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What the End of HARP Means for Your Mortgage

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

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Home values have been on the mend since the financial meltdown of just a decade ago. This has been good news for people who have struggled with negative equity in their homes, meaning the value is lower than the amount they owe on their mortgage.

The percentage of “underwater” homes has dropped significantly, decreasing 16% year over year at the end of 2018 to comprise 4.1% of all mortgaged properties, real estate research firm CoreLogic found. But that means there are still homeowners who need assistance with recovering their equity.A popular government-sponsored refinancing program aimed at helping these homeowners has recently ended, and people looking for help getting above water may not be aware of the other options they have.

In this article, we highlight and explain what the closing of HARP means for homeowners and several available alternatives.

What is HARP?

The Home Affordable Refinance Program, known as HARP for short, is an initiative that helped underwater homeowners refinance their mortgage. The program was introduced in 2009 after the housing crisis.

HARP allowed eligible homeowners to refinance their mortgages to lower their mortgage interest rate or switch from an adjustable-rate to a fixed-rate mortgage even if they were underwater. Typically, lenders will not allow a borrower to refinance if the house is worth less than what is owed.

In order to qualify, homeowners needed to meet the following requirements:

  • No late mortgage payments over the last six months that were 30-plus days behind, and no more than one late payment over the last year.
  • The mortgage you’re attempting to refinance must be for your primary residence, a one-unit second home or a one- to four-unit investment property.
  • Your mortgage must be owned by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac.
  • Your mortgage was originated on or before May 31, 2009.
  • Your loan-to-value ratio is more than 80%.

The program had been extended a few times, but the last HARP deadline was Dec. 31, 2018.

Fannie and Freddie’s HARP replacements

Government-sponsored enterprises Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have refinance products in place that are meant to replace HARP.

Fannie Mae’s High Loan-to-Value Refinance Option

Beginning on Nov. 1, 2018, Fannie Mae has offered a high loan-to-value refinance option to borrowers with mortgages owned by the government-sponsored entity. The product is meant to make refinancing possible for borrowers who are maintaining on-time mortgage payments but have an LTV ratio that exceeds the amount allowed for standard refinance options.

Borrowers must benefit from the refinance through a reduction in their monthly principal and interest payment, a lower mortgage interest rate, shorter loan term or by switching to a fixed-rate mortgage. There is no maximum LTV ratio for fixed-rate mortgages; however, the maximum LTV for adjustable-rate mortgages is 105%.

The eligibility requirements include:

  • The loan being refinanced must be an existing Fannie Mae-owned mortgage.
  • The loan must have been originated on or after Oct. 1, 2017.
  • At least 15 months must pass between the loan origination of the existing mortgage and the refinanced mortgage.
  • Borrowers must be current on their mortgage, have no late payments over the last six months and only one 30-day delinquency over the last 12 months. Delinquencies longer than 30 days aren’t permitted.
  • The existing mortgage can’t be a Fannie Mae DU Refi Plus or Fannie Mae Refi Plus mortgage.

Freddie Mac’s Enhanced Relief Refinance Mortgage

Freddie Mac offers the Enhanced Relief Refinance mortgage to borrowers who are current on their mortgage but can’t qualify for a standard refinance because of a high LTV ratio. The mortgage being refinanced must meet the following requirements:

  • The mortgage must be owned or securitized by Freddie Mac.
  • The mortgage can’t have any 30-day delinquencies over the past six months and only one 30-day delinquency in the last year.
  • The closing date for the mortgage was on or after Oct. 1, 2017.
  • The mortgage can’t already be a Relief Refinance mortgage.
  • There should be at least 15 months between when the original loan was closed and the refinanced loan’s origination.
  • The loan can’t be subject to an outstanding repurchase request.
  • The maximum loan-to-value ratio for adjustable-rate mortgages is 105% and there’s no max for fixed-rate mortgages.

Borrower benefits include a lower interest rate, switching from an adjustable-rate to fixed-rate mortgage, shorter mortgage term or lower monthly principal and interest payment.

Alternatives to refinancing when you’re underwater

If refinancing your mortgage doesn’t sound like the best move for you, consider one of the following alternatives.

Mortgage modification

A mortgage modification is a way to change the original terms of your loan without going through the refinancing process. In some cases, you can work with your lender to switch from an adjustable-rate to a fixed-rate mortgage, extend your loan term, lower your interest rate or add past-due amounts to your unpaid principal balance.

Modifying a mortgage could be beneficial for homeowners facing hardship who aren’t eligible to refinance and are delinquent on their mortgage payments or expect they will eventually fall behind.

Mortgage recasting

If you have a lump sum of at least $5,000 in cash, you could potentially recast your mortgage. A mortgage recasting results in lower monthly mortgage payments. You pay a lump sum of cash to your lender to reduce your outstanding loan principal amount, then your loan is reamortized based on the lower remaining principal balance. Your interest rate and loan term stay the same.

This option makes sense if you’re expecting a bonus from your employer, a large income tax refund or some other financial windfall.

