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Guide to Mobile and Manufactured Home Refinancing

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

There are many reasons why someone might want to refinance a manufactured home, formerly known as a mobile home. For one, if you have more than 20% equity in your home, you may want to get rid of a pesky PMI requirement. For another, even though interest rates are rising, they’re still relatively low from a historical perspective. Depending on when you originally financed your manufactured home, you may want to take advantage of these low rates while they last.Whatever your reason, refinancing a manufactured home is a bit different than refinancing a traditional site-built home. Read on to get a sense of the options available and how the process works.

Refinancing a mobile home

Unfortunately, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a lender that’s willing to refinance a true mobile home. In the world of manufactured housing, the term “mobile home” is outdated. It refers to any manufactured home that was built before June 15, 1976.

On that date, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) released the National Mobile Home Construction and Safety Standards Act, a code that regulated the construction of manufactured housing. Mobile homes built before that date were entirely unregulated.

Today, in order to receive financing on a manufactured home, the vast majority of lenders require that the home be compliant with the HUD code. For its part, HUD will not issue stickers signifying compliance to any mobile home, even if modifications have been made to meet HUD standards.

Fannie Mae requirements for manufactured homes

Regardless of the type of loan you end up getting, there’s a high probability that it will eventually be sold to Fannie Mae, a government-sponsored enterprise that buys loans from mortgage lenders and sells them as mortgage-backed securities on the open market. In order for their loans to be eligible for resale in this manner, manufactured homes must meet the following criteria:

  • The home must be built after June 15, 1976 and must be in compliance with all HUD regulations
  • The home must display an HUD data plate and HUD certification label
  • The home must never have been moved from its original location
  • The home must be a one-unit dwelling and classified as real property
  • The dwelling must assume the characteristics of a site-built home, meaning that the towing hitch, wheels and axles must be removed
  • The borrower must own the land on which the manufactured home is placed, unless it is a condo or co-op
  • Multi-width manufactured homes may be located on either an individual lot or project development
  • Single-width manufactured homes must be located in a Fannie Mae–approved condo, co-op, or Planned Unit Development lot
  • The home must be at least 12-feet wide and have a minimum of 600 square feet
  • Site preparation for delivery must be completed
  • The home must be attached to a permanent foundation
  • The home must be permanently connected to a septic tank or sewage system and to other utilities
  • If the home is not situated on a publically-maintained street, then it must be situated on either a community-maintained or privately-maintained street
  • Homes that need extensive repairs or have incomplete renovations or additions are not eligible
  • Structural modifications must be inspected in order to be deemed eligible

Refinancing a manufactured home

When you go to refinance your manufactured home, there are a few different loan types you can choose from. Below is a list of the requirements for each. Read them over to get a sense of which type will ultimately work best for you.

Conventional

Conventional loans generally fall in line with Fannie Mae guidelines. In addition to the requirements listed above, Fannie Mae has the following guidelines specific to refinancing:

  • You’ll need at least 5% equity in the home, which means a 95% loan-to-value ratio (LTV)
  • Private mortgage insurance (PMI) is required if you have less than 20% equity in the property
  • The refi must meet the standard conventional loan limit of $484,350, or $726,525 in high-cost areas
  • Your credit score may need to be at least 620, though that requirement can vary by lender
  • Loan terms are available for up to 30 years

VA

The Department of Veterans Affairs guarantees two separate refinance loans for eligible veterans, active servicemembers and surviving spouses: an Interest Rate Reduction Refinance Loan, and a VA cash-out option. In general, a cash-out refinance is for homeowners who want to borrow a lump sum of cash from their home equity for a big expense such as home repairs or college tuition.

Both VA refinance loans must be made by approved lenders.

Interest Rate Reduction Refinance Loan

  • No credit underwriting package or appraisal is required
  • The closing costs can be rolled into the new loan
  • You may not receive cash back from this type of refinance
  • The VA does not set limits on how much money you can borrow
  • There is a VA funding fee of 0.5%, which increases to 1% if the manufactured home is not affixed to the land

VA Cash-Out Refinance

  • Can be used to refinance up to 95% of the property’s value
  • No PMI is required

FHA

FHA loan refinances are popular because these loans are insured by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). Since the lender has reassurance that it will be made whole if you default on the loan, it’s willing to take a bigger risk. As a result, FHA loans often have less strict qualifying requirements than other loan types.

