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Investing

Best IRA Account Providers 2019

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Individual retirement accounts (IRAs) are investment vehicles designed to help you save for retirement. If you have a company-sponsored retirement plan, like a 401(k), IRAs are an important supplement to further boost retirement savings. If you’re self-employed, IRAs are your main tool for saving up the nest egg you need to retire.

There are a variety of different IRAs available, and which one you choose depends on your unique employment and financial situation. The two main types are Traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs, which differ in the tax treatment of the funds you place in each account. With a Traditional IRA, you pay income taxes on the funds when you make withdrawals, while with a Roth IRA, you pay taxes on your contributions upfront, allowing the money to grow tax-free.

If you’re self-employed or run a small business, you’ll want to look at opening a simplified employee pension (SEP) IRA. SEP IRAs are available to anyone working as a business sole proprietor, earning freelance income or running a business with one or more employees.

Read on as we round up the best IRA account providers for both active and passive investors. For people who want to take an active role in choosing the investments held in their IRAs, we offer a selection of brokerage firms with premium trading resources. For those who would rather fund their IRA and let somebody else handle the investing process, check out our list of best robo-advisor services.

How we chose the best IRA account providers

We regularly review the latest IRA account offerings — we’ve evaluated 39 different offerings in this round — and have selected our top choices. All of the providers on this list may well be worth considering, with those at the top scoring the best in our methodology.

To determine our list of the best brokerage IRA account providers we focused on trading fees, account minimum, the diversity of investment products offered (stocks, bonds, ETFs and mutual funds) and low account fees (yearly fees, transfer fees and inactivity fees)

To determine our list of the best automated IRA account providers, we focused on management fees and account minimums and considered ease of use and customer support. See our methodology article for more details on how we created our rankings.

Best IRA providers for hands-off investors

Many people lack the time and specialized knowledge required to make the best possible investing decisions. This makes choosing a robo-advisor to manage your IRA a good bet. Robo-advisors are automated investing services operated by established brokerages and stand-alone companies. Robo-advisors generally charge annual management fees, usually 0.25-0.50% of your account balance, in addition to other fees to own ETFs and mutual funds. In return, computer algorithms written by financial professionals maximize your earnings to build a nest egg that will carry you through retirement. These are our picks for the best robo-advisors to manage your IRA.

 Annual Management FeeAverage Expense Ratio (moderate risk portfolio)Account Minimum to Start

Wealthfront

0.25%0.09%$500

Charles Schwab Intelligent Portfolios

0.00%0.14%$5,000

Betterment

0.25% (up to $100,000); 0.40% ($100,000.01 or more)0.11%$0

SoFi Automated Investing

0.00%0.08%$1

Wealthfront — Low fees, great tools

Wealthfront Advisers LLCWealthfront’s low annual costs and free financial planning tools are well-suited to IRA investors. Their annual cost is one of the lowest on this list, with a 0.25% management fee and 0.09% average ETF expense ratio. The $500 minimum to open an account is a bit higher than others on this list, but still attainable for many folks looking to build a nest egg. There is little human interaction at Wealthfront, which saves you time and helps the company keep costs low. This can be a drawback for those who would have complicated tax situations or who prefer a bit of personal attention.

Wealthfront Highlights:

  • An annual management fee of 0.25%; average ETF expense ratio of 0.09%
  • Investments are diversified and automatically rebalanced across four to five asset classes using a portfolio of low-cost ETFs tailored to your risk profile
  • IRAs available: Traditional IRAs, Rollover IRAs, Roth IRAs and SEP IRAs. Wealthfront does not offer inherited or beneficiary IRAs

Charles Schwab Intelligent Portfolios — Automated investing from a leading brokerage

The Charles Schwab Corporation Charles Schwab Intelligent Portfolios can be a smart choice for automating your IRA investments, but do not let the 0% management fee mislead you: Instead of charging a fee, Charles Schwab requires that Intelligent Portfolios clients hold 6-30% of deposited funds in cash at a 0.70% APY, which will decrease overall returns in years where the market returns above 0.70%. In addition, Charles Schwab charges a higher expense ratio for owning their ETFs, which averages 0.14% for a moderate portfolio. The minimum deposit requirement of $5,000 to open an account may be a touch high for investors just starting out. Customer service is one of Schwab’s highlights. As a well-established broker, the company has over 350 branch locations where you can get in-person assistance with your IRA investing questions. Plus, 24/7 phone support is available.

Intelligent Portfolios Highlights:

  • No annual management fee, although customers must keep 6% to 30% of portfolios in cash; average expense ratio of 0.14%
  • Investments are diversified across up to 20 different asset classes and auto-rebalanced
  • Starting at Schwab can benefit investors who anticipate opening other account types down the road
  • IRAs available: Traditional IRAs, Rollover IRAs, Roth IRAs, SEP IRAs, inherited IRAs and Custodial IRA

Betterment — Low fees for balances under $100K

Betterment Holdings Inc.Betterment is one of the most prominent names in automated investing. They offer a full suite of robo-advisor features for IRA investors at low cost, with no minimum deposit. Annual management fees for accounts under $100,000 are 0.25% plus an average 0.11% expense ratio. The annual management fee jumps to 0.40% for accounts $100,000 and up. Betterment gives another advantage to accounts with over $100,000 deposited, allowing those clients to actively manage some assets. If active management is your goal, though, you can avoid Betterment’s 0.40% fee by opening a free brokerage account. If you are managing more than $100,000, you may want to consider a different robo-advisor.A feature that sets Betterment apart versus peers is its Tax-Coordinated Portfolio, which attempts to decrease the amount you pay in taxes. It does this by placing assets that will be taxed highly into IRAs, which have big tax breaks, while placing lower-taxed assets in taxable accounts.

Betterment Highlights:

  • No minimum deposit and low fees for balances under $100k
  • Betterment invests your deposits in ETFs diversified across 12 different asset classes with a strategy personalized to your risk profile
  • The tax-coordinated portfolio feature works to lower your tax bill by placing high-tax items in a tax-advantage IRA account
  • IRAs available: Traditional IRAs, Rollover IRAs, Roth IRAs, SEP IRAs, inherited IRAs and inherited Roth IRAs

SoFi Automated Investing — Low costs, great perks

SoFi Securities LLCSoFi Automated Investing is one of the most competitively-price automated IRA providers, featuring no annual management fee and an ultra-low 0.08% average expense ratio. Valuable perks come with opening a SoFi account, including free access to SoFi financial advisors who can help you create a retirement plan, plus free career counseling and discounts on loans. SoFi also offers an attractive 2.00% APY on deposits in their checking/savings product, though customers must open that account separately.Automated Investing’s main downside is that their portfolios are less customizable than peers’ offerings, with only five different risk levels to choose from, as opposed to at least 10 available from others.