The bottom line

Although HARP has come to an end, there are still options for mortgage borrowers with Fannie- or Freddie-owned loans. In order to qualify for the enterprises’ refinancing programs, it’s helpful to maintain on-time payments even when your loan amount exceeds your home’s value.

If you don’t qualify, be sure to strategize on how best to attack your mortgage balance and rebuild equity. Consider making extra mortgage payments whenever possible by freeing up room in your budget, earning extra income or dedicating unexpected money to your mission.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Crissinda Ponder
Crissinda Ponder |

Crissinda Ponder is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Crissinda here

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5 Worst Home Improvement Projects for the Money

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

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Homeowners are opting to stay in their homes longer. The expected tenure currently sits at a median of 15 years, up 25% from just three years ago, according to data from the National Association of Realtors.

Since people are foregoing a new home purchase for a while, it often makes sense to improve their existing one. It helps to run the numbers and figure out which home improvement projects will be worth their time and money, especially when they eventually decide to sell.

This article will highlight the projects that provide the lowest return on investment, plus explain the benefits of home improvement and how to finance a project.

The benefits of improving your home

Making improvements to your home has several benefits, one of which is increasing your home’s value. If you’re updating your home with features that buyers desire, you could see an increase in the value and list price.

An increase in your home’s value also means a boost in equity. As your home’s value increases and your mortgage balance decreases, you build more equity. A jump in your home’s value from home improvements further increases your equity.

The more equity you have, the closer you’ll be to getting rid of private mortgage insurance if you must pay for it currently. Once your loan-to-value ratio reaches 80%, you’re eligible to have your PMI payments removed, though fair warning: This may involve another home appraisal.

5 worst improvements for the money

Not all home improvements provide you with a good return on investment. These are the five worst projects for the money, according to Remodeling magazine’s 2019 Cost vs. Value Report.

Upscale major kitchen remodel

The average upscale major kitchen remodel costs $131,510 and has a resale value of $78,524, Remodeling magazine found. Based on these numbers, only 59.7% of the cost is recovered.

Some of the features of an upscale kitchen remodel might include adding in stone countertops or a high-end undermount sink with designer faucets.

Midrange master suite addition

A midrange master suite addition is $130,986 on average, has a $77,785 resale value and thus recoups 59.4% of its cost, according to Remodeling magazine.

The suite is described as 24-by-16 feet with a walk-in closet.

Upscale bathroom addition

The average upscale bathroom costs $87,704 and has a $51,000 resale value, according to Remodeling magazine. The project recovers 58.1% of its price tag.

Remodeling  describes the job as adding a new master bathroom to the existing master bedroom. The addition might also include a freestanding soaker tub with high-end faucets, a double-vanity with a stone countertop, a separate toilet area, ceramic floor tiles and in-floor heating.

Midrange backyard patio

Adding a midrange backyard patio to costs $56,906 on average, according to Remodeling magazine. The resale value is $31,430 and just 55.2% of the job cost is recovered.

Remodeling magazine describes the midrange job as a flagstone patio with a gas-powered fire pit, four all-weather deck chairs, a stone veneer modular kitchen unit, a cedar pergola with low-voltage lights and underground electric and gas connections.

Upscale master suite addition

You’ll barely recoup half of your money for an upscale master suite addition to your home — 50.4% to be exact, according to Remodeling magazine. The job costs $271,470 on average but has a resale value of only $136,820.

The 32-by-20 foot upscale suite might include a sitting area; a large master bathroom; custom bookcases and built-in storage; a high-end gas fireplace with stone hearth and a custom mantle and a walk-in closet.

How to finance home improvement projects

There are several options for financing a home improvement project.

Home equity loan

A home equity loan is a financial product that allows you to borrow against your equity in a lump sum. It’s an installment loan that often comes with a fixed interest rate and fixed monthly payment. A home equity loan might suit you if you know the exact amount of money you’ll need for a home improvement project.

Home equity line of credit

A HELOC, or home equity line of credit, is a revolving credit line that works much like a credit card. You borrow against your equity but instead of taking out a lump sum, you have a credit line with a specified limit and only make payments based on the amount of credit you use, plus interest.

If you have an ongoing home improvement project with unpredictable costs, it might make sense for you to borrow a HELOC.

Contractor financing

The contractor you choose might offer the option for you to finance your project through a third-party lender they have an existing relationship with. Your loan term could last up to 12 years and might include an interest-free period to incentivize you to repay the loan more quickly and avoid backdated interest charges.

The bottom line

Home improvement projects are generally meant to give your home more appeal, and improve its functionality while also adding value. Before you dedicate any time and money to a project, be sure you’re clear on the costs and are able to recover as much of your investment as possible through an increase in your home’s value or sales price.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Crissinda Ponder
Crissinda Ponder |

Crissinda Ponder is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Crissinda here

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Debt-To-Income and Your Mortgage: Will You Qualify?

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

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The most important factor in getting a mortgage probably isn’t your credit score. Your application more likely hinges on your debt-to-income ratios — crucial measures that tell lenders how well you are managing payments with your monthly earnings.

Before you take ownership of your dream home, you’ll need to prove you’re aren’t presently overwhelmed with your credit card and loan payments, and that you can comfortably repay a mortgage on top of everything else on your plate.