FHA Cash-Out Refinance

  • Your credit score must be 580 or higher
  • Your debt-to-income ratio (DTI) cannot be more than 43%. (More about DTIs below.)
  • The maximum loan-to-value (LTV) ratio, the value of the loan divided by the property value, of allowed is 85%.
  • You must be current on mortgage payments for the last 12 months

FHA Streamline and FHA Simple Refinance

These two loan programs conform to the same criteria as a traditional FHA mortgage. This means that all the usual borrower requirements apply:

  • Your DTI cannot be more than 43%
  • If you have a credit score of 580 or higher, you can put as little as 3.5% down
  • If you have a credit score between 500 and 579, you must put at least 10% down
  • The home must be your primary residence
  • You must carry FHA mortgage insurance (MIP)
  • You must be able to provide proof of employment
  • The home must be in its original location (it cannot have been moved)

Required safety certification

As mentioned earlier, every manufactured home needs to be in compliance with HUD code. In order to comply, the home must pass a required safety inspection. The HUD Installation Certification and Verification Report requires inspectors to use a checklist covering the following areas:

  • Site location with respect to home design and construction
  • Consideration for site-specific conditions
  • Site preparation and grading for drainage
  • Foundation construction
  • Anchorage
  • Optional features (skirting, etc)
  • Completion of ductwork, plumbing and fuel supply systems
  • Completion of electrical systems
  • Exterior and interior close-up
  • Completion of operational checks and adjustments

What are the HUD tag and data plate?

In order to be considered compliant, each manufactured home has to have two pieces of documentation affixed to it: an HUD tag and a data plate.

The HUD tag, sometimes called the certification label, is a metal plate that is secured to the outside of the home. It’s approximately two inches by four inches and is etched with two separate numbers. There’s a three-digit number that identifies the primary inspection agency and a sequential six-digit number furnished by the label supplier.

“The dealer, the manufacturer, the title report all have this number so the home can be easily identified,” said Alberto Pina, co-founder of Braustin Mobile Homes in San Antonio, Texas.

The data plate is a paper label that can be found inside the home, usually inside a kitchen cabinet, the electrical panel or a bedroom closet. It shows a map of the United States and lists the wind zone, snow load and roof load of the home. It also includes the name and address of the manufacturing plant, and the serial number and model designation of the unit.

Be careful about additions to the home

If you’re looking to refinance, unfortunately, you can’t have made any permanent additions to the home that leans on or puts weight on the home. Those could stress the structure of the home. Any such addition that was added after the home received its safety certification can cause the home to fall out of compliance with the HUD code, rendering it ineligible for financing.

One possible exception, however, are decks and patios, which are regulated by states. If you’ve already added one, check your state’s requirements to see if you’re in compliance.

Property ownership requirements

“If you’re going with an FHA loan, the land has to be yours,” said Pina.

The same can be said for many conventional loans, which hold to many of the same, if not stricter, requirements. VA loans, however, are a different story.

With a VA loan, you have the option to finance just the manufactured home and not the land. With other loan types, you have to finance the home and the land it sits on. Additionally, VA says the only requirements for the property are that it be “safe, sanitary, and sound.”

