Tag: veterans

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Small Business

How to Find Your Best VA Business Loan Options in 2017

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: iStock

Veteran-owned businesses make up just under 10 percent of all businesses in the U.S., according to a 2017 report by the Small Business Administration. Despite veterans’ propensity toward entrepreneurship, funding options for veteran-owned business can be difficult to find. According to the same report, nearly 60 percent of veterans’ startup or acquisition capital comes from personal or family savings, while less than 10 percent comes from loans from federal, state, or local government, government-backed business loans from banks, or business loans from banks or other financial institutions.

Obtaining startup financing is always a challenge, but veterans may have an especially difficult time. Because their housing, transportation, and many other daily necessities are handled by the military, they may not have built credit while actively serving.

Fortunately, many organizations, including the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) have stepped up to provide resources for veteran entrepreneurs. In this guide, we’ll take a look at the options available for current veteran business owners and veterans looking to start their own business.

Traditional bank loans

Borrowers who bank with a financial institution that caters to military members should talk to a loan officer at their bank first.

Navy Federal Credit Union provides small business financing of up to $50,000 through a combination of term loans, business credit cards, vehicle loans, and business checking lines of credit. A four-page application is available on their website and can be submitted online.

Fort Knox Federal Credit Union, which is available to active duty military, reserve, National Guard, and civil service employees and retired military or civil service members, provides SBA-backed commercial real estate loans. You can request more information by filling out a Commercial Loan Request Form online.

Tammy Everts, a certified business adviser with the Spokane Small Business Development Center, says borrowers with a good credit score seeking a loan of less than $150,000 may be able to qualify for a loan based on their credit score alone. “Talk to your commercial banker where you already have a relationship,” Everts says. “If you’re denied there, then you can expand your search.”

SBA-guaranteed loans

Neither the VA nor the SBA loan money directly to veteran entrepreneurs, but the SBA does guarantee small business loans for veterans. This means that should the business default on the loan, the government will pay a portion of the remaining balance back to the lender. This guarantee encourages banks to lend to applicants that might otherwise be considered too great a risk.

Everts says veterans, unfortunately, have fewer options than they did a few years ago. Prior to 2013, the SBA offered the Patriot Express Loan targeted at helping veterans and active duty military with loans up to $500,000. That program ended, but Everts says it was rolled into the SBA Express Program under the name SBA Veterans Advantage

To qualify, the business must be owned and controlled (51 percent or greater) by a veteran.

The SBA defines a veteran as:

  • Veterans (not those dishonorably discharged)
  • Active-duty military participating in the Transition Assistance Program (TAP)
  • Reservists and National Guard members
  • Current spouses of any veterans, active duty service members, reservists, or National Guard members and widowed spouses of any service members who die while in service or of a service-connected disability.

To document eligibility, the borrower must provide a copy of Form DD 214 or other documentation as outlined in SBA Information Notice 5000-1390. Eligible veterans have four options under the Veterans Advantage Program:

SBA Express loans of $150,001 to $350,000

  • No upfront fees
  • Two-page application and response within 36 hours
  • The SBA guarantees 50 percent of the amount borrowed

SBA 7(a) loans $150,000 and under

  • No upfront fees through 9/30/17 (typically 1.5 percent of the guaranteed portion)
  • Terms up to 10 years for equipment and up to 25 years for real estate
  • The SBA guarantees 85 percent of the amount borrowed

Non-SBA Express loans $150,001 to $500,000

  • The upfront fee is 50 percent less than the fee charged to non-veteran owned small businesses as follows:
    • Loans with terms greater than 12 months: fee is 1.5 percent of the guaranteed portion
    • Loans with terms of 12 months or less: fee is 0.125 percent of the guaranteed portion

Loans of $500,001 to $5 million

  • For loans of $500,001 to $700,000, upfront fee is 3 percent of the guaranteed portion
  • For loans of $700,001 to $5 million, upfront fee is 3.5 percent of the guaranteed portion up to $1 million, plus 3.75 percent of the guaranteed portion over $1 million

Note that for all but the Express Loan, the reduced fees are applicable only for loans made until September 30, 2017. The fee waiver has been extended in the past, but there is no guarantee it will be extended again.

Interest rates on all SBA loans are negotiated between the lender and the borrower.

