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Auto Loan

How Much to Put Down on a Used Car

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

what to look for when buying a used car
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A brand-new car might sound appealing, but may not always be the best financial option. That’s where used cars can come in. Used cars can be much more cost-efficient than new cars because they are just that: used, not new. And while you may not be the first person to own the car, you’ll likely find that an older model, say a 3- to 5-year-old car, can still offer high-quality tech and safety options that you’d find from something that’s brand new. Another good reason for a used car? You may get a chance to own a car that you normally wouldn’t be able to afford if you were buying it new.

Plus, used cars are great values for customers. Since a car’s depreciation usually happens within the first year, that means it has likely already taken place with used cars. In most cases, a new car can lose more than 20% of its value as soon as it leaves the lot. And nowadays, many modern cars can run for well beyond 100,000 miles, sometimes even longer.

The car-buying process for purchasing a used car is similar to the process for buying a new car, but you may wonder how much you should put down on a used car since it will be more affordable. Let’s take a closer look at how much to put down on a used car (and how it might compare with new cars) below.

What is a down payment on a used car?

When you buy or lease a car (both new and used), you’ll likely need to put money down first to help show the lender or dealer you’re financially committed. A down payment also serves other functions as well; it helps determine how much you’ll pay each month and what your interest rate on an auto loan might be (if applicable).

The math works out like this: The larger your car down payment, the better the interest rate and the lower the monthly payments will be on that vehicle.

So just how much should you put down? The average down payment on a new car is around 20-30%, which is more than used cars. The reason is because the depreciation in new cars happens in the first year, so you’ll likely need to put down more to help offset that hit.

Used cars on the other hand, don’t need as much of a down payment. In fact,most down payments for a used car range anywhere from 10-20% with a current average of about 11% of the car’s selling price, according to Ronald Montoya, a consumer advice editor at Edmunds, the car-buying site.

How to calculate how much you should put down on a used car?

Knowing how much you can afford to put down on a used car is pretty crucial to your finances. That’s why it’s important to only take on a car you can afford. Take a hard look at your finances to help determine how much you’re able to pay each month and how much you can put down. One way to go about this is by using online tools, such as MagnifyMoney’s auto affordability calculator. Here, you can plug in your how much you’d like your monthly payment to be and how much you’re willing to put down. Once you put in that information, you can get an estimate of how much you can afford on a car at its estimated value. Auto loan calculators can also help determine your estimated monthly payments on a new car loan if you choose to go that route, which is discussed in more detail later on.

Putting more down on a used car can help save you in the long run as it can help lower your monthly payment and provide a better interest rate. If you can’t put down the typical 10-20% of the car’s value, it might be wise to keep shopping around for a less expensive vehicle. You may also want to inquire with your lender about getting a possible lower interest rate loan.

What does ‘low down payment,’ ‘no down payment’ or ‘zero down payment,’ mean?

If you’ve been shopping around for a car, whether used or new, there’s a good chance you’ve heard the terms “low down payment,” “no down payment” or “zero down payment.” But what do they mean and how do they differ from one another? Let’s break each term down to get a better idea of what these down payment options mean and how they might work (or not work) for you.

What does low down payment mean?

A low down payment is a certain amount of money you put down to help reduce the money you’re borrowing. In years prior, anything less than 20% was considered a low down payment. Today, the average down payment for a used car is 10.9%. Anything below that may be considered on the low side, but usually a down payment within 1-5% range is typically a low down payment.

Pros of low down payment

  • Since you’re putting something down (even if it’s on the low side), you may get a lower monthly payment or interest rate than if you didn’t put anything down at all
  • Possibly shorten the term of your loan than if you didn’t put anything down
  • Shows the lender you are committed to the purchase

Cons of low down payment

  • It may only be a low down payment, but you still have to come up with the cash
  • You may not be putting down enough money to get the best monthly payment or interest rate

What does no down payment or zero down payment mean?