SoFi Automated Investing Highlights:

  • No annual management fee, an average expense ratio of 0.08%, and a $1 minimum deposit
  • IRA and Roth IRA portfolios contain less municipal bonds and more corporate bonds to maximize returns for these tax-advantaged accounts
  • Investments are invested in low-cost ETFs diversified across 16 different asset classes and automatically rebalanced monthly
  • IRAs available: Traditional IRAs, Rollover IRAs, Roth IRAs and SEP IRA

Best IRA providers for active investors

If you are confident in your ability to make financial decisions and are willing to put in the time and effort needed to maintain an investment portfolio, a traditional brokerage IRA can be a good option. With the selected IRA providers below, you have complete control over how investments are allocated within the account. The best part: You pay no management fees.

 Fee per tradeCommission-free ETFsNo transaction fee mutual funds

Charles Schwab

$4.955143,457

Fidelity

$4.955033,636

TD Ameritrade

$6.955713,985

E-Trade

$6.952774,222

Charles Schwab — Free fixed-income consultation

The Charles Schwab CorporationBroker Charles Schwab’s multitude of low-fee investment options and customer service offerings make them a top pick for IRA investors. Schwab offers a number of ways to keep fees low with a low $4.95 per trade commission, $0 minimum to open an account and a large selection of commission-free ETFs and no-transaction fee mutual funds.Especially relevant for investors approaching retirement, Schwab offers free consultations with fixed-income specialists. Customer service is a highlight at Schwab with over 350 branch locations if you need in-person help and 24/7 phone support available. High fees for transfers out of your account or for foreign stock trading are gotchas to look out for.

Charles Schwab Highlights:

  • Free consultation with fixed-income specialist, an advantage for investors close to retiring
  • Low trading commissions at $4.95 per trade
  • There is no minimum deposit to open an IRA with Schwab, so it is easy to get started
  • IRA available: Traditional IRAs, Rollover IRAs, Roth IRAs, inherited IRAs and Custodial IRAs.

Fidelity — Strong mutual fund offerings

Fidelity Brokerage Services LLCFidelity is a top pick among investors saving for retirement, and for good reason. Their vast selection of no-fee mutual funds and ETFs help investors hold onto more of their retirement savings. Fidelity’s lineup of mutual funds with 0% expense ratios are especially noteworthy for fee-conscious investors. Low $4.95 per trade commissions will attract investors who likely actively manage trades in retirement accounts.Fidelity also offers several options for hands-off retirement investors, including its robo-advisor, Fidelity Go, a lineup of well-regarded target date mutual funds, and private client services. For folks looking for in-person help, Fidelity offers over 190 branch locations, and can help by phone 24/7 if you would rather stay home. Low fees and a wide offering of investments make Fidelity a compelling option for beginners.

Fidelity Highlights:

  • 500+ commission-free ETFs, 3,600+ no-transaction fee mutual funds and some proprietary Fidelity funds with 0% expense ratios
  • No fees on early IRA withdrawals or transfers in or out of accounts
  • Great educational resources and useful checklists for retirement
  • IRAs available: Traditional IRAs, Rollover IRAs, Roth IRAs, SEP IRAs, inherited IRAs and custodial IRACustodial IRAs.

TD Ameritrade — Broad selection of no-fee funds

TD AmeritradeTD Ameritrade has a strong IRA offering with almost 4,000 no-fee mutual funds and over 500 commission-free ETFs, paired with strong customer support offerings. Investors comfortable managing their own funds will appreciate TD’s selection of analyst reports, charting tools and watch lists. The high $6.95 per trade commission is TD Ameritrade’s main drawback. If you plan on doing heavy stock or options trading inside your IRA, a broker with lower fees may be a better choice. If you’re willing to pay a premium on trades for full-service customer support and a strong assortment of ETFs and mutual funds, TD Ameritrade is a solid choice.

TD Ameritrade Highlights:

  • Large selection of no-transaction-fee mutual funds
  • Special offers available for qualifying TD Bank customers including free trades and account rebates
  • No fees for early withdrawal, over-contributing, or recharacterizing IRA contributions
  • IRAs available: Traditional IRAs,Rollover IRAs, Roth IRAs and SEP IRAs.

E-Trade — Wide assortment of investments, be careful of fees

E-Trade Securities LLCE-Trade offers one of the broadest assortments of no-transaction-fee mutual funds in the industry with over 4,000 no-transaction-fee mutual funds available, making them an excellent home for your IRA. Their robust research tools make it easy to select your investment portfolio and no minimum deposit to open an account makes it easy to get started. Trading fees are higher than some peers at $6.95 per trade, though they do drop to $4.95 per trade when you place more than 30 trades per quarter.Be aware, however, that E-Trade charges $25 for any early distribution, even those that can be taken penalty-free from IRAs and Roth IRAs, such as first-time home purchases, medical expenses or education expenses. They also charge a $25 fee if you accidentally overfund an IRA or if you need to recharacterize an IRA contribution to a Roth IRA contribution or vice versa.

E-Trade Highlights:

  • Deposits of more than $25,000 in a new E*Trade retirement account qualify for cash bonuses and 500 free trades
  • Expansive selection of no-transaction-fee mutual funds, over 4,200 in total
  • Offers proprietary robo-advisor Core Portfolios for hands-off investors
  • IRAs available: Traditional IRAs, Rollover IRAs, Roth IRAs, SEP IRAs, inherited IRAs and Custodial IRAs.

Individual retirement account FAQs

What is a Traditional IRA?

A Traditional IRA is the most basic variety of IRA. With a Traditional IRA, your contributions are tax-deductible in the year you make them and funds in the account grow tax-deferred. You pay regular income tax on distributions made from the account in retirement.

