Tag: Federal Student Loans

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College Students and Recent Grads

What Is the NSLDS? A Tool to Keep Track of Student Loans

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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Over the course of a college career, a student may take out multiple education loans of different amounts and term lengths. Loans are often granted on an annual basis, and by the time you graduate, it’s easy to lose track of your total borrowing.

What’s more, holders of federal loans get a short reprieve from repayment after graduation — up to six or nine months, depending on the loan time — making it can be easy to forget that you’ve got money due. It’s smart to use that grace period to begin planning for repayment, rather than viewing it as a vacation from thinking about your college loans.

One of the best ways to keep track of your federal student loans and payments is through the National Student Loan Data System, a centralized database for federal student loan and grant information managed by the U.S. Department of Education. By checking in regularly on the NSLDS, you can stay on top of how much you owe, the repayment terms of your loans and the monthly payment amounts.

For new graduates making a budget — sometimes for the first time — this student loan information can help them understand how much money they need to set aside for monthly payments, or if they need to look into alternative loan repayment programs.

“It’s a helpful tool, and so often as humans, we’re inclined to denial or procrastination,” says Melinda Opperman, executive vice president with Credit.org, a nonprofit organization focused on personal finance education. “By ignoring that tool, you could have a problem compounding. See what’s in there, and get yourself anchored and prepared.”

What’s the purpose of the National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS)?

The NSLDS was authorized as part of the 1986 Higher Education Act (HEA) Amendments and is administered by the Office of Federal Student Aid. It was formed with three purposes:

  • To better the quality of student aid data and its accessibility
  • To decrease the administrative work required for Title IV Aid
  • To decrease fraud and abuse of student aid programs

The NSLDS initially focused on federal loan compliance but eventually expanded to encompass detailed data from federal student loan and grant programs in which students are enrolled.

Where does the NSLDS get its information?

The NSLDS gets information from several government and loan processing services. Here are the sources for NSLDS data:

  • Guaranty agencies, which are state agencies or private, nonprofit organizations that provide information on the Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program
  • Department of Education loan servicers
  • Department of Education debt collection services (information about defaults on loans held by the Department of Education)
  • Direct loan servicing (information on federal direct student loans)
  • Common origination disbursement (information on federal grant programs)
  • Conditional disability discharge tracking system (information on disability loans)
  • Central processing system (information on aid applicants)
  • Individual schools (information on federal Perkins loan program, student enrollment and aid overpayments)

When data from these sources are combined, you can get a comprehensive overview of your outstanding loans, repaid loans and repayment schedules.

The NSLDS is updated according to each organization’s loan reporting schedule. Some report monthly, and many report data more frequently.

What you’ll find on the NSLDS

After signing up for an FSA ID (Federal Student Aid ID), you can log into the NSLDS to see the updated status of your federal student loans and grants, as well as your college enrollment status and the effective date of your status.

Loans are listed from newest to oldest, and you can find more information about each, including the loan servicer’s name and contact information, by clicking on the loan number. You also will have access to an array of details about each of your federal loans and grants:

  • Name
  • Disbursed amount
  • Date of disbursement
  • Last-known balance
  • Outstanding interest
  • Status (e.g. repayment, in grace, paid in full)
  • Status effective date
  • Interest rate
  • Progress toward the 120 qualifying payments needed for Public Service Loan Forgiveness
  • Income-driven repayment plan anniversary date

“It gives a centralized, integrated view of the loans and grants under the student’s complete life cycle,” Opperman says. “Everything is there.”

You may see a lot of terms and abbreviations you don’t recognize, but there’s a glossary to help you understand them.

What you won’t find

The NSLDS only provides information about federal loan programs, so you will not see details about private loans. To get that information, you’ll need to contact your private loan’s servicer or your school’s financial aid department. You also can review your credit report (you are entitled to one free credit report annually) to find the information.

You also won’t find:

  • Real-time balance accounts. You should see the outstanding principal balance for each loan, but this number may not include the most recent data. Contact your loan servicer for the most up-to-date numbers.
  • Information about nursing and medical loans. While these are federal loan programs, they are not included in the NSLDS. Contact your school’s financial aid department for information about nursing or medical loans.
  • Loans you are not responsible for paying. Any federal loans your parents took out on your behalf, including federal PLUS loans, will not be listed on your NSLDS account. For information about federal student loans that they are responsible for paying, your parents will need to create their own FSA ID and password to access the NSLDS data.