Zero or no down payment means you do not put any money down on the used car you’re buying. Unlike with a low down payment, you won’t have to put any money forward but you’ll have higher payments to worry about.

Pros of no down payment or zero down payment:

  • There is no down payment to come up with
  • Keeps more money in your pocket

Cons of no down payment or zero down payment:

  • Since you’re not putting anything down at all, you’ll likely have a higher monthly payment
  • Possible higher annual percentage rate (APR)
  • You may invest in something that is out of your price range because it was enticing without a down payment
  • Usually only offered to those with a credit score of 700 or higher
  • Your loan can go upside down, which means you’ll owe more on your car than what it is worth

Where do you find low or no down payment used cars?

Unfortunately, there’s no one-stop shop to find low or no down payment used cars. You’ll likely have to do a little digging on your own. You can start by going online to search for dealerships in your area and possible lenders to work with for an auto loan that offers the features you are looking for. Once you find a dealership or lender you’d like to work with, you’ll then be able to contact them directly to apply and determine a proper financing plan for your individual needs.

Each finance plan will vary depending on the lender and the car. One thing to remember: Interest rates are usually higher with used cars because they are riskier for lenders to invest in. Because older cars can break down and owners sometimes decide to stop paying for a broken car, the lender considers this a reason for borrowers to potentially default on their loan. Also note, any car over seven years old can be even harder to get a loan on.

Depending on the lender, you may have the option to apply for a low or no down payment directly on your application or you may discuss this once you are approved for the loan.

Credit history plays a significant role in buying any car, especially a new one. However, when it comes to used cars, you’ll likely only need a good to normal score.

For those who have poor credit, some consider a buy here, pay here dealership. These dealerships can possibly help finance your car when you might not be able to do it otherwise but be cautious, says Ronald Montoya. An option like this may be more costly and is not usually recommended. These dealers tend to sell older cars for much more than they are worth, with too high interest rates. And while you’ll be able to build up your credit if you choose to do business with this type of dealership, you should know that they don’t always report to the credit agencies. That means, you can be making all your payments on time without your credit score improving. If your credit is bad and you don’t have a lot of extra money to spend, you may want to work on raising your score first.

How do you finance a used vehicle?

Now that you have decided on getting a used car, you may be wondering how you’ll be able to finance it. If you’re like many and don’t have extra cash stored away to help buy your car in full, you may need some financial help.

Once you have figured out how much you want to spend on a used car, located the right vehicle for you, figured out what kind of down payment you can provide, it’s time to shop for lenders. An auto loan can help finance your ride by offering you a way to pay for the car with monthly payments. You’ll want to shop around for different lenders to find one that can offer you the best annual percentage rate (APR), which is determined by your credit history and the price of the car you’re looking to purchase. Car loan terms can vary depending on the lender and your credit, but tend to range from around 5 to 6 years. However, a 60-month loan term is ideal because you’ll have five years to finance your car rather than six, which is usually more feasible for most people. And since it’s only five years, you likely won’t grow tired of your car in that amount of time, as opposed to if you had the car for a longer period. Keep in mind, the loan term will depend on how old your car is; with an older car, you may want to try to get a shorter term.

And terms that are longer? These usually come with a higher monthly payment. When you find a potential lender, you’ll need to apply for an auto loan, which can be done online. Once you provide information on your income, employment, and the car you’re interested in, the lender will notify you whether or not you are approved.

Leasing a used car may also be an option. With a lease, the lender will determine your monthly payments by looking at what the car is selling for compared with its overall value. Interest rates on leasing used cars can be higher than with new cars but the terms (which vary with each individual) are usually the same as with new cars. Plus, at the end of your lease you have the option of purchasing the used car (just like with a new one) if you so choose.

