Tag: Repayment

College Students and Recent Grads

8 Student Loan Repayment Options if You Join the Military

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Student Loan Repayment Options

Several military programs offer scholarships and grants in exchange for your prior military service, or a promise of service in the future. But, what if you already have a degree and are working to pay off your student loans? You may want to consider one of the military’s student loan repayment programs.

In 2013, CNN reported on Thomas McGregor, an attorney who enlisted in the Army to help pay off his $108,000 student loan debt. Between his income and a loan-assistance program, he was student loan free within four years.

Military service isn’t for everyone, and you should seriously consider the potential impact of signing up for a multi-year commitment. It was a good fit for McGregor, who decided to stay on after his three-year service ended. However, he was deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, and some of his friends were injured or died in combat.

If you decide joining the military is a good choice for you and are paying down student loans, the loan assistance programs could guide your decision to choose one branch over another. While the different programs sometimes share similar names, the qualifications, requirements, and award amounts can vary from one branch’s program to another.

Make sure the loan-repayment guarantee is in your contract before enlisting and double-check your loan’s eligibility for repayment through the program. For example, a program may pay off some types of federal student loans, but not state or private loans. Restrictions also apply based on which position you enlist in, your length of service, and whether or not you have prior military experience. In some cases, the loan payments count as income for tax purposes.

The military’s loan repayment programs and offers can change based on government funding and a branch’s need for new recruits. You can find an overview of the programs below, and you should follow-up with a local recruiter to clarify specifics and find out whether or not you’ll qualify.

Air Force

  • JAG Corps Student Loan Repayment ProgramEligible attorneys can receive up to $65,000 in student loan repayments, payable over three years following the completion of your first year of service. The payments can go towards undergraduate, graduate, or law school loans and payments will go directly to your lender. If you stay on past four years, then you can qualify for a $60,000 in cash bonuses: $20,000 for two more years of service and another $40,000 for four more. That’s not specifically earmarked for your loans, but you can use them to pay off your debt. That would be $125,000 over 8 years, in addition to your salary and other benefits.

Army

  • Healthcare Loan Repayment ProgramsThe Army offers special pay and incentives to doctors, nurses, dentists, veterinarians, psychologists, and other healthcare professionals. Depending on your profession and specialty, you may be eligible for up to $120,000 in student loan repayments over three years of active-duty service in addition to salary, bonuses and special pay. Reserve-duty servicemembers may receive up to $50,000 for three years of service for loans.
  • College Loan Repayment ProgramThe Army also offers some highly qualified Military Occupational Specialists (MOSs) student loan assistance if they enlist for at least three years of service. At the end of each of the three years, you’ll receive the greater of $1,500 or 33.33 percent of your outstanding principal loan balance, less taxes. There’s a maximum potential payout of $65,000.

Army National Guard and Reserves 

  • College Loan Repayment Program The Army National Guard and Army Reserves have similar student loan payments for some highly qualified Military Occupational Specialists (MOSs). You could receive the greater of $1,500 or 15 percent of your outstanding loan principal at the end of each year of service, up to a maximum of $20,000. To qualify, you must enlist and serve for at least six years. Parent PLUS loans can be covered. 

Coast Guard

  • College Student Pre-Commissioning Initiative Student Loan Repayment ProgramThe Coast Guard offers recent college graduates who are 19- to 27-year-olds up to $10,000 per year, for six years, in student loan aid. The program requires candidates to complete a series of trainings, including basic training and leadership training, and enlist for five years as a commissioned officer. There are some interesting catches: you can’t have more than two dependents and if you’re single, you can’t have sole or primary custody of dependents. Online degrees also don’t qualify.

Navy

  • Health Professions Loan Repayment ProgramThe Navy pays select health care professionals up to $40,000, minus approximately 25% for federal income tax, in student loan payments each year in exchange for agreeing to continue, or begin, active duty service. The hefty tax portion will be taken out prior to sending the payment along to your lender.
  • College Loan Repayment Program Pays up to $65,000 in student loan payments if you’re serving in your first enlistment.