Other lender requirements

No matter what type of loan you’re after, when you go to refinance your manufactured home, you’re going to be subject to some financial benchmarks. For the most part, these are similar to the ones you had to meet when you first applied for a mortgage:

  • Debt-to-income ratio: Your debt-to-income ratio (DTI) is the way that lenders measure your ability to pay back a loan. It’s determined by the sum of all your monthly debts divided by your gross monthly income. In general, 45% or less is considered an acceptable DTI for a refinance on all loans being sold to Fannie Mae.
  • Credit score: Generally, the acceptable credit score for a refinance will vary by lender. FHA loans tend to require a minimum credit score of 580, while conventional loans tend to follow the Fannie Mae guidelines and require a credit score of 620. VA loans, on the other hand, have no official minimum and leave that guideline up to the individual lender.
  • Proof of income: You’ll likely have to provide proof of income to prove that you have the ability to pay back the loan. Typically, this comes in the form of two years of W-2’s, or tax returns if you’re self-employed.
  • Loan-to-value ratio: In a refinance, your loan-to-value ratio (LTV) is the loan amount you’re asking for (usually the amount you have left to pay off on your mortgage) compared to the appraised value of your home.
    • FHA refinances require an LTV of no more than 85%.
    • Fannie Mae’s guidelines are 90%-95% for a limited cash-out refinance or 60%-65% for a standard cash-out refinance
    • The VA does not set limits on how much you can borrow.

Conclusion

Whether your goal is to save money by getting a better interest rate or to change the term of your mortgage, there are lots of options to choose from when you’re ready to refinance your loan on your manufactured home. Your best bet is to shop around and talk to a variety of lenders to see who can offer the loan that is the best fit for you.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Tara Mastroeni
Tara Mastroeni |

Tara Mastroeni is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Tara here

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Loan Options for Manufactured, Mobile and Modular Homes

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

According to the Manufactured Housing Institute, about 22 million people in the United States live in manufactured homes. With numbers like that, it doesn’t make sense that these homes are still so misunderstood.For example, many people think that manufactured homes, mobile homes and modular homes are one and the same, but that’s not true at all. There are key differences that set the three apart and affect financing options.

Read on to learn what these differences are so that you can find the right loan for you.

Manufactured, mobile and modular: What are the differences?

Manufactured homes

Manufactured homes are built in manufacturing plants and then taken to their plot of land via a permanent chassis that’s attached to the bottom of the home. They also are built in accordance to Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards, a safety code set by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, or HUD.

Mobile homes

“Mobile homes are manufactured homes, but the term is outdated,” said Alberto Pina, the co-founder of Braustin Mobile Homes in San Antonio, Texas.

“In 1976, the government decided to get involved in the regulation of mobile homes for people’s safety. That’s when the HUD Code — the National Mobile Home Construction and Safety Act — became effective. It’s also when mobile homes started being called manufactured homes.”

Modular homes

Like manufactured homes, modular homes are also partially constructed in a factory. However, they’re transported to the plot of land in pieces and then they’re put together on-site. Modular homes also have permanent foundations and, rather than conforming to a single HUD Code, they also have to meet he same local, state and regional building codes as traditional houses.

Financing a manufactured home

Retail installment contracts

Retail installment contracts are commonly used for manufactured homes and are slightly different from a traditional loan. In this case, rather than going to a bank or lender to get a loan for funding to buy your home, you would contract directly with the dealership from which you’re purchasing your home.

The retail installment contract is the official agreement stating that you agree to pay the dealer back over time, plus interest. However, afterward, the dealer is free to sell the contract to another lender or third party.

Title 1 loans provided by FHA-approved lenders

Title 1 loans are the Federal Housing Administration’s answer to manufactured homes. With this program, the FHA encourages approved lenders to lend to consumers by insuring the loan in case of default.

It’s used for used for the purchase (or refinancing) of a manufactured home, of a lot on which the manufactured home will be placed or a manufactured home and lot in combination, as long as the home is being used as a primary residence.

Depending on which option you choose, there will be different limits on your loan amount and loan term. They are as follows:
Maximum loan amount

  • Manufactured home only: $69,678
  • Manufactured home lot: $23,226
  • Manufactured home and lot: $92,904

Maximum loan term

  • 20 years for a loan on a manufactured home or on a single-section, or single-wide (the newer term for single-section) manufactured home and lot
  • 15 years for a manufactured home-lot loan
  • 25 years for a loan on a multi-section manufactured home and lot

Interestingly, Title 1 loans can also be used to buy a home that will be placed on a leased plot of land, provided that the initial lease term is at least three years and that the lease states that the homeowner will be given at least 180 days’ notice before the lease ends.

