rewards Visa Signature® Card
  • PenFed Promise Visa® Card
  • PenFed Premium Travel Rewards American Express® Card
  • PenFed Gold Visa® Card

 

American 1 Credit Union

American 1 Credit Union American 1 Credit Union offers four different credit cards with no cash advance fees. Interest rates on purchases and cash advances are the same, though there is a foreign transaction fee of 1%.

Anyone can join American 1 Credit Union by joining Community 1 Cooperative. You pay $3 for membership, which includes a litany of discounts on consumer products and services across an array of industries.

  • American 1 In-House Visa

 

CapEd Federal Credit Union

 CapEd Federal Credit Union CapEd Federal Credit Union offers one card with no cash advance fees. It also carries the same interest rate for purchases and cash advances, but does have a foreign transaction fee that varies depending on if the transaction is in USD or requires conversion into a foreign currency.

To join CapEd, all you have to do is make a one-time $20 donation to the Idaho CapEd Foundation.

  • Visa Platinum Card by CapEd Federal Credit Union

 

First Tech Federal Credit Union

First Tech Federal Credit Union First Tech Federal Credit Union offers three different cards that come with no cash advance fees. The interest rates on these transactions will be higher than the interest rates on regular purchases, however. There are no foreign transaction fees.

Anyone can join First Tech through membership in the Financial Fitness Association, which costs $8 per year, or a digital membership to the Computer History Museum, which will run you $15 per year.

  • Odyssey™ Rewards World Elite MasterCard®
  • Platinum Rewards MasterCard®
  • Choice Rewards World MasterCard®
  • Platinum Secured MasterCard®

 

ISU Credit Union

ISU Credit Union ISU Credit Union offers two cards that have zero cash advance fees. Interest rates on cash advances are higher than those on regular purchases for the first year only, and there is a foreign transaction fee of 1%.

To join ISU Credit Union if you don’t live, work or study in Southeastern Idaho, you can qualify through paid membership at a number of Southeastern Idaho organizations including humane societies and educational cause groups. Also, ISU has a $1.00 membership fee and a minimum deposit of $25.00 which represents your share of ownership in the credit union . You must maintain a share balance of $25 while your account is open.

  • Platinum MasterCard® by ISU Credit Union
  • Platinum Plus MasterCard® by ISU Credit Union

 

Mid-Illini Credit Union

Mid-Illini Credit Union Mid Illini Credit Union offers two different cards that come with no cash advance fees. Interest rates for purchases and cash advances are identical, and there is a foreign transaction fee of 1%.

Anyone can join Mid Illini Credit Union by making a one-time $1 donation to the Mid-Illinois Dollars for Scholars, an organization that provides scholarships to students of McLean County, Illinois.

  • Visa Classic Card by Mid Illini Credit Union
  • Visa Platinum Card by Mid Illini Credit Union

 

Stanford Federal Credit Union

Stanford Federal Credit Union Stanford Federal Credit Union offers several cards with no cash advance fees for which the general public qualifies. There are no foreign transaction fees, and rates are the same for purchases and cash advances.

To join Stanford Federal Credit Union, you can become a member at the Museum of American Heritage or join Friends of the Palo Alto Library.

  • Visa Platinum Cash Back Rewards Card by Stanford Federal Credit Union

 

Digital Credit Union

Digital Credit Union Digital Credit Union offers two cards with no cash advance fees. While interest rates are the same for both cash advances and regular purchases, foreign transaction fees will vary based on the need for currency conversion.

You can join Digital Credit Union by donating to any number of organizations that match your interests. The most common organization new members choose is Reach Out for Schools, which only requires a one-year membership at the cost of $10.

  • DCU Visa® Platinum Credit Card
  • DCU Visa® Platinum Rewards Credit Card

 

Other Options with Restricted Membership

There are other credit unions that offer no cash advance fees, however they have restricted membership based on your residence or other factors. Here are some other cards that can be an option depending on where you live.

  • The Central Florida Educators' Federal Credit Union offers 5 cards for people who live, work, worship, volunteer, or attend school in Orange, Osceola, Seminole, or Lake County:
    • Visa® Premier Rewards credit card
    • Visa® Platinum Rewards credit card
    • Visa® Platinum credit card
    • Visa® Platinum Cash credit card
    • Visa® Premier Cash credit card
  • O BEE® Credit Union provides a card for those who live or work in Washington State:
    • Visa® Oly Gold Card
  • The Hawaii State Federal Credit Union offers 2 cards for those who are active or retired members of the State of Hawaii, City and County of Honolulu, Maui County, Hawaii State FCU or select employment groups:
    • Visa® Signature Cash Rewards Credit Card
    • Visa® Platinum Rewards Credit Card

 

Alternatives to Cash Advances

While cards that offer no fees on cash advances are cheaper, that does not mean these transactions are cheap. You should only take a cash advance as a last resort in a true emergency. In order to avoid becoming one of the American households that can’t cover $400 financial hardships, start building an emergency fund today. When you withdraw money from your own savings account, you have to pay zero interest and zero fees.

If you don’t have an emergency fund, but you do have a credit card, it is wiser to charge emergency expenses as a purchase rather than taking money out as a cash advance if at all possible. Even when interest rates are identical for these two different types of transactions, cash advances will start charging you those rates immediately, while purchases won’t require you to pay interest until after the first statement is issued.

Payday loans are another alternative. However, they’re not necessarily a good one. They often come with numerous fees and aren’t as hassle-free as some lenders make them out to be. If you don’t pay off your loan at the end of the term (often about two weeks), you risk incurring fees that can add up to more than your loan. This can translate into effective interest rates in the triple digits. If they’re your only option, be extremely careful. Above all, make sure you fully understand the terms and costs.

Foreign travelers will also want to charge purchases whenever possible for this same reason. If you must use cash, a cash advance is a safer alternative to withdrawing money from your bank account abroad, but it is also wise to pay it off using your financial institution’s online services as soon as possible to avoid paying more interest than you have to.

Cash advances aren’t ideal, so if you can avoid them you should. However, they are a much better option than turning to the alternative lending industry where you’ll find predators and payday loans.

Brynne Conroy
Brynne Conroy |

Brynne Conroy is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brynne at brynne@magnifymoney.com

TAGS: , ,

Advertiser Disclosure

News

7 Holiday Debt Traps that Can Sabotage Your Finances

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

holiday debt traps
iStock

For some consumers, the cheer of the holiday season soon will be replaced with dread over debt.  

Holiday shoppers in 2016 took on an average of $1,003 worth of debt, up from $986 in 2015, and 11 percent said they would only be making the minimum payments, which can extend the payoff date by years.  

"Consumer debt is at the highest of all time,” says Howard Dvorkin, CPA and chairman of Debt.com.

Total household debt rose to a record $12.96 trillion for the third quarter of this year, according to data released in November by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Credit card debt, for example, rose by 3.1 percent, to $808 billion. 

Dvorkin expects that this holiday season will be expensive as consumers make more online purchases with credit cards and because of overall optimism about the economy. 