How to apply

To apply for an SBA-backed loan, borrowers can use the Lender Match tool available on the SBA’s website. Everts says qualifying for an SBA Veterans Advantage loan isn’t really different from other bank loans. “The bank will expect a 15 percent cash contribution from the business owner and a good credit score,” Everts says. “With a credit score over 700, the borrower may be able to get a loan with very little paperwork.

Nonprofit lenders

Nonprofit lenders can often provide small business funding when traditional banks won’t.

CDC Small Business Financing VetLoan Advantage

CDC Small Business Financing’s VetLoan Advantage Program is available to veterans looking to purchase commercial or industrial buildings and equipment.

The VetLoan Advantage loans are backed by the SBA, but they offer lower down payments (typically 10 percent). Mike Owen, Chief Credit Officer and Director of Business Development for CDC Small Business Finance, says CDC provides a cash rebate of up to $3,000 to help veterans offset loan expenses. Borrowers can prequalify for a loan online.

The Jonas Project

The Jonas Project provides startup funding, training, and mentorship for veteran women. To qualify, applicants must be a U.S. military veteran with honorable discharge verification, demonstrate knowledge or skill in their desired field of business, and pass an extensive interview and qualification process. Applications are available online.

Veterans Business Fund

Veterans Business Fund (VBF) was established to assist veterans by providing them with the supplemental capital required to satisfy the equity requirements for a small business loan. VBF loans are non-interest bearing.

Currently, the VBF is not accepting applications until their necessary fundraising is complete, but borrowers should check back in the future to find out more about the application process and requirements.

Microloans

If your borrowing needs are modest, a microloan may be the way to go. Microloans typically range from $500 to $100,000, although the definition of a microloan varies by lender.

Kabbage, a microlender that has provided over $3 billion in funding to more than 100,000 businesses, has a microloan program designed specifically for veteran-owned businesses. Borrowers can apply online or through the Kabbage mobile app for a line of credit up to $150,000.

Angel investment groups

Angel investors are affluent individuals who provide capital for a business startup, usually in exchange for ownership equity in the business. Some angel investors organize themselves into angel investment groups to share research, pool their investment capital, and provide advice to their portfolio companies.

Hivers and Strivers is a Great Falls, Va.-based angel investment group that focuses on investing and supporting startups founded and run by graduates of U.S. military academies. The group concentrates on investing $250,000 to $1 million in a single round, although they can work with other investment groups when larger financing rounds are needed.

Their investors, most of whom have also served in the military and have a broad range of experience in different industries and business models, will also serve as board members and advisers to the businesses they finance. Borrowers can submit their idea for consideration online.

Online lenders

Online lending platforms (sometimes referred to as peer-to-peer lending) are online services that match lenders with borrowers. Because they typically run with lower overhead, they often provide loans with better terms than traditional financial institutions.

StreetShares is an online lending platform that focuses on connecting veteran-owned and -run businesses with investors. They offer three different funding solutions:

Term loans

  • Loan amounts from $2,000 to $100,000
  • Terms of three to 36 months

Patriot Express line of credit

  • Lines of credit from $5,000 to $100,000
  • Terms of three to 36 months

Contract financing

  • Based on future earnings
  • No limit on contract amount

StreetShares only loans to borrowers who have been in business for at least one year and have “reasonable” credit. Borrowers can get pre-approved in minutes, and there is no application fee.

Grants

Grants are attractive to entrepreneurs without a lot of cash available to start or grow a business because, unlike a loan, the funds do not have to be repaid.

StreetShares Foundation

The StreetShares Foundation awards $10,000 in business grants to veterans and military spouses each month. Applicants must be a veteran, reserve, or active duty member of the U.S. armed forces or a spouse of a military member or veteran. Selection criteria are based on the business idea, use of funds and potential impact, product-market fit, team and company history, and influence of the business on the military and veterans community.

Applicants must qualify for the award by downloading or viewing educational materials, then complete an online application that includes writing a 300-word summary of the business and submitting a short video about the project or company.

USDA Outreach and Assistance for Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers and Veteran Farmers and Ranchers Program (a.k.a The 2501 Program)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture provides small business grants, education, training, outreach, and other forms of support to veterans and minorities looking to begin or expand agricultural operations. Funding opportunities are closed for 2017.