For 2019, you are allowed to contribute $6,000 per year to a Traditional IRA ($7,000 if you’re 50 or older). These contributions are in addition to one made to a 401(k) employment savings plan, however there are limits to how much you may deduct from your taxes depending on how much you make.

Anyone can open a Traditional IRA if they earn taxable income in the year in which they make a contribution. However, the funds you contribute to a Traditional IRA aren’t allowed to grow indefinitely. Holders are subject to or required minimum distributions, which means you’ll need to start taking distributions from the IRA once you reach the age of 70 ½. In addition, you pay a 10% penalty if you withdraw funds before the age of 59 ½.

What is a Roth IRA?

A Roth IRA is the other main variety of IRA. Contributions to a Roth IRA are not tax-deductible in the year you make them, but your money grows tax-free in the account and you pay no taxes on the income when you withdraw the money in retirement.

The contribution maximums are the same as a Traditional IRA: for 2019, you may add $6,000 per year to a Roth IRA ($7,000 if you’re 50 or older). Like a Traditional IRA, these contributions are allowed on top of ones made to a 401(k) employment savings plan, however there are strict rules capping the annual totals you may put into a Roth IRA depending on how much you make.

One big advantage of a Roth IRA that’s different than a Traditional IRA is that you can withdraw money from a Roth IRA at any time without paying penalty. Note that there are rules dictating how much and when you may make early withdrawals from a Roth IRA. Also, Roth IRAs do not have required minimum distributions.

The rules prevent people earning above a certain amount from opening a Roth IRA. However, there is a tax strategy called a “backdoor IRA” that lets you open a Traditional IRA and then convert it to a Roth IRA.

What is a SEP IRA?

A simplified employee pension (SEP) IRA is designed to let the self-employed and small business owners save for retirement. With a SEP IRA, you get a tax deduction on contributions and funds kept in the account grow tax-deferred. SEP IRA withdrawals in retirement are taxed at regular income tax rates.

Maximum annual contribution limits for SEP IRAs are much higher than other IRAs, because the holders of this type of IRA do not have access to 401(k)s. The maximum contribution for 2019 is $56,000. Eligible SEP IRA owners cannot contribute more than 25% of their annual compensation.

For small business owners that have employees, owners must contribute to their employees SEP IRA accounts at the same rate that they contribute to their own SEP IRA account. Small business employees generally can’t contribute to a SEP IRA set up by their employer — although they can make Traditional IRA contributions in some cases.

What is an IRA rollover?

An IRA rollover is an IRA used to house funds that initially accrued in a different retirement account, such as a 401(k). If you change jobs or otherwise find yourself without access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan, a rollover IRA can help keep your assets invested and growing — while keeping you from paying the taxes and penalties you would face if you cashed out the old account.

The easiest way to perform an IRA rollover is to have your existing account custodian transfer the funds directly to the new account or write a check made out to the new trustee in your benefit. You also can do an “indirect rollover,” where you cash out the account and reinvest the funds manually, but there are some important caveats to keep in mind before taking this approach.

As required by the IRS, your retirement account manager must withhold 20% when writing you a distribution check, even if you intend to reinvest it later. Although you have a 60-day window in which you can redeposit the funds without incurring a penalty, you must redeposit the entire amount, which means you’ll need to make up the difference out of your own pocket.

How do I open an IRA account?

You can open an IRA at your bank, at a wealth management firm, at a brokerage or through online robo-advisors. The specific steps required to open an IRA will depend on your chosen account custodian. You’ll be asked verifiable identification information, such as your Social Security number, and you may also be required to meet a certain minimum initial deposit.

Once your account is open and funded, you can begin to research and invest in specific stocks, bonds and other securities and investments. The investments you choose will dictate how the account will generate income from capital gains over time, so it’s important to select and properly allocate your assets as soon as you open your account.

What are the advantages/disadvantages to managing my IRA myself?

Some folks want to handle their investments by themselves. In order to manage your own IRA, you should feel confident in your ability to invest and make decisions with meaningful sums of money? — it is your retirement savings after all. With a brokerage IRA, you will have full control over where and how your money is invested, and by doing it yourself you will not pay any management fees.

The downside is that you will have to spend time and energy researching investment decisions and rebalancing your portfolio. You also do not get the advantage of having a professional money manager in your corner. Luckily, a number of brokers will offer free consultations to get you going, and by investing in mutual funds and ETFs, you can leverage the expertise of some of the best money managers in the world.

What are the advantages/disadvantages to automating my IRA?

Many people would prefer to have a professional manage their investments, either because of lack of time or investing expertise. Choosing an IRA managed by a robo-advisor lets a computer algorithm written by investing professionals is a great strategy a hands-off investor.

This comes at a price. Most robo-advisors charge an annual management fee of around 0.25-0.50% of your account balance. Additionally, you lose some of the customization that comes with managing your own investments. Most robo-advisors will assign you one of their predetermined portfolios based on a questionnaire. As a result, you could end up with a portfolio that isn’t as optimal as a custom one or that contains companies that you would rather not own.

One last thing to consider is that many of these robo-advisors are relatively new. If you are young, chances are that the industry and robo-advisors’ offerings will likely change by the time you are retiring.

What investments should my IRA broker offer?

Ensure that the broker you choose has a strong selection of commission-free ETFs and mutual funds along with screening and portfolio-building tools to help you choose the right investments. Most brokers offer a “select list” of mutual funds, which often feature funds created and managed by the same broker. As with all investing decisions, be skeptical and make sure to compare funds from a number of different companies to try and get the best return while paying the lowest fees.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Joshua Rowe-Heupler
Joshua Rowe-Heupler |

Joshua Rowe-Heupler is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Joshua here

Jamie Cattanach
Jamie Cattanach |

Jamie Cattanach is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Jamie here

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Investing

The Best Robo-Advisors of 2019

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

If you’re new to the world of investing in stocks and bonds, knowing where to begin can be an intimidating prospect. Robo-advisors could be the best choice to start your investing journey. They make putting money in the market simple and intuitive utilizing smartphone apps and sophisticated computer algorithms.

Robo-advisors invest your money in diversified portfolios of stocks and bonds that are customized to your needs. Since computers do the work, they are able to charge much lower fees than traditional wealth advisors.

