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Best Business Checking Accounts

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If you’re starting a business, one of the first steps to take is opening a business checking account. Being able to make transactions and deposit funds is an essential component of actually doing business, after all.

Every business owner will need different things from their checking account, based on factors like how many transactions you make per month and what kind of minimum balance you can manage. However, these are the basic business checking account features you need to look for:

  • Low transaction fees
  • Low minimum opening deposit and minimum balance requirements
  • High interest rates
  • Access to physical bank branches
  • Extensive ATM network

Since finding the right account can be a chore, we’ve compiled a round-up of the best business checking accounts that are currently available. Every month, we review business checking account rates using data from another LendingTree company, DepositAccounts.com, a database of offerings at more than 17,100 banks and credit unions. We sorted the products by APY, then eliminated institutions that were not available nationwide and did not meet the five criteria above.

To make the cut, the account needed to have minimal fees, a minimum of 50 transactions per month and the option to waive monthly fees if certain requirements are met. While offering an APY wasn’t a requirement, it was taken into consideration when developing this list.

Best Business Checking Accounts of September 2020

Account NameMinimum Balance to Waive Monthly Fee Number of Transactions Per Month with No ChargeAPY

BlueVine Business Checking

N/A

Unlimited1.00%

Axos Bank Business Interest Checking

Average daily balance of $5,000

Up to 500.50%

Radius Bank Tailored Checking

Average monthly balance of $5,000

Unlimited0.10%

TIAA Bank Business Checking

Daily balance of $5,000

First 200 itemsNone

Chase Total Business Checking

Daily balance of $1,500

100 None

First Citizens Bank Basic Business Checking

None, but must enroll in paperless statements

Up to 175 itemsNone

Capital One Spark Business Unlimited Checking

Prior 30- or 90-day average account balance of $25,000

UnlimitedNone

nbkc Bank Business Account

N/A

UnlimitedNone

Bank of America Business Advantage Checking

Average monthly balance of $15,000

500None

PNC Bank Business Checking

Average monthly collected balance of $500

Up to 150 transactionsNone

BlueVine Business Checking

BlueVine Business Checking

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on BlueVine’s secure website

Internet-based BlueVine is currently offering the most competitive business checking account out there, with a generous APY and no fees. Currently, BlueVine’s Business Checking account doles out an APY of 1.00% if you maintain a balance over $1,000.

Customers of BlueVine’s Business Checking account will also enjoy the account’s minimal fee model, which features no monthly service fees, unlimited transactions with no monthly balance required, no ATM fees at MoneyPass ATMs nationwide and no NSF fees. BlueVine’s banking services are provided by The Bancorp Bank.

  • Transaction fees: Unlimited free transactions
  • Monthly fee: $0
  • ATM fees: None at MoneyPass ATMs nationwide
  • Number of physical branches: Online-based, with three U.S. branches

Axos Bank Business Interest Checking

Business Interest Checking

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on Axos Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

Axos Bank offers one of the few business checking accounts with minimal fees and a competitive APY, making it one of the best choices out there. Axos Bank’s Business Interest Checking account features an APY of 0.50% on account balances ranging from $0 to $5 million.

There is a $100 minimum required to open an account, and although the bank does charge a monthly maintenance fee of $10, you can waive the fee if you maintain a minimum average daily balance of $5,000. Other attractive features of the Axos Bank Business Interest Checking account are:

  • Transaction fees: Up to 50 items per month, $0.50 after that
  • Monthly fee: $10, can be we waived with minimum average daily balance of $5,000
  • ATM fees: Unlimited domestic reimbursements
  • Number of physical branches: Online only

Radius Bank Tailored Checking

Tailored Checking

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on Radius Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

Radius Bank is another online-only option that offers a great business checking account. Radius Bank’s Tailored Checking account features an APY of 0.10% on balances over $5,000. Like Axos, there is a $10 monthly maintenance fee, which can be waived if you maintain a minimum monthly balance of $5,000. There is a minimum deposit of $100 required to open an account, but no minimum balance requirement after that.

In addition to earning interest, other features of the Radius Bank Tailored Checking account worth noting are:

  • Transaction fees: Unlimited transactions
  • Monthly fee: $10, but can be waived with average monthly balance of $5,000
  • ATM fees: Unlimited ATM reimbursements, excluding international exchange fees)
  • Number of physical branches: One in Boston, otherwise it’s all online

TIAA Bank Business Checking

Small Business Checking - 1st Year Intro Rate

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on TIAA Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

TIAA Bank offers a number of business checking accounts, ranging from options geared specifically to small businesses, to others tailored for non-profits. The standard Business Checking account is a solid product that ticks a number of boxes for a great, low-fee account. It’s worth noting that there’s a minimum deposit of $1,500 required to open an account, relatively higher than other business checking accounts out there.

