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Personal Loans

How to Protect Yourself from Personal Loan Scams

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

If you need some extra cash or want to pay off debt, taking out a personal loan can be a smart way to get the money you need. Personal loan interest rates can be lower than credit cards if you have decent credit and a personal loan can help you raise your credit score. In addition, there are dozens of online lenders to choose from, some of which offer an easy application process and funding in just one business day.

Along with the pros, of course, come cons. Personal loan scams are not uncommon, so it’s important to proceed with caution when vetting personal loan companies. Find out how to protect yourself from falling victim to fraud.

Warning signs of a personal loan scam

Personal loan scams typically come with at least one red flag that should signal something isn’t right. Jeramy E. Genaway, a financial advisor from Pittsburgh, Penn., shared these six warning signs of a personal loan scam:

1. Unsolicited loan offers

Traditionally, when you want a personal loan, you seek out a lender. Scammers, however, often turn the tables by approaching consumers with bogus offers.

“Oftentimes, personal loan scams start in a very similar manner as phishing — email — or phone scams,” Genaway said. “If you receive an email with an offer for a personal loan and the message contains spelling, punctuation or grammar errors, it can be an immediate red flag.”

2. Pressure to make a decision quickly

“If you receive a phone call with an offer for a personal loan and the caller is rushing you to make a quick decision or you ‘risk the offer being rescinded,’ it’s often a red flag as well,” Genaway said.

Taking out a personal loan is a big decision that you shouldn’t make quickly. Legitimate financial institutions want you to feel comfortable with your choice, so you’ll never be pressured to make a move before you’re ready.

3. Guaranteed approval

If you have no credit or a less-than-stellar credit score, a personal loan with a guaranteed approval is bound to catch your eye. Don’t get too excited though, because it’s likely too good to be true. Legitimate lenders never promise your application will be approved. Extending a personal loan is a risk, so trustworthy lenders always review background information on consumers before offering money. If you have poor credit, check out list of the best personal loans for bad credit here.

4. Money transfer requested prior to receiving the loan

When you take out a personal loan, you should be the one receiving the funds. If you’re asked to pay money out of your pocket for your loan, that’s a problem.

You should never make payments for a loan directly to an individual, according to the FTC. The agency also advises against using a wire transfer service or sending money orders to pay for a loan, because a legitimate lender wouldn’t make a request like that.

5. No credit check required

Beware if the lender loans money to those with a poor credit histories, Genaway said. If your credit is poor, a lender not interested in your creditworthiness might seem like a dream come true, but it’s likely a scam.

The FTC notes that advertisements containing wording such as “Bad credit? No problem” or “Get money fast,” are often telltale signs the lender is trying to swindle you. It might not be what you want to hear, but legitimate lenders typically verify credit information prior to approving a loan.

6. Hidden fees required to obtain the loan

Legitimate lenders are open and honest about any fees associated with your loan. If you’re immediately hit with charges before getting your funds, something isn’t right.

Application, appraisal and credit report fees are standard, but the lender usually deducts the fees from the amount you borrow. If a lender asks you to pay upfront fees for services like insurance, processing or paperwork, don’t move forward with it.

“It’s important to remain diligent in an uncertain situation where these red flags may be present,” Genaway said. “Most importantly, keep in mind, the scammer is not only trying to potentially obtain money from you, they could also be attempting to obtain personal information such as social security numbers, bank account numbers, address or any other confidential personal information, which could be used for fraudulent purposes.”

Is applying for a personal loan online safe?

The possibility of falling victim to a scam might make you hesitant to apply for a personal loan online, but it’s actually very safe if you exercise proper due diligence. Jeffrey Brown, a financial advisor in the St. Louis area, said applying for a personal loan online is common practice these days, but he advises consumers to do it the right way.

“People get panicked and they make poor decisions because they’re trying to deal with the short term, but they get themselves in trouble in the long term because they haven’t made a wise decision with their loan,” Brown said.

Genaway agreed that applying for a personal loan online is generally safe, thanks to technology advances.

“It has become almost commonplace to skip working directly with a banker or visiting a local branch in lieu of obtaining financing online,” Genaway said.