The bottom line

Buying a car can be a financial strain. However, used cars can be a cheaper option while still providing you with some decent wheels. In order to get the best bang for your buck, you’ll likely need to put money down on a used car. Putting money down is a good way to save money because it will lower your monthly payment. If you’re looking to save more on your monthly payments, it might be a good idea to put more down if your finances permit. It’s important to only do what you can afford and to take a good look at your finances before making any final decisions.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Carissa Chesanek
Carissa Chesanek |

Carissa Chesanek is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Carissa here

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Auto Loan

Should I Buy a New or Used Car?

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

new or used car
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You need a car, and the new cars you see look beautiful. They’re clean, smell nice and have every latest gadget and technological advancement. You figure a new car won’t break down, and it comes with a warranty and the option of a service contract. It’s so easy to go to a new car lot and sign on the line for the car you want.

On the other hand, you can get a used car for less, and drive it for years to come. But you dread haggling with the owner or you’re leery of a used car’s questionable history. If you hate to part with more money than you have to, you may agree with author and consumer advocate Beverly Harzog who said, “I have a visceral reaction to buying a new car.” Buying this year’s model may feel like an extravagant waste of money.

So which is better, a new car or a used one? It depends on you and your situation. Before you decide to buy a car, make sure you understand the advantages and disadvantages of buying new or used. Just as importantly, be sure you know why you are buying a car, what you want and need from it and what you can afford.

What are the advantages of buying a new car?

New cars have some advantages, which can sometimes make them worth the higher price tag, an average of $37,169, according to Kelley Blue Book, nearly twice as much as the average used car price of $20,247.

New cars offer the latest styling, technology and safety features

Car models tend to go four to six years between major redesigns. It can be difficult to tell this year’s model from last year’s, or even one from several years ago. If you’re a car aficionado and you want the look of the newest model, however, you may not mind paying for it.

Technological and safety features have made big strides in recent years. Heated and ventilated seats, 360 degree cameras and USB ports are common, though it’s likely you’ll have to upgrade to a higher trim level or pay more for some of these features. Some cars even offer features that were unheard of a few years ago like parking assist, which may help cars maneuver into a parking spot with limited or no driver assistance.

A new car should need fewer repairs in the first few years

New cars should spend less time in the shop than older ones do. Car parts wear out, often at fairly predictable rates.

Although the difference in repair costs varies between brands or even models within a brand, these costs trend higher as cars age. Using Edmunds’ True Cost to Own tool, for example, a consumer near Seattle who owned a 2014 Accord Sedan EX four-door sedan (2.4L 4-cylinder CVT) paid on average $320 for repairs in the first year of ownership. In the fourth year of owning the same car, the average amount rose to $507.

Buying a new car at the dealership is easy

Brand-new cars are sold by dealerships, not private parties or secondary dealers, which makes buying one fairly straightforward. Simply drive to a dealer, and they’ll be happy to sell you a car.

Because the car is new, you don’t compare mileage on one car with that of another, or worry about whether the car has been in a wreck.

The dealer will even be happy to sign you up for financing on the spot (although that might not be your best deal).

Some dealers offer new car incentives

Some dealer and manufacturer incentives are available to everyone, while others only work if you meet certain criteria, such as being a veteran or living in certain geographical area. For example, Toyota offers a $500 military rebate to qualified service members and veterans. You may qualify for 0% financing incentives, often available to customers with excellent credit. Although new cars are still more expensive than used ones, sometimes a new car incentive can help bridge the gap.

New cars often have better warranties and service contracts

A new car shouldn’t be spending much time in the shop, but if it does, a warranty or service contract can give you peace of mind. The contract may also help you maintain your car in top condition while it is in force, but research the pros and cons of extended warranties before signing.

What are the drawbacks of buying a new car?

If cost were not a factor, perhaps most of us would buy brand new cars every time. In the real world, however, we have limited funds and we need to make the best use of them. Here are three drawbacks of buying a new car.

New cars cost more than comparable used cars

“The gap between pricing of new and used cars is becoming pretty wide,” said Matt Jones, senior manager of Insights at Edmunds. “The average new car price is now about $37,000. A person who is looking to make the most of their money will see a savings on a used car of 30-40%.” When people make payments for close to six years on a car, the more expensive car costs them a lot of money in principal and interest.

