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Student Loan Forgiveness Programs for Doctors

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As a medical professional, you might have taken on a mountain of debt on your journey to becoming a doctor. The average indebted doctor left medical school in 2016 owing more than $189,000 in student loans, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Even if you’re on your way to a six-figure income, your residency income will likely be far less — in 2017, residents earned an average of just over $57,000. During that time, the interest alone on all your student loans could be equal to your entire disposable income after room and board.

Fortunately, there are student loan forgiveness programs for doctors and other medical professionals that could pay off part or even all of your loans. If you’re looking to cure yourself of medical school debt, turn to these programs for assistance.

National Health Service Corps (NHSC)

The National Health Service Corps can provide up to $50,000 to repay your health profession student loan in exchange for a two-year commitment to work at an NHSC site in a high-need, underserved area. After completing your initial service commitment, you can apply to extend your service and receive additional loan repayment assistance.

In order to qualify, you’ll need to work at least half-time in a designated Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA). Along with earning loan forgiveness, you could put your medical degree to good use by caring for an underserved community.

Indian Health Services Loan Repayment Program

This federal program offers up to $40,000 in exchange for two years of service in an American Indian or Alaskan Native community. You can also renew your contract and receive additional benefits that could pay off your entire student loan balance.

National Institutes of Health (NIH) Loan Repayment Program

If you work in medical research, you could qualify for $35,000 per year from the NIH Loan Repayment Program. To do so, you’ll need to conduct research at a non-profit organization in an eligible field, such as health disparities, contraception and infertility or pediatric medicine.

Students to Service Program

If you’re still in medical school, you can apply for a major award through the Students to Service Program. This program provides up to $120,000 to medical students who commit to providing primary health care at an approved site for three years after graduating.

Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program (PSLF)

The PSLF program is intended to encourage individuals to enter and continue to work full-time in public service jobs. You could receive forgiveness of the remaining balance of your federal direct loans after making 120 qualifying payments while employed by certain public service employers.

Since you’ll likely have to work for 10 years before you get loan forgiveness, you’ll have to move your student loans off the standard 10-year plan and onto an income-driven repayment or extended repayment plan — otherwise you’ll have already paid off your balance by the time you qualify for forgiveness.

You should also keep up to date with any developments around the PSLF program. While it was signed into law in 2007, the program is not guaranteed to be around forever, and it’s recently drawn controversy over the uncertainty around getting approved.

Military loan repayment programs

If you’re serving as a medical provider in the Army, Navy or Air Force, you could qualify for assistance toward your student loans. Here are some of the programs available for military personnel.

Financial Assistance Program (FAP)

The Army, Air Force and Navy all offer the FAP, a program that grants loan repayment assistance and a living stipend to medical residents.

If you’re a medical resident in the Army or Air Force, you could get at least $45,000 per year of service, plus a monthly stipend of at least $2,000. And although the Navy grant can change from year to year, Navy medical residents could also qualify for significant assistance from the Navy FAP.

Active Duty Health Professions Loan Repayment Program

This program offers up to $40,000 per year in student loan repayment over a set number of years. You must be a physician in the Army, Navy, or Air Force to qualify.

U.S. Navy Health Professions Loan Repayment Program (HPLRP)

The Health Professions Loan Repayment Program (HPLRP) provides medical personnel in the Navy with aid for their education loans. If you meet the program’s criteria, you could receive repayment assistance of up to $40,000 per year, minus about 25% in federal taxes.

State Loan Repayment Assistance Programs (LRAPs)

Many states also run programs that grant student loan repayment assistance in exchange for working in a high-need or underserved area. A good place to check the medical loan repayment and forgiveness programs available in your area is through the AAMC database.

Here are just two examples of the many state-specific programs:

  • The Arizona Loan Repayment Program offers up to $65,000 in exchange for a two-year commitment from physicians.
  • The Kansas State Loan Repayment Program offers up to $25,000 per year of contract toward your outstanding education debt. After completion of the initial two-year service obligation, you may be able to extend your contract in one-year increments.