Consumers can identify potentially fraudulent websites a couple different ways, according to Genaway. First, make sure a lender’s site is secure — the URL on secure sites start with “https” — and look for a padlock symbol in the address bar on any page you’re asked to provide personal information.

“If the perceived lender’s website is not secure or does not have a padlock symbol, do not enter any additional information” said Genaway. “There is no reason a legitimate lender would not have a secure website, meaning the site you are on is unsecured and could potentially be a fraudulent website.”

Brown reiterated the importance of entering personal information only on a secured website, and also suggested checking with the Better Business Bureau to review the lender’s ratings.

What to look for when searching for a lender online

Beyond looking for a secure website, make sure the lender has a physical address.

“If there’s an address listed on the website, double check the address via your favorite online map service to see if there is a building there, and preferably, with their name on or around the building,” Genaway said. “Often times, fraudulent lenders will have addresses that are actually vacant lots or buildings that would not normally contain operating businesses.”
He also said online lenders are required to register in the states where they do business, so see if you can verify that the proper licenses are in place.

“The lender’s website should list any states in which it is allowed to conduct business, and if it doesn’t, the lender might be fraudulent,” Genaway said.

He also advises researching a lender’s online reviews and ratings to learn more about other customers’ experiences.

Brown emphasized the importance of researching the lender you’re dealing with, and recommended covering all the bases by specifically searching for unfavorable information on the lender. Do a Google search and include the lender’s name and key terms associated with a negative personal loan experience.

What if you’ve been scammed?

If you’re conned into a personal loan scam, Genaway said to contact your local police department. He also advised reporting it to your State Consumer Protection Office and the Federal Bureau of Investigation Internet Crime Complaint Center.

Speaking up promptly can help authorities catch the scammer quickly. The faster they’re shut down, the less time they’ll have to target innocent consumers.

Where to find the best personal loans online

Shopping around is the key to locating the best personal loans online. LendingTree, which owns MagnifyMoney, has a personal loan comparison tool that connects dozens of reputable lenders with consumers in need of financing. By completing one online form, you could receive multiple personal loan offers in a matter of minutes. This is an easy way to find lenders you can trust, without your credit taking a hit — LendingTree performs a soft credit pull that won’t impact your score. Find your loan today with our table below.

LendingTree
APR

5.99%
To
35.99%

Credit Req.

Minimum 500 FICO

Minimum Credit Score

Terms

24 to 60

months

Origination Fee

Varies

SEE OFFERS Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website

LendingTree is our parent company

LendingTree is our parent company. LendingTree is unique in that you may be able to compare up to five personal loan offers within minutes. Everything is done online and you may be pre-qualified by lenders without impacting your credit score. LendingTree is not a lender.

When you do it correctly, finding a personal loan online is a safe way to get a competitive rate. Now that you’ve learned about personal loan scams, be on the lookout for red flags. In some cases, they’ll be obvious, but sometimes the signals are harder to spot. Always trust your instincts and never proceed with a lender that doesn’t feel quite right.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Laura Woods
Laura Woods |

Laura Woods is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Laura here

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Personal Loans

Personal Loans vs. Payday Loans: What’s the Difference?

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Disclosure : By clicking “See Offers” you’ll be directed to our parent company, LendingTree. You may or may not be matched with the specific lender you clicked on, but up to five different lenders based on your creditworthiness.

personal loans and payday loans
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If you need cash in a pinch to pay a medical bill, fund an urgent home repair or keep food on the table while between jobs, you might consider taking out a loan. This can be a good way to get the money you need — and fast — but the type of loan you choose is important. The terms attached to the loan can have a significant impact on your finances, so before signing any papers, it’s important to know exactly what you’re getting into.

Here’s a look at the difference between personal loans and payday loans to help you make an informed decision.

Personal loan vs. payday loan

 Personal LoanPayday Loan

What is it?