Veterans can also search for additional grant opportunities through grants.gov; however, Everts says her office typically counsels people to bootstrap their business because the process of searching and applying for grants can take a significant amount of time.

Other small business financing options for veterans

While funding is important, it’s often not the only resource veterans need to successfully start or grow a business. Here’s a look at some other great resources:

Boots to business

The Boots to Business entrepreneurial program is offered by the SBA. The curriculum includes a two-day classroom course on entrepreneurship as well as an eight-week online course with in-depth instruction on preparing a business plan and starting a business.

At the end of the eight-week online course, participants will have the tools and knowledge they need to identify business opportunities, draft a business plan, and launch a small business.

Veteran’s Business Outreach Center

Also funded by the SBA, Veteran's Business Outreach Centers are a resource for service members, veterans, and military spouses looking to start, purchase, or grow a business. Centers are located in 17 states.

Business counselors at the outreach centers provide mentorship and work with veteran entrepreneurs on business plans, feasibility analysis, and provide training on franchising, marketing, accounting, and more.

Syracuse University Institute for Veterans and Military Families

The Institute for Veterans and Military Families hosts conferences and provides training for veterans transitioning to civilian life. Their initiatives include:

Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities

Available to post-9/11 veterans with a service-connected disability. The boot camps feature a 30-day online program, nine days of live training, and 12 months of post-program support.

Bootcamp for Veterans Families

Available to military families who serve in a caregiver role to a veteran with a service-connected disability. The boot camps feature a 30-day online program, nine days of live training, and 12 months of post-program support.

Veteran Women Igniting the Spirit of Entrepreneurship

Women veterans and female military spouses can receive entrepreneurship and small business management training through Veteran Women Igniting the Spirit of Entrepreneurship. This three-phase program includes a 15-day online course, a three-day entrepreneurship training event, ongoing mentorship, training, and support opportunities for graduates launching or growing a business.

There is a one-time $75 registration fee for the program, but the SBA covers a two-night hotel stay for event attendees and all meals and educational materials during the conference. Veterans can view the program calendar and apply online.

VetFran

The International Franchise Association created VetFran, a strategic initiative to teach veterans about becoming a franchise business owner. Veterans and their spouses can get help figuring out whether franchising is right for them and search a directory of franchises, many of which offer discounts or grant free franchises to veterans.

American Corporate Partners

American Corporate Partners connects post-9/11 veterans to corporate mentors from companies such as Deloitte, Morgan Stanley, AT&T, Coca-Cola, and Intel for year-long, one-on-one corporate mentoring. Mentors help veterans with small business development, professional communication and leadership skills, and career development.The program is open to service members, veterans, and spouses who meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • Currently serving and recently separated veterans who have served on active duty orders for at least 180 days since 9/11.
  • Surviving spouses and spouses of severely wounded post-9/11 veterans.
  • Service members who served less than 180 days of active duty since 9/11, but who were injured while serving or training.

Applications can be completed online.

SCORE Veteran Fast Launch Initiative

SCORE (previously known as the Service Corps of Retired Executives) is a nonprofit association of thousands of volunteer business counselors throughout the U.S. Their Veteran Fast Launch Initiative provides mentoring and training to veterans transitioning to entrepreneurs. The program is a package of free software combined with mentoring aimed at helping veterans and their families start and succeed as small business owners.

In addition to templates and tools to help veterans plan and operate their businesses, veterans also receive five hours of free financial advice from a CPA.

National Veteran-Owned Business Association

The National Veteran-Owned Business Association (NaVOBA) doesn’t provide funding for veteran-owned small businesses, but it does provide networking opportunities for veteran entrepreneurs, encourages the federal government to spend their contract dollars with veteran-owned businesses, and advocates with state governments to pass laws creating opportunities for veteran-owned businesses.

The Bunker

The Bunker is an incubator for veteran-owned technology startups. They have local chapters throughout the U.S. that provide educational programming, resources, and networking for military veterans and their spouses interested in starting and growing a business. Their EPIC Entrepreneurial Program is a 12-week course designed to help participants launch a business.

