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The Most (And Least) Charitable Places in the U.S.

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

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In order to find the most charitable places in America, researchers analyzed data for the 100 largest metro areas.

Giving to charity is a good thing, generally speaking. Not only may you support a cause you care about, but it could help lower your tax burden if you itemize deductions.

However, despite these benefits, our researchers found that certain places in the U.S. are more charitable than others. They compared 2017 itemized tax returns and analyzed data for the 100 largest metro areas to determine which places in the U.S. were the most charitable.

Key findings

  • Ogden, Utah, is the most charitable place in the U.S., followed by Birmingham, Alabama and Memphis.
  • In Birmingham, more than 89% of tax returns itemized deduction donations to charity.
  • Southern metro areas tended to be the most charitable. Seven of the top 10 most charitable places are in the South.
  • Religious centers tended to be more charitable than non-religious. The religious South and Utah tended to be the more charitable, while the less-religious Northeast tended to score the worst in our metrics. One obvious explanation for this is that church donations are tax-deductible for people who itemize.
  • Springfield, Massachusetts was the least charitable metro area in the study. People itemizing their tax returns there gave just 2% of their income.
  • Springfield’s neighbors were also stingy when it came to giving to charity. Worcester came in second-to-last. Here, tax returns with itemized deductions showed an average of 1.8% of income donated to charity.
  • The poorest who gave to charity tended to be the most generous, although the poorest tended to donate the least often, a fact that has not changed over time. According to 2016 data, Americans who earned at least $1 but less than $10,000 donated 14% of their income on average, though just 58.5% of them had charitable deductions.
  • The rich are more likely to have charitable deductions but tend to give a smaller portion of their income.

Rankings: The most charitable U.S. metro areas

This map shows how the 100 largest metro areas in the U.S. ranked according to the percentage of people who took charitable donation deductions on their tax returns in 2017. Areas represented by a blue dot are the most charitable, while those represented with orange dots are the least charitable. Purple and red dots represent areas that fall in the middle of our rankings.
The most charitable metro areas are located in states that are known for being heavily religious — Utah and the Bible Belt in the Southeast. The Northeast tends to be less religious and is blanketed with metro areas that have low donation rates.

Utah is a standout state when it comes to charitable giving, with two metro areas in the top 10. Ogden claims the top spot, and Salt Lake City comes in sixth place. Most of the rest of the top 10 is made up of metro areas in the Southeast: Birmingham, Ala. (second), Memphis, Tenn. (third), Atlanta (fourth), and Augusta, Ga. (fifth).
Springfield, Mass., is at the very bottom of our list rankings, with Worcester, Mass., following in the 99th slot. The rest of the bottom five includes: Scranton, Penn. (98th), Allentown, Pa. (96th), and Providence, R.I. (95th). Portland, Ore., represents the west coast as the 97th least charitable metro area on the list.

How charitable Americans are at different income levels

The following graphic shows how rates of charitable giving differ at various income levels. Each blue bar shows the percentage of tax returns on which itemized charitable donations were claimed at each income level. Each purple bar shows the average percentage of one’s income those charitable donations make up in each income bracket.

Overall, 81.9% of people itemized charitable deductions on their tax returns, and those donations make up an average of 3.4% of their income. Those who make more money tend to give to charity more often. Of people making $200,000 or more per year, 91% claim charitable deductions, while only 58.5% of those making less than $10,000 do so.

It’s not those who make the most who give the biggest portion of their income to charity, though. Those who make less than $10,000 a year give the biggest portion of their earnings (14%). Americans who make $100,000 to $199,000 give the smallest proportion of their income at just 2.7%.

Changes in charitable giving by year

In order to determine how charitable Americans are over time, we looked at charitable donations over a 12-year span. The following graphic reveals charitable giving as a percentage of income across various income levels.

Overall, the average percentage of income that’s claimed as a charitable donation has remained at fairly consistent levels between the years of 2004 (3.6%) and 2016 (3.5%). It dipped to a low of 3% in 2008, in the midst of the Great Recession.

