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Auto Loan

What Car Should I Buy? 5 Questions to Ask Yourself

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

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Have you ever seen a piece of furniture you really wanted to buy and then realized, dang, that won’t fit in my car? Have you ever stood at the pump watching the numbers go up and wished you had a car that was better on gas? Vehicles have different purposes and strengths — but while it may be an enticing idea to have a different vehicle for every function, few people can afford it, so getting one vehicle that’ll accomplish most of what you need is the goal.

Whether you spend your weekends transporting construction lumber or half a soccer team, or you want a vehicle that’ll haul butt down the road, we list the major vehicle types and their primary objectives, plus the questions you’ll need to ask yourself when looking for a new car.

What car should I buy?

What kind of driver are you?

Vehicle type

Example

Prioritizes transporting people over things

Hyundai Sonata, Audi S3

Needs to haul large things

Ford F-150, Toyota Tacoma

Only needs to transport self and one other adult

Honda Civic Coupe, Ford Mustang

Needs room for multiple adults and some stuff

Subaru Outback, Volkswagen Golf

Transports multiple adults and is eco-conscious

Toyota Prius, Chevy Volt

Keeps vehicles for a long time and drives a lot

Land Rover Discovery, BMW 328d

May face bad weather and needs room for five adults

Nissan Rogue, Infiniti QX50

Needs room for five adults and some stuff

Audi Q7, Chevy Tahoe

Transports seven people or large things

Chrysler Town & Country, Nissan Quest

Likes to feel the wind in their hair

Mazda Miata, Fiat 214 Spider

Transports multiple adults

Kia Soul, Honda Fit

Wants sporty looks and performance to match

Acura NSX, Ferrari Portofino

Wants to impress people with a smooth ride

Cadillac Escalade, Porsche Cayenne

Eco-conscious

Tesla Model 3, Nissan Leaf

Before you choose a car, ask these five questions:

When you step on the car lot and see all those glittering vehicles, you’re probably asking two questions: what looks the coolest and what can I afford? While these are perfectly legitimate questions, you don’t necessarily want to end up with a 12-year-old Maserati; there are other things to take into account.

How do you intend to use the vehicle?

What do you transport — people, pizzas, packages or just your awesome self? If you only need to transport yourself (and maybe some pizza) for short commutes in the suburbs, then a small, zippy car might suit you best. If you help take the whole team to a game or have a bunch of stuff for work, a minivan or truck would work better. But if your job involves impressing clients with your ride’s smoothness, power or price tag, a luxury vehicle might be your style.

Distance. If you travel for work, or even just for pleasure, you may want a larger vehicle with room to stretch. You’ll probably also want a gasoline-powered vehicle, as gas stations don’t always sell diesel and electric vehicle charging stations are relatively sparse. And if you’re planning to travel at high speeds, make sure that the car is well-insulated for sound — especially if you’re looking at a convertible — so you won’t hear the wind and the road.

Passengers. If you need to take five kids to sports practice every other day, a coupe is obviously not going to cut it. But if you don’t anticipate transporting lots of people (or animals) very often, going small could not only be convenient, but also economical — smaller cars generally cost less and usually have better fuel mileage.

Young passengers will need safety seats no matter the type of car; larger cars make it easier to not only install them, but to take the child in and out without gymnastic contortions. And if you’re transporting teenagers, adults or large animals in the backseat, a larger vehicle might be more comfortable for all involved.

Stuff. Real estate agents who need to transport yard signs, contractors who need to transport tools and artists who need to transport supplies may need vehicles to fit not only the amount of stuff they have, but the size and weight of it. A framed painting canvas might not be voluminous, but it may be 6 feet long.

Awe factor. Impressing others can be a legitimate vehicle purpose. You may want to impress (prospective) clients when you pick them up from the airport in a luxury car, or impress (upon) your friends (and frenemies) by leaving them in the dust in a performance car or a jacked-up truck.

What’s the weather?