The exact information you’ll need and qualifications to be approved for a loan depends on the funding option you’re interest in and the bank you’re working with. Some have simple applications and quick approval processes. Others will want to see collateral, business plans, personal financial statements, bank statements, and credit scores. Whatever funding opportunity you pursue, Everts recommends taking some time to prepare before applying. “Get your numbers in a row and know how much you can contribute to the business,” she says.

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Janet Berry-Johnson
Janet Berry-Johnson |

Janet Berry-Johnson is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Janet here

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Life Events, Mortgage

The Best Mortgages That Require No or Low Down Payment

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

If you’re considering buying a home, you’re probably wondering how much you’ll need for a down payment. It’s not unusual to be concerned about coming up with a down payment. According to Trulia’s report Housing in 2017, saving for a down payment is most often cited as the biggest obstacle to homeownership.

Maybe you’ve heard that you should put 20% down when you purchase a home. It’s true that 20% is the gold standard. If you can afford a big down payment, it’s easier to get a mortgage, you may be eligible for a lower interest rate, and more money down means borrowing less, which means you’ll have a smaller monthly payment.

But the biggest incentive to put 20% down is that it allows you to avoid paying for private mortgage insurance. Mortgage insurance is extra insurance that some private lenders require from homebuyers who obtain loans in which the down payment is less than 20% of the sales price or appraised value. Unlike homeowners insurance, mortgage protects the lender – not you – if you stop making payments on your loan. Mortgage insurance typically costs between 0.5% and 1% of the entire loan amount on an annual basis. Depending on how expensive the home you buy is, that can be a pretty hefty sum.

While these are excellent reasons to put 20% down on a home, the fact is that many people just can’t scrape together a down payment that large, especially when the median price of a home in the U.S. is a whopping $345,800.

Fortunately, there are many options for homebuyers with little money for a down payment. You may even be able to buy a house with no down payment at all.

Here’s an overview of the best mortgages you can be approved for without 20% down.

Type of Loan

Down Payment Requirement


Mortgage Insurance

Credit Score Requirement

FHA

FHA

3.5% for most

10% if your FICO credit score is between 500 and 579

Requires both upfront and annual mortgage insurance for all borrowers, regardless of down payment

500 and up

SoFi

SoFi

10%

No mortgage insurance required

Typically 700 or higher

VA Loan

VA Loan

No down payment required for eligible borrowers (military service members, veterans, or eligible surviving spouses)

No mortgage insurance required; however, there may be a funding fee, which can run from 1.25% to 2.4% of the loan amount

No minimum score
required

homeready

HomeReady

3% and up

Mortgage insurance required when homebuyers put down
< 20%; no longer required once the loan-to-value ratio reaches 78% or less

620 minimum

homeready

USDA

No down payment required

Ongoing mortgage insurance not required, but borrowers pay an upfront fee of 2% of the purchase price

620-640 minimum

FHA Loans

An FHA loan is a home loan that is insured by the Federal Housing Administration. These loans are designed to promote homeownership and make it easier for people to qualify for a mortgage. The FHA does this by making a guarantee to your bank that they will repay your loan if you quit making payments. FHA loans don’t come directly from the FHA, but rather an FHA-approved lender. Not all FHA-approved lenders offer the same interest rates and costs, even for the same type of loan, so it’s important to shop around.

Down payment requirements

FHA loans allow you to buy a home with a down payment as low as 3.5%, although people with FICO credit scores between 500 and 579 are required to pay at least 10% down.

Approval requirements

Because these loans are geared toward lower income borrowers, you don’t need excellent credit or a large income, but you will have to provide a lot of documentation. Your lender will ask you to provide documents that prove income, savings, and credit information. If you already own any property, you’ll have to have documentation for that as well.

Some of the information you’ll need includes:

  • Two years of complete tax returns (three years for self-employed individuals)
  • Two years of W-2s, 1099s, or other income statements
  • Most recent month of pay stubs
  • A year-to-date profit-and-loss statement for self-employed individuals
  • Most recent three months of bank, retirement, and investment account statements

Mortgage insurance requirements

The FHA requires both upfront and annual mortgage insurance for all borrowers, regardless of their down payment. On a typical 30-year mortgage with a base loan amount of less than $625,500, your annual mortgage insurance premium will be 0.85% as of this writing. The current upfront mortgage insurance premium is 1.75% of the base loan amount.