Keep reading to get a handle on debt-to-income ratios and why they matter so much when you’re buying a home.

Understanding debt-to-income ratios

Mortgage lenders definitely care about your credit score, but they’re even more concerned with your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio. Your DTI ratio is the percentage of your gross monthly income that is dedicated to monthly debt payments, including auto loans, credit cards, housing, personal loans, student loans and any other loans or lines of credit you’re responsible for repaying.

DTI ratios help tell lenders how much money you’ll have left over each month after you satisfy your debt obligations. It also gives them a measurement of how likely you’ll fall behind on your payments and helps them determine how much money they’ll be comfortable lending to you.

How to calculate your DTI

There are two types of DTI ratios: front-end and back-end. The front-end ratio focuses solely on your housing debt, whether it’s rent or mortgage payments. Let’s say you’re trying to get approved for a home loan that has a $1,000 monthly mortgage payment and you earn a gross monthly income of $5,000. You would divide the mortgage payment by your income amount to get a front-end DTI ratio of 20%.

The back-end ratio is more widely used. It includes all of your monthly debt obligations, including your housing payment. To continue the above example, let’s add another $1,000 to account for your auto loan, student loans and credit cards, bringing your total monthly debt payments to $2,000. That makes your back-end DTI ratio to 40%.

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What DTI do you need to get a mortgage?

Generally speaking, to increase your chances of mortgage approval, try to keep your front-end debt-to-income ratio at or below 30% and your back-end DTI ratio at or below 43%. However, it’s possible to qualify with a slightly higher back-end DTI.

The average front- and back-end ratios for all loans closed during December 2018 was 26% and 39%, respectively, according to mortgage software firm Ellie Mae’s latest Origination Insight Report.

Mortgage TypeDebt-to-Income Ratio
Conventional loan43%; up to 50% with compensating factors.
FHA loan43%; up to 50% with compensating factors.
VA loanNo DTI max, but there’s a residual income test.
USDA loan41%; up to 44% with compensating factors.

Conventional lenders usually want to see a back-end DTI ratio of 43% or less, though some lenders may approve DTI ratios of up to 50% if the borrower has a higher credit score or a larger down payment. Similar guidelines apply to FHA loans. Check out our explainer on minimum mortgage requirements for a deeper dive on the DTI requirements for additional mortgage types.

How to improve your DTI

There are a few ways to improve your debt-to-income ratio before you apply for a mortgage.

Pay down your existing debt

Take the time to chip away at your auto loan, credit card, student loan and other debt by dedicating any extra money that comes your way to that debt. Use bonuses, gifts, inheritances and tax refunds to pay down your debt balances and eventually lower the amount of your income going to debt payments every month.

Increase your income

If money is a little tight for you right now and you don’t have additional dollars to put toward paying down your debt load, consider increasing your income by picking up a side hustle, such as driving for Lyft or accepting freelance projects. Review these 10 ways to make extra money and pay off debt for more guidance.

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Mortgage options for borrowers with a high DTI

It’s possible to still qualify for a mortgage if your debt-to-income ratio slightly exceeds the general requirements mentioned above. Below, we highlight a few mortgage products available to high-DTI-ratio borrowers.

Fannie Mae HomeReady® Mortgage

This low down payment loan product from government-sponsored enterprise Fannie Mae allows a maximum back-end DTI ratio of 45% for manually underwritten loans. Depending on your credit score and down payment amount, you may also need to show you have a few months of cash reserves saved up.

Freddie Mac Home Possible® Mortgage

Similar to Fannie Mae’s HomeReady® product, GSE Freddie Mac offers the Home Possible® mortgage that allows a maximum 45% DTI ratio for loans that are manually underwritten.

FHA Mortgage

Home loans backed by the Federal Housing Administration allow borrowers to have DTI ratios up to 50% if they supply a down payment of at least 10%.

Other important mortgage eligibility requirements

While debt-to-income ratios can make or break a prospective borrower’s chances at buying a home, there are several other mortgage requirements that matter to the loan application process. Here’s a quick rundown of some of the most important must-haves:

 

  • Credit score: Prepare to have a credit score of at least 620 for a conventional loan and 580 for an FHA loan. It’s possible to qualify for an FHA mortgage with a score as low as 500, but you’ll have to make a larger down payment.
  • Down payment: Save for at least a 3% down payment, or higher if your credit score means you’ll need to put more money down. However, keep in mind that you’ll need to account for mortgage insurance for down payments that are less than 20%.
  • Employment and income: You’ll need to have proof of a steady job and income in order to qualify for a mortgage. Gather your pay stubs and tax returns to demonstrate your capacity to take on a mortgage.

 

The bottom line

Mortgage lenders are tasked with establishing your ability to repay a mortgage, and that includes reviewing your existing debt load and how your hypothetical mortgage would fit into your current financial picture.

If you’re anxious about your debt-to-income ratio percentages, take action to increase the money you bring in monthly and decrease your credit card and loan balances to more manageable amounts.

This article contains links to LendingTree, our parent company.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Crissinda Ponder
Crissinda Ponder |

Crissinda Ponder is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Crissinda here

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