It’s worth noting that there’s a minimum deposit of $1,500 required to open an account, relatively higher than other business checking accounts out there. Other business checking accounts offered by TIAA Bank that are worth exploring, depending on your business’s needs, include the Small Business Checking account, which is made for sole proprietors and single owner LLCs and earns a modest APY, and the Business Analysis Checking account.

The TIAA Bank Business Checking account features the following:

  • Transaction fees: First 200 items per month, $0.25 each after that
  • Monthly fee: $14.95, but can be waived with balance of $5,000
  • ATM fees: $15 monthly ATM reimbursement (domestic)
  • Number of physical branches: 145

Chase Bank Total Business Checking

Chase Total Checking

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on Chase Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

Chase Bank’s Total Business Checking account offers the confidence that comes with banking with one of the largest banks in the U.S., with its extensive branch network and deep bench of deposit and lending products. Chase charges a $15 monthly service fee for this account, but there are ways you can waive it or reduce it, including maintaining a daily balance of at least $1,500 or maintaining a linked Private Client or Sapphire Personal account.

Other standout features that come with the Chase Total Business Checking account include:

  • Transaction fees: 100 free transactions per month, $0.40 each after that.
  • Monthly fee: $15, can be waived if you maintain a daily balance of at least $1,500 or maintain a Private Client Checking account or Sapphire Personal Checking account; reduced to $12 when you’re enrolled in paperless statements
  • ATM fees: No fee for Chase ATMs
  • Number of physical branches: Nearly 5,000

First Citizens Basic Business Checking

Basic Business Checking

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on First Citizens Bank (NC)’s secure website

First Citizens Bank, which has a branch network sprawling across the Southeast and Southwest, and also offers online banking services. First Citizens promotes its Basic Business Checking account as a “favorite starter account” for businesses because of its simplicity and affordability. It’s one of the few banks on this list that doesn’t have any monthly maintenance fees, regardless of the account’s balance, as long as you opt out of paper statements.

With a low minimum deposit requirement of just $100 to open an account and no minimum balance requirements after that, it’s also one of the more accessible checking accounts for businesses that are not flush with cash from the get-go. While the First Citizens Basic Business Checking account doesn’t offer many bells and whistles, it’s a low-fee account with attractive features similar to those offered at big financial institutions:

  • Transaction fees: Up to 175 free transactions per month, $0.50 each after that
  • Monthly fee: None
  • ATM fees: Free access to First Citizens Bank ATMs
  • Number of physical branches: Over 500 branches in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Maryland, Missouri, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin and West Virginia.

Capital One Spark Business Unlimited Checking

Spark Business Unlimited Checking

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on Capital One’s secure website

The standout feature of Capital One’s Spark Business Unlimited Checking account is its unlimited transactions, a relatively rare feature for business checking accounts at the other big banks.

The Spark Business Unlimited Checking account requires a pretty hefty balance to waive the monthly service fee of $35. Capital One, however, does offer free overdraft protection with a linked small business deposit account. Other noteworthy features offered by the Capital One Spark Business Unlimited Checking account include:

  • Transaction fees: Unlimited transactions
  • Monthly fee: $35, can be waived with prior 30- or 90-day average account balance of $25,000
  • ATM fees: Free access to 55,000 Allpoint ATMs
  • Number of physical branches: More than 400

nbkc bank Business Account

Business Account

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on nbkc bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

The nbkc bank Business Account is a no-frills business checking account with competitive incentives, including unlimited transactions. There is no minimum required to open an account, and with no minimum balance requirements, this is a checking account that’s especially accessible for businesses just starting out.

For those who want more from their nbkc bank Business Account services, the bank also offers add-on options for an additional cost, like the Desktop Deposit, which gives you unlimited deposits from your office and unlimited account support. Drawbacks of the nbkc bank Business account include only having a handful of physical bank branches in Kansas and Missouri. However, nbkc primarily presents itself as an online-only bank.

Other standout features of the nbkc bank Business account include:

  • Transaction fees: Unlimited transactions
  • Monthly fee: None
  • ATM fees: Free access to 34,000 MoneyPass ATMs and up to $12 monthly refunds for any ATM’s fees
  • Number of physical branches: 4 total in Kansas and Missouri (it positions itself as an online bank)

Bank of America Business Advantage Checking

 Business Advantage Checking

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on Bank Of America’s secure website

Bank of America (BoA) offers a number of business checking accounts, but its Business Advantage Checking account in particular has a number of competitive features. This account does have a relatively steep monthly fee of $29.95, but it gives you several options to avoid that fee. There is a minimum deposit of $100 required to open the account.

One perk worth highlighting is that you’ll also receive an additional Business Advantage Checking account and an additional Business Advantage Savings account at no extra charge, as well as a $300 credit to new, eligible business credit cards if you make at least $3,000 in new purchases within the first 90 days.