Check with your state to find out if it has an LRAP for doctors, nurses or other medical professionals. Depending on where you live and work, you could qualify for significant assistance toward your student loans.

Do the math before committing to a loan forgiveness program

As you take a look at each loan forgiveness program, remember to weigh salary considerations against any amount you’d receive in student loan assistance. Opting for a job with a $75,000 salary to earn $25,000 in loan forgiveness wouldn’t be as lucrative as going after a job with a $200,000 salary and no loan forgiveness, for instance.

Unless you’re driven to work in a high-need area or with an underserved population, you might not benefit from sacrificing a high salary for the sake of qualifying for loan forgiveness. Consider your career goals and your wants and needs in a job.

Refinancing student loans can also help

Whether or not you’re working toward student loan forgiveness, you might also consider refinancing as a strategy for managing your debt. Through refinancing, you could reduce your interest rates and save money on your loans beyond whatever forgiveness you can get from these programs.

Because of their steady incomes, doctors tend to be especially strong candidates for student loan refinancing. Along with lowering your rate, you could choose new terms and adjust your monthly payments.

But refinancing with a private lender also means you’ll lose access to federal programs and repayment plans, so make sure you’re comfortable with this sacrifice before making any changes to your debt. If you decide refinancing is right for you — or simply want to learn more about the process — check out the best lenders to refinance student loans here.

Rebecca Safier contributed to this article.

Our Top Picks for Refinancing Student Loans

You can learn more about what these lenders have to offer by checking out the best options to refinance student loans here.

LenderTransparency ScoreTermsFixed APRVariable APRMax Loan Amount 
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2.99% - 6.28%*


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Citizens BankA+

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Discover Student LoansA+

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How to Find All Your Student Loans

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How to Find All Your Student Loans

Congratulations, you graduated college. Whether you graduated Summa Cum Laude or with the minimum GPA allowed by the university, well done either way you are a college graduate. As you begin to look for your first job, you start to realize that the student loans you took out to pay for tuition, room and board, spring break to Cabo, and the bar tabs throughout the years of school are coming due. The problem is you have no idea where they all are, the only memory you have of student loans is signing some piece of paper and picking up a check with your name on it on each semester. The bad news is, these student loans are not going away, the good news is we are going to help you find your student loans right now.

First off we need to know if you have a federal student loan or a private student loan. If you are not sure it’s a safe bet to start looking first for your Federal Student loan. If you are 100% sure you have a private loan and do not have any federal student loans to speak of, scroll down to the bottom of the article under Private Student Loan to find out more. If you have both Federal and Private student loans, I suggest you read the whole thing, I think you are going to need it.

Federal Student Loan

Start by going to the National Student Loan Data System, this can be found at https://www.nslds.ed.gov. This is a great resource and has all of your federal loans in one place. The federal government wants to know how much is owed so the website is all in order and relatively easy to use. According to the website, the National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS) is the U.S. Department of Education’s (ED’s) central database for student aid. NSLDS receives data from schools, guaranty agencies, the Direct Loan program, and other Department of ED programs. NSLDS Student Access provides a centralized, integrated view of Title IV loans and grants so that recipients of Title IV Aid can access and inquire about their Title IV loans and/or grant data.

Once at the website select the Financial Aid Review button to see what loans are currently outstanding.

Screen Shot 2015-06-03 at 12.55.43 PM

To do this you will need a Federal Student Aid or FSA username and password. This FSA ID will give you access to a number of different government websites including the following:

At this point in the process of finding your student loans you will need to create a FSA ID, it’s pretty simple and only requires a few items of personal information including your:

  • Social Security number
  • Date of Birth
  • First Name, Middle Initial, and Last Name

After this information is confirmed, you will be asked to enter your PIN, if you do not want to link your PIN to your FSA ID, then select CONTINUE WITHOUT PIN.  However according to the NSLDS Frequently Asked Questions:

Only PINs with a verified match with the Social Security Administration (SSA) will be allowed to associate their PIN with their FSA ID. By associating a verified PIN with your FSA ID, you do not have to go through the SSA match, which can take up to 1-3 days.