An unsecured loan that typically comes with a fixed
interest rate and a term of one to five years

A loan obtained by paying a borrowing fee that usually needs to be repaid in two weeks

Typical interest rates*

Interest rates range from about 6% to 35%

Many states have laws limiting fees to $10 to $30 per $100 borrowed, but APRs can reach nearly 400%, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB)

Common eligibility requirements

Credit check, proof of income, bank account, identification

Proof of income, bank account, identification

Typical amount borrowed

$1,000 to $50,000

$500

*Loan and interest rate amounts vary by individual borrower and lender.

What are personal loans?

If you need money quickly, a personal loan could be the answer. Since this form of financing is unsecured, underwriting typically only takes a few days. And if you default, the lender cannot repossess your property. Most personal loans come with a fixed interest rate and a set payment schedule so that you always know exactly how much you owe each month.

Who should take out a personal loan?

Personal loans can be used for a variety of purposes, including debt consolidation, paying for a wedding, medical bills, car repairs or almost any other reason you need cash. But it’s important to use common sense since taking out a personal loan that doesn’t offer a long-term benefit — say, using a personal loan to buy a new wardrobe or pay for a vacation or lavish wedding — can set you back financially for years. Think of it this way: Making payments on a personal loan leaves less room in your budget to put money aside for the future or save for retirement.

If you’re trying to raise your credit score, a personal loan can also be a useful tool. Credit scoring systems consider installment debt preferable to revolving debt, such as credit cards. Your monthly payment activity will be reported to the three credit bureaus — Equifax, Experian and TransUnion — so making consistent, on-time payments will eventually boost your score.

How do personal loan rates and terms compare to other forms of borrowing?

Personal loans pose a greater risk to the lender than a loan that requires borrowers to provide a security deposit or collateral. So personal loans tend to come with higher interest rates than secured debt.

But your credit score is a factor in determining your interest rate, so if it’s high, you might be offered a low rate. You might also be charged an origination fee or other borrowing fees, so it’s always wise to shop around for the best personal loan offer.

Do note that personal loans typically come with lower interest rates than credit cards. Since most rates are fixed, they’re usually the better option when you need funding that you can’t pay off immediately.

Where can you get a personal loan?

Banks and credit unions offer personal loans, but don’t stop there. Cover all the bases by checking with online lenders, as many offer competitive rates and terms that can’t be beaten by traditional financial institutions. Comparison shopping is essential. One lender might offer better rates, but lower costs and fees at a different financial institution could make it a better choice.

You’ll likely be paying off your personal loan for one to five years, so take the time to find the right fit. If you go with the first offer you receive, you won’t know if you’re making the best choice for your unique situation.

The LendingTree online marketplace makes it easy to find the best personal loan for your needs. Complete a quick online form to connect with one of the largest lender networks in the country. This one-stop tool could allow you to receive offers from up to five lenders without impacting your credit score.



Compare Personal Loans

Note: LendingTree is a parent company of MagnifyMoney.

Personal loan pros

  • Unsecured personal loans require no collateral
  • Boost your credit score
  • Get the funds you need quickly
  • Good credit could score you a lower interest rate
  • Most are fixed-rate loans, making it easier to budget

Personal loan cons

  • Poor credit could cause your application to be denied
  • Approved borrowers with subprime credit might receive higher interest rates
  • Many come with origination or other borrowing fees
  • Interest rates are typically higher than secured loans
  • Payments could take away from other savings opportunities

What are payday loans?

As it sounds, a payday loan is typically a short-term, high-cost loan due on your next payday, according to the CFPB. Most payday loans are granted for sums of $500 or less, but they can vary in size. Many states have regulated the dollar amount of payday loans.

Most payday loans are based on the size of your paycheck. When you choose this type of financing, you either write the lender a postdated check for the full balance of the loan and the borrowing fee or authorize them to access the funds electronically from your bank account. In most cases, the loan will need to be repaid in two to four weeks, but if you still don’t have the money, most lenders will allow you to roll the loan over — which, if you’re not careful, can create a cycle of debt.

Who should take out a payday loan?

If you need money to tide you over until your next paycheck but your credit isn’t the best, you’ll likely be approved for a payday loan. Generally a quick and easy process, most payday lenders don’t run a credit check or otherwise dig into your financial history before granting the loan. The only things needed to get a payday loan are a bank account, steady income and a form of identification, making the barriers to approval notably low.