National Guard

  • Student Loan Repayment ProgramYou could receive the greater of $500 or 15 percent of your initially disbursed loan amount each year, with a maximum $50,000 payout and minimum six-year service agreement. You must have at least one disbursed Title IV federal loan.

Public Service Loan Forgiveness

The Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program isn’t military specific, instead it’s a federal loan-forgiveness program contingent on your employment with a qualified government or non-profit organization. Only federal student loan that are part of the Direct Loan program qualify for PSLF. However, you may be able to consolidate non-qualifying federal loans (such as a Perkins loan) into a qualified Direct Consolidation Loan.

With PSLF, your remaining loan balance will be forgiven after you make 120 qualifying monthly payments (10 years’ worth) while employed full-time. The 120 payments don’t need to be consecutive, and some, or all, of the employment, could be within the military. You currently won’t have to pay income taxes on the forgiven amount.

Additional Military Benefits

In addition to the loan repayment programs, your federal student loans may be eligible for a capped 6-percent interest rate during active duty, and up to five years of no interest if you’re serving in qualified hostile areas. You may also be able to postpone payments during active duty, but the loans will still accrue interest.

Bottom line

The military’s student loan forgiveness programs may be able to help repay your loans, but don’t take the decision to enlist lightly. Other employers offer loan repayment programs, and potentially less-dangerous jobs qualify for the PSLF. If you do decide to enlist, compare the loan repayment programs and be sure to get the loan repayment included in your contract.

Louis DeNicola
Louis DeNicola |

Louis DeNicola is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Louis at louis@magnifymoney.com

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College Students and Recent Grads, Life Events, Pay Down My Debt

How to Set Up IBR, PAYE, and ICR Student Loan Repayment Plans

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How to Set Up IBR, PAYE, and ICR Student Loan Repayment Plans

Does the amount you earn on a yearly basis pale in comparison to your monthly student loan payments? Do you have federal student loans? Then you might benefit from setting up an income-based repayment (IBR) plan, income-contingent repayment (ICR) plan, pay as you earn (PAYE) repayment plan or revised pay as you earn (REPAYE) repayment plan.

These repayment programs are only available to those with federal student loans, and they’re collectively referred to as income-driven repayment plans. Setting your federal loans up under an income-driven repayment plan reduces your monthly payment amount because your payment is based on your income and family size. Your payment adjusts annually according to these factors.

Payment amounts are calculated from a percentage of your discretionary income. According to studentaid.ed.gov, for IBR and PAYE, discretionary income is “the difference between your income and 150% of the poverty guideline for your family size and state of residence.” For ICR, it’s 100% of the poverty guideline. (If you’re interested in looking at the poverty guidelines, those can be found here.)

Want to find out how to apply for an income-driven repayment plan? Read on for information on how the process works.

[Learn how to track down all your student loans here.]

Getting Started With Income-Driven Repayment Plans

Generally, if you want to set your student loan account up with an income-driven repayment plan, your best bet is to first contact your student loan servicer. (Not sure which loan servicer you have? You can check in the National Student Loan Data System.)

If you log into your account online, you should see a section for changing your repayment plan. At the very least, your servicer should address the issue in a FAQ section of its site.

It’s your loan servicers job to help you find the best plan for your situation, but you need to contact them as soon as you know you’re experiencing difficulty in making payments. You don’t want to miss any payments and end up delinquent (or worse, in default) because you couldn’t pay. Plus, loans that are in default aren’t eligible for income-driven repayment plans.

The application process is actually very simple and straightforward.

Income-Driven Repayment Application Process

The first step of the process is to request an income-driven repayment plan. You need to fill out the “Income-Driven Payment Request” form to do that. This can be done online by yourself, or you can apply with a paper application supplied by your student loan servicer.

When you make your request, you have to choose the specific plan you’d like to go with. You can select one yourself, or you can ask your loan servicer to choose the best plan for you. It will choose the one with the lowest monthly payment amount.