“The most bang for my buck, without a doubt, is used cars,” said Jones.

The value of your new car is guaranteed to go down — fast

Cars don’t depreciate (go down in value) at an even rate over their useful lives. Their value tends to drop when they are driven off the dealer’s lot and plummet as much as 50% in the first few years, before slowing down around year five. Those first few years are expensive ones to own a car, when the showroom gleam is first wearing off. Insurance provider State Farm factors in depreciation as well as taxes in its new versus used calculator — plug in the price of a used or new vehicle you’re eyeing as well as your state and local taxes to compare.

It’s easy to overspend on a new car

With new cars, it’s easy to let the amount you are willing to spend creep up beyond what you intended to spend, especially if a dealer emphasizes monthly payments over total sales price. What’s a few thousand here and there when you’re spreading it out over several years?

When you’re bargain hunting for a used car, especially if you’ve saved up all or part of the money ahead, you may be able to stick to a budget more successfully and avoid mistakes.

What are the advantages of buying a used car?

The biggest reason to buy a used car is to save money, saving as much as 30-40%, but there are other reasons, too.

You may get a better car if you buy used

Buying an older car doesn’t necessarily mean settling for less. You may be able to afford a higher quality car if you’re willing to buy it when it’s a few years old. Harzog, the finance author, likes driving a luxury car, such as a Lexus. “I prefer used cars. I keep my cars almost until they turn into dust,” she said. “I’ve only had about four cars in my life.”

By consistently buying used vehicles and keeping them as long as possible, you’ll save over time. AAA estimates that the cost of owning a new car is an average of $8,849 a year — a significant sum if you roll from new car to new car.

You don’t own the car during the years of highest depreciation

If you buy the car after the first couple of years, it’s still a good car. But someone else has paid handsomely for the privilege of driving it new.

Used cars may still have plenty of good miles left

Cars are lasting far longer than they did in the past — Americans keep cars for an average of 10 years, longer for trucks and vans. “The reality is that most used cars, say three or four years old, are going to live for a long time,” Jones said. “Since cars have been built so well in the last few years, a lot of the fears people have can be put aside.”

If you’re worried about buying a used car, Jones suggested buying a certified pre-owned car. “Certified pre-owned is a used car, but it’s a used car that has been treated pretty well and is backed by the manufacturer,” he said. “It’s the best of both worlds. The carmaker is standing behind it.”

What are the drawbacks to buying a used car?

Although you’ll almost certainly save money buying a used car, you should know that buying a used car can be more complicated and sometimes riskier than buying a new car. Here are a few drawbacks of buying used.

You might end up buying someplace besides a dealership

You can buy a used car from many different places, including a reputable used car lot, dealership, website or from a private party. Some people are less comfortable going to used car lots or responding to classified ad listings to find cars. You could buy from a friend, but if anything goes wrong, you can lose the friendship.

It’s harder to compare the values of used cars

Comparing new car prices from one dealer to another should be fairly straightforward. Used cars can have more variables, from the number of miles on the odometer to the condition of the car. This makes it a bit more subjective to determine the value of the car. It’s important to research using a service like Kelly Blue Book or NADAguides.

Older cars require more maintenance and may not be under warranty

The older the car, the more it typically costs to keep it running. Some cars hold together better as the years go by, but they still need regular maintenance, and some parts will wear out. Standard manufacturer warranties vary in length, and some warranties are transferable to new owners, while others are not. Be sure you know if any existing warranty will transfer to you, and how much of the warranty period is left.

Your used car loan may outlive the car

If you buy an older used car, and you finance it for a number of years, be careful. “The danger is that the car is going to continue to lose value,” said Harzog. “You could end up underwater. You’re still making payments on a car, and it’s not worth what you’re paying.”

While this is also possible with a new car, especially if you don’t make a down payment or finance it for a long term with high interest, Harzog recommends that you pay off a used car as quickly as you can.