Retail holiday sales were expected to grow to $1.04 trillion-$1.05 trillion in 2017, according to Deloitte’s annual holiday retail forecast. Deloitte also projects that e-commerce sales during the holiday season will grow to $111 billion-$114 billion, an 18-21 percent increase from the 2016 holiday season, and 55 percent of survey respondents planned to shop online for gifts. 

“When people feel really good about things, they tend to spend more,” Dvorkin says.   

Bruce McClary, vice president of communications at the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, says people have a tendency to overspend during the holidays, relying heavily on credit cards and not paying off the debt until later, sometimes even years later.   

McClary has also noticed that credit card delinquencies have been increasing slightly over the last two quarters. The Federal Reserve Bank notes in its report that “credit card balances increased and flows into delinquency have increased over the past year.”
 

While most Americans are aware and ready to spend a little extra during the holiday season, you can make it a little more merry by avoiding these common debt traps.  

Keeping up with the Joneses

Holiday purchasing pressure ranges from buying the hottest toys to giving (or buying for yourself) the latest tech gadget or the biggest TV on the block. People are tempted to get the latest and greatest, Dvorkin says. 

The average consumer spent roughly $967 on holiday shopping in 2016, up 3.4 percent from 2015, according to the National Retail Federation. Deloitte forecasts that the average consumer in 2017 will spend an average of $1,226, or nearly $2,226 among households earning $100,000 or more.

It all adds up, especially if you’re out to outdo a neighbor: The tree and all the trimmings; hostess gifts for parties; food for your own holiday meals and entertaining; your Clark Griswold-style light shows. Randy Williams, president of A Debt Coach, a counseling service in Kentucky, says the desire for personal reward can contribute to holiday debt. 

“You feel good when you do something for somebody,” he says. 

But then consumers may have the motto “One for you, one for me,” and purchase an item for themselves, which continues the spending cycle. 

Hot holiday toy crazes

Unfurling your child's Christmas wish list can be at once fun and terrifying. Parents planned to spend, on average, $495 per child, according to 2016 holiday shopping data from the Rubicon Project. 

Lists could include hot holiday toys for 2017 like the $30-$45 Fingerlings (the little plastic monkeys that attach to fingers and move in response to sounds and touch) a $300 Nintendo Switch gaming console or even the $799 Lego Ultimate Collectors Series Millennium Falcon, the company’s biggest set with 7,541 pieces. 

When the toys start to run out, the prices can escalate. The Fingerlings, for example, typically retail at $14.99, but some were listed in November for twice as much on eBay. Since it can be harder for parents to say “no” to the frenzy when it’s a gift that’s going to bring a smile to a little one’s face, Williams says there’s extra incentive to plan well. 

Store credit card pitches

McClary warns not to get into store credit card offers. The instant savings of 10 percent off on the day of your purchase could come with a high cost, such as 29.99 percent APR later. 

“People should resist the temptation,” he says.  

Williams says there’s a reason for the incentives, such as a discount on your purchase, because the company will make back whatever you initially saved. 

“Most people do not pay off their cards within the intro offer time,” he says. 

Instead, set aside cash for holiday spending and use it, instead of credit. If you’re sure you can “affordably borrow,” Williams suggests using an existing line of credit instead of falling for the attractive offers from retailers.  

“Special” offers

Deals seem to abound when shopping online or in stores, but if you aren’t careful, some can land you in more trouble than no deal at all. 

McClary advises to avoid promotions like deferred interest cards and convenience checks. Discounts during the holidays are usually found during other times of the year, too, when the budget is less tight.  

“It’s to the advantage of the consumer to be looking at sales during the year and look for opportunities to get the most out of their money,” he says. 

Trying to keep family traditions alive

Wanting to continue your grandparents’ or parents’ traditions may be sentimental but also pricey in today’s economy. Maybe they held extravagant dinner parties, paid for holiday trips and gave their children  a certain number of gifts every year. You want to follow suit, but can’t afford it. 

“(I’m a) firm believer that what gets us in trouble in the holidays is wanting to do what Mom and Dad did,” Williams says. “Things are more expensive now.” 

Shopping with family members post-Thanksgiving, on Black Friday, although a tradition, also may be a temptation because of impulse buys or if family members don’t hold you accountable to sticking to a budget. 

“It’s tradition but it’s also a day people can’t afford,” Williams says.  

Hosting hordes of holiday visitors

While milk and cookies are left out for Santa, entertaining guests, from neighbors and co-workers to out-of-town family and friends, can increase your food and utilities spending in December. 

According to a holiday retail survey by Deloitte, 24 percent of people plan to attend and/or host more parties and events during the holidays.  

“You spend money in all sorts of ways,” Dvorkin says. 

Indulgent spending

“Where the problem is, we don’t plan for Christmas, we just do Christmas,” says Williams. He says that means sometimes consumers plan, mentally, to go into debt.  

He advises to plan ahead for the next season, adding that he knows people who start checking items off their list in February during sales, or in June or July when fewer people are buying and prices are lower.  

The NRF predicts holiday sales, including gifts and food and beverage items, to reach nearly $682 billion, up from $655.8 billion in 2016. Without careful spending, a large amount of that could be a debt burden on consumers until the next season comes around.

“You don’t want this to be a compounding problem that continues to grow each year,” McClary says. 

Kat Khoury
Kat Khoury |

Kat Khoury is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Kat at kat+mandi@magnifymoney.com

TAGS: ,

Advertiser Disclosure

Personal Loans

Can I Get a Holiday Loan?

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

can i get a holiday loan
iStock

If you’re stressed over the possibility of racking up holiday debt this year, you may be right to worry. In our 2016 holiday debt survey, 65.2 percent of respondents who added debt during the holidays said they did so unexpectedly and didn’t budget for the extra expenses.

This just goes to show what can happen if you take on debt without a plan. If you charge holiday purchases and don’t have a plan to pay them off, you can wind up making monthly payments for longer than you think — and fork over lots of interest payments along the way.

While most people said credit cards were the main source of their debt, nearly 9 percent said they used personal loans to finance their holiday spending, making it the third most popular borrowing option overall.

If you’re considering using a personal loan to fund your holiday shopping this year, it’s important to know the pros and cons first.

First up … what’s a holiday loan?

A holiday loan is simply a personal loan issued by a financial institution, like an online lender, bank or credit union. While these loans are intended to cover holiday expenses, they are not the same as other short-term loans such as payday or cash advance loans.

Since holiday loans are unsecured, you can borrow money without putting up anything as collateral. But because the lender is assuming more risk this way, these loans can carry very high interest rates. That being said, if you have good credit, relatively low levels of debt and sufficient income, you might qualify for lower rates.

Generally speaking, you can get a holiday loan (or other unsecured personal loan) in amounts up to $35,000 with several lenders. However, some may let you borrow quite a bit more. Your interest rate can vary depending on your creditworthiness, and the amount of time you have to repay your loan depends on how much you borrow and the loan terms you select. Personal loans are issued with a fixed repayment period, which can last up to 84 months.

Why get a loan for the holidays?