They begin the process with a questionnaire to assess your financial goals and your risk tolerance. Based on your answers, robo-advisors purchase low-cost exchange-traded funds (ETFs) for you and adjust the portfolio — or rebalance, as they say on Wall Street — on a regular basis, with no further intervention required from you.

To match your risk tolerance, robo-advisors offer more aggressive portfolios containing a greater percentage of stock ETFs, or more conservative ones containing a greater percentage of bond ETFs. The robo-advisor will also consider your age in developing your portfolio.

How we chose the best robo-advisors

We regularly review the latest robo-advisor offerings — we’ve evaluated 19 different ones in this round — and have selected our top choices. All of the robo-advisors on this list may well be worth considering, with those at the top scoring the best in our methodology.

To determine our list of the best robo-advisors, we focused on management fees and account minimums, and also considered ease of use and customer support.

The top 7 robo-advisors of May 2019

Robo-advisorAnnual Management FeeAverage Expense Ratio (moderate risk portfolio)Account Minimum to Start
Wealthfront0.25%0.09%$500
Charles Schwab Intelligent Portfolios0.00%0.14%$5,000
Betterment0.25% (up to $100,000), 0.40% (over $100,000)0.11%$0
SoFi Automated Investing0.00%0.08%$1
SigFig0.00% (up to $10,000), 0.25% (over $10,000)0.15%$2,000
WiseBanyan0.00%0.12%$1
Acorns$12/yr0.03%-0.15%$5

Wealthfront — Low fees, high APR for cash account

Wealthfront
Wealthfront’s stand-out features are its low annual cost and free financial planning tools. The 0.25% management fee and 0.09% average ETF expense ratio adds up to one of the lowest annual costs on this list. In addition, Wealthfront includes a cash management account with an attractive 2.32% APY.

Wealthfront continues to steal share in wealth management as customers fed up with high fees leave traditional brokerages and wealth advisors. Human interaction is intentionally minimal at Wealthfront: This could be a benefit to those who want to be left alone, or a drawback for those who would prefer personal attention or who have complicated tax situations.

Wealthfront’s key attributes:

  • Fees: Management fee of 0.25%, plus 0.09% avg ETF expense ratio
  • Minimum starting deposit: $500
  • Investing strategy: Wealthfront invests your money in one of 20 different automated portfolios. Each portfolio is a different mix of 11 low-cost ETFs, which are rated with risk scores from 0.5 (least risk) to 10.0 (most risk).
  • Average annual return over the past five years: 5.40% per year, based on Wealthfront’s mid-level 5.0 risk score.
  • Other notable features: Tax-loss harvesting (see below for a full explanation of tax-loss harvesting) comes standard, also includes an FDIC-insured cash management account yielding 2.32% APY.

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Charles Schwab Intelligent Portfolios — Brand-name brokerage

Charles Schwab
Intelligent Portfolios can be a smart choice, but do not be misled by the 0% management fees — investing with this robo-advisor still comes at a cost. Intelligent Portfolios requires users to hold 6% to 30% of deposited funds in cash at a 0.70% APY, which will eat into overall returns in years where the market returns above 0.7%. This is on top of an average 0.14% expense ratio for a moderate portfolio. The $5,000 minimum deposit to open an account may also be too high a bar for investors just starting out.

That said, Intelligent Portfolios has an exceptionally detailed description of their ETF selection methodology, and a major brokerage like Schwab can be a good launchpad for folks who anticipate getting deeper into investing. Intelligent Portfolios users get access to Charles Schwab’s 300 U.S. branch locations where you can talk to advisors and handle administrative tasks in person.

Key attributes of Intelligent Portfolios:

  • Fees: Zero management fee, but customers must hold 6% to 30% of their portfolio in cash at 0.7% APR, plus 0.14% avg ETF expense ratio.
  • Minimum starting deposit: $5,000
  • Investing strategy: Schwab invests your money in a custom portfolio with two main components: ETFs representing up to 20 different asset classes, including stocks and bonds; and cash, in the form of a FDIC-insured cash sweep program earning 0.7% APY. Cash must be between 6% and 30% of the portfolio.
  • Average annual return from 3/31/2015 to 12/31/2018: 3.1% per year for medium-risk portfolio
  • Other notable features: Tax loss harvesting available for accounts over $50K, includes access to in-person assistance at over 300 U.S. branch locations.

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Betterment — Low fees for balances under $100K

Betterment
Betterment offers a full suite of robo-advisor features at low cost with no minimum deposit. The annual management fee for accounts under $100,000 is 0.25%, plus an average 0.11% expense ratio. Unfortunately, accounts over $100,000 will see the annual management fee jump to 0.40%. One advantage Betterment gives to accounts above the $100,000 threshold is that they can actively manage some assets. If active management is your goal, though, you can avoid Betterment’s 0.40% fee by opening a free brokerage account — so if you are managing more than $100,000, you may want to consider a different robo-advisor.

Betterment’s key attributes:

  • Fees: If total balance is less than $100,000, the annual management fee is 0.25% of assets; for balances over $100,000, management fee rises to 0.40% of assets. The average ETF expense ratio is 0.11% (for a 70% stock and 30% bond portfolio).
  • Minimum starting deposit: $0
  • Investing strategy: Betterment invests your money in an automated portfolio comprised of stock and bond ETFs in 12 different asset classes.
  • Average annual return over five years: 6.2% per year on a 50% equity portfolio (July 2013 to July 2018).
  • Other notable features: Tax-loss harvesting comes standard; active management features for clients with $100,000+ balance; several premium portfolios available.

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SoFi Automated Investing — Low costs, great perks

SoFi
SoFi Automated Investing’s 0.00% management fee and ultra-low 0.08% average expense ratio makes it one of the most competitively-priced robo-advisors in the market. Valuable perks come with opening a SoFi account, including free access to SoFi financial advisors, free career counseling and discounts on loans.

Automated Investing’s main downside is that their portfolios are less customizable than its peers’, with only five different risk levels to choose from, as opposed to at least 10 available from others. SoFi does not offer tax loss harvesting yet, though this may change in the near future.