However, because the home is manufactured, it must meet certain requirements in addition to FHA’s normal qualifying standards. They are:

  • The home must be built after June 15, 1976
  • The red HUD label must be affixed to each section
  • Minimum size to be financed is 400 square feet
  • The home must be permanently affixed to a foundation that meets FHA standards
  • The home must meet the Model Manufactured Home Installation Standards
  • The lot where the manufactured home will be set must be designated or approved

“Buyers like this type of loan because it allows them to get a low interest rate and low down payment, as well as some of some of the sitework done, such as the base pad, skirting, decking and utilities and sewer system,” Pina said.

VA loans

If you’ve served in the military, you’re eligible for a loan through the Department of Veterans Affairs and, fortunately, you can use that benefit to buy a manufactured home. Qualifying for a VA loan for a manufactured home is much the same as using a VA loan to buy a conventional home. You’ll need to provide proof of your financials, as well as a Certificate of Eligibility, which verifies that you served.

However, some of the loan terms are different. For example, you cannot finance more than 95% of a manufactured home, even though you can finance up to 100% of a traditional home.

The term lengths that are offered for these loans are also different. They are as follows:

  • 15 years and 32 days for a lot purchase if you already own the home
  • 20 years and 32 days for a single-family manufactured home and lot
  • 23 years and 32 days for a double-wide manufactured home
  • 25 years and 32 days for a double-wide manufactured home and lot

Fannie Mae MH Advantage mortgage

The Fannie Mae MH Advantage program offers flexible underwriting standards and reduced pricing for manufactured homes that meet certain construction requirements. It’s a 30-year loan that allows borrowers to finance up to 97% of their loan-to-value (LTV) ratio.

As far as what requirements need to be met in order to qualify for the loan:

  • The home must be 12 feet wide and have at least 600 square feet
  • It must be built on a permanent chassis and be installed on a foundation
  • It must be titled as real estate
  • After being appraised, it must receive an “MH Advantage Sticker” that signifies that it has certain features similar to traditional homes

Single-wides, today more commonly referred to as single-section homes, are not accepted in the Fannie Mae MH Advantage program. If you were planning on buying one, or have a manufactured home that doesn’t otherwise meet the MH Advantage qualifying requirements, you can look into their standard manufactured housing program.

Chattel loans

Chattel loans are a common way to finance manufactured homes that sit on a leased lot. Because the land is leased, the home cannot be affixed to the ground, which makes it much harder to qualify for a traditional mortgage.

With a chattel loan, the manufactured home itself is treated as collateral for the loan. Initially, the lender will take ownership of the home. Then, once you finish paying it off in full, ownership is transferred to you.

Financing a mobile home

It would be difficult to get financing on a true mobile home, Pina warned.

Remember, the term “mobile home” refers to manufactured homes that were built before 1976, when the National Mobile Home Construction and Safety Act was released. The difficulty comes from the fact that the construction of these older homes was totally unregulated.

In order to receive financing, many lenders require that the mobile or manufactured home meets HUD’s standards. However, even if you make improvements to an older mobile home, HUD will not issue you a sticker signifying compliance.

“Fortunately,” Pina said, “you’re not buying one of these for more than $5,000 or $10,000, so the need to finance the purchase is rare.“

Financing a modular home

“Modular homes have the same loan options as what folks would call a traditional home,” Pina said. With that in mind, below are some of the most common options:

Construction-to-permanent loans

“Construction-to-permanent loans can be used In either manufactured or modular housing transactions,” Pina said.

Construction-to-permanent loans are unique in that they provide funds for the construction of the home upfront, but after construction on the home is completed, the balance is converted into a permanent loan, or traditional mortgage.