While some people budget throughout the year, setting aside money for the holiday season, there are plenty of ways to get off track. It’s possible that other expenses will pop up and cause your savings plan to go awry, or that you’ll need to pay for holiday travel or to get your home ready for guests.

Applying for a personal loan may be a good way to bridge the gap between the money you have and the money you need, says Jeff Rose, a certified financial planner and Discover Personal Loans partner. “Borrowing a set amount of money with a fixed repayment term and fixed rate can help you meet your financial obligations over the holidays while having a set budget with a clear payoff schedule, resisting the temptation to rely on revolving debt.”

Rose says he has seen situations where a holiday loan made sense. In one situation, an acquaintance of his was desperate to return home for the holidays to see his dying father on what could be his last Christmas. In that case, taking out a personal loan to travel home was “one of the best investments they’ve ever made,” Rose tells MagnifyMoney.

But, holiday travel isn’t the only reason to take out a holiday loan.

For example, the holidays are a popular time to propose, and “engagement rings can get expensive,” says Rose. You might even find the perfect ring that costs more than you have saved, but the time is ripe for asking.

“That’s where a personal loan can be a financially responsible tool to help you make this purchase,” he adds.

Or, perhaps you want to borrow money to cover the costs of holiday gifts, replace the appliances in your home or make a special purchase for your family.

What it takes to qualify

Getting a personal loan to cover expenses during the holidays is no different than getting a personal loan any other time of year, notes Rose. “Different lenders have different qualifications for loan approval and offer different rates, so my advice would be to research and find what fits your financial situation,” he says.

Generally speaking, however, some typical minimum requirements for a personal loan include being a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, being at least 18 years of age, and having a low debt-to-income ratio.

Your credit score may also impact your ability to get a personal loan. While it’s possible to get a personal loan with a FICO score of 500 or above, the best loan rates and terms go to those with good or excellent credit.

In addition to your credit score, another important requirement for getting a personal or holiday loan is that DTI — debt-to-income ratio — says San Diego financial adviser Taylor Schulte. To calculate your debt-to-income ratio, add up your monthly debt obligations (i.e. mortgage, auto loan) and divide that by your monthly gross income.

“Some experts say a debt-to-income ratio higher than 36 percent can dramatically reduce your chances of getting a loan or increase the interest rate to an unreasonable number,” he says. To improve your debt-to-income ratio, try paying down your existing debts,, picking up extra work to bring in additional income or putting on your game face and asking for a raise.

Schulte also notes that, if all else fails, you could ask a family friend or family member to cosign for your loan. While this can help you get a lower interest rate and better terms, this also means your cosigner is jointly responsible for repayment.

Holiday loans versus credit cards

While a holiday loan can be a good option for consumers who need cash to cover end-of-year or holiday expenses, some consumers also turn to credit cards to meet their needs. This strategy can be advantageous since some credit cards may offer a 0 percent intro APR on purchases for 12 months or longer. But, before you decide between a holiday loan and a 0 percent intro APR credit card, it’s important to note how each one works — and the reasons one option might work better for you than the other.

If you’re considering a personal loan, know that these financial products typically have a fixed interest rate and are structured with equal payments made over a specified time period. In that respect, a personal loan may be easier to pay off in a timely manner since you know exactly when your last payment will come due.

With a credit card, on the other hand, you’ll get access to a line of credit you can use to charge purchases. Because the amount you borrow may vary, you may not know your exact monthly payment. Plus, your monthly payment will increase as you use your card to charge more purchases.

While many cards offer 0 percent intro APR on purchases for more than 12 months, your APR, or interest rate, also resets after the introductory offer is over. If you don’t pay off your balance before that happens, you could wind up paying a hefty interest rate on your balance that is higher than what you would pay on a personal loan.

Things to watch out for

While borrowing money for the holidays can make sense, that doesn’t mean this option is foolproof. There are plenty of risks that come with borrowing.

Risk #1: Borrowing without a plan

Whether you decide to take out a holiday loan or charge your holiday purchases on a credit card, Rose recommends making sure you have a clear plan for the funds you borrow and a true need, along with the ability to repay the loan.

“Also, consider the repayment timeline and total cost of the loan, including any fees, from the start to ensure you can afford the monthly payments,” he adds

Any time you borrow money, you should also make sure you’re not borrowing to buy things you can’t truly afford — or just being wasteful in general. “Around the holiday season, it can be easy to spend more than you planned,” says Rose.

If you rack up too much debt and don’t have a clear plan to pay it back, you could wind up spiraling into more and more debt or taking years to pay it all off. And obviously, more debt inevitably leads to more interest charges layered on top.

Risk #2: Too many fees

Look for personal loans that do not charge additional fees — examples of these would be origination fees and prepayment penalties.

And understand other potential traps, such as with personal loan companies that precompute interest or ask you to pay for unnecessary insurance. In a precomputed loan, the total amount of interest that you would pay during the entire term of the loan is calculated and added to the balance up front.

Risk #3: Not shopping around

Another major risk of personal loans is that you won’t take the time to shop around, Schulte says. Through his personal experience, Schulte has seen how many people wrongly assume their primary bank is the best place to get a loan — even when that’s not even close to being accurate.

“It doesn't hurt to start with your primary bank to see what they can offer,” says Schulte. “But, failing to shop around could literally cost you thousands.”

Schulte suggests shopping around with at least three to five lenders before making a decision. Fortunately, it’s fairly easy to get multiple loan quotes online.

We recommend you shop online to find lenders without those tricks and traps. A good place to start the search is with LendingTree, MagnifyMoney’s parent company. With a short online form LendingTree will perform a soft credit pull (with no impact to your score) and match you with multiple loan offers.

Because dozens of lenders participate in LendingTree’s program, you may also find lenders willing to accept borrowers with less-than-perfect credit.

LEARN MORE Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website

Tips for financial success during the holidays

There are a number of things you can do throughout the year to help yourself financially when the holidays roll around, Rose says. If you’re eager to make the most of this holiday season, or at least escape the holidays with minimal financial damage, consider these suggestions:

  • Save for the holidays all year long.“If each month you put a portion of your income in a separate account designated for holiday spending, you should have a nice amount of money set aside when the season arrives,” says Rose. While it may be too late to start saving for this year’s holiday season, it’s never too early to start saving for next year.
  • Set appropriate expectations for your family.Whether you’re worried you’ll have a skimpier array of gifts under the tree or not, Rose says it’s important to have an upfront conversation with your family (spouse and children) about how many gifts they are going to receive and how much you’re going to spend. “It’s easy to get caught up in the season and start adding more and more to the pile and buying stuff you don’t need,” he says.
  • Stock up on gifts all year long.“You can also take advantage of buying gifts when retailers are having big sales,” says Rose. On Cyber Monday, you can typically get huge savings on everything from clothes to electronics. Buying in advance on these type of sales is huge, and right after this year’s holiday season can be a great time to stock up on next year’s gifts.
  • Opt out of gift exchanges.If you’re involved in multiple gift exchanges or “Secret Santa” arrangements, opting out for the year can help you save some cash. By not participating in these holiday "extras," you can save money for the gifts that are most important.
Holly Johnson
Holly Johnson |

Holly Johnson is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Holly here

TAGS: ,

Get A Pre-Approved Personal Loan

$

Won’t impact your credit score

Advertiser Disclosure

News

What Happens to Debt When You Divorce? 