Is a new or used car better for you right now?

Before you decide to buy new or used, ask yourself these questions:

Do you want a new car? Assuming you can afford it, Jones said, “If you want the new car, get the new car. Maybe there’s new technology, or maybe they want to be the first butt to sit in that seat.” Buying a car is an incredibly emotional decision, and as long as you’ve done your research, buying the right car is more important than deciding to buy new or used. “Make sure you buy what you want,” said Jones. “That sounds obvious, but it’s not. When people buy cars they don’t want and they end up trading them in later, that mistake is far more expensive than any other mistake they could make.”

What will you use the car for? If you need a car simply to get to work safely, the latest technology and styling may not matter much. If you use your car in your work; for example, you drive clients around in your car, you may need to keep up with appearances. You may also need a newer model or specific features if you transport people or goods, if you live somewhere with inclement weather, or if dependability is your top priority.

What can you afford? If you have cash saved to buy a car, you know how much you can pay. If you’re financing a car, whether it’s new or used, make sure you can make the payments. “Just as a guideline, your car payment shouldn’t be more than 10% of your gross income,” said Harzog. “You just want to be sure you have enough cash to cover it. It’s a line item in your budget.” You could use an auto calculator to help you make your decision.

The bottom line

Buying a new or used car can significantly impact your financial life for years to come. A good car-buying decision can help you feel more secure, giving you reliable, affordable transportation. A bad decision, on the other hand, can cause stress and keep you from reaching your other financial goals. In the worst-case scenario, you could even lose your car and wreck your credit if you can’t make the payments.

Whether you buy a new or used car, the secrets to making good purchasing decisions are research, research and research. Before you buy a car, be sure you know why you are purchasing and what you need it for. Make a budget and know exactly what you can afford. And research cars, so you know what kinds of cars you are interested in, and what you should expect to pay, before you negotiate a good deal on your next car.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Sally Herigstad
Sally Herigstad |

Sally Herigstad is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Sally here

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Auto Loan, Reviews

The Best Auto Loans: 2019 New & Used Car Loan Rates

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Disclosure : By clicking “See Offers” you’ll be directed to our parent company, LendingTree. You may or may not be matched with the specific lender you clicked on, but up to five different lenders based on your creditworthiness.

The best auto loan for you depends on your priorities, but two common goals are to get the most competitive rate and the lowest monthly payment. That’s why longer-term loans are so popular right now, with more people stretching out new and used car loans over 60 months or more. Despite that, new and used car payments hit an all-time high in 2017, meaning that people are spending more than ever on their vehicle purchases. That’s why MagnifyMoney has compiled a list of the best auto loans in 2019. We know that with rising rates, you need as much help as you can get finding the best rates to secure the vehicle you want and need.

Overview of the best auto loans in 2019

Company name

Best for

Loan types offered

 

LendingTree

Comparison shopping auto loan rates - LendingTree is not a lender.

New, used, refinance, lease-buyout

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on LendingTree’s secure website

LendingTree is our parent company

LightStream

Car buyers with good or excellent credit

New, used, refinance, lease-buyout

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on Lightstream’s secure website

Capital One

Car buyers with fair or poor credit

New, used, refinance

SEE OFFERS Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website

Carvana Auto Loan

Buying a used car online

Used

SEE OFFERS Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website

How we picked the best auto loan rates

Using information from LendingTree, we compiled auto loan data over a six month period spanning across 22 auto lenders. We analyzed the loan data by applicant credit tier, and whether the loans were to purchase a used or new car to determine 1) the lenders consumers chose most often, and 2) the lowest average APR offered by the lender.

A closer look at the best new and used auto loans

Start with LendingTree

With LendingTree, you can fill out one short online form, and there are dozens of lenders ready to compete for your business. Upon completing the form, you can see real interest rates and approval information instantly. Some auto lenders will do a hard pull on your credit and this is common with auto lending. It’s important to remember, multiple hard pulls will only count as one pull, so the best strategy is to have all your hard pulls done at one time.