Other standout features of the Bank of America Business Advantage Checking account include:

  • Transaction fees: Up to 500 free transactions per month, $0.45 after that
  • Monthly fee: $29.95, which can be waived in several ways, including maintaining an average monthly balance of at least $15,000, maintaining a combined average monthly balance in linked BoA accounts of $35,000, or spending $2,500 in net new purchases on a BoA business credit card
  • ATM fees: Free access to Bank of America ATMs
  • Number of physical branches: Over 4,000

PNC Bank Business Checking

Business Checking Plus

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on PNC Bank’s secure website

PNC Bank’s Business Checking account is great for budding businesses interested in the checking essentials with minimal fees. There is a minimum deposit of just $100 required to open an account, and the $10 monthly maintenance fee is waived by meeting certain requirements, including maintaining an average, monthly collected balance of just $500.

There are drawbacks of the PNC Bank Business Checking account, though. PNC itself has a relatively nonexistent footprint in the Western region of the U.S., so if you live in that region and want the convenience of a bank with brick-and-mortar locations, you’ll want to take that into consideration.

Other noteworthy features of the PNC Bank Business Checking account are:

  • Transaction fees: Up to 150 free transactions monthly, $0.50 each after that
  • Monthly fee: $10, waived if you maintain a balance of $500, use a linked PNC business credit card to make a minimum of $500 in eligible purchases or Maintain a linked PNC Merchant Services account and generate a minimum of $500 in qualifying monthly processing deposits
  • ATM fees: Free access to 18,000 PNC and partner ATMs, two reimbursements per statement cycle of non-PNC Bank ATM fees
  • Number of physical branches: 2,300 in Alabama, Delaware, Washington, DC, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin

Business checking accounts vs. personal checking accounts

At first glance, business checking accounts versus personal checking accounts might seem fairly similar. But if you take a closer look, you can understand the key differences. While every account has its differing features, personal checking accounts usually have:

Meanwhile, business checking accounts often have:

  • Monthly service fees or minimum balance requirements to waive them
  • Lower APYs
  • Extra fees for actions ranging from having an excess of transactions to depositing cash
  • More documentation required to open an account
  • The option to order employee debit cards

Why you need a business checking account

If you’re a business owner, you might be wondering why you even have to open a checking account separate from your personal one. After all, personal checking accounts tend to have lower fees, higher APYs and better features. Why not just skip opening one and — when it comes to your checking accounts — mix business with pleasure?

There are several reasons why you should keep your work and personal checking accounts from co-mingling. First and foremost: If you operate your business as a legal entity that is separate from you – say, as an LLC – you’re legally required to keep your personal and business finances separate. Opening a business checking account is the simplest way to do that.

Another reason why you need a checking account for your business is to protect yourself. If you have structured your business entity as a corporation or an LLC, and you have a separate checking account for your business, you and other shareholders’ personal assets are not likely to be seized for damages your company is obligated to pay when filing for bankruptcy.

Benefits of a business checking account

There are a number of other benefits associated with maintaining a business checking account, aside from the obvious ones of following the law and protecting your personal assets. Those benefits can include:

  • Keeping your business records organized. This will make it easier to track your business’s profitability and assess its performance.
  • Simplifying your taxes. By keeping your personal and business checking accounts separate, it will be easier for you to file your taxes accurately and avoid penalties from the IRS. Also, it will make it easier for you to deduct business expenses from your taxes.
  • Being able to accept credit cards as a form of payment, either by setting up a merchant system or credit acceptance system.
  • Being able to allow your employees to use the business checking account.

What you need to open a business checking account

When opening a business checking account, you need more than just a spiffy company name and logo. You’ll typically be required to present the following documents:

  • Employee Identification Number (or Social Security number if it’s a sole proprietorship)
  • Your business’s formation documents
  • Ownership agreements
  • Business license

Opening a business checking account might be one of the first, big business decisions you will make as an entrepreneur. Make sure it’s an informed decision: Do your research, come with questions and be confident about the account you are opening before signing on the dotted line.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

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Mortgage

How to Recover From Missed Mortgage Payments

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It may not have been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

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understanding good faith estimate vs loan estimate
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Can you bounce back from a missed mortgage payment or two? The answer is yes, but there’s work involved. After all, your payment history has the greatest impact in determining your credit score.

Falling behind on your mortgage payments can affect your credit and finances, and you could lose your home to foreclosure. It’s critical to be proactive and not wait until it’s too late to get help.

How missed mortgage payments affect your credit

In most cases, mortgage lenders give you a 15-day grace period before charging a fee — often around 5% of the principal and interest portion of your monthly payment — for late payments. But your credit history typically isn’t impacted until you’re at least 30 days behind on a mortgage payment. At this point, your mortgage servicer may report your late mortgage payment to the three major credit reporting bureaus: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion.