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

what happens to debt when you divorce
iStock

For every two to three new marriages in 2014 there was at least one divorce, according to the latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data — a grim statistic that could easily kill deflate your inner romantic.  

Breaking up a marriage is hard to do and it's made all the more difficult by the financial implications. 

The average price of a divorce, from start to finish, lands at around $15,500 (including $12,800 in attorney's fees), according to a 2014 survey put out by Nolo, a publisher specializing in legal issues. If the legal expenses are one side of the coin, figuring out what to do with your joint financial assets and debts is the other.  

We’ve talked about what happens to debt after you’ve married. Now it’s time to ask what happens to debt when you divorce. 

Here's everything you need to know, plus some tips for protecting your finances when a marriage ends. 

Where you get divorced 

When it comes to splitting up debts, the state you live in can sway the outcome in a big way. A majority are considered equitable distribution states, where the judge uses his or her discretion to divide up debt in a way that’s deemed fair and evenhanded. 

Each state has its own set of laws and procedures, but Vikki S. Ziegler, a longtime matrimonial law attorney licensed in multiple states, says the court generally has more leeway in an equitable distribution state.  

Simply put, the judge has the freedom to take multiple factors into consideration. This might include everything from one spouse's income to another's employment status.  

The situation could play out much differently if you live in a community property state. These states are listed below, and in them, debt is viewed a bit differently. 

  • Alaska* 
  • Arizona 
  • California 
  • Idaho 
  • Louisiana 
  • Nevada 
  • New Mexico 
  • Texas 
  • Washington 
  • Wisconsin 

*Alaska has an optional community property system. 

Community property states typically split all marital debt right down the middle, regardless of who actually accrued the debt. This means that if your spouse racked up hidden balances during the marriage, you'll likely be on the hook for half. In community property states, the divorce process is typically more cut and dried than subjective. 

"The most important thing for someone leaving a marriage to understand is how the law applies in each state that they are getting divorced in," Ziegler told MagnifyMoney. "How are you going to allocate debt, and who's going to be responsible for what?" 

An experienced divorce attorney can help fill in the blanks. 

The type of debt 

The type of debt you have is another biggie. Let's first zero in on secured debt, like a mortgage or car loan.  

According to John S. Slowiaczek, president of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, whichever spouse decides to keep certain assets — such as the house or a car — will also assume whatever debt is left over.  

"Debt associated with an asset will ordinarily be allocated to the person acquiring the property," Slowiaczek tells MagnifyMoney. 

Your mortgage: The loan will likely be the responsibility of both parties equally, unless it’s only in one party’s name. If you both co-borrowed the mortgage, you’ll have to decide who will keep the loan and who will exit if one partner wants the house. One way to get one name off a mortgage loan is to refinance the debt and put the loan under just one person’s name.  

The equity built up in the home usually belongs to each party 50/50 as long as the title is held as joint tenants with right of survivorship or tenants by the entirety; don’t be intimidated by the legal jargon. All this means, essentially, is that you legally own the home together.  

If you decide to sell the house, either the couple or the court will likely compel that process, after which you can divide the proceeds equally after paying off the debt.  

If you're planning on staying in your home, refinancing your mortgage before you divorce can help ease the financial blow. With divorce being as costly as it is, finding ways to trim your budget can better prepare you for a single-income lifestyle. Refinancing could do just that, lowering your monthly payment and potentially your interest rate, assuming you have good credit.  

A lower bill may also make it financially possible for you to stay in the house, if that’s what you want. Plus, if you apply before splitting, you're more likely to get approved since a combined income will likely make you more attractive to lenders.  

Your car loan: The same usually goes for car loans — if one spouse wants to keep the vehicle, he or she could refinance the loan under his/her own name. Or you can sell altogether and divvy up the cash. As Slowiaczek mentioned above, remaining debt follows the asset, so whoever keeps the car will assume the debt. 

Credit debt. The way nonsecured debts, like credit cards, are handled goes back to individual state laws.  

In a community property state, Ziegler says the courts usually take a 50/50 view of marital debt. But equitable distribution states typically look at who contributed to the debt, how much money each party makes, and other statutory requirements that allow them to potentially allocate the debt differently. In other words, things aren’t as black and white, and the courts have more interpretive wiggle room.   

Barbara, a 36-year-old sales professional in Tampa, Fla. is eight months into the divorce process. Florida is an equitable distribution state, meaning the debt she and her husband accrued could end up being split any number of ways. One of the toughest parts of her experience has been the $35,000 of credit card debt she says she shares with her ex. 

"It was mostly accrued by [my husband], but mostly in my name," she told MagnifyMoney. The couple also have a $202,000 mortgage, and deciding who will assume the mortgage (and the equity in the home that comes with it) has been a point of contention.  

Ziegler says Barbara probably has more leverage than if she lived in a community property state.  

Student loans. Generally speaking, Ziegler says the court is required to look at the purpose of the degree each spouse pursued to determine whether it’s marital or non-marital debt. Again, it really depends on the nature of the debt, who benefitted from it, and what state you live in, among other things.  

For example, a student loan may be in your spouse’s name, but who’s making the payments? And which one of you is the primary earner? These things matter and could potentially play into your divorce agreement. 

When you acquired the debt 

One bit of good news: no matter where you live, Ziegler says premarital debts are off limits. Where divorce is concerned, the court is only interested in debts that were accrued during the marriage. The same generally goes for debt acquired post-separation.  

How the debt was used 

Every case is different, but the reason behind the debt can sometimes be argued. If, for example, debt was taken on for one spouse’s personal use, the other spouse might argue against being on the hook for it, depending on the property laws in the relevant state. 

"Credit card purchases to buy groceries or make a car payment are obviously marital, but what about debt that was racked up for personal use, like [cosmetic surgery] or gifts for someone your spouse was having an affair with?" asked Ziegler. "It can be argued that those expenses are not marital debt and should be assumed by the individual."  

This underscores the importance of parsing out individual versus marital debts. To help make it easier, Ziegler recommends that couples maintain two different types of accounts: joint for marital expenses, and individual for personal spending. It's also wise to keep your statements handy.
 

How to financially protect yourself during a divorce 

Divorces don't usually come cheap, but there are steps you can take to soften the blow. 

Sign a prenup

Prenuptial agreements aren't as taboo as they once were. According to a survey released by the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers (AAML) in 2013, "prenups" are on the rise; a whopping 63 percent of divorce attorneys cited an increase in recent years. This is because they serve as a loophole against state rules, dramatically simplifying the fight over debts and assets. 

"Most prenuptial agreements say that if the debt is in either party's name, it's separate debt that cannot be allocated or redistributed for payment," said Ziegler.  

If you're already married, it isn't too late to protect yourself. As of 2015, 50 percent of AAML members reported an uptick in postnuptial agreement requests. 