The type of weather you face should have a large input on the type of vehicle you get. However, it shouldn’t make you overly confident in adverse conditions. Just because you have all-wheel drive, doesn’t mean you should go down an icy freeway without caution.

Rain

If you expect slippery roads, consider a vehicle that’s more physically balanced, like a sedan or an SUV. A coupe, which is heavy in the front from the engine and light in the back, could make you more prone to loose steering control on turns or curves and have you fishtailing across the lanes. “Fishtailing” is when your back wheels have little to no traction and the rear of the vehicle swings uncontrollably, either side-to-side or to an extreme on one side. The same thing can happen with a performance car or a pickup (with an empty bed) for the same reasons.

Snow and ice

Colder climates probably mean your car will be exposed to snow, ice and all of the downsides that come with them — slippery and bumpier roads due to expanding and contracting pavement creating potholes. You might consider a vehicle with all-wheel drive (AWD) or four-wheel drive (4WD).

  • Four-wheel drive (4WD): This is also called 4×4 and is usually offered on SUVs, trucks and wagons. It is the best type of drivetrain to handle the worst conditions, on- and off-road through deep snow, water or mud. The Jeeps you may see in videos climbing near vertical cliffs have 4WD, although we don’t recommend you getting one and trying it out immediately. The driver usually turns the 4WD on and off, according to road conditions.
  • All-wheel drive (AWD): This is usually found on crossovers and luxury vehicles. It is designed to help the vehicle keep traction in light to moderate conditions without the driver turning it off and on.

In addition, consider getting a car that’s not white or gray, especially if you have to park on the street at home or for work instead of in a driveway or parking lot. The color might make your car blend into the wintery environment, so it’s harder for other drivers, including snowplow drivers, to see it. The ice from the salty roads will also be harder for you to see on your vehicle. And if you can’t see it, you might be less inclined to wash your vehicle as often, leaving the salt to eat away at the car’s clear coat and paint.

Hot and cold

If the summer heat is considerable in your area, look at cars with colors that reflect heat (mostly light colors) instead of absorb it (mostly dark colors).

But it doesn’t necessarily have to snow and ice for it to be cold where you live — if temperatures often drop, you might not want a cloth-top convertible or select trims of Jeep Wranglers, as they may not be well insulated to keep you warm in the winter.

What’s the geography?

Where will you use the vehicle? The type of landscape in your town can help determine the type of vehicle you want. Whether you live in the mountains, the jungle or even just a concrete jungle, you’ll want a vehicle that can best handle the terrain you face daily.

City. If you often drive in a city, you may want a compact sedan, a coupe, a Mini or a small electric vehicle — you’ll be better able to squeeze into parking spots, navigate sharp city corners and save on gas with all of the stop-and-go driving you’ll probably do. Most cities manage their urban roads with infrastructure to handle rain and snow, so you might not need a large AWD or 4WD vehicle to help you plow through the weather.

Country. If you have to go long distances to get anywhere, you probably want to be able to take all of your stuff with you, and the roads you face may be less well maintained. A larger vehicle with AWD or 4WD might be the most useful.

Mountains. A lot of cars can handle going up, down and around mountain roads. However, it especially takes a toll on electric vehicles. Using power to climb a mountain, to brake descending a mountain and to brake and accelerate on twists and turns drains a battery, greatly reducing your expected driving range.

What is most important to you?

People value different things depending on their lifestyle. Maybe you just totaled your car and you’re really interested in safety features for your next one; perhaps you go on long trips and a cushy seat and top-notch sound system are important. We broke out some categories to help guide you when you’re asking yourself what you care about in a vehicle.

Safety. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety crash tests vehicles each year to see which brands are the safest. Kia had the most 2018 award winners with nine models — 32 models were named as “top picks” over the last five years. Volvo and Lexus do well in the luxury categories, having won 23 and 20 top picks, respectively, over the past five years.

Luxury. If you want your car to feel like a 5-star hotel room on wheels, you’ve got plenty of choices, from BMW to Rolls Royce. Many luxury cars also cross into other categories with extremely good safety ratings (Volvo), performance (Porsche) and off-roading (Land Rover).