But just because payday loans are easy to get doesn’t mean they’re the right solution. Payday loans are considered a last resort. If you have bills to pay and nowhere else to get the money, payday lenders offer immediate access to cash, which makes them an attractive offer for borrowers with poor credit. But the high cost and short repayment period of this debt is a slippery slope. If you’re unable to make a payment, your debt could quickly balloon out of control.

How do payday loan rates and terms compare to other forms of borrowing?

The biggest drawback of payday loans is the costs associated with them. Fast and convenient financing comes at a high price that can add up very quickly. Both the fees and APR attached to a payday loan are notably higher than those charged for personal loans by traditional lenders.

Many states have laws in place limiting payday loan fees to a maximum of $10 to $30 for every $100 borrowed, according to the CFPB. A standard two-week payday loan with a $15 per $100 fee comes with an APR equivalent of nearly 400%. In comparison, the CFPB notes that APRs on credit cards typically range from about 12% to 30%.

Fees can add up fast during one payment cycle, but according to the CFPB, many borrowers ultimately roll over or refinance their loans. This adds a new round of charges to their total, making it even more difficult to catch up on payments.

In total, more than 4 in 5 payday loans are re-borrowed within a month, according to the CFPB. Most of the time, this occurs when payment for the loan is due or not too long afterward. Even worse, nearly 1 in 4 original payday loans are re-borrowed at least nine times, causing the borrower to pay more in fees than the actual loan balance.

The federal Military Lending Act offers special protections from payday loans to active-duty service members and their dependents, according to the CFPB. This includes a 36% cap on the Military Annual Percentage Rate and other restrictions on the fees that lenders can tack onto payday loans and other consumer loans.

Where can you get a payday loan?

Most payday loans are granted by check cashers, finance companies and other nonbank institutions. If permitted by your state’s laws, you might also be able to get a payday loan online.

It’s important to note that payday loans are not available in every state. Some states have outlawed this form of borrowing, and regulations in other states have caused payday lenders to decide not to do business there at all, according to the CFPB.

Payday loan pros

  • No credit check makes it easy to qualify
  • Upon approval, money is immediately distributed
  • Some lenders offer cash, prepaid debit cards or direct deposit
  • You might be able to roll the loan over if you can’t repay it immediately
  • Easy access to cash can ease the stress of financial woes

Payday loan cons

  • Loans are typically limited to $500 or less
  • Fees generally range from $10 to $30 for every $100 borrowed
  • APRs can reach nearly 400%
  • They’re not available in every state
  • Repeatedly rolling over payday loans can exceed the original loan balance

Which should you get?

If you need money right now, you’re probably ready to accept a loan from the first available source, but don’t act in haste. Take the time to weigh your options to make the best possible decision for you.

Get started by asking yourself these questions:

  • How much money do I need?
  • How quickly can I repay the loan?
  • Is my credit score attractive to lenders?

If you need a large amount of money — $1,000 to $50,000 — apply for a personal loan. Interest rates generally range from 5.99% to 35% and repayment terms are usually one to five years. This gives you the flexibility to negotiate a monthly payment that comfortably fits your budget. Even if your credit isn’t perfect, some lenders might be willing to work with you.

But if you have poor credit or otherwise can’t qualify for other loans, payday loans may be your only option. Before you borrow, be sure you can repay the loan at its due date, since APRs can reach almost 400%. The last thing you want is to have to roll your payday loan over, which could quickly cause the fees to exceed the original balance.

The bottom line

Being in desperate need of cash isn’t a good feeling. When you needed money yesterday, it’s easy to panic and go with the first available form of financing, but don’t make this mistake. Choosing the wrong type of loan for your situation can be detrimental to your finances for years to come.

Take the time to weigh the advantages and disadvantages of personal loans and payday loans, as applied to your unique circumstances. When you decide which option is best, comparison shop to make sure you get the best possible deal. Being savvy with your finances is a decision you’ll never regret.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Laura Woods
Laura Woods |

Laura Woods is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Laura here

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Pay Down My Debt

Debt Consolidation Loan Rates – What to Expect

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Disclosure : By clicking “See Offers” you’ll be directed to our parent company, LendingTree. You may or may not be matched with the specific lender you clicked on, but up to five different lenders based on your creditworthiness.