If you have a PIN, but it was not verified (meaning SSA did not have a good match), then you cannot associate that PIN with your FSA ID and your identifiers will be sent to SSA for verification.

You will have limited access to certain applications until your information is verified with the SSA.

Once we complete verification with the SSA (1-3 days), you will be able to use your FSA ID to access your personal information on Federal Student Aid websites.

NSLDS also gives an option to select Forgot Pin, this will bring you to a *Pin Challenge Question.  While this information may not seem familiar, you most likely have entered this information while filling out your FAFSA application. Once this challenge question is answered correctly the FSA ID application will continue allowing you to create a username and password.

Next up in the FSA ID application is 5 Challenge Questions and Answers that you will create to protect your account for extra security. The last two steps in the FSA ID application require you to verify and accept your information as correct, following this you will need to complete the email verification process by entering the secure code into the Secure Code field on your web page.

Congratulations, not only did you graduate college, you also set up a FSA ID to look at all of your student loans that you are going to pay back ASAP!

Once logged in you will be able to see the Aid Summary, which provides all the details you could have ever asked for including the:

  • Type of Loan
  • Loan Amount
  • Loan Date
  • Disbursed Amount
  • Canceled Amount
  • Outstanding Principal
  • Outstanding Interest

Each loan provides a hyperlink with more individual details for each loan including: Amounts and Dates, Disbursements and Dates, and Servicer/Lender/Guaranty Agency/ED Servicer Information, which is all the information you will need to get started making payments. All of your federal student loans will be in one place. Now you just have to figure out a way to pay them all.

[Check out details on forgiveness programs and income-based repayment programs.]

Private Student Loans

The problem that you will run into with private student loans is it’s more difficult to find out the loan servicer. The federal student loans have a national website dedicated to them, private student loans will need a little more hunting and gathering.

[We Recommend Reading: 7 Things You Need to Know About Private Student Loans]

The first place you can start is with your financial aid office at your college or university, they may be able to lead you in the right direction. Although if you have attended another university during your college career it might be a little more difficult going with this strategy.

The best way to find your student loan servicer is through your credit report. The credit report will have any outstanding debt under your Social Security number, which will include private and federal student loans.

The best thing you can do is check your credit reports at all three credit bureaus:  Experian, Transunion, and Equifax. You can obtain a free copy of your credit report from each of the credit bureaus once every 12 months, through www.annualcreditreport.com. This will not provide you with your credit score, but it will show you the information needed to find your private student loan provider and more.

Congratulations are in order if you followed the steps outlined here because you are on your way to locating your student loans and will be paying them off in no time. Good luck!

Interested in refinancing your student loans? Check out our comparison table

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The Dangers of Co-Signing a Loan

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ChexSystems Big

When you first step out into the real world it is hard to ignore the marketing of what you need or want in your new life. You’ll find advertisements for colleges, credit cards and which car to buy are about as normal as a McDonald’s advertisement. Because money is currently not growing on trees, you may need to borrow some to make life happen. If you have ever applied for a loan before you received your first job or while in college, the application may have asked for a co-applicant or co-signer. The two terms may sound similar, but the obligations of a co-signer and co-applicant are different.

In a co-applicant the individual is attempting to get a joint loan with someone else, an example would be obtaining a mortgage. In most cases when buying a home, both incomes will be needed to obtain the loan and will feature both names on the mortgage loan and deed.

A co-signer is usually brought on if the applicant lacks income or good credit or for that matter any credit at all. Assuming the co-signer’s credit history meets the lender’s requirements, the co-signer will act as a default if the borrower or individual receiving the loan does not make payments per the loan agreement. A co-signer is required if the bank is worried you may not pay back the loan. To reduce the risk it requires someone who has a good credit history, income, and demonstrated they have paid their bills on time. So that doesn’t sound so bad, where’s the danger?