Casey Fleming, a mortgage adviser with C2 Financial Corporation and author of The Loan Guide: How to Get the Best Possible Mortgage, also reminds buyers that mortgage insurance on an FHA loan is permanent. With other loans, you can request the lenders to cancel private mortgage insurance (MIP) once you have paid down the mortgage balance to 80% of the home's original appraised value, or wait until the balance drops to 78% when the mortgage servicer is required to eliminate the MIP. But mortgage insurance on an FHA loan cannot be canceled or terminated. For that reason, Fleming says "it's best if the homebuyer has a plan to get out in a couple of years."

Where to find an FHA-approved lender

As we mentioned earlier, FHA loans don’t come directly from the FHA, but rather an FHA-approved lender. Not all FHA-approved lenders offer the same interest rates and costs, even for the same type of loan, so it’s important to shop around.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has a searchable database where you can find lenders in your area approved for FHA loans.

First, fill in your location and the radius in which you’d like to search.

Next, you’ll be taken to a list of FHA-approved lenders in your area.

Who FHA loans are best for

FHA loans are flexible about how you come up with the down payment. You can use your savings, a cash gift from a family member, or a grant from a state or local government down-payment assistance program.

However, FHA loans are not the best option for everyone. The upfront and ongoing mortgage insurance premiums can cost more than private mortgage insurance. If you have good credit, you may be better off with a non-FHA loan with a low down payment and lower loan costs.

And if you’re buying an expensive home in a high-cost area, an FHA loan may not be able to provide you with a large enough mortgage. The FHA has a national loan limit, which is recalculated on an annual basis. For 2017, in high-cost areas, the FHA national loan limit ceiling is $636,150. You can check HUD.gov for a complete list of FHA lending limits by state.

SoFi

For borrowers who can afford a large monthly payment but haven’t saved up a big down payment, SoFi offers mortgages of up to $3 million. Interest rates will vary based on whether you’re looking for a 30-year fixed loan, a 15-year fixed loan, or an adjustable rate loan, which has a fixed rate for the first seven years, after which the interest rate may increase or decrease. Mortgage rates started as low as 3.09% for a 15-year mortgage as of this writing. You can find your rate using SoFi’s online rate quote tool without affecting your credit.

Down payment requirements

SoFi requires a minimum down payment of at least 10% of the purchase price for a new loan.

Approval requirements

Like most lenders, SoFi analyzes FICO scores as a part of its application process. However, it also considers factors such as professional history and career prospects, income, and history of on-time bill payments to determine an applicant’s overall financial health.

Mortgage insurance requirements

SoFi does not charge private mortgage insurance, even on loans for which less than 20% is put down.

What we like/don’t like

In addition to not requiring private mortgage insurance on any of their loans, SoFi doesn’t charge any loan origination, application, or broker commission fees. The average closing fee is 2% to 5% for most mortgages (it varies by location), so on a $300,000 home loan, that is $3,000. Avoiding those fees can save buyers a significant amount and make it a bit easier to come up with closing costs. Keep in mind, though, that you’ll still need to pay standard third-party closing costs that vary depending on loan type and location of the property.

There’s not much to dislike about SoFi unless you’re buying a very inexpensive home in a lower-cost market. They do have a minimum loan amount of $100,000.

Who SoFi mortgages are best for

SoFi mortgages are really only available for people with excellent credit and a solid income. They don’t work with people with poor credit.

SoFi does not publish minimum income or credit score requirements.

VA Loans

Rates can vary by lender, but currently, rates for a $225,000 30-year fixed-rate loan run at around 3.25%, according to LendingTree. (Disclosure: LendingTree is the parent company of MagnifyMoney.)

Down payment requirements

Eligible borrowers can get a VA loan with no down payment. Although the costs associated with getting a VA loan are generally lower than other types of low-down-payment mortgages, Fleming says there is a one-time funding fee, unless the veteran or military member has a service-related disability or you are the surviving spouse of a veteran who died in service or from a service-related disability.

That funding fee varies by the type of veteran and down-payment percentage, but for a new-purchase loan, the funding fee can run from 1.25% to 2.4% of the loan amount.