Even with these gaps in information, the NSLDS is a great place to start when you’re not sure whom to contact with student loan questions or when you’re trying to get on top of your loan payments. It’s also helpful if you’re trying to figure out what type of loans you have, which is necessary when you’re applying for certain loan forgiveness programs.

How to sign up for the NSLDS

As mentioned previously, to use the NSLDS you must have an FSA ID username and password, which serve as your login information and allow you to access data about your federal loans and grants online. The ID and password also provide access to many other Department of Education websites.

To create an FSA username and password, visit this link. Opperman says the certified student loan counselors who work with Credit.org recommend you never give out your FSA number or password, even to credit counselors. This information carries the legal weight of a signature, and it can be used to commit identity theft. Credit counselors can get student loan information from you rather than by directly accessing your NSLDS account.

The FSA ID and password application requires your email address, mailing address, date of birth and Social Security number. A cellphone number can be provided if you’d like to bypass answering security questions to retrieve an FSA ID or password.

To look at your federal loan and grant information, click on “Financial Aid Review” after entering your FSA ID and password into the NSLDS website. You do not have to enter loan information, as agencies that issued your federal grants and loans will be responsible for reporting information to the NSLDS.

Is this site accurate?

While the information on the NSLDS generally is accurate because it is provided by loan servicers, it is usually not up to date. Organizations that provide loan information for the NSLDS report on different schedules..

What if the info is wrong?

The NSLDS is not infallible; it’s important to check your page regularly for errors and inaccuracies. Here are some common issues with the NSLDS and how to remedy them:

An error

Check the NSLDS record for this loan, and contact the data provider listed. You will need to give the data provider information that will help the organization look into the error and remedy it. If the data provider is uncooperative and will not fix the error, contact the NSLDS Customer Service Center at (800) 999-8219.

Missing data

If updated loan information is not available within 45 days of disbursement, contact a guaranty agency, the loan’s servicing center or your school’s financial aid office. Otherwise, allow for typical time lapses in reporting.

Frequently asked questions about NSLDS

Usually, no. Typically, only data providers can update information related to your loan when they make their reports to the NSLDS.

The site has an SSL certificate, which means all data passing between your web browser and the site server is encrypted (provided you’re using an SSL-compatible browser, like the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari or Internet Explorer).

The Department of Education does not charge a fee to use the site.

The site is designed to work best with Microsoft Internet Explorer. You can use other browsers, but keep in mind that the NSLDS pages may not function or display properly on other browsers. The NSLDS system requirements page provides help with browsers and a link to contact information for further assistance.

You are strongly advised not to share your FSA password — ever — as your FSA ID and password are for your use only. Anyone else who uses your FSA information is committing a security violation, and your user ID can be terminated. Organizations can lose access to the NSDLS if they share FSA IDs and passwords.

No. FSA ID passwords expire every 90 days. Fifteen days before the password expires, you will see a warning that it must be changed soon. Users can reset their passwords anytime during that 15-day window by clicking on the “change password” link on the FSA login page.

In this situation, call the NSLDS support number: (800) 999-8219.

You can call the Federal Student Aid Information Center at (800) 4FED-AID — 1-800-433-3243 — between 8 a.m. and 11 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. This helpline is not available on federal holidays. You can also contact the office by email or live chat through the website.

Advertiser Disclosure: The card offers that appear on this site are from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all card companies or all card offers available in the marketplace.

Marty Minchin
Marty Minchin |

Marty Minchin is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Marty here

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College Students and Recent Grads, Pay Down My Debt

How To Tell If Your Student Loans Are Private or Federal

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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How To Tell If Your Student Loans Are Private or Federal

Do you know if your student loans are private or federal? It’s an unfortunate fact that many college graduates don’t completely understand their student loans. You might not know who your student loan servicer is, or why the difference between private and federal student loans matters.

Let’s review a few methods you can use to determine if your student loans are private or federal, what makes each different, and why knowing what type of loan you have is important.

What Makes Federal and Private Student Loans Different?

In case you’re not sure why you should know whether your student loans are federal or private, let’s briefly go over the differences between the two.

Federal student loans are offered through programs funded by the federal government to those that demonstrate a need for financial aid. Typically, these loans are easy to qualify for – in most cases, your credit isn’t even checked.