LendingTree
APR

As low as
3.99%

Terms

24 To 84

months

Fees

Varies

SEE OFFERS Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website

LendingTree is our parent company

LendingTree is our parent company. LendingTree is unique in that they allow you to compare multiple, auto loan offers within minutes. Everything is done online. LendingTree is not a lender, but their service connects you with up to five offers from auto loan lenders based on your creditworthiness.

What Car Loan Amount Do You Need?
Calculate Payment Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website
Terms & Conditions apply. NMLS#1136

 

Where people with good credit (680+) get the lowest rates on car loans

LightStream

LightStream is the online consumer lending division of SunTrust Bank. LightStream seeks to make the online lending process easy, so you may apply, be approved, sign your loan agreement and receive your funds all through your computer or mobile device — no papers to fill out or sign.

Why we chose Lightstream
Out of the lenders compared, borrowers with good and excellent credit were most likely to choose a loan with LightStream and receive the lowest APR. You can read our full LightStream review here.

New auto loan product details

  • APR: See table below
  • Terms offered: 24 – 84months
  • Loan amounts: $5,000 - $100,000

Lightstream New Auto Loan APRs

Loan Amount

Loan Term (months) *

24 - 36

37 - 48

49 - 60

61 - 72

73 - 84

$5,000 to $9,999

5.24% - 6.79%

5.84% - 7.39%

6.29% - 7.84%

6.59% - 8.14%

6.79% - 8.34%

$10,000 to $24,999

3.99% - 5.99%

4.44% - 6.24%

4.69% - 6.49%

4.94% - 6.74%

5.14% - 6.94%

$25,000 to $49,999

4.44% - 5.99%

4.69% - 6.24%

4.94% - 6.49%

5.19% - 6.74%

5.39% - 6.94%

$50,000 to $100,000

4.44% - 5.99%

4.69% - 6.24%

4.94% - 6.49%

5.14% - 6.69%

5.29% - 6.84%

As of 7/31/19. Includes a 0.50 point discount for autopay. Exact rates depend on your credit profile.

Used auto loan product details

  • APR: See table below.
  • Terms offered: 24 – 72 months
  • Loan Amounts: $5,000 - $100,000

LightStream Used Auto Loan APRs

Loan Amount

Loan Term (months) *

24 - 36

37 - 48

49 - 60

61 - 72

73 - 84

$5,000 to $9,999

5.24% - 6.79%

5.84% - 7.39%

6.29% - 7.84%

6.59% - 8.14%

6.79% - 8.34%

$10,000 to $24,999

3.99% - 5.99%

4.44% - 6.24%

4.69% - 6.49%

4.94% - 6.74%

5.14% - 6.94%

$25,000 to $49,999

4.44% - 5.99%

4.69% - 6.24%

4.94% - 6.49%

5.19% - 6.74%

5.39% - 6.94%

$50,000 to $100,000

4.44% - 5.99%

4.69% - 6.24%

4.94% - 6.49%

5.14% - 6.49%

5.29% - 6.84%

As of 7/31/19. Includes a 0.50 point discount for autopay. Exact rates are dependent on your credit profile and for purchases made from dealer. 

What we like

  • Fixed rate, simple interest fully amortizing installment loans. This means you won’t pay interest on your interest, and if you follow the payment schedule, your loan will be fully paid off at the end of the term.
  • No fees or prepayment penalties
  • No restrictions on the vehicles year, make, model or mileage
  • If you’re not 100% satisfied, Lightstream will pay you $100 (conditions apply)

Where it may fall short

  • Loans may not be used for a cash-out refinance
  • Secured loans may not be used for commercial vehicles
  • Vehicle must be classified as automobile, sport-utility vehicle (SUV), light-duty truck, passenger or conversion van
  • No phone support for customer service. Everything is handled by email