Traditional FHA loans

Because modular homes are secured to a concrete foundation, they’re eligible for a traditional FHA loan. This means that all the usual borrower requirements apply:

  • You must have a debt-to-income (DTI) ratio of less than or equal to 43%
  • If you have a credit score of 580 or higher, you can put as little as 3.5% down
  • If you have a credit score between 500 and 579, you must put at least 10% down
  • The home must be your primary residence
  • You must carry FHA mortgage insurance, or MIP
  • You must be able to provide proof of employment

Where to find a lender

Not all lenders work with manufactured or modular homes. But, luckily, there are many great tools at your disposal that can help you find the right lender. In particular:

  • HUD has a search tool that allows you to filter approved lenders by your area.
  • The Manufactured Housing Institute can provide you with a list of lenders and manufacturers in your state.
  • Fannie Mae also provides a list of suggested manufactured housing lenders.

Though the loan options for manufactured, mobile and modular housing are a bit different than they might be in a traditional housing scenario, qualifying for one is a small price to pay for the affordable living that these homes can provide.

If you’re interested in one of these homes, do your research. Look into some of the loan options above, talk to lenders that specialize in manufactured housing and get a few loan estimates. It won’t be long before you find the loan program that’s right for you.

This article contains links to LendingTree, our parent company.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Tara Mastroeni
Tara Mastroeni |

Tara Mastroeni is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Tara here

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How to Get the Best Rate on a Jumbo Loan Refinance

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Sometimes the typical limits on loan amounts may not be enough to allow you to buy or refinance your home — especially if you live in a high-cost area. In that case, you may need to apply for a jumbo loan.Jumbo loans can be harder to get than their traditional, conforming counterparts, but it’s far from impossible. Follow these tips to learn how to get the best rate on a jumbo loan refinance.

What is a jumbo mortgage?

In order to understand what a jumbo loan is, it first helps to understand how the conventional mortgage system works. Most residential mortgages in the U.S. are backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. These two government-sponsored enterprises buy mortgages from lenders, bundle the ones with similar terms together, and then sell them as mortgage-backed securities to Wall Street investors. More importantly, they guarantee that if a mortgage defaults, they’ll pay off the loan to investors.

Each year, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which oversees Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, sets maximum amounts for the loans that they agree to purchase from lenders. In general, most loans fall within these limits, so they’re known as “conforming loans.”

However, in some areas, where the cost of living is higher, the standard conforming loan limit may not provide sufficient funds to buy a home. In these cases, it’s possible to get a loan that exceeds these limits, though it will often cost more. These larger loans are known as “jumbo loans.”

In 2019, the standard conforming loan limit is $484,350, while the loan limit for high-cost areas like Hawaii and Alaska is $726,525.

When should you refinance a jumbo mortgage?

If you already have a jumbo mortgage, here are some reasons you might want to refinance it:

If you want a better interest rate

One of the main reasons to refinance is to get a better interest rate. Your interest rate closely affects how much you pay for your mortgage each month. A lower rate will mean lower payments.

The rates you’ll be offered are largely a consequence of current market conditions and your credit score. Now may be a good time to refinance if:

  • Current interest rates are much lower than they were when you first bought your home.
  • Your credit score has improved drastically since you applied for your mortgage.

The Federal Reserve raised the federal funds rate four times in 2018, and two or three more rate hikes are expected in 2019, according to Tendayi Kapfidze, chief economist for LendingTree, which owns MagnifyMoney.

Now is a good time to refinance, said Hillary Legrain, vice president of First Savings Mortgage Corporation in McLean, Va. “Because of the fluctuations in the stock market, rates are a lot lower than they were in the fall.”

If you need to cash out to cover expenses

Another reason to refinance is to tap into the equity of your home. Your home equity is the portion of your home that you own outright, or the difference between the value of your home and the balance on your mortgage.

When needed, that equity can be used to finance life’s big expenses, like medical debt, home improvements or college tuition.

One way to access your home equity is to do what’s known as a cash-out refinance. In a cash-out refinance, you replace your mortgage with another loan that’s bigger than what you owe on your home. You then receive that difference in the form of a cash payment, which you can use any way you want.

If you’re ready to change your loan terms

You may also be ready to refinance your mortgage if you’d like to change the terms of your loan. Usually, when we discuss loan terms, we’re referring to either the length of the loan or the type of interest rate.

