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How to Get a Car Loan with Bad Credit

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

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Have bad credit? Not to worry, there are plenty of opportunities to get an auto loan, even with a less-than-stellar credit history. Finding a reputable lender offering good terms can be tricky, though. With a low credit score, you’ll likely pay a higher interest rate and there could be extra fees. Here’s what you need to know about choosing a car loan when you have bad credit.

How to tell if you have bad credit

If you’ve applied for credit cards or a loan and been denied, there may be a problem with your credit. A subprime credit score generally falls below 669, according to the credit reporting bureau, Experian. With a FICO score below this level you may not be eligible for credit products with the lowest interest rates and fees.

The FICO credit score ranges are as follows:

  • 800-850: Excellent
  • 740-799: Very Good
  • 670-739: Good
  • 580-669: Fair
  • 300-559: Poor

Every lender has its own approval criteria. There are many factors in addition to your FICO score that go into the loan approval process, including debt-to-income ratio, your employment status, and whether you have an established relationship with the lending institution where you are applying for the loan.

If you have bad credit there are a variety of outcomes that could happen when you apply for an auto loan:

  • Your application may be denied. If you are denied for credit, the lender has to provide you notice in writing that explains the reasons for the denial. Federal law entitles you to a free copy of the credit report the lender used to make their decision.
  • The lender may require you to provide a large down payment or get a cosigner to be approved for an auto loan.

It’s important to know your rights if you think you have bad credit. You are entitled to a free copy of your credit report from each of the three major credit reporting agencies once every 12 months. Visit annualcreditrreport.com to see what’s in your credit file. If you have accounts in collections, judgments, repossessions, foreclosures, or late payments, your credit suffers.

What you may not know is that lenders from different industries use different versions of your credit score to assess your creditworthiness. Auto lenders, in particular, pay special attention to your payment history on other auto loans.

Auto lenders look at your FICO Auto Scores which are different from your simple FICO score. It begins with your base FICO score. This is the score that you see when you check your credit.

In addition to the base score, auto lenders also look at how likely you are to pay back an auto loan, based on your previous vehicle debt history. The FICO Auto Score gives lenders information like:

  • Late payments on previous or current auto loans
  • Repossessed vehicles
  • Personal bankruptcy that included car loans
  • Collections on auto loans
  • Auto loans or leases you have paid off and settled

FICO Auto scores range from around 250-900.

Unfortunately, your free credit report doesn’t provide FICO credit scores that auto lenders use to determine whether they’ll approve your application. For access to FICO Auto Scores, you’ll need to purchase a different report called the FICO Auto Scores for $59.85. You should choose FICO Auto Score options 2,4,5,8, or 9 to get a clear idea of what auto lenders see on your report.

Types of auto financing loans for those with bad credit

Most car buyers require some sort of financing to purchase a vehicle. Before shopping for a car, carefully explore your options for financing so you can get the best possible interest rate and terms.

Credit unions and banks: Most banks can offer you a preapproval without being a member there, but you’ll need to be a member of most credit unions to get preapproved for a loan. If you are already a member or have a relationship with a bank, check with them to find out if they offer auto loans for bad credit. They may have programs to help their credit-challenged customers and since you already have a relationship there, they may be able to help you find a better deal. You can also comparison shop rates at other banks and credit unions. You can check out a list of recommended auto loans and banks, here.

Lenders that offer financing for those with bad credit include USAA and Navy Federal Credit Union. Capital One and Exeter Finance offer subprime loans as well.

Dealers: Many dealerships work with car shoppers who have less-than-great credit. It’s smart to go into a dealership’s finance and insurance (F&I) office armed with other financing options so you can negotiate the best possible loan terms. Talk with the F&I manager about manufacturer incentives, discounts, and rebates that could help lower the price of the vehicle.