How to apply
Before you apply, keep in mind that you’ll need to:

  • Have good credit
  • Have sufficient income and assets
  • Agree to electronic records and signatures

Applying is done entirely online. You’ll provide:

  • Personal information. Name, address, phone, Social Security number, driver’s license, etc.
  • Employment information. Employer name and address, income and other financial assets
  • Loan information. Loan purpose, loan amount and term
  • Security information. Create a username and password
LightStream

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on Lightstream’s secure website

Where people with fair (620-679) & bad credit (500-619) get the lowest rates

Capital One Auto Finance

Capital One is a Fortune 500 company and a trusted name in banking and other financial services. In the fourth quarter of 2017, Capital One originated $6.215 billion worth of auto loans, making it one of the top five U.S. banks offering auto loans.

Why we chose Capital One
The most borrowers with fair and bad credit chose a loan with Capital One, and it came in second in terms of lowest average APR.

New auto loan product details

  • APR: See table below
  • Terms offered: 36 – 72 months
  • Loan Amounts: $7,500 - $40,000

Capital One new auto loan APRs

Credit

Loan Term (months) *

36

48

60

72

Rebuilding

7.45%

7.99%

7.99%

10.97%

Average

4.76%

5.16%

5.16%

6.42%

Excellent

3.99%

3.99%

3.99%

3.99%

As of 7/31/19

Used auto loan product details

  • APR: See table below
  • Terms offered: 36 – 72 months
  • Loan Amounts: $7,500 - $40,000

Capital One used auto loan APRs

Credit

Loan Term (months) *

36

48

60

72

Rebuilding

11.11%

12.55%

12.55%

13.98%

Average

5.90%

7.36%

7.36%

8.95%

Excellent

4.53%

4.54%

4.54%

5.30%

As of 7/31/19

What we like

  • Easy to pre-qualify online without a hard inquiry on your credit
  • Minimum monthly income required is $1,500 or $1,800, depending on your credit
  • 12,000 auto dealers work with Capital One

Where it may fall short

  • The best rates require excellent credit with 20% down on the vehicle
  • Vehicles must be 2006 or newer
  • Vehicles must have less than 120,000 miles
  • Dealers may charge additional fees, including document fees, dealer preparation fees and delivery charges
  • Maximum loan amount may not cover the cost of the vehicle you desire

How to apply
Apply using Capital One’s Auto Navigator. Enter your personal information including your Social Security number to get pre-qualified for an auto loan without affecting your credit. Then take your financing certificate to the dealership to shop for cars and make a selection. Once you’ve selected a vehicle, the dealer will have you fill out a credit application and you’ll finalize the paperwork for your vehicle purchase with the dealer.

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Carvana

Carvana specializes in helping you shop for a car online. It uses things such as 360-degree photos, free vehicle history reports, details and specs, ratings and reviews to provide you with the maximum amount of information.

Why we chose them
We looked at the three used auto lenders chosen most often in each credit tier, and Carvana was the only lender in the top three in every tier. That’s why we chose Carvana, even though other lenders offered lower average APRs on used auto loans.

Product details – Used auto loans only

  • APR: APR depends on credit history, vehicle type and down payment.
  • Terms offered: Up to 72 months.
  • Minimum loan amount: None
  • Maximum loan amount: Any amount, as long as it’s a vehicle listed on the Carvana website.

What we like

  • High level of detail on vehicles makes online shopping easy
  • Online application personalizes your shopping experience and doesn’t require a hard pull on your credit
  • You can return the vehicle within seven days and get your money back (Make sure you’re familiar with the limits on this policy before you buy)
  • All vehicles are certified with a 150-point inspection

Where it may fall short

  • Only available for used vehicles
  • Carvana is a car dealership, and you must select a vehicle through their website

Online experience
Carvana provides a lot of information about each vehicle. You won’t have to visit other sites to find specs or read reviews

When you fill out the online application, you’ll see a breakdown of your monthly payment, minimum required down payment and your APR, making your shopping experience truly personalized.
How to apply
You may get pre-qualified with Carvana without a hard pull on your credit by filling out the online application. After you complete it, you may start shopping for a used vehicle, and your payment, down payment and APR will be displayed for each vehicle. Keep in mind, with Carvana, you must purchase a vehicle in their inventory.