Lower income brackets tend to have more ups and downs in charitable giving. In 2004, those making $5,000 or less donated an average 19.4% of their income to charity. But in 2007 and 2012, that average dropped to 14.6%.

Those in the highest income bracket on the graph ($10 million or more) made a significant jump in charitable donations in the last two years we analyzed, with their charitable donations going from 7% to 9.1% of their income.

5 tips if you’re donating to charity

While your intentions to donate to charity may be purely altruistic, if you’re making them, you may as well get credit for them if you can. Here are five things to keep in mind when making charitable contributions:

  • Research charities before donating. Sites such as Charity Navigator and GuideStar provide information about charity missions, as well as how they operate and spend money.
  • Ask for verification of an organization’s tax status before donating. In order for your donation to be tax deductible, it must be made to an organization that qualifies under IRS guidelines as tax-exempt.
  • Remember: You can only claim charitable donations if you itemize your taxes. You won’t qualify for a deduction if you take the standard deduction. If your deductible expenses including charitable donations are greater than the standard exemption ($24,400 for married couples and $12,200 for single taxpayers in 2019) then itemizing can save you money. (If you’re unsure whether itemizing your taxes makes sense, you may need to seek out a pro.)
  • Request and keep your receipts. While you don’t need to submit them with your tax return, if you ever get audited, you want to have them on hand.
  • Keep these two dates in mind. Remember that even though taxes must be filed by April 15 each year, charitable deductions must be made by the end of the calendar year (December 31) in order to be claimed on your taxes for that year.

Methodology

In order to find the most charitable places in the U.S., researchers analyzed data for the 100 largest metro areas. Specifically, we compared them across the following three categories:

  • Percent of itemized returns with charitable donations. Data comes from the IRS and is for the 2017 filing year.
  • Percent of adjusted gross income given to charity. This is the total deducted amount from charitable donations divided by total adjusted gross income for itemized returns. Data comes from the IRS and is for the 2017 filing year.
  • Average itemized charitable donation. This is the total amount donated to charity divided by the number of returns deducting charitable donations. Data comes from the IRS and is for the 2017 filing year.

We then created a score averaging the three percentile ranks each metro scored in each metric. Each metric was given the same weight. For the over-time data, we looked at the percent of adjusted gross income given to charity for each income bracket from 2004 to 2016.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Julie Ryan Evans
Julie Ryan Evans |

Julie Ryan Evans is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Julie here

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These States Spend the Most on Weddings

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

wedding cost study
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Weddings are notoriously expensive. Combine that bill with the costs of other aspects of adulthood — student loans, a mortgage, child rearing — it’s no surprise that the average age of first marriage is on the rise for both men and women (27.8 years for women and 29.8 for men in 2018), as reported by the U.S. Census Bureau. While many factors affect the cost of a wedding, where you live is a major one. Due to differences in costs of living and local incomes, the average wedding price tag is significantly higher in some states than it is in others.

Below, we analyze wedding cost data, marriage length data, household income data and divorce rates to find the states spending the most on their weddings. Read on to find out how your state fares when it comes to celebrating nuptials.

Key findings

  • New York couples spend the most on weddings. The average wedding in the Empire State costs about $34,300 or just under 53% of the state’s average income.
  • Vermont takes second when it comes to wedding spending. The average couple there can expect their wedding to cost over 52% of one year’s income.
  • Pennsylvania takes third, with our data showing the average couple spending just over $28,800 on their wedding. That’s over 48% of the statewide household income.
  • Regionally, the northeast spends the most on weddings. In addition to New York, Vermont, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts and New Jersey are all in the top 10. New Hampshire falls just short of the top 10, coming in at 11.
  • Southern states spend the least proportionally on weddings. Four of the bottom five states that spend the least on weddings relative to income are in the south. Kentucky, Alabama, Tennessee and Mississippi all spend between 35% and 36% of household income on weddings on average. While these states tend to rank near the bottom in terms of income, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau, they also spend much less on weddings. Those four states spend an average of $17,100 on weddings. The top four states spend nearly double that amount.
  • Weddings in Hawaii are the most expensive at nearly $38,000 on average, followed by New Jersey at $37,000 and Washington D.C. at $36,000. Though due to income differences, the relative cost of those weddings varied.