Finance specialists at car dealerships may inflate the value of a vehicle to help subprime borrowers get approved. They also may add percentage points to the interest rate offered by the financing company in exchange for a kickback of part of that extra profit. This is known as a “markup.” While it’s technically legal, it’s a grey area and you should pay close attention if you think that a dealer is marking up your rates or value. It’s important to seek preapproval and research financing options separate from a dealership to maximize your options. Negotiating the terms of your loan is just as important as negotiating the price of your car.

Online lenders: Shopping around online can be a good way to find a better auto loan rate when you have bad credit. Be sure to limit the timeframe to less than one month, though. Each time a lender pulls your credit they can choose to do a hard or soft inquiry. Hard inquiries can lower your credit rating further while soft inquiries do not. There are many online lenders specializing in auto loans for bad credit, so pay close attention to the fine print to get the best deal and protect your credit.

Online lenders like RoadLoans offer loans for subprime borrowers.

Subprime auto financing companies: Be especially cautious when exploring this option. This type of lender may offer to finance 125% of the car’s market value, meaning borrowers will immediately owe much more for their car than it’s worth. High-interest rates, prepayment penalties, and origination fees can drive the debt up even further. Subprime auto lenders like Westlake Financial offer these kinds of loans.

Use an auto loan calculator to determine how much money you can spend on a new or used car. It will help you incorporate important details like sales tax, title and registration fees, and your trade-in value.

Five tips for securing financing with bad credit:

  1. Preapproved loan: Getting preapproved for a car loan online will give you leverage at a car dealership and make shopping for your vehicle simpler. You’ll know your interest rate and terms and can determine whether you can afford the monthly payments plus ongoing costs of ownership like insurance, maintenance, and registration fees.
  2. Consider a cosigner: If you are sure you can afford the payments and you have a cosigner with good credit willing to take the risk of adding their name to your debt, you may have a chance of getting an auto loan with better terms by applying with a cosigner.
  3. Pay in cash or part cash/part credit: If you have the cash to buy a car outright, doing so could save you hundreds, if not thousands of dollars in fees and interest. Making a large down payment may also help you negotiate a better interest rate on your auto loan.
  4. Negotiate with the dealer: Once you get preapproved for an auto loan you can negotiate better loan terms with the dealer and get them to compete for your business. They may have some flexibility with the interest rate or terms of the loan, so bring your preapproval document and ask if they can match or beat that offer.
  5. Wait to buy and build your credit: If waiting is an option and you can put off purchasing a vehicle for a few months, do so. Bring past due accounts up to date and make all payments, on time, going forward. If possible, reduce your total credit utilization to below 30% of your total available credit across all of your cards to increase your credit score.

How to rebuild your credit

While bad credit won’t necessarily keep you from getting a car loan, you’ll pay less in fees and get a lower interest rate if you work to rebuild your credit before applying for an auto loan. There are certain things you can do even while you look for financing that will help you improve your credit scores.

Your payment history is a crucial part of your overall credit picture. Make sure you pay your credit card bills and make all loan payments on time every month. Over time, making every payment on time will improve your credit score.

Credit utilization ratio on revolving accounts is the percentage of available credit across all credit cards that you’ve used. According to MyFICO, this number determines 30% of your credit score.

Reducing your credit utilization ratio by paying down your credit card balances to less than 30% of your total available credit across all your revolving charge accounts will help your credit score in a shorter amount of time. Credit card companies typically report to the credit bureaus once each month, so it may take a few weeks for you to see your new lower balances reflected on your credit reports.

Check your credit. Get in the habit of getting your free credit reports from each agency and check them carefully for mistakes. Removing inaccuracies could help raise your FICO scores.

Register for Experian Boost to see if your bank participates in this program. You may be able to raise your Experian credit scores by allowing the credit reporting bureau to access information about your payment history with utilities, rent and your phone bill.

Consider a secured credit card. If you need to build a positive payment history, consider getting a secured credit card. This type of credit card works to help people who don’t have a credit history or who have had past credit problems build a positive payment history with the credit bureaus. Applicants are required to provide collateral in the form of a cash deposit. The credit limit of the card equals the amount of the deposit. The card works just like a regular credit card. Secured cards charge interest on purchases, like any other credit card.