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A debt consolidation loan streamlines existing debts into one new loan. Most unsecured consumer debt can be consolidated, including credit cards, medical bills, utility bills, payday loans, student loans, taxes and bills sent to a collection agency. Having one monthly payment instead of several can make it easier to get your finances in order and could allow you to save money on interest fees. When shopping around, it’s essential to find a loan with a lower interest rate and better terms than the original debts.

Average debt consolidation interest rates by credit score

Credit rangeAverage interest rate

Excellent (700 & above)

10.84%

Good (640 - 699)

28.04%

Average (600 - 639)

38.83%

Poor (600 & Below)

40% and above
* These rates are based on LendingTree’s personal loans data ranging from $10,000 to $10,999 for March 2018 – August 2018

How are debt consolidation loan interest rates determined?

Paying down debt is hard work, but it’s even more challenging when you’re working against sky-high interest rates. Your credit score isn’t the only factor that plays into loan pricing, but it’s a big one. Generally speaking, the higher your credit score, the lower your interest rate.

On its website, credit bureau TransUnion explains that your credit score offers financial institutions a quick snapshot of your credit health. The manner in which scores are used is entirely up to the individual lender.

If your credit score isn’t great, don’t panic. Several other elements are also taken into consideration as part of the loan underwriting process, including:

Debt-to-income ratio

A key indicator of your financial fitness, your debt-to-income ratio allows financial institutions to weigh your current debt against your income. This helps lenders determine your ability to keep up with new loan payments. Your debt-to-income ratio is calculated by dividing the total sum of all your monthly obligations by your gross monthly income. According to guidelines set by Wells Fargo, a good debt-to-income ratio is 35% or less, a decent one falls into the 36% to 49% range and one that needs improvement is 50% or higher.

Alternative credit history

Your bill-paying habits can help or hinder your ability to get a good interest rate. It’s not uncommon for lenders to review your track record of paying noncredit accounts, such as rent, utilities and phone bill. Lenders, credit bureaus and credit scoring firms generally believe that the past is the greatest indicator of future behavior, so this data can provide telling insights.

Employment history

Loan repayment is expected to be funded by your income, so lenders want to verify your ability to hold a job. Some will dig deeper into your employment history than others. In many cases, a steady employment history will be enough, but some financial institutions prefer applicants who have worked for the same company for several years or at least have a long track record in their current industry.

How to get the lowest interest rate on a debt consolidation loan

Not all debt consolidation loans offer equal value, so it’s important to do your homework. All else equal, the lower the interest rate on your debt consolidation loan, the lower your monthly payment. You want to achieve financial freedom as quickly as possible, and much of that weighs on finding the most competitive interest rate.

Shopping around to compare multiple loan rates is a step you can’t afford to pass up, even if you have excellent credit. Each lender has its own criteria and pricing model, which can lead to major rate discrepancies. Limit your comparison shopping to lenders that perform a soft credit pull, so it doesn’t lower your credit score.

LendingTree, the parent company of MagnifyMoney, allows you to compare up to five lenders without affecting your credit score. Find the best debt consolidation loan for you today!

LendingTree
APR

5.99%
To
35.99%

Credit Req.

Minimum 500 FICO

Minimum Credit Score

Terms

24 to 60

months

Origination Fee

Varies

SEE OFFERS Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website

LendingTree is our parent company

LendingTree is our parent company. LendingTree is unique in that you may be able to compare up to five personal loan offers within minutes. Everything is done online and you may be pre-qualified by lenders without impacting your credit score. LendingTree is not a lender.

A low credit score won’t necessarily prevent you from getting a debt consolidation loan, but it could impact your ability to get a competitive rate. Most people have credit scores in the range of 600 to 750, according to Experian. For scores that fall within the 300 to 850 range, the consumer credit reporting agency cites a score of 700 or higher as good and 800 or higher as excellent.