Since you’re applying for a repayment plan based on your taxable income, you do need to provide proof of income.

The easiest way to provide proof of your adjusted gross income (AGI) is with your most recent tax return, as long as your income hasn’t changed significantly from the last date you filed. You also need to have filed a federal income tax return for the past two years.

The online application makes it easy to find your AGI. You can just use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool to import your income information.

If you apply with the paper application, you’ll need to supply a paper copy of your most recent federal tax return, or an IRS tax return transcript.

If your income has changed a lot since you last filed, or if you haven’t filed two federal tax returns yet, there are other ways of proving your income.

First, if you don’t have any source of income at all, you just need to indicate that on your application. Only taxable income counts, so if you receive any government assistance or any other income that’s not considered taxable, you don’t need to report it here.

If you do earn an income, you’ll need to provide your most recent pay stubs or other alternative documentation that shows your salary.

Additionally, if you have federal loans with multiple loan servicers, you must request income-driven repayment for each individually. There’s a section of the application that asks if you have eligible loans with more than one servicer, so you can indicate that there.

Wondering how your payments are determined when you owe multiple lenders? First, your income-driven repayment plan amount is calculated. This amount is then multiplied by the percentage of total debt with each servicer.

For example, if you have loans with two servicers, and your income-driven repayment amount is $120, and 50% of your outstanding debt is with Loan Servicer 1, and the other half is with Loan Servicer 2, then you’d have to pay $60 toward each. (50% of $120 is $60.)

The application shouldn’t take very long to complete, but the entire process can take a few weeks depending on which loan servicer you have.

If you have an immediate need to lessen your payments, your loan servicer may apply a forbearance to your federal loans while the process wraps up. That’s why it’s important to contact your servicer as soon as you can’t make your payments.

You Have to Reapply Annually

You’ll be required to submit your proof of income on an annual basis after you apply the first time. As your income changes, so does your payment, so you need to provide this information continuously.

However, there’s no income limit for income-driven repayment plans. If you start earning more, your payment amount is simply capped at the amount you’d be paying under the standard 10-year repayment plan. It will never exceed that amount.

Technically, your loans will still be under your chosen income-driven repayment plan, but your monthly payment is no longer based on your income. You can still have your outstanding loan balance forgiven after your repayment term ends (if you don’t pay your loan off before then).

Who’s Income is Taken Into Consideration?

If you’re married and wondering if your spouses income will be taken into consideration, it depends on how you file your taxes.

Filing separately means only your income and loans will matter.

Filing jointly means your monthly payment will be based off of your joint income.

If you and your spouse file jointly and both have eligible federal student loans, both loans will be taken into consideration, but your spouse doesn’t have to choose to enter into an income-driven repayment plan.

Income-Based Repayment Plan Overview

You don’t qualify for IBR unless your payment amount will be less than what you’re paying under the standard 10-year repayment plan.

A good baseline for determining whether or not you’ll qualify is if your total student loan debt is much higher than your annual discretionary income. If your debt-to-income ratio is really high, you’ll probably qualify.

New borrowers (those that borrowed after July 1st, 2014, and didn’t have any loans outstanding prior to that) have a maximum of 20 years to pay back their loans, while old borrowers (those that had outstanding loan balances after July 1st, 2014) have a maximum of 25 years to pay back their loans.

Pay As You Earn Plan Overview

For PAYE, your monthly payment will be around 10% of your discretionary income, and never more than what you’re paying under the standard 10-year payment plan.

You have a maximum of 20 years to pay back your loans under this plan.

The qualifications for PAYE are the same as IBR – you must be paying less under PAYE than you were under the standard 10-year plan.

However, PAYE is only available to those who were new, first-time borrowers as of October 1st, 2007, and they also must have received a disbursement in the form of a Direct Loan on or after October 1st, 2011.