Look for one that doesn’t charge an annual fee and transitions to an unsecured account automatically after a set amount of time when you make all payments before their due date. With a good payment history, the bank may increase your credit limit on a secured card without requiring an additional deposit.

The Capital One® Secured Mastercard® has a low refundable security deposit of $49, $99, or $200. The DCU Visa® Platinum Secured Credit Card has a lower APR than most secured cards at 13.75% Variable.

Make on-time payments. After you get auto financing, be sure to make every auto loan payment before the due date. This will help you avoid late fees and penalties and it will boost your credit scores over time, making it easier for you to get approved for low interest and low fee credit products in the future. This type of loan will also help add diversity to your credit file, which helps boost your credit scores.

What is the best auto financing option for you?

Unfortunately, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all answer for auto financing when you have bad credit. While credit challenges don’t typically prevent someone with a steady income from getting financing, it’s crucial to consider the total price of the car including financing costs to determine whether you can afford to buy a new or used vehicle, or whether you can afford the lease payment on the car you want.

Use an auto loan calculator to help evaluate various scenarios. Proceed with caution. Not every bad credit auto financing offer is in the best interests of the borrower. In fact, many drive consumers with credit problems deeper into debt and cause further harm to their credit scores.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Rachel Morey
Rachel Morey |

Rachel Morey is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Rachel here

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Exeter Finance Auto Loan Review

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

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For subprime borrowers, there’s a lot of uncertainty when it’s time to get a car loan. Although borrowers with bad credit may be able to get financing for their car, they generally have to pay higher interest rates, make larger down payments or add a cosigner to get the loan they need. Those with a history of late payments, judgements, defaults or repossessions also could have a difficult time finding a lender.

Exeter Finance is one option for subprime borrowers. It works directly with franchised dealerships, so the application process starts in the finance and insurance (F&I) office. If you’re trying to decide if Exeter Finance is right for you, here’s what you need to know.

About Exeter Finance

Exeter Finance, based in Irving, Texas, is a 13-year-old company that specializes in offering subprime loans to credit-challenged customers. The company offers new and used car loans through franchised dealers to those with credit scores as low as 575.

Loans are only available through F&I departments located inside car dealerships that have a relationship with Exeter Finance; you can’t apply for a loan directly through Exeter. However, Exeter is available in participating franchised dealerships in every state in the U.S. except Hawaii.

Exeter: At a glance

If you are looking at Exeter Finance, here are some key points to keep in mind so you can better compare it against other options:

  • Loan amounts start at $6,000
  • Terms vary according to financial information and credit scores, but APRs can be as low as 5% and as high as 29%
  • Loans terms can be as long as 72 months (six years)

Exeter can finance both new and used cars, though you must go through a dealership to apply. Exeter does not refinance current car loans.

How to apply for financing

Exeter Finance provides subprime auto loans through the dealerships it works with. If a borrower has a low credit score, they may be able to get a car loan through a subprime lender like Exeter.

Subprime auto lenders require the same type of personal information to qualify an applicant as other mainstream lenders like banks and credit unions. The F&I department at the dealership typically collects the following information:

  • Legal name
  • Date of birth
  • Social Security number
  • Current and former address
  • Current and previous employers
  • Income sources
  • Total gross monthly income
  • Current debt obligations

To make the process faster, when it’s time to apply for dealer-arranged financing, be sure to bring a government-issued photo ID (like a valid driver’s license or current passport) and recent pay stubs, 1099 forms and bank statements. Here’s a full list of the documents to bring when buying a car.

Additionally, the F&I department will get the applicant’s permission to conduct a hard pull on their credit report. Depending on how many new credit accounts you’ve opened recently and your recent number of credit inquiries, a hard pull on your credit may negatively affect your FICO credit score.

It’s smart to shop around for the best interest rate when you look for an auto loan. You can do so without worrying about the impact of multiple hard pulls to your credit because the FICO credit scoring model groups credit inquiries for auto financing within a 14-day window and counts them as one.