Approval requirements

VA loans are typically easier to qualify for than conventional mortgages. To be eligible, you must have suitable credit, sufficient income to make the monthly payment, and a valid Certificate of Eligibility (COE). The COE verifies to the lender that you are eligible for a VA-backed loan. You can apply for a COE online, through your lender, or by mail using VA Form 26-1880.

The VA does not require a minimum credit score, but lenders generally have their own requirements. Most ask for a credit score of 620 or higher.

If you'd like help seeing if you are qualified for a VA loan, check to see if there's a HUD-approved housing counseling agency in your area.

Mortgage insurance requirements

Because VA loans are guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs, they do not require mortgage insurance. However, as we mentioned previously, be prepared to pay an additional funding fee of 1.25% to 2.4%.

What we like/don’t like

There’s no cap on the amount you can borrow. However, there are limits on the amount the VA can insure, which usually affects the loan amount a lender is willing to offer. Loan limits vary by county and are the same as the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s limits, which you can find here.

HomeReady

 

The HomeReady program is offered by Fannie Mae. HomeReady mortgage is aimed at consumers who have decent credit but low- to middle-income earnings. Borrowers do not have to be first-time home buyers but do have to complete a housing education program.

Approval requirements

HomeReady loans are available for purchasing and refinancing any single-family home, as long as the borrower meets income limits, which vary by property location. For properties in low-income areas (as determined by the U.S. Census), there is no income limit. For other properties, the income eligibility limit is 100% of the area median income.

The minimum credit score for a Fannie Mae loan, including HomeReady, is 620.

To qualify, borrowers must complete an online education program, which costs $75 and helps buyers understand the home-buying process and prepare for homeownership.

Down payment requirements

HomeReady is available through all Fannie Mae-approved lenders and offers down payments as low as 3%.

Reiss says buyers can combine a HomeReady mortgage with a Community Seconds loan, which can provide all or part of the down payment and closing costs. “Combined with a Community Seconds mortgage, a Fannie borrower can have a combined loan-to-value ratio of up to 105%,” Reiss says. The loan-to-value (LTV) ratio is the ratio of outstanding loan balance to the value of the property. When you pay down your mortgage balance or your property value increases, your LTV ratio goes down.

Mortgage insurance requirements

While HomeReady mortgages do require mortgage insurance when the buyer puts less than 20% down, unlike an FHA loan, the mortgage insurance is removed once the loan-to-value ratio reaches 78% or less.

What we like/don’t like

HomeReady loans do require private mortgage insurance, but the cost is generally lower than those charged by other lenders. Fannie Mae also makes it easier for borrowers to get creative with their down payment, allowing them to borrow it through a Community Seconds loan or have the down payment gifted from a friend or family member. Also, if you’re planning on having a roommate, income from that roommate will help you qualify for the loan.

However, be sure to talk to your lender to compare other options. The HomeReady program may have higher interest rates than other mortgage programs that advertise no or low down payments.

USDA Loan

USDA loans are guaranteed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Although the USDA doesn’t cap the amount a homeowner can borrow, most USDA-approved lenders extend financing for up to $417,000.

Rates vary by lender, but the agency gives a baseline interest rate. As of August 2016, that rate was just 2.875%

Approval requirements

USDA loans are available for purchasing and refinancing homes that meet the USDA’s definition of “rural.” The USDA provides a property eligibility map to give potential buyers a general idea of qualified locations. In general, the property must be located in “open country” or an area that has a population less than 10,000, or 20,000 in areas that are deemed as having a serious lack of mortgage credit.

USDA loans are not available directly from the USDA, but are issued by approved lenders. Most lenders require a minimum credit score of 620 to 640 with no foreclosures, bankruptcies, or major delinquencies in the past several years. Borrowers must have an income of no more than 115% of the median income for the area.

Down payment requirements

Eligible borrowers can get a home loan with no down payment. Other closing costs vary by lender, but the USDA loan program does allow borrowers to use money gifted from friends and family to pay for closing costs.

Mortgage insurance requirements

While USDA-backed mortgages do not require mortgage insurance, borrowers instead pay an upfront premium of 2% of the purchase price. The USDA also allows borrowers to finance that 2% with the home loan.