Income-Contingent Repayment Plan Overview

From studentaid.ed.gov, your monthly payment is the lesser of these two: 20% of your discretionary income, or “what you would pay on a repayment plan with a fixed payment over the course of 12 years, adjusted according to your income.”

Under this plan, you have a maximum of 25 years to pay back your loans. There are actually no initial guidelines you must qualify under – anyone can choose to repay their student loans under this plan.

However, the Federal Student Aid office warns that payments tend to be more expensive under this plan than IBR and PAYE – and possibly even more than the 10-year repayment plan. Make sure you’re going to be paying less if you want to go this route.

Benefits of Income-Driven Repayment Plans

A big bonus for all three of these repayment plans is that your outstanding balance is forgiven after your repayment term is complete. The Federal Student Aid office notes that if you qualify for forgiveness after 10 years through the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program, that takes precedence.

How can you still have an outstanding balance at the end of your repayment period? The monthly amount you owe will fluctuate with your income. You could end up repaying your loans before your term is up, or you could end up with a balance.

Under IBR and PAYE, if your monthly payment isn’t enough to cover any interest that accrues monthly on your subsidized loan, the government will pay the difference for the first three years. So if $30 in interest accrues every month, and your monthly payment under IBR and PAYE only pays for $15 of that, the government will cover the other $15.

You might want to use the estimated repayment calculator to see which plans offer you the lowest monthly payment. Income-driven plans aren’t guaranteed to give you the lowest monthly payment – all situations are different. There are still other repayment plans that aren’t reliant upon your income that could lower your monthly payment, such as the graduated or extended repayment plans.

Check With Your Loan Servicer First

Before applying for an income-driven repayment plan, it’s best to check with your loan servicer to get its input. You don’t want to end up owing more per month than you do now. These repayment plans are designed to help you, not hurt you. You may find that forbearance or deferment is a better option for you, especially if you’re only experiencing a temporary economic hardship.

 

Erin Millard
Erin Millard |

Erin Millard is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Erin at erinm@magnifymoney.com

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College Students and Recent Grads, Pay Down My Debt

Miss A Student Loan Payment? Where To Find Help And What Happens

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Mixed Race Young Female Agonizing Over Financial Calculations in Her Kitchen.

If you’ve missed a student loan payment or are struggling to make payments, you’re not alone. According to the Department of Education, millions of loans are currently delinquent, with many more being sent to collections every day.

What happens when you can’t afford to make a payment, and subsequently miss the due date? If you have federal student loans, at first, you’ll be delinquent. Nine months after you miss a student loan payment, your loans will then enter into default status.

If you have private loans, there’s no “grace period” of delinquency; your loans are immediately in default the day after your payment was due.

While this might sound like bad news, there are ways to recover from delinquency and default. We’re covering what the consequences are, and what options you have to get your loans current again.

What Does Being Delinquent Mean and What Are the Consequences?

Do you remember that promissory note you had to sign every semester when taking out student loans? That note was a binding contract in which you promised to make timely payments on your student loans (among other things). By missing a payment, you are in direct violation of that contract.

The day after your payment is due, you are considered delinquent on your student loans. During your delinquency, your student loan servicer will attempt to get in touch with you in the first 15 days following a missed student loan payment.

Your credit score can also suffer if you don’t make any payments within a certain time. For example, My Great Lakes will report a lateness to the 3 major credit bureaus (Experian, Equifax and TransUnion) once an account is 60 days past due, but Nelnet will wait 90 days. Different servicers have different guidelines for this, so it’s best to call yours directly to ask them for the specifics.

Even if you become current on your loans, the delinquency can remain on your credit report for up to 7 years.

Additionally, you might incur late fees if you don’t make an effort to pay within a set time frame. Late fees vary by lender, and the amount of time passed before getting hit with a late fee also depends on the lender.

While being delinquent isn’t great, it’s not the end of the world. Simply making a payment will bring your loan into repayment again.

But what if you can’t afford that payment?