Another option is getting pre-approved for a loan separate from the dealership, which requires the same information and documents. Shopping around for the best possible terms on an auto loan before approaching a dealership may allow you to save money by paying a lower interest rate. You may also get better terms by applying for auto loans through an online marketplace.

Borrowers who choose to get pre-approved before they go car shopping can take their pre-approval documents with them to the dealership and ask the F&I department if it’s possible to get a better deal.

The fine print

Fees associated with taking out a car loan with Exeter Finance are not listed on its website. Like other subprime lenders, Exeter Finance may charge a loan origination fee and late fees, but does not charge a prepayment penalty. Borrowers should carefully review all charges and fees with the finance specialist at the car dealership before agreeing to use Exeter Finance to get a car loan. It’s crucial to understand the interest rate on the loan and make a note of the first payment due date.

As soon as possible after receiving approval, the borrower should create an account in Exeter Finance’s MyAccount online portal. This site offers 24/7 access to the company’s customer service department and also serves as an interface where customers can make their car payment using a checking or savings account, debit card or ATM card. Exeter Finance also offers a recurring payment option, which is an especially good choice for those trying to build good credit by making on-time payments. Paying bills on time is the biggest factor used by FICO to calculate credit scores.

Pros and cons of financing through Exeter

Exeter Finance is one option of hundreds for subprime borrowers. Shopping around outside of the dealership is an important part of making sure you secure the best possible deal on financing. For instance, many banks and credit unions offer credit builder programs or are willing to relax their FICO score standards if the borrower has a longstanding relationship with the business, has a cosigner with a solid credit history or can provide a larger-than-required down payment.

To get the best possible interest rate on an auto loan with bad credit, compare car loans before making a decision. It may be easier to simply accept the terms offered by a company that has a relationship with the dealership, but even a slightly lower interest rate means borrowers save money over the life of the loan. Car shoppers with credit challenges may have more options than they realize. Even though a subprime borrower is likely to pay between three and five times the prime loan interest rate, there’s a lot of competition among lenders.

Since Exeter Finance only works with dealerships, it’s important for car shoppers to understand that many dealerships make extra money on a car sale by charging a few extra points of interest on financing — for example, Exeter Finance may charge 8% interest, but the dealership could add 2% and offer the buyer an interest rate of 10%. According to consumer advocacy organization Center for Responsible Lending, dealers add an average of 2.47%, and it could be even higher for those with lower credit scores.

Just a few interest points could add up to a large sum of money. For example, a borrower with a $20,000 loan at 10% interest with a 72-month term will pay $6,677.16 in total interest throughout the life of the loan. At 8% interest, they would pay $5,247.98 in total interest over the same time period, saving $1,429.18.

Highlights of Exeter Finance’s auto loans

  • Credit-challenged borrowers with FICO scores as low as 575 may be able to get financing.
  • It is available through car dealerships in 49 states and Washington, D.C.
  • APR can start as low as 5%.
  • There is no prepayment penalty for paying off the loan early, which could save money on interest.
  • The interest accrual method is simple interest, which means borrowers only pay interest on the principal of the loan.
  • For those who can and will make every payment on time, financing a vehicle with this company helps build a good credit history, as they report to all three credit bureaus each month.
  • Participating in a free financial counseling program through the Exeter Finance website earns borrowers six free months of credit monitoring.

Lowlights of Exeter Finance’s auto loans

  • The information available on the company’s website does not disclose terms, interest rates or fees.
  • New and used car loans are not available outside of a dealership.
  • Refinancing an existing loan is not an option through Exeter Finance at this time.
  • If a borrower extends the term of their loan, they’ll also have to extend their GAP insurance, which could be expensive. GAP insurance does not automatically extend past the original term of the loan.
  • While Exeter Finance’s legal department posts thorough replies to customer complaints left on the Better Business Bureau (BBB) website, there are a total of 111 complaints in the past 12 months and 330 over the past three years. With 31 consumer reviews, the company has an average of less than 1.5 stars out of 5.
  • The company recently settled lawsuits in Delaware and Massachusetts where they were accused of facilitating unfair loans to subprime borrowers who did not have the ability to repay the debt.