What we like/don’t like

Some buyers may dismiss USDA loans because they aren’t buying a home in a rural area, but many suburbs of metropolitan areas and small towns fall within the eligible zones. It could be worth a glance at the eligibility map to see if you qualify.

At a Glance: Low-Down-Payment Mortgage Options

To see how different low-down-payment mortgage options might look in the real world, let’s assume a buyer with an excellent credit score applies for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage on a home that costs $250,000.

As you can see in the table below, their monthly mortgage payment would vary a lot depending on which lender they use.

 

Down Payment


Total Borrowed


Interest Rate


Principal & Interest


Mortgage Insurance


Total Monthly Payment

FHA


FHA

3.5%
($8,750)

$241,250

4.625%

$1,083

$4,222 up front
$171 per month

$1,254

SoFi


SoFi

10%
($25,000)

$225,000

3.37%

$995

$0

$995

VA


VA Loan

0%
($0)

$250,000

3.25%

$1,088

$0

$1,088

HomeReady


homeready

3%
($7,500)

$242,500

4.25%

$1,193

$222 per month

$1,349

USDA


homeready

0%

$250,000

2.875%

$1,037

$5,000 up front,
can be included in
total financed

$1,037

Note that this comparison doesn’t include any closing costs other than the upfront mortgage insurance required by the FHA and USDA loans. The total monthly payments do not include homeowners insurance or property taxes that are typically included in the monthly payment.

ANALYSIS: Should I put down less than 20% on a new home just because I can?

So, if you can take advantage of a low- or no-down-payment loan, should you? For some people, it might make financial sense to keep more cash on hand for emergencies and get into the market sooner in a period of rising home prices. But before you apply, know what it will cost you. Let’s run the numbers to compare the cost of using a conventional loan with 20% down versus a 3% down payment.

Besides private mortgage insurance, there are other downsides to a smaller down payment. Lenders may charge higher interest rates, which translates into higher monthly payments and more money spent over the loan term. Also, because many closing costs are a percentage of the total loan amount, putting less money down means higher closing costs.

For this example, we’ll assume a $250,000 purchase price and a loan term of 30 years. According to Freddie Mac, during the week of June 22, 2017, the average rate for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage was 3.90%.

Using the Loan Amortization Calculator from MortgageCalculator.org:

Assuming you don’t make any extra principal payments, you will have to pay private mortgage insurance for 112 months before the principal balance of the loan drops below 78% of the home’s original appraised value. That means in addition to paying $169,265.17 in interest, you’ll pay $11,316.48 for private mortgage insurance.

The bottom line

Under some circumstances, a low- or no-down-payment mortgage, even with private mortgage insurance, could be considered a worthwhile investment. If saving for a 20% down payment means you’ll be paying rent longer while you watch home prices and mortgage rates rise, it could make sense. In the past year alone, average home prices increased 16.8%, and Kiplinger is predicting that the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate will rise to 4.1% by the end of 2017.

If you do choose a loan that requires private mortgage insurance, consider making extra principal payments to reach 20% equity faster and request that your lender cancels private mortgage insurance. Even if you have to spend a few hundred dollars to have your home appraised, the monthly savings from private mortgage insurance premiums could quickly offset that cost.

Keep in mind, though, that the down payment is only one part of the home-buying equation. Sonja Bullard, a sales manager with Bay Equity Home Loans in Alpharetta, Ga., says whether you’re interested in an FHA loan or a conventional (i.e., non-government-backed) loan, there are other out-of-pocket costs when buying a home.

“Through my experience, when people hear zero down payment, they think that means there are no costs for obtaining the loan,” Bullard says. “People don’t realize there are still fees required to be paid.”

According to Bullard, those fees include:

  • Inspection: $300 to $1,000, based on the size of the home
  • Appraisal: $375 to $1,000, based on the size of the home
  • Homeowners insurance premiums, prepaid for one year, due at closing: $300 to $2,500, depending on coverage
  • Closing costs: $4,000 to $10,000, depending on sales price and loan amount
  • HOA initiation fees

So don’t let a seemingly insurmountable 20% down payment get in the way of homeownership. When you’re ready to take the plunge, talk to a lender or submit a loan application online. You might be surprised at what you qualify for.

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Janet Berry-Johnson
Janet Berry-Johnson |

Janet Berry-Johnson is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Janet here

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