Your credit score could drop by 60 to 110 points after a late mortgage payment, depending on where your score started, according to FICO research. Being 90 days late on your loan could lower your score by another 20 points or more.

It can take up to three years to fully recover from a credit score drop after being a month behind on your mortgage, FICO’s research found. Once you’re three months behind on your mortgage, that time can increase to seven years.

Recovering from missed mortgage payments

Falling behind on your mortgage can be a frustrating and scary experience, particularly if you’re facing the threat of foreclosure. Here are some options to help you get back on track after missed mortgage payments:

  • Repayment plan. Your loan servicer agrees to let you spread out your late mortgage payments over the next several months to bring your loan current. When your upcoming payments are due, you’d also pay a portion of the past-due amount until you catch up.
  • Forbearance. Your servicer temporarily reduces or suspends your monthly mortgage payments for a set amount of time. Once the mortgage forbearance period ends, you’ll repay what’s owed by one of three ways: in a lump sum, a repayment plan or by modifying your loan.
  • Modification. A loan modification changes your loan’s original terms by extending your repayment term, lowering your mortgage interest rate or switching you from an adjustable-rate to a fixed-rate mortgage. The goal is to reduce your monthly payment to a more affordable amount.

Be proactive about getting back on track and reaching out to your lender for help instead of waiting until you get late payment notices. If you think you’ll be behind soon or are already a few days behind, make contact now and review your options.

Extra help for homeowners affected by COVID-19

If you’re behind on mortgage payments because of a financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic, you may qualify for a mortgage relief program through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act.

Homeowners who have federally backed mortgages, and conventional loans owned by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, can request mortgage forbearance for up to 180 days. They can also request an extension for up to an additional 180 days.

Federally backed mortgages include loans insured by the:

  • Federal Housing Administration (FHA)
  • U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
  • U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

Reach out to your mortgage servicer to request forbearance. Even if your loan isn’t backed by a federal government entity, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, your servicer may offer payment relief options. You can find your servicer’s contact information on your most recent mortgage statement.

How many mortgage payments can you miss before foreclosure?

Your lender can begin the foreclosure process as soon as you’re two months behind on your mortgage, though it typically won’t start until you’re at least 120 days late, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Still, it’s best to check your local foreclosure laws since they vary by state.

Here’s a timeline of how missed mortgage payments can lead to foreclosure.

30 days late

Your lender or servicer reports a late mortgage payment to the credit bureaus once you’re 30 days behind. Your servicer will also directly contact you no later than 36 days after you’re behind to discuss getting current.

45 days late

You’ll receive a notice of default that gives you a deadline — which must be at least 30 days after the notice date — to pay the past-due amount. If you miss that deadline, your servicer can demand that you repay your outstanding mortgage balance, plus interest, in full.

Your mortgage servicer will also assign a team member to work with you on foreclosure prevention options. This information will be communicated to you in writing.

60 days late

Once you’re 60 days late, expect more mortgage late fees, as you’ve missed two payments. Your servicer will send you another notice by the 36th day after the second missed payment. This same process applies for every month you’re behind.

90 days late

At 90 days late, your servicer may send you a letter telling you to bring your mortgage current within 30 days, or face foreclosure. You’ll likely be charged a third late fee.

120 days late

The foreclosure process typically begins after the 120th day you’re behind. If you live in a state with judicial foreclosures, your loan servicer’s attorney will file a foreclosure lawsuit with your county court to resell the home and recoup the money you owe. The process may speed up in nonjudicial foreclosure states, because your lender doesn’t have to sue to repossess your home.

You’re notified in writing about the sale and given a move-out deadline. There’s still a chance you can keep your home if you pay the amount owed, along with any applicable legal fees, before the foreclosure sale date.

Can you get late mortgage payment forgiveness?

If you’ve otherwise had a good payment history but now have one missed mortgage payment, you could try writing a goodwill adjustment letter to request that your servicer erase the late payment information from your credit reports.

Your letter should include:

  • Your name
  • Your account number
  • Your contact information
  • A callout of your good payment history prior to missing a payment
  • An explanation of what led to the late mortgage payment
  • The steps you’re taking to prevent late payments in the future

End the letter by requesting that your servicer remove the late payment from your credit reports, and thank your servicer for their consideration. Print, sign and mail your letter to your servicer’s address.

The letter is simply a request; your servicer isn’t required to grant late mortgage payment forgiveness. If your servicer agrees to remove the late payment info from your credit reports, your credit scores may eventually increase — so long as you continue to make on-time payments.

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Best of

Top Checking Accounts With No Overdraft Fees

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It may not have been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Written By

Reviewed By

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.