Typically, a mortgage will be either 15 or 30 years in length. A 15-year mortgage lets you pay off your loan faster, but comes with higher monthly payments. A 30-year mortgage will keep your payments low, but it will take longer for you to truly own your home. Depending on how much you can afford to put aside for a mortgage payment each month, you may want to switch from one to the other with a refinance.

Alternatively, you may want to switch your interest rate type. There are two types of interest rates: fixed-rate and adjustable-rate. A fixed-rate mortgage stays the same over the life of the loan, while an adjustable-rate mortgage changes in accordance with current market interest rates. Many people decide to change to a fixed-rate mortgage because they want predictable monthly payments, but you may be able to get a lower interest rate if you go with an adjustable-rate option.

Challenges of refinancing a jumbo mortgage

Qualifying for a jumbo loan is more difficult than a conforming loan, Legrain said. “The lender is taking more of a risk because the balance on the loan is higher. As a result, the requirements that you have to meet in order to be approved are stricter.”

Below are some common qualifying requirements for jumbo loans:

Debt-to-income ratio

Looking at your debt-to-income ratio is a way for lenders to measure how likely you are to be able to repay your debts. It’s the measure of the sum of all your monthly debts divided by your total monthly income.

“For a conforming loan, your DTI has to be less than or equal to 50%,” Legrain said. “But for a jumbo loan, that number drops to 43%.”

Reserve requirements

When you go to buy a home, lenders will look to make sure that you still have money in the bank after your down payment and closing costs. This money is known as cash reserves, and is usually expressed as the number of monthly mortgage payments you’d be able to make using those assets.

“The reserve requirements you’ll face will vary according to the lender,” Legrain said. “However, on a jumbo loan they will be much higher. You’ll be expected to prove that you have anywhere between six and 12 months of mortgage payments in the bank.”

Credit score

The minimum credit score for a jumbo loan starts at 680, but could be even higher, according to Legrain.

In contrast, conforming loans guaranteed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) require a credit score of 580 to take advantage of its low 3.5% down payment. The FHA will accept even lower scores if you’re able to put down 10%. On the other hand, conventional loans require a credit score of at least 620.

Loan-to-value ratio

Your loan-to-value ratio (LTV) is how much you’re looking to borrow in comparison to the overall value of your home.

Loan-to-value limits are usually lower for jumbo loans than they are for conforming loans. “On a no-cash-out refinance, you can go up to 97% with a Fannie Mae conforming loan amount, but with a jumbo loan you are usually restricted to 85%,” Legrain said.

Ways to get a low jumbo mortgage refinance rate

You’ll need to give your lender some financial information to find out whether they can approve you for a loan and, if so, at what rate, according to Legrain. They’ll want documents similar to those you’d provide for any refinance. They include:

  • Copies of paycheck stubs for the most recent 30-day period
  • W-2 forms for the previous two years
  • A copy of your federal income tax returns for the previous two years

However, once you get one rate from a lender, don’t stop there. Shop around. Once you start getting pre-approved for a mortgage, you have a 45-day window during which all mortgage inquiries on your credit report will count as one. Credit bureaus agree to this because they realize that you’re only going to buy one home, and they want to give you a chance to find the loan that works for you.

In addition to getting loan estimates, Legrain stressed the importance of asking questions to find out if a particular lender is the right fit for you. She suggested the following questions:

  • What rate can you offer?
  • What are your fees?
  • What are the loan-to-value restrictions?
  • Are you local to my area?

“Working with a local lender is important because national lenders aren’t aware of local programs, so they get overlooked,” Legrain said. “Also, they may be using appraisers from out of the area, who may not know the differences in value between different neighborhoods.”

The bottom line

Getting a jumbo loan might be more complicated than getting a traditional mortgage. However, it can be done. By shopping around and making sure to ask the right questions, you should have a good chance of getting a jumbo loan refinance that works for you.

This article contains links to LendingTree, our parent company.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Tara Mastroeni
Tara Mastroeni |

Tara Mastroeni is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Tara here

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