Who’s Responsible?

Co-signers are common with student loans as an 18 year old rarely has built a strong credit report with a history of good behavior. Both the student borrower and the cosigner are equally responsible for paying back the loan. Some private student loans offer the student loan borrower the option to release the cosigner, but this is usually at the financial institutions discretion after a certain amount of consecutive monthly payments are made on time and the borrower/student has meet certain credit requirements.

Even in the event the borrower has reached the consecutive monthly payments made on time the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has received complaints that borrowers have experienced a challenge getting the co-signer released from a loan. One particular complaint noted that even after making the required 28-on time payments, and then finding out it was 36 on-time payments, to only be met with a policy change from the lender that requires 48 on-time payments before applying to release the co-signer.

Remember that co-signing a loan means the obligation is shown on your credit report and thus affects your credit score. So if little Johnny forgets a payment because he failed to set up automatic payments or is having trouble making the payments on time, then this also can negatively affect your credit score as the co-signer.

It’s also important to remember, if you co-sign for a $20,000 student loan during little Johnny’s freshman year in college, this loan has 4 years to grow and accumulate interest. If the borrower defaults on the payments, then you are responsible for paying back your new student loan.

What’s the Worst That Could Happen?

Any time you co-sign for a loan, it is in your best interest to consider that you are fully responsible for paying back the full amount of the loan, because in the eyes of the law and the financial institution you are. It could even be the case if the borrower passes away before repaying the debt.

In the unfortunate case the borrower passes away, Federal student loans are discharged after the death of the borrower.

Under the same circumstances with private loans, in many cases the co-signer is now fully responsible for the balance of the loan; this also works the other way as well if the co-signer passes away.

According to a April 2014 mid-year student loan update from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, from 2008 to 2011 there was a more than a 20% uptick in private loans being co-signed. In 2008 67% of private loans were co-signed often by a parent or grandparent, but by 2011, over 90% of loans were co-signed.

One scary highlight from the CFPB report found that borrowers  are discovering when a co-signer passes away, like a parent or grandparent, an automatic default occurs. This default can occur even if the borrower is in good standing and current on the loan. I’m sure you can imagine the confusion when borrowers received notices to pay the loan in full.

It never really occurred to me when I received my private student loan that if the borrower or co-signer of the loan were to pass away it could result in financial distress. If you are already in a private student loan with a co-signer, then it may be a good time to consider having life insurance on one another as a source of funds to pay off the loan in the event of a death.

Private Student Loans: My Story

I was accepted to study in Rome, Italy, but unfortunately I did not attempt to obtain anything more than Federal student loan funding for my study abroad trip, so I was forced to cancel. I told myself I would pursue my dream of studying in another country at any cost. I found a study abroad program in London and I was accepted. However I needed extra finances and more than the Federal government could spare. I started applying for private student loans, the university I planned to attend was a private university, which cost four times more than current in-state tuition. Because I did not have much of a credit score or any income to report, I asked my parents if they would co-sign to receive the funding I needed to study abroad.

After a short online application process with my parents, we were approved and the loan did exactly what I needed at the time; it helped pay for my tuition, room and board, and whatever other shenanigans London and the surrounding European countries had to offer. At that exact moment I could not have been happier, I was going to London and studying abroad in another country. But I didn’t focus on the fact my lender expected me to pay the loan back in full plus interest.

While I enjoyed my time in London, my private student loan put financial stress on myself and my parents. I never defaulted but I remember the pressure I felt to make sure it was never the financial responsibility of my parents. I couldn’t imagine putting my parents through a financial hardship all because I wanted to study abroad while I was in college. I made a commitment to pay off my private student loan first for a number of reasons, but most of all it was to make sure my family was not a story in the news that resulted in a son defaulting on a loan to only hurt my family’s financial situation.

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