The best way to get the lowest interest rate on a debt consolidation loan is to improve your credit score!

If your current credit score isn’t great, take measures to improve it. Payment history and credit utilization can make up to 70% of a credit score, according to Experian, so simply paying your bills on time and keeping your balances low can be a tremendous help. You can also help your score by only applying for new credit only when absolutely necessary and getting a head start at paying your loans off now, if possible.

Comparing more than just rates

Interest rates play a huge role in the total price of your debt consolidation loan, but they aren’t the only factor worth comparing. Taking out a new loan is a very big deal, so conduct plenty of research to make sure you’re entering into an agreement that sets you up for success.

Fees

Many lenders tack on additional costs that can cause you to end up paying more than you were before consolidating your payments. Read the fine print to see how much, if anything, you’ll be charged for late fees, origination fees (a fee charged for processing your loan) and prepayment penalties (an added cost for paying your loan off early).

User experience

Taking out a loan should be a relatively seamless process. There are a lot of lenders to choose from, so conducting research to see which financial institutions provide the best — and worst — user experience can save you a lot of headaches. Browse each bank’s website to review customer service contact options, read reviews and search social media to see what people are saying about your top choices.

Transparency

When your financial health is at stake, you need a lender you can trust. Unfortunately, some financial institutions make it difficult to find all the information you need to make an educated decision. This can cause you to inadvertently sign up for a misleading loan that doesn’t serve your best interests. If you can’t easily find the answers to any questions you may have about a debt consolidation loan, you may want to consider another lender.

Alternative options

A debt consolidation loan can be an effective way to get your finances in order, but it’s not the only option. Before applying for a loan, take a look at other alternatives to get a well-rounded look at every available route.

If the amount of debt you’re trying to pay off is relatively small and you have a great credit score, a balance transfer credit card might be a better choice. Many balance transfer credit cards offer a 0% APR for an introductory period of time, which could allow you to pay off your debt without accruing any additional interest. This can help you save a great deal of money, but there are a few things you should know first.

In most cases, the 0% APR interest rate is a limited-time promotion, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. If the rate rises, your monthly payment could also increase. The CFPB also notes that the company can raise your rate if you’re more than 60 days late on a payment. Additionally, you may have to pay a balance transfer fee, and if you also use the card to make purchases, the new charges may be subject to interest unless there’s also an introductory 0% APR for purchases.

If you own a home, you might also consider a home equity loan or a home equity line of credit, which will provide you with extra cash. Home equity loans come at a fixed rate, while home equity lines of credit have variable interest rates and follow a flexible repayment structure. Borrowing criteria vary by lender, but the amount of equity you have in your home will at least partially factor into the size of the loan you’re able to take out. More equity tends to equate to better terms.

The best rates are typically given to homeowners with a mortgage that totals less than 85% of the home’s value and a debt-to-income ratio of 45% or less. This can be a great way to consolidate debt, but do remember you can lose your home if you don’t keep up with payments.

Taking out a home equity loan could also require you to pay closing costs that can add up to hundreds or thousands of dollars, according to the CFPB. If the property declines in value, you could also run the risk of falling underwater on it. With that said, a home equity loan or a home equity line of credit could serve as an optimal way to pay off debt. As with any major financial decision, being well-informed will help you make the best choice for your unique situation.

Where to find the best debt consolidation loans

Shopping around and comparing personal loans for debt consolidation is essential, but you might not know where to start. Visiting the website of every lender that offers debt consolidation loans isn’t feasible, but LendingTree, the parent company of MagnifyMoney, has a one-stop tool that can recommend several debt consolidation loan offers.

Simply complete one online form, and LendingTree will run a soft credit pull that could match you with multiple loan offers. This is a convenient way to connect with multiple lenders in a matter of minutes. Participating lenders have a range of acceptance criteria, so you could find an attractive rate even if your credit score isn’t the best.


Compare debt consolidation loans and save money with the best rates you can find

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Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Laura Woods
Laura Woods |

Laura Woods is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Laura here

TAGS:

Get A Pre-Approved Personal Loan

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