After nine months of missed payments, your loan will go into default. Nine months is a considerable amount of time to work with your student loan servicer in an attempt to lower your payments, and that’s exactly what you should do.

Steps You Can Take To Get Out of Delinquency

If you’re delinquent on your student loans, the absolute best thing you can do is to get on the phone with your student loan servicer and explain your situation to them. You want them on your side in this process, and most are willing to help you out. Many servicers have information and options on lowering payments directly on their website.

If you can afford to make any sort of payment, do so. This will show your loan servicer that you’re concerned and making every effort to rectify your delinquent status.

The worst thing you can do in this situation is to ignore what’s going on. You have 9 months in which to make things right before going into default, and you want to do everything in your power to make sure you don’t get reach that point.

When speaking with your loan servicer, ask them to review your payment options.

Under certain circumstances, you may be eligible for deferment or forbearance. Both will excuse you from having to make any payments for a set amount of time. Interest doesn’t continue to accrue if your loans are in deferment, but it will accrue in forbearance.

Typically, forbearance is easier to qualify for than deferment, and there’s no limit to how many months you can ask to stay in forbearance. But because interest accrues, and you’re not making payments, your loan balance will grow every month you’re in forbearance.  But you won’t have any negative marks on your credit report.

If you’re not eligible for either of these options, don’t lose hope. There are several different income-based repayment options out there, including Pay as You Earn, Income-Based Repayment and Income-Contingent Repayment, and your student loan servicer will point you toward the one that makes the most sense for you.

Your number one priority when your student loans are delinquent is to get them current as soon as possible so that they don’t go into default.

What Consequences Does Defaulting On Your Student Loans Have?

If you haven’t been able to make any payments toward your student loans in 9 months, and haven’t reached out to your servicer, then you will end up defaulting on your student loans.

There are serious consequences to defaulting:

  • Some loan holders will require your entire balance to be paid in full. This includes the principal and the interest.
  • You become ineligible for deferment, forbearance, or any repayment programs.
  • You become ineligible for further federal student aid.
  • Your wages can be garnished, plus your tax return can be held to repay your loans.
  • Your credit score will be damaged.
  • You might end up responsible for more than just your loan balance if there are late fees, collection fees, or court fees involved.

These all sound a little scary, don’t they? While defaulting on federal student loans shouldn’t be taken casually, there are ways to improve your situation.

Options for Getting Your Loans Out of Default

In order to get your loans out of default status, you have to make a plan. The unfortunate part is that you have significantly less options than you would in delinquency, and the options you do have require you to be able to make payments.

MyEdDebt.com is a great resource for those looking for more information on getting their loans out of default. The site is run by the Department of Education and highlights its Rehabilitation Program as an option for getting loans out of default.

MyEdDebt

Going through a rehabilitation program is your best chance at redemption. Upon successfully completing the program, all the negative consequences of defaulting will be reversed. That even includes the damage to your credit score (the default will be erased).

Successful completion involves making 9 monthly payments out of 10 months, so it’s important that you can make the payments according to the plan you’re given. You have to make the payments monthly; lump-sum payments or extra payments will not speed up the process.

A debt collector creates your repayment plan during rehabilitation. They’re supposed to work with you to create a manageable repayment plan, though some of them have wrongfully tried to get borrowers to pay back more than they can afford.

[3 Steps to Handle Being Mistreated by a Student Loan Servicer]

StudentLoanBorrowerAssistance.org has highlighted the importance of paying back only what you can reasonably afford, as a new system was put into place this past July. Under this system, the amount you must pay should coincide with what you would be paying under the Income Based Repayment formula. For “not new borrowers” this is generally 15 percent of your discretionary income, but never more than the 10-year Standard Repayment Plan amount. For “new borrowers”, it’s 10 percent of discretionary income.