The bottom line: Who is Exeter Finance’s auto loan best for?

Subprime borrowers who don’t want to get financing on their own through a credit union, bank or online lender may end up using Exeter Finance through the dealership where they buy their car. They may find it convenient to allow the F&I department of the dealership to handle the application process on their behalf. (Note that refinancing is not available through Exeter Finance if that’s what you’re looking for.)

If you have a higher FICO credit score, you should shop around for a better deal to avoid the higher interest rates typically associated with subprime loans like those offered by Exeter Finance. Additionally, if the dealership offers loan terms that stretch the limits of the borrower’s budget, it’s smart to look around for better interest rates and possibly reconsider the purchase.

The rates and fees mentioned in this article are accurate as of the date of publishing.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Rachel Morey
Rachel Morey |

Rachel Morey is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Rachel here

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Auto Loan

RoadLoans Auto Loan Review

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

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RoadLoans is a subsidiary of Santander Consumer USA that offers financing for new and used cars through dealers, as well as auto loan refinancing direct to applicants. When you’re comparing loan offers, you may want to consider initiating an online application with this company to see its offers.

About RoadLoans

The lender, based in Fort Worth, Texas, has been originating auto loans for consumers since 1997. You can apply on the company’s website, get prequalified, and shop for your next vehicle with financing in hand. Its pre-qualification is good for 30 days if you qualify for a loan. RoadLoans promises “instant” decisions, but it’s worth noting that checking rates with the lender will mean a hard credit inquiry. However, it should not impact your credit to complete multiple auto loan applications any more than it does to apply to one, as long as you do so within a two-week window.

Like most auto lenders, RoadLoans bases its decision about whether to approve your application and how much money it might be willing to lend you on your FICO credit score, your income level and whether you can verify your identity.  RoadLoans does consider applicants with bad credit, previous bankruptcies or no credit history.

If you’re approved, the funds may be available in as little as one business day. Preapproval lets you shop at various car dealerships as if you have cash in hand.

RoadLoans: At a glance

  • Loan amounts between $5,000 and $75,000. Minimum amounts are higher in certain states.
  • Not available in certain states including Alaska, Hawaii, New Hampshire, Mississippi and Nevada. There are further restrictions on states where cashback refinancing is available.

RoadLoans offers financing for new and used cars and two types of refinancing: the traditional method and what it calls cashback refinancing, when you refinance your auto loan for more than you owe. RoadLoans lists several advantages to cashback refinancing, like a cash sum up to $5,000 to be used to pay off other debt. However, there are several disadvantages, too — you could wind up “underwater” on your car, owing more than it is worth.

Notably, cashback refinancing is not available in Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Virginia or Washington, D.C.

Although RoadLoans says that it offers loans to consumers with credit issues, it does not list a minimum credit score or ranges for rates and terms on its website. “Bad” credit, in this case, may be scores around 600. However, the cost of credit for those with less-than-stellar credit scores may be high: the average APR for Santander loans, including those made through dealers, was 17.2% as of March 31, 2019.

Loan amounts range between $5,000 and $75,000, though minimum amounts are higher in Arizona ($10,001), California ($6,000) and Massachusetts ($6,001). If you decide to apply and RoadLoans approves you, its loan terms are included with the offer.

No matter the condition of your credit or your income level, it’s important to shop around to get the best possible interest rate and terms on your auto loan. Comparing rates from multiple lenders is the only way to know for sure that you aren’t paying unnecessarily high interest rates.

How to apply for financing

Applicants ages 18 years or older may apply online, free. A co-borrower is allowed, which may improve your chances of approval. RoadLoans will ask whether you’d like to purchase from a dealer, refinance your current auto loan or apply for a cashback refinance. The RoadLoans application requires your:

  • Email address
  • Full legal name
  • Phone number
  • Home address
  • Date of birth
  • Social Security number
  • Annual income
  • Any additional income you receive

RoadLoans does not offer refinancing to active-duty service members or their immediate family members.