Which states spend more for weddings

The Northeast clearly leads in this category, with a few states on the west coast also ranking high. In general, the southern states tend to spend the least amount on weddings proportionately to their incomes.

When it comes to wedding spending, it’s New Yorkers who spend the most in proportion to their income. The average cost of a wedding in NY is $34,315, while the average median household income is $64,894 — meaning an average of 52.9% of a couple’s annual income is spent on their wedding.

While the cost of weddings themselves is most expensive in Hawaii — an average of $37,827 per wedding is spent — the Aloha State comes in at No. 4 when it comes to the proportion of their income they spend (48.6%). Vermont, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island round out the top five in wedding spending relative to income.

Average wedding costs by age

It’s not only where a couple lives that tends to affect the price of their wedding but also the age at which they get married that shows a strong correlation. The following graphic shows how much on average people spend on first-marriage weddings by age. As you can see, in general, the older people are, the more they tend to spend on weddings.

For example, in a state like Idaho where the median age of marriage is 26.7, the average wedding cost is $19,925, whereas in Massachusetts, with a median marriage age of 31.2, the average wedding cost rings in at $35,966.

Median age and duration of marriage by state

Another interesting factor to consider when putting a type of cost “value” on marriage is to look at how long marriages last and how one’s age affects that.

The following chart shows how the median age of each state’s residents compares to the average length of their marriage. For example, in Washington, D.C., the median age of residents is relatively young (34) and the average length of marriage is estimated to be 10.6 years, whereas in Maine the median age is 44.6, with the average length of marriage coming in at 22.6 years.

It’s important to note, however, that the Census Bureau collects this data by asking people how long their current marriage has lasted. This means the data only tracks currently successful marriages and doesn’t entirely factor in divorces, and people who were married, divorced and then remarried would then lower the average length of the marriage.

Annual cost of a marriage by state

Much like a down payment on a home, weddings often come with expensive upfront costs, but those costs serve as an investment in something that can potentially carry long-term value — your marriage. While determining that value on emotional level will be unique to every couple, it’s fascinating to look at just how that upfront investment fares in financial sense over the years.

The following map shows which states get the biggest bang for their buck, so to speak, when it comes to money spent on their weddings. For each state, it shows how much on average a couple would pay annually if they spread out the cost of their wedding over the life of their marriage. Those states with the lightest shades pony up the least amount, and those with darker shades pay more.

The best “value” is in Michigan, where the cost of a wedding is an average of 1.8% of a couple’s income over the course of their marriage.

On the other end of the spectrum is Washington, D.C. (not shown on map), which has the most expensive marriages. The average current marriage in D.C. is chugging along at roughly 11 years strong, meaning the average price of a wedding there — $36,082 — spread out over the life of the marriage costs about $3,400 per year or roughly 4.1% of a couple’s annual income.

Should you take out a personal loan for your wedding?

Ideally, you should avoid taking out debt for your wedding. There are countless ways to save when it comes to weddings, such as skipping a wedding planner for a do-it-yourself event and making economical food and beverage choices.

Unfortunately, many couples find themselves cash-strapped and unable to fully fund their wedding. In these cases, a personal loan may be helpful for minimizing the cost of borrowing, assuming you have strong credit.

While the terms of a personal loan will depend largely on your financial situation, they may offer a lower-interest way to pay for your big day than, say, a credit card. Borrowers with less-than-perfect credit, though, may find they don’t qualify for good rates, if at all. In these cases, you may consider borrowing from friends or considering a secured loan, which requires collateral but may offer lower rates.