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Understanding the auto loans process

How do car loans work?

For the lenders we detailed above, you may apply for a loan online and receive personalized loan rates without a hard pull to your credit. So while you don’t see rate tables on certain lender websites, don’t be discouraged. If you’re serious, just fill out an application to see what you may qualify for.

Once you’ve completed the initial application, you’ll be able to shop for a vehicle knowing which type of financing you’ll likely qualify for.

Once you’ve selected a vehicle, you’ll need to submit a full application for the loan. This can be done online or with a dealer, if you’re working with one. Once again, most lenders are streamlining this process online, so for the lenders we discussed on this page, you may upload your documents using a computer or mobile device.

Once you’ve purchased the vehicle and completed your loan documents, you’ll just need to make payments. Making payments has moved online as well, and many lenders offer apps to help you manage your payments and loan information using your mobile device.

Tips when shopping for car loans

Here are some tips to help you avoid common mistakes and shop confidently for a car loan.

  • Set a budget. Everyone says it, but it’s not always easy to do. If you aren’t keeping a budget, here’s how to start in four easy steps.
  • Know how much you can afford. MagnifyMoney suggests you keep your total car expense less than 10% of your monthly budget. This is part of the 20/4/10 rule, which also says you should put down at least 20% and choose a maximum loan term of four years.
  • Save for a down payment. The amount of your down payment is likely to affect the interest rate you receive when financing your vehicle. So saving for a larger payment will help save you money and putting more down will lower your monthly payment, too.
  • Check your credit. You’re entitled to a free copy of your credit report from each of the three major credit bureaus every 12 months, and it’s easy to get your free credit score from a variety of sources.
  • Consider a co-signer. If your credit score is low or you have a limited credit history that needs improvement, having a co-signer with good credit on your auto loan could significantly lower your interest rate.
  • Shop around. It’s smart to get multiple rate quotes, so you may compare loans.
  • Get pre-approved. Shopping for a vehicle doesn’t make a lot of sense if you don’t know how much money you’ll have to work with. Shoppers have many options for getting auto loan quotes without a hard inquiry on their credit, but if you’re serious about buying a car, doing all your loan shopping in a short period of time will minimize the potential impact on your credit score, if loan applications result in a hard pull.
  • Talk to local credit unions. While banks and online auto loan companies offer easy-to-use online tools, don’t forget to talk to your local credit union to see if it has a more competitive rate.
  • Beware of extra fees. Keep in mind you’ll need to pay state taxes and title fees. In addition, dealers may charge fees, including document fees, dealer preparation fees and delivery charges. These fees will affect your APR if you finance them into your loan.
  • Check your paperwork. Everyone makes mistakes. When you get the final copy of your auto loan, check to make sure you got everything you were promised and there are no extra fees.

How to apply for an auto loan

From choosing the right car to getting approved for financing, this article will walk you through the complete online car buying process.

When you apply for an auto loan, it will help to have your documentation ready. This will include proof of identity, proof of income, credit and banking history and proof of residence. If you’ve selected a vehicle, you also want that information, including VIN, mileage, year, make and model.

While many online lenders advertise the loan process as being quick, be prepared for roadblocks. Sometimes a lender may request additional information or take time to verify information, and that may delay the process.

Be proactive! Once you’ve started the auto loan process, the lender will walk you through what’s needed. But that doesn’t mean you have to wait for your lender to get back to you. If the loan process has stalled, make a call or send an email to your lender asking what’s needed. In many cases, you’ll have an online login that will allow you to see your loan status, or take the next step online.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Ralph Miller
Ralph Miller |

Ralph Miller is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Ralph here