New borrowers are defined by:

“… (1) no outstanding balance on a Direct Loan or FFEL program loan as of October 1, 2007 or has no outstanding balance on a Direct Loan or FFEL program loan when you obtain a new loan on or after October 1, 2007, and (2) received a disbursement of a Direct Subsidized Loan, Direct Unsubsidized Loan, or student Direct PLUS Loan on or after October 1, 2011, or received a Direct Consolidation Loan based on an application received on or after October 1, 2011. However, you are not considered a new borrower if the Direct Consolidation Loan you receive repays loans that would make you ineligible under part (1) of this definition.”StudentLoans.gov.

[Read more about repayment plans and student loan forgiveness here.]

Once you’ve gone through the rehabilitation program, a lender must purchase your loans in order for them to enter back into standard repayment status. Likewise, only after a lender has purchased your loans will the collection agency ask the credit bureaus to clear your credit report of the default.

Just note that you may only go through the rehabilitation program once. If your loans fall back into default, then you won’t be eligible for the program.

What About Defaulting on Private Student Loans?

Private student loans are a different beast. There’s no delinquency period associated with private loans; as soon as you miss a payment, your loans have defaulted.

Unfortunately, private loans don’t offer the same protection as federal loans do. Therefore, the repayment options associated with federal loans don’t apply for private loans.

Even worse, there aren’t any rehabilitation programs to go through for private loans, unless your lender offers such a program. It’s worth it to ask!

For instance, Discover will report your loan as late to credit bureaus during its monthly account audit, so there isn’t necessarily a time frame to consider. If you missed a payment that was due on the 10th, and their audit is on the 20th, it might take some time to be reported as late. At that time, your loan is also considered to be in default. The good news is that there are no fees associated with their loans, even late fees, which is reflected on their student loans page.

Wells Fargo reports a loan as late after 30 days have passed, and their standard late fee is $28, though this largely depends on the type of loan you have.

For Citizen’s Bank, private student loans are serviced through Firstmark. Their loans are reported as late after being 30 days past due (from the last business day of the month). The loan is considered defaulted after 120 days past due, and late fees (5% of the borrowed amount) are incurred after the loan is 15 days past due.

According to Sallie Mae, depending on the type of loan you have, you’re considered to have defaulted after 6 to 9 months of no payments.

Fortunately, there are some private lenders coming around to the fact that borrowers need help. Wells Fargo is one private lender willing to lend a hand. If you’re having trouble making payments, they offer additional repayment options, and they also have a new loan modification program which can lower your payments temporarily or permanently.

Sallie Mae offers borrowers interest-only payments on certain loans, and they also offer a graduated repayment option on their Smart Option Student Loan.

Discover also offers deferment options to those serving in the military, in public service jobs, or in a residency program.

All lenders encourage borrowers to call if they’re having trouble making payments under their current repayment terms. But you should work under the assumption that once you’re 30 days late it will show up on your credit report, which can stay there for seven years.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has attempted to strip away some of the uncertainty and confusion surrounding student loans, but according to a recent report, the industry remains unchanged. More and more complaints are being received concerning private loans, as borrowers claim they don’t have enough information about the options they have.

The CFPB is encouraging borrowers to use a template that they have available for download to try and negotiate a repayment plan with their lenders. This should be done as soon as you miss a payment, as your private lender will sell your loan to a collection agency after enough time has passed without a payment. They will be more willing to help you than a collection agency will.

As a last resort, you may be able to get your private student loans discharged in bankruptcy. Private loans are slightly easier to get discharged than federal loans. If you’d like to read more about that process, StudentLoanBorrowerAssistance.org has a comprehensive write-up on it.

Final Recap

You want to avoid defaulting on your student loans at all costs, so if you’re delinquent on your loans, get in touch with your loan servicer to figure out the best way to bring your account current. If you’ve already defaulted, check with your loan holder to see if you can enter into a rehabilitation program. If you have private student loans, contact your lender immediately to find out if you can negotiate more manageable repayment terms. These options are available to help you, and there is no shame in taking advantage of them.

Erin Millard
Erin Millard |

Erin Millard is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Erin at erinm@magnifymoney.com

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