Safeguard your credit

Take steps to safeguard your credit before you divorce. As soon as you begin the separation process, do yourself a favor and make a list of all your individual and joint debts to get an idea of what you're dealing with. Are you or your spouse listed as authorized users on any accounts? If so, cancel those straight away to avoid accruing any new joint debt. To make sure you don't miss anything, pull your credit report and take a thorough look at your open accounts. 

Ziegler also suggests making it clear in the divorce agreement who's responsible for which debts — but that doesn't always protect you. 

"The reality is, if your name is still attached to the account, and your ex-spouse defaults on payments, it's going to negatively impact your credit," she warned.  

If your ex agrees to pay off any debts, you can protect yourself by transferring the balances fully into the former partner’s name. 

Marianne Hayes
Marianne Hayes |

Marianne Hayes is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Marianne here

TAGS: , ,

Advertiser Disclosure

Personal Loans

Getting Loans from Someone Other than a Bank

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Getting Loans from Other Bank

Updated November 06, 2017

Personal loans allow borrowers to have access to a fixed amount of money at a fixed interest rate, with a fixed monthly payment and you know when you’ll have completely paid off the loan. They are a great resource for someone looking to refinance debt and can’t use a balance transfer. If you need cash, personal loans are usually the best way to borrow. Personal loans tend to be much cheaper and simpler than a credit card.

How to get a personal loan?

Step 1: Check and see if you can get a loan with an Internet-only lender.

Ideally, you should start your shopping with a site like LendingTree, which lets you shop at dozens of lenders with just one simple online form (described below). LendingTree is the parent company of MagnifyMoney.

Step 2: Go to your local credit union and see if they can match or beat your P2P loan

Step 3: Take the loan with the lower interest rate

If you aren’t eligible for a P2P loan from an Internet-only lender then try your local credit union.

Internet-only lenders

The rise of technology allowed a new wave of lenders to offer an alternative to traditional bank loans. Peer-to-Peer lending (or P2P for short) allows borrowers to receive loans from “peers” often in the form of individual investors or hedge funds, endowments and pension funds.

Peer-to-peer loans are interesting because they were developed specifically for the digital environment. This makes them accessible with a few clicks on a computer and a relatively simple application process. Companies like Prosper, LendingClub and Upstart facilitate matching borrowers with investors. There is no need to visit a bank branch. The aim of P2P lending is to give a borrower lower interest rates while giving investors higher returns.

Interestingly, some big banks have acquired or built their own online lenders which are offering consumers even better rates. SunTrust has done that with the acquisition of LightStream, and Goldman Sachs Bank USA has recently invested in building Marcus.

Step 1: Shop Online for a Personal Loan (without hurting your score)

[Disclosure: LendingTree is the parent company of MagnifyMoney.] At LendingTreee, you can shop for a loan at dozens of lenders with just one online form (that takes less than 5 minutes to complete). LendingTree will perform a soft credit pull (with no impact to your score), and you can get real offers - including how much you can borrow and the interest rate. We think this is one of the best places to start your personal loan shopping journey.

LEARN MORE Secured

on Lending Tree’s secure website

LightStream*

Pro:

  • If you have excellent credit, LightStream offers some of the lowest interest rates in the market. Rates start as low as 2.49% (to finance an auto) and 5.49% (to refinance credit card debt).
  • You can get the money by the next business day. This is a remarkably fast process.
  • LightStream has a rate match promise: if you find a lower interest rate somewhere else, they will match it.
  • There is no pre-payment penalty and no origination fee.

Con:

  • You must have excellent credit to qualify.
  • LightStream does not have "soft pull" functionality. If you apply for a loan, there will be a hard inquiry on your credit report.

LendingClub*

Pro

  • Their interest rates are most likely lower than other loans with an APR range of 5.99% to 35.89%.
  • You can find out your interest rate without a hard inquiry on your credit score. Prosper uses a “soft pull” so there will be no point reductions on your credit score, nor an inquiry left on your report for finding out the interest rate.
  • There is no pre-payment penalty(fine if you pay off the loan early), but they won’t refund your loan fee.

Con:

  • You must have a high credit score (600 or higher) to be eligible to get a personal loan from LendingClub.
  • You probably won’t be accepted if you have a history of missed payments.
  • There is an upfront fee, but your APR will include the fee. Be sure to compare the APR and not just the interest rate when you’re shopping around.

Upstart*

People with minimal credit history can turn to Upstart for an opportunity to be eligible for a personal loan.

Upstart evaluates where you went to school, your area of study, your grades and employment history to determine your eligibility for a loan and your interest rate.

Step 2: Credit Unions

Credit unions are not-for-profit organizations that offer alternatives to traditional banks. They have more of an emphasis on serving their community than worrying about a corporation’s bottom line. Unlike banks, credit union members own the credit unions.

Credit unions do offer loans, but first you must become a member of the credit union. Some credit unions are closed. But others (like PenFed) will let you join if you make a $15 donation to a charity.

Pros

  • Loans from a credit union usually have lower interest rates than a bank, and possibly the lowest you can find.

Cons

  • You will need to join a credit union, and may not qualify for a loan so you could be out the cost to join.

PenFed offers a 9.99%-14.99% interest rate with no upfront fee for a term of five years. However, you will need to have a 700+ credit score to be competitive for this personal loan.

Non-bank lenders

OneMain is a non-bank lender owned by Citigroup. You will have to physically visit a branch to get approved. But, the process usually takes less than 30 minutes. Borrowers with high credit scores should first explore the P2P space and credit unions before turning to OneMain, because it will be a more expensive form of borrowing.

Pros:

  • If having face-to-face contact is important to you, then you can visit physical branches.
  • OneMain will approve people with credit scores as low as 550, so it is possible to get a loan when other reject you. Although expensive, OneMain will be much less expensive than payday loans or title loans.

Cons:

  • You have to visit a branch, even if you’re preapproved online. If you don’t have a branch near you, this could be a serious hassle.
  • There will be a hard inquiry on your credit report
  • Likely higher interests rates (APRs) than a loan from P2P lenders like Prosper or LendingClub
  • A few complex terms and conditions

Warning:

  • Don’t bother with the insurance products they’ll try to sell you.

Step 3: Take the Lowest Interest Rate

Personal loans can be valuable tools to help pay down debt, reduce interest rates and save you hundreds to thousands of dollars. But remember; don’t rush into a personal loan just because it seems like a good deal. Take the time to do your research, shop around and ensure your getting the absolute best interest rate you can. Even the difference of .01 can make a difference in the long run.

Read where to find the best personal loan rates online here.

Erin Lowry
Erin Lowry |

Erin Lowry is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Erin at erin@magnifymoney.com

TAGS:

Get A Pre-Approved Personal Loan

$

Won’t impact your credit score

Advertiser Disclosure

News

Back to Our Pre-Recession Ways, Americans Are Spending More and Saving Less

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

iStock

Americans appear to be back to their pre-recession savings habits. The personal savings rate in the U.S. dropped to 3.1 percent in September 2017, according to the Commerce Department — the lowest level since the Great Recession took hold.