If you decide to finance part of the wedding, make sure you know exactly how much the loan will cost over the life of the loan and have a plan to pay it off in a timely manner to avoid racking up interest charges. As much as you want your marriage to last for many years to come, the opposite should be the case with interest charges.

Methodology

In order to rank the states that spend the most on weddings, we looked at data on three factors for all 50 states plus Washington D.C. Specifically, we looked at the following three metrics:

  • Cost of wedding. Data comes from theweddingreport.com and is for 2018.
  • Median household income. Data comes from the U.S. Census Bureau and is for 2017.
  • Median marriage length. Data comes from the U.S. Census Bureau and is for 2017.

To create the final rankings, we divided wedding costs by median household income. This gave us wedding costs as a percent of household income. We also amortized the cost of a wedding over the marriage length and then divided by household income to create another ranking.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Julie Ryan Evans
Julie Ryan Evans |

Julie Ryan Evans is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Julie here

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Prosper Personal Loan Review

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

APR

6.95%
To
35.99%

Credit Req.

640

Minimum Credit Score

Terms

36 or 60

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Origination Fee

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For example, a three-year $10,000 loan with a Prosper Rating of AA would have an interest rate of 5.31% and a 2.41% origination fee for an annual percentage rate (APR) of 6.95% APR. You would receive $9,759 and make 36 scheduled monthly payments of $301.10. A five-year $10,000 loan with a Prosper Rating of A would have an interest rate of 8.39% and a 5.00% origination fee with a 10.59% APR. You would receive $9,500 and make 60 scheduled monthly payments of $204.64. Origination fees vary between 2.41%-5%. APRs through Prosper range from 6.95% (AA) to 35.99% (HR) for first-time borrowers, with the lowest rates for the most creditworthy borrowers. Eligibility for loans up to $40,000 depends on the information provided by the applicant in the application form. Eligibility is not guaranteed, and requires that a sufficient number of investors commit funds to your account and that you meet credit and other conditions. Refer to Borrower Registration Agreement for details and all terms and conditions. All loans made by WebBank, member FDIC.

Prosper personal loan details
 

Fees and penalties

  • Terms: 36 or 60 months
  • APR range: 6.95% to 35.99%
  • Loan amounts: $2,000 to $40,000
  • Time to funding: On average, borrowers can see funds deposited in their bank accounts within a week of starting the loan review process. However, investors will have up to 14 days to fund loans.
  • Hard pull/soft pull: Prosper does a Soft Pull on your credit when you check your rates.
    Origination fee: Origination fees range from 2.41% - 5.00% and will be deducted from the final loan amount.
  • Prepayment fee: Prosper has no prepayment penalties for paying your loan off early.
  • Late payment fee: You will be assessed a late fee of $15 or 5% of your unpaid monthly amount — whichever is greater — if you have not paid in full within 15 days of your due date.
  • Other fees: Prosper charges a check processing fee — the lesser of $5 or 5% of your monthly payment — as well as an insufficient funds fee of $15 for each returned or failed payment.

Eligibility requirements

  • Minimum credit score: 640
  • Minimum credit history: Borrowers must have at least three open trades on their credit reports; fewer than five credit inquiries over the last six months; and no filed bankruptcies within the last year.
  • Maximum debt-to-income ratio: A borrower’s DTI must be below 50%.

In addition, borrowers must:

  • Be 18 years of age
  • Have a bank account and a Social Security number
  • Report an income greater than $0 and debt-to-income ratio of less than 50%

Prosper is not available to borrowers in Iowa or West Virginia.

Applying for a personal loan from Prosper

To apply for a loan through Prosper, start by filling out their online form to check your rates, which will trigger a Soft Pull on your credit — this does not impact your score. You’ll have to provide some personal information, including your physical address, birthdate, email, annual income, monthly housing cost and employment status. You can also apply via phone at 877-611-8801.