SoFi Automated Investing’s key attributes:

  • Fees: Zero management fee, plus 0.08% avg expense ratio.
  • Minimum starting deposit: $1
  • Investing strategy: All SoFi Automated Investing portfolios are actively managed. This means that real humans at SoFi decide the makeup of the five model portfolios, which they believe will add value beyond what passive investing offers. SoFi invests your money in one of five portfolios of low-cost ETFs, covering 16 different asset classes. Each of the five portfolios has two versions: one is for taxable accounts and the other for tax-deferred or tax-free accounts, like IRAs and Roth IRAs. SoFi only rebalances portfolios monthly, versus some peers which check for this opportunity daily.
  • Average annual return over five years: 6.78% per year on the moderate risk portfolio (60% stocks / 40% bonds).
  • Other notable features: Commission-free stock trades in separate Active Investing accounts. SoFi’s combined checking/savings product, SoFi Money, offers 2.00% APY on deposits. Customers must open this account separately.

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SigFig — Free access to advisors

SigFig
Free access to financial advisors by phone and 0.00% management fees on the first $10,000 deposited are SigFig’s biggest strong points. On deposits over $10,000, management fees rise to 0.25%. Expense ratios are on the high side compared to the competition, at an average of 0.15%.

One of SigFig’s peculiarities is that they do not hold your assets. If you open a new account, SigFig will open an account at TD Ameritrade for you and then manage it. Current TD Ameritrade, Fidelity and Charles Schwab customers can also use SigFig’s robo-advisor services.

The $2,000 minimum deposit may put SigFig out of reach for some, but SigFig is worth a look for investors looking to keep robo-advisor costs low.

SigFig’s key attributes:

  • Fees: Zero annual management fee for the first $10,000; management fee rises to 0.25% of assets on balances over $10,000. Average ETF expense ratio of 0.15%, depending on allocation.
  • Minimum starting deposit: $2,000
  • Investing strategy: SigFig invests your money in an automated portfolio based on how you indicate you want to invest. Each portfolio is made of ETFs from Vanguard, iShares and Schwab, comprising stocks and bonds in nine different asset classes. The specific ETFs SigFig invests in will vary based on whether your account is held at TD Ameritrade, Fidelity, or Schwab.
  • Average annual return over five years: 5.45% per year for moderate portfolio (as of 4/24/2019)
    Other notable features: SigFig has a free portfolio tracker that allows investors to track their entire portfolio’s performance across multiple brokers.

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WiseBanyan — No-frills choice for beginners

WiseBanyan
A 0.00% management fee for core robo-advisor functionality makes WiseBanyan a good choice for beginning investors who can get by with a no-frills offering. Make sure to notice that they still charge a 0.12% average ETF expense ratio, so it is not completely free.

WiseBanyan charges premiums for features that come standard with other robo-advisors, including tax loss harvesting (0.24% of assets up to $20/month max), expanded investment options ($3/month) and auto-deposit ($2/month). If you care about these other features, do the math based on your own portfolio size to compare WiseBanyan to its peers.

WiseBanyan’s key attributes:

  • Fees: Zero management fee, plus average ETF expense ratio of 0.12%. Premium features carry additional fees and higher expense ratios.
  • Minimum starting deposit: $1
  • How WiseBanyan invests your money: For basic Core Portfolio users, portfolios comprise ETFs across nine asset classes, with an average expense ratio of 0.03% to 0.69%. If you upgrade to the Portfolio Plus Package, you gain access to 31 total asset classes with exposure to ETFs tracking oil and gas, precious metals and other industries, with an average expense ratio of 0.03% to 0.75%.
  • Average annual return over five years: Not provided
  • Other notable features: Premium offerings, including tax loss harvesting (0.24% /month up to $20/month max), Fast Money auto-deposit ($2/month) and Portfolio Plus ($3/month).

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Acorns — Unique savings functionality

Acorns
By rounding up the spare change from your transactions and placing it into an investment account, Acorns provides a clever way to get started with investing. The main drawback is that, until you have more than $4,800 deposited in an Acorns Core account, the $1/month fee will actually be proportionally higher than the 0.25% management fees that most competitors charge.

Acorns does not offer tax loss harvesting, joint accounts, or access to financial advisors currently. Still, if you’re looking for an easy way to start investing, give Acorns a shot.

Key attributes of Acorns:

  • Fees: $1/month for Acorns Core, plus ETF expense ratios ranging from 0.03% to 0.15%
  • Minimum starting deposit: $5
  • How Acorns invests your money: Acorns invests your money in one of five automated portfolios— notably, this is a more limited number of portfolios than some other competitors. Each portfolio comprises ETFs across seven asset classes.
  • Average annual return over past five years: Not provided
  • Other notable features: Offers two add-on accounts for expanded functionality with Acorns Later retirement product ($2/month) and Acorns Spend checking account ($3/month).

Learn More

What is a robo-advisor?

A robo-advisor is a service that uses computer algorithms to invest customers’ money in portfolios customized to their needs. Since robo-advisors create these portfolios using automated algorithms, they can charge a fraction of what human advisors do and still offer advanced benefits like auto-rebalancing and tax-loss harvesting to boost overall returns. Most robo-advisors start with a questionnaire to assess your financial goals, risk tolerance and assets. Based on the answers, the robo-advisor allocates your investments accordingly.

How do I choose the right robo-advisor?

When considering which robo-advisor to choose, you should focus on management fees, minimum balances, ease of use and customer support. The lower the fees, the more money stays in your account. The top robo-advisors typically charge a flat management fee of 0.00% to 0.50% of your deposited balance. In addition, you pay an expense ratio to cover the fees charged by the companies offering the ETFs that comprise your investment portfolio. Note that some robo-advisors claim to offer zero management fees, but still charge an expense ratio.

Make sure you are comfortable leaving your deposits with a robo-advisor for the medium to long term — think five to eight years. There are a number of robo-advisors with $0 account minimums and most are under $5,000 today.

How do I open a robo-advisor account?

Most robo-advisors can have you up and running with an account in a few minutes. Typically you create a username, fill out a questionnaire to assess your financial goals and risk tolerance and connect your profile to a bank account. There may be some additional steps required for verification depending on the robo-advisor.

What other features should I consider?

Robo-advisors offer a host of additional features, including tax loss harvesting, cash management options, checking accounts and rewards programs. Cash management can provide a meaningful compliment for users who keep some of their portfolio in cash. Some robo-advisors offer an APY of more than 2.00% on cash management accounts. Tax loss harvesting can make a difference for users looking to lower tax exposure.

What is tax loss harvesting?