Meanwhile, Americans are spending more (household debt is at a 10-year high) and consumer confidence has risen to its highest level in almost 17 years, according to data released Tuesday through The Conference Board, a global, independent business membership and research association.

3 reasons we’re saving less:

Household debt is on the rise again. Total household debt increased to $12.84 trillion in the second quarter of 2017, up $114 billion, or 0.9 percent, from the same quarter last year, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reported in August. This was a new high since the third quarter of 2008, the peak of the mortgage crisis. People may feel they can get access to funds by borrowing when it is needed, rather than holding money in savings, said Andrew Opdyke, economist at the First Trust Advisors.

But incomes are up and we’re spending more. While personal income rose 0.4 percent in September, consumer spending surged 1 percent, the fastest pace since 2009, Commerce reported.

Hurricanes don’t come cheap. The Commerce Department Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) said August and September estimates of personal income and spending reflected the effects of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Millions were displaced by the hurricanes, and experts say the spending jump was driven by a hurricane-induced uptick in auto sales and increases in gas and household utility prices.

Year

Personal Savings Rate

Total Household Debt

Consumer Confidence

2007

3.0%

$11.85 trillion

99.6

2008

4.9%

$12.60 trillion

97.3

2009

6.1%

$12.41 trillion

98.1

2010

5.6%

$11.94 trillion

97.9

2011

6.0%

$11.73 trillion

96.8

2012

7.6%

$11.38 trillion

99.0

2013

5.0%

$11.15 trillion

99.0

2014

5.7%

$11.63 trillion

99.8

2015

6.1%

$11.85 trillion

100.4

2016

4.9%

$12.29 trillion

100.4

2017

3.7%*

$12.84 trillion

101.1

Sources:

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis


*as of Q3

Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Organisation for Economic
Co-operation and Development

It’s not exactly news that Americans aren’t the greatest savers. The Federal Reserve reported that in 2016, 44 percent of Americans could not come up with $400 in cash to cover emergencies.

But should we worried that we’re saving less and spending more than we have in a decade?

Economists say that as the economy is humming along, consumers are feeling more confident that they can spend and borrow more without putting themselves in financial distress. It’s no coincidence that Americans saved the most in the same year (2012) that consumer confidence was comparatively low.

Brian Wesbury, chief economist at First Trust Advisors, writes that rising debt levels aren’t so alarming when you factor in overall income growth. Household incomes grew by 3.2 percent between 2015 and 2016, according to the Census Bureau.

“Yes, consumer debts are at a record high in raw dollar terms, but so are consumer assets,” wrote Brian Wesbury, chief economist at First Trust Advisors. “Comparing the two, debts are the lowest relative to assets since 2000 (and that's back during the internet bubble when asset values were artificially high.”

How to calculate your personal savings rate

Take your total monthly income from all sources (salary, retirement account, etc.), less taxes and money spent on everyday expenses, including debt payments.

Next, divide your monthly savings amount by your total income. Then multiply by 100 to get your personal saving rate.

There’s no magic savings rate to aim for. A good rule of thumb is to save 10 percent of each paycheck for retirement, and establish an emergency fund covering at least three to six months’ worth of basic living expenses.

Evidence suggests that many Americans are just getting by, shouldering record levels of student loan debt while grappling with rising fixed costs. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in September reported that 43 percent of American adults struggled to make ends meet in 2016.

But savings is key to achieving financial security. The CFPB study found that adults with savings and financial cushions had a higher level of financial well-being than those who didn’t have a safety net to fall back on.

7 strategies to boost your savings:

  1. Automate. Many employers can set up automatic deposits of your income into multiple checking or savings accounts. You can have a portion of your paycheck automatically transferred into a savings account so that you will be less inclined to touch that money. It makes easier for you to resist the temptations to spend.
  2. Make retirement a priority. If you are not able to set aside 10 percent of your income, you should try to contribute enough to capture the full company match for your 401(k), if your employer offers one.
  3. Track your spending. You will be surprised by the amount of money you spend on groceries or Starbucks once you actually track the money coming in and out. The more you know about your finances, the better off you’ll be. A simple app to track spending patterns is a good place to start engaging in day-to-day money management and establish a habit of saving and budgeting.
  4. Get rid of high-interest debts. Debts are anti-assets. It makes more sense to pay off high-interest debt, such as credit card debt, than to save. Here are four tips to help you pay down debts.
  5. Avoid lifestyle inflation. Lifestyle inflation means people spend more as their incomes increase. It is one of the ultimate budget-killers.
  6. Don’t keep up with the Joneses. Forget them. The key to being satisfied with the state of your finances and your life is focusing on your needs and goals rather than comparing with your friends and co-workers
  7. Find ways to help break your negative spending habits. Here is a simple $20 rule that can help break your credit card addiction. We’ve also written about other strategies to break bad money habits here.
Shen Lu
Shen Lu |

Shen Lu is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Shen Lu at shenlu@magnifymoney.com

TAGS: , , ,

Advertiser Disclosure

Pay Down My Debt, Personal Loans

No Credit, or Poor Credit? Here Are Your Loan Options

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Mixed Race Young Female Agonizing Over Financial Calculations in Her Kitchen.

Updated November 03, 2017
Don’t have a credit history established, or have a low credit score? It can be challenging to find lenders that will approve you if you have a thin credit file or poor credit, but it’s not impossible.

You still have options when it comes to personal loans, and these options come from reputable lenders.

What’s even better is that these lenders will only conduct a soft credit inquiry when you apply to find out what rates they can offer you. This means your credit score won’t be negatively affected, so you don’t have to worry about damaging it further.

In this article we'll review how to find reputable lenders, why you should stay away from two popular options people turn to when they’re in a poor credit situation: payday and title loans. And what you can do to increase your credit score.

Check for approval without a credit hit

It’s worth noting low scores aren’t always indicative of how responsible you are with credit. A low score, or thin file, could just be a result of a short credit history. If you have a clean history (no late payments, low credit utilization, etc.), you’ll have an easier time obtaining a loan over someone who has had delinquencies on their record, but might have a higher score.

If you have bad (or no) credit, you should apply to as many lenders as possible that use a soft pull to ensure you don't hurt your credit score. We recommend starting with LendingTree, where you can use one short application form to get rates from multiple lenders at one.

LendingTree: Dozens of lenders partner with Lending Tree - and many of them may approve people with poor or no credit. You can fill out a simple form and compare multiple offers in minutes. We highly recommend starting your shopping experience here first to have a good chance of getting a loan. (Note: MagnifyMoney is owned by LendingTree)

LEARN MORE

Here are 5 personal loan lenders for people who have less than ideal credit (meaning under 700) that will let you check your rate without impacting your credit score:

OppLoans: If you have no or bad credit, OppLoans is an online lender that could help. If your credit score is below 630 (or if you have no credit score at all), OppLoans will work with you. You can check to see if you are approved without impacting your score. And - unlike payday lenders - OppLoans offers much more affordable borrowing options. They also have great reviews - with a customer service rating of 4.9/5 stars.