Your loan offer is based on your Prosper Rating, a proprietary score assigned to you when you apply. This score indicates the level of risk you pose to lenders and is intended to create consistency in the evaluation and approval process. An AA rating indicates the lowest estimated annual loss (up to 1.99%), while an HR rating represents the highest (15% or more).

If you choose to accept the offer you receive, you can submit documents for verification via email to [email protected], or upload them within your Prosper account; the latter is recommended. Log in to check the status of your documents, application and the percentage of funding you’ve received. Once you accept an offer and request funding, Prosper will perform a hard inquiry on your credit.

Your loan will be listed for up to 14 days, during which investors commit funds, and Prosper completes the underwriting and verification process. The latter usually takes seven business days or less.

Once your loan application has been approved and your listing is funded, you can expect to see your money deposited in your bank account within 1 to 3 business days. However, if your loan is not funded after 14 days, your listing will be canceled and you’ll need to create a new one.

Pros and cons of a Prosper personal loan

Pros:

Cons:

  • Qualify with lower credit. Prosper's minimum credit score is , though the best rates are offered to those with excellent credit. Borrowers can receive funds in as little as one business day after loan approval.
  • Check rates with a Soft Pull. Your credit won’t be affected when you check your interest rates with Prosper.
  • No prepayment penalties. Prosper offers longer terms of three and five years, but you won’t be penalized if you are able to pay your loan down early.
  • The origination fee. Prosper charges 2.41% - 5.00% to originate your loan, so consider whether this added cost makes sense for you.
  • Potential to go unfunded. Investors have to commit to your loan within 14 days of listing. If this doesn’t happen, you will have to create a new listing, which means more time before you receive your funds.

Who’s the best fit for a personal loan through Prosper

If you have average credit, Prosper may be a good fit for you. However, you’re more likely to qualify for a better rate with a higher score — APRs at Prosper go up to 35.99%, which is higher than with lenders with similar credit requirements.

Prosper is also a good option for those who want to reduce their monthly payments and pay down their loans over a longer period of time. Terms are set at 36 or 60 months — and if your financial situation improves and you are able to pay more quickly, there are no penalties to do so.

Checking rates at Prosper doesn’t impact your credit, so there’s no harm in gathering this information and comparing it with competitors.

Prosper consumer reviews

Prosper has an A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau. On LendingTree, our parent company, customer reviews are generally positive, with a rating of 4.65 out of 5 stars on LendingTree.

Reviewers repeatedly praise the simple and efficient process of applying for a loan with Prosper, and say the company provides excellent customer service. One reviewer summed up the sentiments of most: “The application was quick and easy and I had the cash within days,” said Mark from Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania, adding that he was “very pleased with the ease of it all.”

Of those who left less-than-positive reviews, many reports primarily complained about the company’s high interest rates and fees.

Prosper FAQ

Propser is a peer-to-peer lending marketplace, which means it matches borrowers with investors. Borrowers can apply for a fixed-rate unsecured loan. Loan terms are for 36 or 60 months. You can get a loan for between $2,000 and $40,000.

Prosper rates each applicant and assigns you a proprietary score that indicates the level of risk you may pose to investors. The score is based on information you provide, including your credit score, and determines if you’ll be approved for a loan and, if so, the terms of that loan.

Your loan funds can be used for almost any purpose, including consolidating existing debt, paying for medical expenses, buying a vehicle and financing home-improvement projects.

Once you submit your application, the loan review process may take up to 14 days, though it’s usually completed in less than 7 days. Once your loan is approved, it can take 1 to 3 days to show up in your bank account, depending on your bank.

If you don’t qualify for a loan the first time you apply, you will receive notice as to why your application was rejected. You may reapply for another loan after 120 days.

If you can’t pay your bill within 15 days of the due date, your account will be considered delinquent and a late fee will be assessed. Bills that are more than 120 days overdue will be reported as “charge-offs,” which will negatively impact your credit score and prohibit you from borrowing from Prosper in the future.