There are two different federal student loan programs available:

The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program: The lender under this program is the U.S. Department of Education. This program consists of 4 loan types – Direct Subsidized, Direct Unsubsidized, Direct PLUS, and Direct Consolidation. If you’re an undergraduate, you’ll only have Direct Subsidized or Unsubsidized loans.

The Federal Perkins Loan Program: The lender under this program is actually your school, and this is for students with an exceptional need for aid.

Individual banks or credit unions, such as Chase, Wells Fargo, Sallie Mae, Discover, Citizens Bank, etc, make private student loans. There are many lenders that offer private student loans, but the terms aren’t as favorable as those for federal loans. Private loans also require a credit check and may be harder to qualify for.

Additionally, federal student loans come with guaranteed benefits, such as being able to enter a period of forbearance or deferment with your loans (temporarily stops payments), income-based repayment plans, and loan forgiveness. Private loans don’t guarantee these benefits, and different lenders offer different benefits.

How To Determine if Your Loans Are Federal

The first thing you should do to see if you have federal loans is log onto the National Student Loan Data System. The only loans listed here are federal.

If you’ve never used the NSLD before, you’ll want to click the “Financial Review” button on the homepage, hit “Accept,” and then enter your credentials.

If you have an FSA ID, you can enter it here. If not, there’s an option to create one. In May of 2015, the government redesigned its student loan system. You can use your FSA ID to log into multiple government sites now. However, if you haven’t logged on in quite a while, you might need to create one.

In the event you forgot your credentials, you can click on the “Forgot my username/password” button and have the information emailed to you, or answer a challenge question. You’ll just be required to enter your Social Security Number, last name, and date of birth.

I had to go through this process myself and create a new ID as it had been a few years since I had last applied for FAFSA. The process is very simple. After entering your information to create an ID, you just need to link your PIN to your FSA account (you should have a PIN if you applied for FAFSA). If you’ve forgotten it, you can answer a challenge question to have it imported. You also need to confirm your email by entering in a secured code that’s sent to you.

Once you log on, you’ll see a list of all the student loans that were disbursed to you.

This page will also show you what your original loan amount was, and how much you currently owe.

Click on the numbered box to the left of your loan to determine your loan servicer. This will display all the information about that particular loan. Your loan servicer will be listed under the “Servicer/Lender/Guaranty Agency/ED Servicer Information” section. The name, address, phone number, and website should be displayed.

Additionally, this page will also inform you of your loan terms. Along with your original loan balance and current outstanding balance, it will tell you what type of interest rate you have (fixed or variable), your interest rate, and the current status of the loan.

[How to Set Up Income-Driven Repayment Programs]

How To Determine If Your Student Loan is Private

Private student loans are loans not made by the government – banking institutions such as Sallie Mae, Wells Fargo, Chase, Citizens Bank, etc make them.

As a result, there are more lenders to look out for when it comes to private loans. Unfortunately, there’s no central reporting system for private loans like there is for federal loans, which makes them tricky to track down.

Your first stop should be the NSLD to at least see if you have any federal loans. In 2012, only 20% of graduates had private loans, so chances are good at least some of your loans are federal.

Another way to check is to take a look at your credit report. You don’t have to pay for one if you haven’t ordered your three free reports from www.annualcreditreport.com. You can get your credit score within minutes of filling out your information on there.

Some lenders may not look familiar to you. Just conduct a Google search and see what comes up. Further investigation via phone may be necessary to obtain your loan information if you don’t remember making a login for your lenders website.

If you see “Federal Direct Loan,” “Federal Perkins,” “Direct Loan Consolidation,” or “Stafford” on your report, ensure it matches up with what’s on your NSLD account. These are federal loans.

You might also be able to call your school’s financial aid office to see if they have any records of your loans. Otherwise, hopefully you have your own records of the loans you took out.

What Should You Do Once You Find Out?

Knowing whether your student loans are private or federal will help if you ever decide to refinance or consolidate your loans. The process is slightly different if you want to consolidate your federal loans under a Direct Consolidation Loan (through the federal government), or if you want to refinance through a private lender.

Additionally, if you have federal student loans and you’re experiencing difficulty in making payments, you might be eligible for one of the income-based repayment plans offered. Not knowing what type of loan you have means not knowing the repayment assistance options available to you. You can learn more about the three types of income-based repayment plans here.

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Advertiser Disclosure: The card offers that appear on this site are from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all card companies or all card offers available in the marketplace.

Erin Millard
Erin Millard |

Erin Millard is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Erin at erinm@magnifymoney.com

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