APPLY NOW Secured

on Opploans’s secure website

LendingClub: People with credit scores below 600 can get approved. You can borrow $1,000 - $40,000 and get the money deposited into your account within a few days. Fixed APRs range from 5.99%-35.89% on terms up to 5 years. LendingClub has an origination fee of 1%-6% on its loans. LendingClub is not available in Iowa or West Virginia.

APPLY NOW Secured

on Lending Club’s secure website

Upstart: Borrow between $3,000 and $50,000 for up to 5 years with APRs ranging from around 9.56% to 29.99%. While the minimum credit score needed to qualify is 640 (Upstart will also consider applicants who don’t have a score), you must have a clean credit history. You could also be eligible for next day funding.

Avant: You could borrow anywhere from $2,000 to $35,000 through Avant, and you could receive your funds as soon as the next business day. APRs range from 9.95% - 35.99%. Although the minimum credit score varies, you have a much better chance if your score is above 580. Avant is available in all states except Colorado, Iowa, West Virginia, and Vermont.

APPLY NOW Secured

on Avant’s secure website

Avant branded credit products are issued by WebBank, member FDIC.

Prosper: Another peer-to-peer marketplace lender, Prosper’s loans are similar to LendingClub’s. You can borrow $2,000 to $40,000 with APRs ranging from 5.99%-35.99% on 3 and 5 year terms. There’s an origination fee of 1%-5%, and its minimum credit score is 640.

There are several other personal loan lenders that will do a soft credit check. You can find them on our personal loan table here. While many of these lenders have minimum credit score requirements, you’ll find they take other factors into account aside from your FICO score.

Additionally, since these lenders only do a soft credit pull, you’re free to shop around for the best rates without fear of damaging your credit score.

Why You need to Stay Away from Payday Loans and Title Loans

Not eligible for personal loans? Don’t turn to payday loans or title loans.

If you’re not familiar with either, you might be wondering what’s so bad about them. After all, they seem convenient – most offer “fast cash,” and if you live in a populated area, you’ll probably find a payday loan or title loan shop nearby.

However, both require you to give something in exchange for funds, and neither require any sort of stringent approval process to ensure borrowers can afford the loans.

Payday Loans

Payday loan companies require you to write a check for the amount you wish to borrow, plus a set fee. The lender holds onto the check until the loan becomes due (typically on the borrower’s next payday, hence the name), and gives the borrower the money they need in the meantime.

The problem? If you can’t pay when the loan balance becomes due, you can choose to extend the term of the loan. When you do, you get hit with more fees. The APR on payday loans is extremely high, so you’ll pay more each time you extend your loan term.

Payday loans are on the smaller side – anywhere from $100 to $1,000. According to PayDayLoanInfo.org, the average term is two weeks, with 400%+ APRs. When you factor in fees, the APR can go up to 780%.

[Stuck in a Payday Loan Trap? Here are the ways out.]

Title Loans

Title loans require you to give your car’s title to the title loan company in exchange for an amount equal to the appraised value of your car. You usually have to own your car outright to be eligible for a title loan, and the term is around 30 days.

Like payday loans, if you can’t pay on time, you may choose to roll the loan over to the next month, incurring more fees. If you can’t pay back the loan at all, you run the risk of the lender repossessing your car.

As you can tell, both of these options are bad ideas if you want to stay clear of getting into a horrible debt cycle. These loans are purposely too expensive for borrowers to afford. If people are looking for quick cash because they don’t have any, it stands to reason they’ll be in the same situation a week or two from the time they borrow.

Non-Profit Credit Counseling to Rebuild Credit Score

You want to make every effort to improve your credit score, even after you’re approved for a loan, because having a good credit score will benefit you in other areas of life. For that reason, you might want to consider teaming up with a non-profit credit counseling service.

These companies can provide you with personalized advice on your specific situation so you can work on rebuilding your credit score. They can also work with your creditors and negotiate on your behalf to possibly lower interest rates or get better terms on your existing debt.

It can be tricky to find a reputable credit counseling agency – even with a non-profit organization. If you’re interested in a credit counseling service, USA.gov lists a few considerations and questions you should ask before committing. You want to make sure the credit counseling agency is actually going to help you get your credit and financial situation under control.

Alternative to Ways to Build Your Credit Score

If you don’t qualify for a personal loan, and don’t want to turn to payday or title loans, there are a few steps you can take to increase your credit score. This post has 6 tips to help get you started. These methods won’t boost your score immediately, but over time, you’ll see an improvement.

The Federal Trade Commission also has 6 alternatives to payday loans on its website, which might apply to your situation. For example, if you’re a member of a credit union, you could inquire about a loan through them as you have an established relationship already.

Also, if you haven’t started budgeting and tracking your spending, you should – doing so can help you spot problem areas with your money.

Read the Fine Print and Shop Around

Regardless of which loan you decide to apply for, always consider the cost. You want to make sure you’re getting the best possible terms, which means getting the lowest APR offered. Typically, cash advances and credit cards are going to have higher APRs than personal loans but lower than payday lenders.

Remember to always read the fine print. Loans of any type have plenty of fees associated with them that you should avoid. Shop around for the best deals and work on improving your credit score so better options become available to you.

Customize your personal loan offers with comparison tool

*We’ll receive a referral fee if you click on offers with this symbol. This does not impact our rankings or recommendations. You can learn more about how our site is financed here.

Erin Millard
Erin Millard |

Erin Millard is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Erin at erinm@magnifymoney.com

TAGS: , ,

Get A Pre-Approved Personal Loan

$

Won’t impact your credit score

Advertiser Disclosure

Consumer Watchdog, Pay Down My Debt, Personal Loans

Should You Avoid LendUp? A Review of Its Loans

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

personal-loan_lg-e1469273811143

Updated October 25, 2017
Update: On Sept. 27, 2016, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau ordered LendUP to pay more than $3.6 million in fines for allegedly misleading customers about its online lending service. Read the full CFPB order here

In a nutshell, the CFPB claims LendUP's parent company, Flurish, Inc., misleadingly advertised its lowest-priced loans. LendUP advertised its loans as available nationwide, yet the most attractive loans were only available to customers in California, the agency says. 

The CFPB also claims  LendUP failed to accurately market the annual percentage rates offered with its loans and in some cases understated the true APR on its loans. 

What does the CFPB's order mean for LendUP customers?

The CFPB has ordered the company to pay about $1.83 million in refunds to over 50,000 consumers. Consumers are not required to take any action. The company will contact consumers in the coming months about their refunds, the watchdog says.

In response to the CFPB's claims posted on its website, LendUP says the transgressions date back to the company's early days. "When we were a seed-stage startup with limited resources and as few as five employees. In those days we didn't have a fully built out compliance department. We should have."

--

Lendup LendUp is a company offering a better alternative to the typical shady payday loan. Its aim is to disrupt the payday loan system by providing consumers with more affordable loans, more education, and transparency.

This is quite a change from storefront payday lenders, who have confusing policies that often leave customers paying more huge amounts in interest.