Yes, if you’re able to, you may pay off your loan early with no prepayment penalty fee. You can see your pay-off amount and make additional payments by signing into your Prosper account.

Alternative personal loan options

Lending Club

APR

6.95%
To
35.89%

Credit Req.

Not Specified

Terms

36 or 60

months

Origination Fee

1.00% - 6.00%

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on LendingTree’s secure website

LendingClub is a great tool for borrowers that can offer competitive interest rates and approvals for people with credit scores as low as 0.... Read More

Like Prosper, LendingClub is a peer-to-peer lending platform funded by investors. The rates and terms are similar, and they won’t do a hard pull on your credit until after you’ve checked your rates and completed your application.

LendingClub is a good alternative if you don’t meet Prosper’s minimum credit score requirement — However, their minimum credit requirements are not specified. You will pay an origination fee of 1.00% - 6.00% of your loan amount.

There are no prepayment penalties. Expect to wait up to seven days to see your funds deposited. Loans aren’t available to residents of Iowa, Guam and Puerto Rico.

Upgrade

Upgrade
APR

5.99%
To
35.89%

Credit Req.

620

Minimum Credit Score

Terms

36 or 60

months

Origination Fee

1.50% - 6.00%

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on LendingTree’s secure website

Advertiser Disclosure

Upgrade is an online lender that offers fairly priced personal loans for a term of either 36 or 60 months.... Read More .


Personal loans made through Upgrade feature APRs of 5.99%-35.89%. All personal loans have a 1.5% to 6% origination fee, which is deducted from the loan proceeds. Lowest rates require Autopay and paying off a portion of existing debt directly. For example, if you receive a $10,000 loan with a 36-month term and a 17.98% APR (which includes a 14.32% yearly interest rate and a 5% one-time origination fee), you would receive $9,500 in your account and would have a required monthly payment of $343.33. Over the life of the loan, your payments would total $12,359.97. The APR on your loan may be higher or lower and your loan offers may not have multiple term lengths available. Actual rate depends on credit score, credit usage history, loan term, and other factors. Late payments or subsequent charges and fees may increase the cost of your fixed rate loan. There is no fee or penalty for repaying a loan early. Personal loans issued by WebBank, Member FDIC.

Upgrade is an online lending platform that offers similar personal loan rates, terms and fees. You can check your rates without impacting your credit — sign up for autopay and get a better rate.

Borrowers can get between $1,000 and $50,000 through Upgrade. The company claims most borrowers can expect to see their funds within four business days of approval.

Marcus by Goldman Sachs®

Marcus by Goldman Sachs®
APR

6.99%
To
28.99%

Credit Req.

Not specified

Terms

36 to 72

months

Origination Fee

No origination fee

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on LendingTree’s secure website

Advertiser Disclosure

Marcus by Goldman Sachs® offers personal loans for up to $40,000 for debt consolidation and credit consolidation. ... Read More


Your loan terms are not guaranteed and are subject to our verification of your identity and credit information. To obtain a loan, you must submit additional documentation including an application that may affect your credit score. Rates will vary based on many factors, such as your creditworthiness (for example, credit score and credit history) and the length of your loan (for example, rates for 36 month loans are generally lower than rates for 72 month loans).Your maximum loan amount may vary depending on your loan purpose, income and creditworthiness. Your verifiable income must support your ability to repay your loan. Marcus by Goldman Sachs is a brand of Goldman Sachs Bank USA and all loans are issued by Goldman Sachs Bank USA, Salt Lake City Branch. Applications are subject to additional terms and conditions. For New York residents, rates range from 6.99% to 24.99% APR.

Marcus by Goldman Sachs® offers a no-fee personal loan. Rates are also slightly more favorable than those offered through Prosper. Terms are for 36 to 72 months, which gives you more flexibility to pay over time.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Julie Ryan Evans
Julie Ryan Evans |

Julie Ryan Evans is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Julie here

Emily Long
Emily Long |

Emily Long is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Emily here

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