The fine print

  • RoadLoans doesn’t work with every dealership.
  • Vehicles must meet certain eligibility criteria.
  • RoadLoans does not finance trailers, recreational vehicles, commercial vehicles or motorcycles.

RoadLoans offers fast decisions on an auto loan you could take to the dealership, but not any dealership. The company provides applicants with a list of preferred dealerships where they can choose a vehicle with a price that fits within the loan offer’s parameters. If you don’t see one in your area, you may use your preapproved loan at any franchised dealer, but not at an independent dealer unless it is part of RoadLoans’ network.

Vehicles must also fall within certain parameters. Vehicles to be financed must be nine years old or newer, have less than 120,000 miles, and have clean titles. Vehicles to be refinanced must be seven years or newer with fewer than 105,000 miles. You may only refinance auto loans from companies other than RoadLoans — RoadLoans won’t refinance its own loans.

Pros and cons of financing through RoadLoans

Every auto loan company has pros and cons that affect how appropriate it is for your specific situation. It’s important to research multiple companies and get multiple loan offers so you can compare your options and make sure you can get terms you are comfortable with, including a payment that fits into your budget.

Poor credit

It is possible to get a bad credit auto loan, even with a bankruptcy in your past. Lenders issued 379,100 auto loans to “subprime” car buyers with credit scores below 620 during the first quarter of 2019, according to Equifax. The average loan amount for these subprime accounts was $18,934 during January 2019.

Improved credit

If your credit has improved since taking out your original auto loan, refinancing may help you save money. You may be eligible for a lower interest rate, which will reduce the total amount you pay for your vehicle over the life of your loan so long as the term remains the same. You could also refinance for a longer loan term (hopefully at a lower interest rate) and also save money on your monthly payment, but the longer your term, the more you’ll pay overall in interest.

Here are some specifics about the pros and cons of financing a vehicle through RoadLoans:

Highlights of RoadLoans auto loans

  • No fees — There is no application or early payoff fee.
  • Preapproval — You can get preapproved for a loan before you go car shopping. There is no obligation to “activate” the loan. Pre-approval is good for 30 days.
  • All credit types welcome — RoadLoans may approve all types of credit, including subprime, those with no credit, and those who have been through bankruptcy.
  • Quick approval — “Instant” approval in many cases after filling out a one-page online application.
  • Delay a payment — Depending on how your loan payment due date falls on the calendar, you may be able to delay your first payment up to 60 days.

Lowlights of RoadLoans auto loans

  • Limited information — You must fill out an application in order to see rates and terms, which will involve a hard credit pull.
  • Limited dealerships — If you get approved, your offer will include a list of dealerships in your area that accept RoadLoans’ financing. Although there are 14,000 dealers in its network, you are restricted to shopping at these dealerships or a franchised dealer.
  • Poor reviews — Although the Better Business Bureau gives RoadLoans an A- rating, the lender only received 1 out of 5 stars based on 100 customer reviews.
  • Legal issues — Santander, RoadLoans’ parent company, has been cited for overcharging customers, including auto loan customers who had their vehicles repossessed. In November 2018, Santander settled for nearly $11.8 million in restitution and fees with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau after the agency said Santander improperly disclosed terms and conditions of its auto loan add-on product and loan extensions.

The bottom line: Who is a RoadLoans auto loan best for?

RoadLoans describes itself as a subprime lender that will finance consumers with bad credit, no credit, and those who have been through a bankruptcy. It take other factors into consideration like the value of the car, your down payment, whether you have a cosigner with good credit, and your income. This can help borrowers with credit challenges get approved.

Those with credit scores above the mid-600s may get a better deal at their local credit union or with a bank they already work with regularly. If you are shopping for a new car and you have good credit, you may get better terms by taking advantage of dealer incentives, rebates and financing offers.

The rates and fees mentioned in this article are accurate as of the date of publishing.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Rachel Morey
Rachel Morey |

Rachel Morey is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Rachel here

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