Tax loss harvesting is a tax strategy that some robo-advisors offer to help clients reduce their tax bill. Generally, this involves selling an asset that has lost value for a loss, using that loss to offset capital gains taxes or income taxes, then purchasing a similar but not “substantially identical” asset to maintain exposure to the asset class. The details behind each robo-advisor’s strategy can get complicated and should be looked at in detail to make sure you understand what you are getting into.

Capital losses from tax loss harvesting can be used to offset capital gains and can potentially offset up to $3,000 (or $1,500 if married and filing separately) of ordinary income.

What if my robo-advisor goes out of business?

While not a pleasant thought, it is possible that a robo-advisor could go out of business. Most robo-advisors insure clients’ assets through the Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC). This is different from the bank account coverage provided by the FDIC; generally, SIPC coverage includes up to $500,000 in protection per separate account type, with up to $250,000 of cash assets protected.

Keep in mind that the SIPC will take necessary steps to return securities and account holdings to impacted clients, but will not protect against any rise or fall in value of those holdings. This means that if you make a bad investment in a stock, the SIPC ensures you still own that bad stock, but do not replace losses from a poor investment. Some brokers also insure assets beyond the $500,000 in SIPC coverage through “excess of SIPC” insurance.

See the full list of SIPC members at their site, along with a detailed explanation of how SIPC coverage works.

The bottom line

Robo-advisors can be an excellent option for users who are starting their investing journeys, rolling over a 401(k) or who want to minimize the time needed to manage their investments. By creating a customized portfolio based on your financial goals and automatically rebalancing your account, a robo-advisor can help to maximize your return while taking on the right amount of risk.

Because robo-advisors run off of automated algorithms, you should be comfortable with little or no human touch for your investments. The upshot to low human interaction is that fees are generally much lower than with a registered investment advisor, which may be worth the tradeoff as part of an overall financial plan.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Joshua Rowe-Heupler
Joshua Rowe-Heupler |

Joshua Rowe-Heupler is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Joshua here

Advertiser Disclosure

Best of

The Best Online Stock Brokers of 2019

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

If you’d like to start investing in the stock market, the first thing you’ll need is a broker. A broker’s main job is to buy and sell stocks, bonds, exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and other securities that make up your investments. Think of a broker as your bridge to financial markets.

There are different kinds of brokers to help you achieve different goals: Some specialize in retirement investing over decades-long timeframes, others facilitate short-term day trading. Most offer services that reach beyond buying and selling securities, such as financial advice, investor education, bank accounts, and market research.

Before you choose an online stock broker, you need to set goals and understand your investing style. At the most basic level, every investor needs to consider how often they plan to make trades, how long they would like to hold their investments, and what securities they want to trade.

For beginning investors, the slightly higher fee per trade that large brokers charge can be worth paying for access to great customer service. Advanced investors will want to keep an eye out for the ability to trade more complicated securities, like options, and get price discounts for higher trading volumes.

In either case, reasonable management fees, solid market data and the ability to trade a wide variety of products are core aspects that all investors should look for in an online stock broker. At a minimum, investors should look at brokers with a solid selection of no-transaction-fee mutual funds and commission-free ETFs.

How we chose the best online stock brokers

We evaluated 20 different online stock brokers in our latest review, and we have listed our top seven choices below. All of these brokers are worth considering, with those at the top of each category scoring the best in our methodology.

For the best online brokers, top consideration was given to firms offering low trading fees, low account minimums and a good diversity of investment products.

We have grouped the top brokers into three categories, based on their features. These categories should be a useful starting point when making comparisons, although they are certainly not hard and fast divisions. Some brokers could fall into more than one category.

  • Full-Featured Brokers: Good for broad investing needs. Offers a good variety of tools, securities to trade and account types.
  • Discount Brokers: Best for investors needing little guidance and who care most about saving money on fees.
  • Premium Brokers: Similar to full-featured brokers, but with more emphasis on retirement planning, high-net-worth individuals and personalized service.

Broker

Type

Fee per trade

Commission-free ETFs

No-transaction-fee Mutual Funds

Charles Schwab

Full-featured broker

$4.95

514

3,457

Fidelity

Full-featured broker

$4.95

503

3,636

Merrill Edge

Full-featured broker

$6.95

0

704

TD Ameritrade

Full-featured broker

$6.95

571

3,985

E-Trade

Full-featured broker

$6.95

277

4,222

Vanguard

Premium broker

$7

1,800

3,140

Ally Invest

Discount broker

$4.95

114

0

Full-Featured Brokers

Full-featured brokers are equipped for many different types of clients, from absolute beginners to advanced traders, and tend to be a great choice for most investors. Fees are slightly higher than at discount brokers, usually around $4.95 to $6.95 per trade, enabling access to better research, analysis tools and customer service.

The menu of investments at full-featured brokers is typically broader than what is offered by discount brokers, including a wider array of stocks, bonds, ETFs and mutual funds. Additional trading categories are usually available, including margin trading, options, commodities, foreign exchange and cryptocurrency. They also offer a plethora of additional services — for additional fees — from wealth advisors and tax advisors, to portfolio analysis and private client services.

Charles Schwab: Great overall offering

The Charles Schwab Corporation Charles Schwab is a great fit for beginner and advanced investors. This broker offers a low fee of $4.95 per trade, requires no minimum balance to open an account, and lets you trade a wide variety of products, many of them fee-free. A Schwab account comes with tools to guide stock picking and portfolio construction, as well as 24/7 phone support and branch offices across the U.S. High fees for transfers out of your account and for international stock trades are gotchas to look out for.

Pros:

  • No minimum deposit and $4.95 per trade commissions
  • 500-plus commission-free ETFs and more than 3,000 no-transaction-fee mutual funds
  • Extensive research and educational tools, including stock screeners and advanced charting
  • Schwab’s robo-advisor product, Schwab Intelligent Portfolios, is an option for folks looking to automate a portion of their investments

Cons:

  • High commissions and foreign transaction fees to purchase international stocks
  • Schwab charges fees to transfer money out of Schwab account; $25 for a partial transfer or $50 for a full transfer
  • Large, $100,000 deposit required to earn 500 free trade bonus for new accounts
Learn MoreSecured
on Charles Schwab’s secure website

Fidelity: Strong mutual fund offerings

Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC Fidelity’s $0 account minimum, low $4.95 per trade commission, and big selection of no-fee mutual funds and ETFs make it a strong contender. Of special note is that Fidelity offers several proprietary mutual funds featuring 0% expense ratios, which are only available to Fidelity clients. The firm offers customer support with representatives available by phone 24/7, though reviews on their site suggest that response times can lag. They also have branch locations across the U.S. if you prefer assistance in-person. Portfolio analysis and allocation tools are basic but functional.