LendUp wants to reform the payday loan industry by helping its customers get out of debt and build credit.

However, it could come at a hefty price for consumers. Payday loans are known for outrageous APRs, and while LendUp has more reasonable APRs than typical payday loan companies, it’s still something to be aware of.

Who Should Use LendUp?

Before we get into the details of the loans offered by LendUp, it’s important to address who should avoid its loans and who should consider them.

Payday loans are typically short-term loans to tide you over if you need money in between pay periods. The term can be one week, two weeks, or one month long. That’s a big difference from other personal loans that have terms of 1 to 5 years.

It comes down to your personal situation, and what you’re looking to use the money for.

If you have damaged credit or no credit at all, then payday loans might look like the only solution. LendUp can help you, but it’s important to consider the price.

If you’re simply looking to build credit, there are much better options out there. Taking a payday loan should be one of your last resorts. You can only start to build credit via LendUp when you reach Platinum or Prime status, which requires you to take on multiple loans.

Each time you borrow money from LendUp, you’ll be paying a significant amount in interest. For example, even if you only borrowed $100 for 31 days, you’d still pay $24.40 in interest (287.29% APR), according to their calculator.

For that reason, if you have poor or no credit, it’s better to look into opening a secured credit card, or trying to get approved for a store card. There’s no reason to pay $24 in interest if you don’t have to.

If you have severely damaged credit and are unable to get approved for any other solution, or you're in dire need of cash to afford necessities like food, then you should consider LendUp over going to a regular payday loan store. LendUp is certainly the better option.

That said, if you’re looking for a long-term loan, or looking for more cash for a big purchase, then LendUp is not the right choice. You should check out the other personal loan lenders we’ve reviewed, such as SoFi*, Payoff*, and Upstart*.

How Does LendUp Work?

LendUp Ladder APRLendUp is a completely new solution to payday loans. It has what it calls the “LendUp ladder,” which is a point-based system. When you show that you’re a reliable customer and can make timely payments, you’re rewarded points, which enable you to climb up the LendUp ladder.

Update: In a consent order issued Sept. 27, 2016 the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau claims LendUP misleadingly advertised its loans as available nationwide. However, the most attractive loans, which customers were told they could earn access to through LendUP's "Ladder" rewards program, were only available to customers in California. 

You can also earn points by watching LendUp’s educational courses on credit and for taking loans with them.

Climbing up the ladder gives you different statuses. You start at Silver, and from there, you can advance to Gold, Platinum, or Prime status. Each status has better terms, and at Platinum and Prime status, you can report your payments to credit bureaus to build your credit.

LendUp also doesn’t allow rollovers. That means if you’re unable to pay back your loan on time, LendUp will not charge you a fee to extend it, as other payday lenders do.

Instead, it offers free 30-day extensions on loans, so if you’re unable to make a payment, all you have to do is log into your account, and choose the option to extend your loan. LendUp tries to work with its customers as much as possible to ensure they’re getting out of debt, not back into it.

According to its website, LendUp is also the “first and only licensed direct lender with a relationship to the major credit bureaus.” LendUp emphasizes that there’s no middleman involved when customers take a loan, which allows LendUp to maintain its transparency.

LendUp Loan Details

Terms vary based upon the status you have with LendUp and you can get a loan amount of $100 - $1,000 depending on your tier.

Silver starts you off with a minimum loan amount of $100 and a maximum of $250. The terms range from 7 to 31 days. The maximum loan amount offered is $1,000, accessible at Prime.

Screen Shot 2015-03-27 at 5.57.58 PMLendUp provides a helpful calculator on its front page that gives you an idea of what you can expect with different loan amounts and terms.

For example, if you want to borrow $250, the APR range is 209.75% (30 days) to 755.03% (7 days).

According to ResponsibleLending.org, the typical two week payday loan as an annual interest rate ranging from 391% to 521%. LendUp falls within that spectrum.

Unlike payday lenders, LendUp rewards customers for continuing to borrower. LendUp does offer rates as low as 29% to its Prime customers, which is great when comparing against other payday loans. However, we’d prefer you focus on building your credit score and look to establish a line of credit with a credit union or get a personal loan from lender with better terms.

LendUp payday loans are also currently offered in only the following states: Ohio, New Mexico, Washington, Maine, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Florida, Texas, Wyoming, Alabama, Idaho, Indiana, Illinois, Mississippi, Oregon, Kansas, California, Missouri, Tennessee, and Minnesota.

LendUp is working on increasing its presence throughout the United States, but since its a direct lender, its has to comply with individual state laws and policies.

LendUp Application Process

The application process is fairly straightforward. LendUp says it should take 5 minutes or less to fill out the application and you’ll get an instant decision.

LendUp offers standard next day funding, instant funding, and same-day funding (Wells Fargo customers only). It warns that if you take instant or same-day funding, you’ll have to pay a fee to cover the cost.

LendUp offers a no credit check payday loan option. To qualify, you just need an active bank account and proof of income.

It assesses applicants on much more than just their FICO scores, which comes as no surprise. Throughout its site, LendUp makes it clear it wants to lend to those with bad or nonexistent credit. Like other personal loan lenders, LendUp uses its own algorithm consisting of different data points to determine whether or not to extend a loan to an applicant.

The Fine Print

LendUp states it doesn’t have any hidden fees, but as with any payday loan, you need to read the fine print.

First, fees and rates are dependent upon the state you live in, so make sure to review state specific information here.

The only fee that’s mentioned with a dollar value attached is a non-sufficient funds fee. LendUp automatically takes money out of your bank account, and if you don’t have enough money in there to cover it, you’ll get hit with this fee, which can be between $15 and $30.

Additionally, if you want to pay before your due date, you can pay with your debit card, but you’ll incur a fee to cover the cost of the transaction.

Opting to get your money instantly or same-day also comes with a fee.

What happens if you can’t afford to pay and you used your extension? This is a common concern among those already tight on money. On its site, LendUp says to contact them at the first sign of trouble. It’s willing to work with borrowers.

However, if you don’t pay, and you don’t contact LendUp, then there are consequences. LendUp can suspend your LendUp account, send your account to outside collection agencies, take legal action, and report your account delinquent to the credit bureaus.

Commendable, but Still a Payday Loan

LendUp’s mission is a commendable one – it wants to educate its customers and provide them with a better way to get back on their feet. LendUp is certainly an improvement over traditional payday lenders, but at the end of the day, it’s still a payday loan. When taking one, you need to consider the overall costs you might face.

Look into secured lines of credit or store credit cards – don’t look to take a payday loan first. Only take one if you desperately need the cash and you’re in a rough spot. Be aware of exactly what you’re getting yourself into, and make every effort to pay off your loan on time and improve your financial situation.

If you’re interested in looking into a loan with LendUp, use its site map to get specific information related to the state you live in, as loan terms vary depending on state.

*We receive a referral fee if you click on offers with this symbol. This does not impact our rankings or recommendations. You can learn more about how our site is financed here.  

Erin Millard
Erin Millard |

Erin Millard is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Erin at erinm@magnifymoney.com

TAGS: , , ,