Pros:

  • 200-plus proprietary mutual funds, some with 0% expense ratios
  • 3,600-plus no-transaction fee mutual funds and 350-plus commission-free ETFs
  • No fees on transfers in our out of accounts
  • Offers robo-advisor, Fidelity Go, for folks who want to automate investments

Cons:

  • You’ll need to deposit at least $50,000 to earn their new account bonus of 300 free trades valid for two years
  • High broker-assisted trade fee of $32.95
  • Robo-advisor Fidelity Go’s management fee of 0.35% is higher than peers
Learn MoreSecured
on Fidelity’s secure website

Merrill Edge: Free trades with more than $50,000 invested

Bank of America Corp. If you have over $50,000 to invest, Merrill Edge could be a good match, but if you don’t have access to this type of capital you might choose another broker. Maintaining an average balance of $50,000 between your Merrill Edge account and an account at Bank of America (see below; BoA is Merrill’s parent company) gets you 30 free stock or ETF trades per month. For those who do not qualify for free trades, the standard $6.95 per trade fee is high vs. peers. Those fees can add up quickly since Merrill Edge does not offer any commission-free ETFs and their selection of no-transaction-fee mutual funds is small compared to others.

Pros:

  • 30 free stock and ETF trades per month if you have an average balance over $50,000; 100 free trades per month if your average balance is over $100,000
  • Bank of America clients can count checking, savings, IRA, CD, and money market deposits to meet the $50,000 or $100,000 Merrill Edge deposit thresholds
  • In-person customer service appointments are available at many Bank of America branches
  • $100 cash reward for $20,000 in qualifying net new assets deposited within 45 days of account opening, increasing to $600 cash bonus for balance of $200,000 or more in qualifying net new assets.

Cons:

  • Pricier than competitors if you have to pay commissions
  • You must open a Bank of America account, if you do not already have one, to qualify for free trades.
  • No commission-free ETFs
  • Small selection of no-transaction-fee mutual funds (about 700, compared to peers with more than 3,000)
Learn MoreSecured
on Merrill Edge’s secure website

TD Ameritrade: Broad offering of investments

TD Ameritrade An expansive assortment of no-fee mutual funds and a respectable selection of commission-free ETFs, paired with strong customer support make TD Ameritrade a great choice for beginning investors. Existing TD Bank customers may want to give special consideration to opening an account with TD Ameritrade since Ameritrade offers special benefits to TD Bank customers including free trades and sign-up bonuses based on the amount deposited. The high $6.95 per trade commission is TD Ameritrade’s main drawback. If you plan on doing heavy stock or options trading, you may want to consider a broker with lower commissions or fee-free trades for very active users. Advanced investors will like the account’s professional-level thinkorswim trading software platform. If you’re willing to pay a premium on trades for full-service customer support and a respectable assortment of ETFs and mutual funds, TD Ameritrade is solid choice.

Pros:

  • Offers nearly 4,000 no-fee mutual funds and more than 500 commission-free ETFs
  • Special promotions available to existing TD Bank customers including free trades and account rebates based on amount deposited
  • 24/7 phone support and 363 branch locations for in-person help
  • $0 minimum balance to open an account

Cons:

  • $6.95 per trade commissions are higher than many competitors
  • $75 full outbound account transfer fee (partial transfers are free)
Learn MoreSecured
on TD Ameritrade’s secure website

E-Trade: Great research options

E-Trade Securities LLC E-Trade offers a competitive assortment of ETFs and mutual funds compared to its peers, but a $500 minimum to open an account and high $6.95 trading fees for those making less than 30 trades per quarter may drive lower-volume investors away. For investors seeking to automate a portion of their portfolio, E-Trade also offers robo-advisor Core Portfolios, featuring a 0.30% management fee. If you are a more active trader, commissions drop to $4.95 per trade when you place more than 30 trades per quarter.

Pros:

  • More than 250 commission-free ETFs and over 4,000 no-transaction-fee mutual funds
  • Robust mobile and trading apps that offer access to charting tools and research materials
  • Competitive $4.95 per-trade commission when you place more than 30 trades per quarter

Cons:

  • Noncompetitive $6.95 per-trade commissions on fewer than 30 trades per quarter
  • No cash bonus is available for new accounts unless a minimum of $25,000 is deposited.
  • The minimum deposit to open an account is $500.
Learn MoreSecured
on E-Trade’s secure website

Premium Brokers

Premium brokers’ offerings are usually similar to those of full-featured brokers, with additional tiers of service available for investors with more money to invest. Most premium brokers offer lots of commission-free products as well, making them worth it for investors with less money to consider opening an account, especially for retirement planning. Trading fees are usually on the higher end of the spectrum, over $7 per trade, however there are often steep discounts for investors with large deposits. Customized advice, private client services, tax optimization and estate planning are common features for premium brokers.

Vanguard: Best for long-term investors

The Vanguard Group Inc. Vanguard is a decent option for long-term investors who are focused on keeping fees low and have more money to invest. Vanguard’s proprietary ETFs and mutual funds have a long track record of success, and fees are extremely low. They have a broad selection of commission-free ETFs and mutual funds. Vanguard appears to discourage active trading, with a stiff $7 per trade commission for the first 25 trades in a year, increasing to $20 for subsequent trades. If you’re looking to buy and sell assets frequently, other brokers would be a better choice. One caveat is that trading fees decrease significantly for clients with over $500,000 invested, and can make Vanguard a much more attractive option.

Pros:

  • Vanguard offers around 1,800 commission-free ETFs and over 3,100 no-transaction fee mutual funds
  • 84% of Vanguard funds outperformed their peers over a 10-year period ending in December of 2018
  • Vanguard’s proprietary ETFs and mutual funds charge very low expense ratios
  • An ETF expense ratio of 0.07% vs. the industry standard of 0.27%
  • A mutual fund expense ratio of 0.10% vs. industry standard of 0.58%
  • No fees on transfers in our out of accounts

Cons:

  • Active traders will be turned off by an overly simple trading platform and higher fees the more you trade
  • Financial advisor services aren’t available unless you have at least $50,000 invested
Learn MoreSecured
on Vanguard’s secure website

Discount Brokers

Discount brokers usually offer the lowest fees to trade stocks, ETFs, and other securities. They are best suited for investors needing little guidance and who care most about saving money on fees. Discount brokers typically provide few, if any, research resources and may only allow trading in a limited set of securities. Some discount brokers, for example, allow trading in stocks and ETFs, but do not support mutual funds. For most investors, we would advise pairing the trading functionality of a discount broker together with analysis tools, potentially from a full-featured broker, in order to make well-informed investing decisions.

Ally Invest: Best for low-cost stock trading

Ally Financial Inc. Ally Invest shines as a low-cost broker for trading individual stocks, but offers little for investors looking to invest in commission-free ETFs or mutual funds for retirement. The $4.95 per stock trade commission is already low and lowers further to $3.95 per trade if you make more than 30 stock trades per quarter. Other services are bare-bones. Ally does not not offer any no-transaction-fee mutual funds, has a small selection of commission-free ETFs, and does not have physical branches. New clients should be careful when evaluating Ally’s current promotion, which offers free trades and cash bonuses for clients who deposit more than $10,000 to an account, since there are a number of conditions needed to comply with its terms.

Pros:

  • Low commissions of just $4.95 per trade; drops to $3.95 for folks who trade more than 30 times per quarter or have a daily balance of $100,000 or more
  • Ally will refund your account transfer fees from another broker up to $150

Cons:

  • Fewer commission-free ETFs (114 total) than most competitors (300 or more)
  • $9.95 transaction fees for no-load mutual funds
  • Limited research options and difficult to use screening tools
Learn MoreSecured
on Ally Invest’s secure website

Online Brokerage FAQs

What is a stock?

A stock represents ownership in a company. If you have a 401(k) or other investment account, you may already own stock, although this may be in the form of mutual funds. But when you buy stock directly — or get options through a company — you own a certain number of shares of that company that you can then sell or hold.

Stocks can be exciting — everyone wants to find the next Apple, Microsoft or Netflix — but buying stocks can also be risky. After all, your money is directly tied to the success (or failure) of a large corporation. Factors such as public relations scandals, technological innovation that renders their main products obsolete, or competing startup companies can all cause a stock’s price to fluctuate dramatically.

That’s why investors often research companies carefully, potentially consult with an advisor to determine the best course of action, and are very careful that the money they buy stocks with isn’t money they are dependent on to live or retire.

What kind of fees do brokers charge?

One point of comparison that’s important to many investors is a broker’s fee structure. Fees vary depending on the brokerage, and it’s important to consider how you may use the brokerage when assessing potential fees.

For example, if you’re not planning on actively trading, commissions and trading fees may matter less than account management charges. As you compare brokerages, you’ll likely see some common investment fees:

  • Trade commission: A trade commission, which may also be called a stock trading fee, is the fee charged when buying or selling stocks, options, ETFs and other securities. This may be a flat fee, or it could be a fee charged per share being bought or sold.
  • Mutual fund transaction fee: This is the fee charged for buying and selling mutual funds.
  • Mutual fund sales load: A commission charged to an investor when they buy or sell a mutual fund. This is generally charged as a percentage of the price of the shares purchased. No-load mutual funds do not charge this type of commission.
  • Account transfer fee: A fee that brokers charge to transfer your balance from their brokerage to another brokerage. Some brokers will charge only for transferring your full account balance, while others charge for transferring any portion of your account outbound to another broker. A number of brokers do not charge at all for this service, and some brokers will even reimburse the fees your old broker charges you if you deposit money at the new brokerage – just make sure to ask.

What should I look for when comparing online brokerages?

When comparing online brokerages, it’s smart to consider how you plan to use them. If you’re looking for in-depth research, models and the ability to seamlessly read investor reports, you’ll need to evaluate the research resources offered by each online stock broker. Are you looking to trade on your phone? Checking out the mobile platform is your first job. Do you plan to trade during market hours, or before and after market? Security is important as well. Knowing whether a brokerage is insured and how your personal and financial information is protected can give you peace of mind. Answer these questions to help choose the best online stock broker for your needs.

How can I learn more about trading?

Of course, investing in stock carries some amount of risk, so it’s important to do your due diligence before you purchase shares. But along with research, one of the best ways to understand the market is to invest.

While buying stock may seem intimidating — even to someone who may already invest in the form of a retirement account or education account — the process can be straightforward. Choose an online stock broker, open an online account and select the stock you wish to purchase.

Before you purchase any shares, understand why you’re buying that stock. Do you want to hold onto it, or is your plan to sell and buy more stock? This is the difference between stock investing and stock trading. There isn’t a right option, but stock trading requires regularly attending to your account, researching, and actively trading.

If you’re still considering whether or not stock trading is right for you, you may be interested in an online stock broker that offers paper trading. Some online brokers — as well as online tools — offer the opportunity to track a stock portfolio, without actually investing dollars.

What other services do brokers offer?

While a broker’s main job is to help you access financial markets, many offer services beyond filling buy and sell orders. Managing money can be complex, requiring additional services to help you simplify the task. Sometimes these services are generally free — automated portfolio analysis tools, for example — while others come with a fee.

About our ranking

Please see the full list of brokers below that were considered for this review. The ones that were included in this best-of ranking were those that received the highest overall score when considering all aspects of their offerings, with trading fees, account minimums, investment products and account fees weighed most heavily.

All brokers considered:

Ally Invest
Charles Schwab
Fidelity
Firstrade
Interactive Brokers
J.P. Morgan You Invest
Just2Trade
Lightspeed
Merrill Edge
Robinhood
E-Trade
eOption
SogoTrade
Stash
T. Rowe Price
TD Ameritrade
TradeStation
USAA Investments
Vanguard
Zacks Trade

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Joshua Rowe-Heupler
Joshua Rowe-Heupler |

Joshua Rowe-Heupler is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Joshua here

Anna Davies
Anna Davies |

Anna Davies is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Anna here