Speed. Enzo Ferrari once said that he designed engines; the rest of the car just happened to be attached. If you like to do autocross on the weekends to get your blood pumping, or you just like to know you’ve got the ability to go faster than anyone and everyone on the street, performance cars will cost you a pretty penny, but some people believe they’re worth every cent.

Off-roading. If the thrill of crashing through brush in the backwoods, carefully gunning up a sheer cliff face or getting neck-deep in muddy water interests you, off-roading might be your thing. Serious off-roading requires 4WD (not just AWD) and some vehicles have special off-road designations. Jeep has Trailhawk trims and “trail rated” badges, and some Land Rover models have specific settings for sand, mud, rocks, gravel, snow/ice and wading through water.

Technology. You can still get a brand new Kia Rio with windows you have to roll up and down by hand, but you could also get a Tesla that can largely drive itself and has a touchscreen that takes up the whole center of the dashboard — most people, though, get something in between. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration takes particular interest in crash avoidance technology, such as automatic braking and blind spot sensor warnings, and says this type of technology may offer significant promise for increasing safety.

Reliability and value. Kelley Blue Book, Consumer Reports, J.D. Power and Edmunds are some of the top industry experts on the subject. Spoiler alert: Toyota consistently ranks at or near the top of the rankings across these four sites.

How much can you afford?

When comparing cars to your budget, the easiest thing to look at is the price of the car. But don’t forget that taxes will add to that monthly payment, plus you’ll also be paying for fuel, insurance and maintenance, and parking if you live in a big city.

Figure out your budget before looking at cars. Most people know how much they make each month, but fewer know how much they spend. Do not head straight to a dealership — you don’t want to fall in love with a car that’s way out of your budget and then become disappointed, or worse, find out after the purchase that you can only really afford it if you lived under a bridge.

Look at how much you spend versus how much you make. Do this to figure out how much you can afford. If you spend everything except that $5 needed to keep your bank account open, then you’re going to have to take a closer look at your spending. You’ll have to decide if getting a car is worth giving up something, such as going out for food and drinks often. If you don’t spend everything, how much do you have left over? And out of that amount, how much do you want to spend each month on everything that a car costs?

Determine how much of your car budget will go to the car. So now you’ve got your monthly budget amount of what you can spend on having a car — but how much of that is for the car versus the car insurance versus taxes and everything else? Admittedly, this is trickier to answer. However, here’s a handy rule of thumb: the more expensive the car, the more expensive everything else will be, taking a bigger the bite out of your budget and leaving less for the car payment itself. The reverse is generally true, too: the cheaper the car, the cheaper everything else will be.

  • See what car insurance will cost. If you’ve never had car insurance before — or if you have a long history of speeding — your insurance will be more expensive. Ask the insurance company for quotes on different cars to get an idea if auto insurance will cost you $50 a month, or $200, so you can plan accordingly.
  • Think about taxes and fees. Depending on your state and the dealership you go to, taxes and fees can vary. According to Nicolas Ortiz, a San Antonio-based insurance professional who formerly worked as a dealership finance manager, the total of most taxes and fees for almost every state range between 8% and 10% of the car’s price tag.
  • Maintenance and gas cost. Be aware gas prices are on the rise and you’ll need to change your car’s oil about every four months, which can cost $20 (regular oil for a low-mileage, mass market car) to $300 (top synthetic oil for a luxury car). 4WD vehicles also require extra maintenance.
  • APR loan cost. The APR on a loan is how much it costs you to borrow money. If you would have to take out a payday loan with 200% APR in order to get a car, don’t do it. That means you’ll pay double the price of the car. Most states limit car loan APRs to below 25% — and that’s still considered high. To see what type of APR you qualify for, you could fill out an online form at LendingTree and potentially get up to five auto loan preapprovals, including APR offers.

What’s left over is the amount of your budget that can go toward paying for the car itself. For an example, let’s say you have a total of $340 to spend on a car each month. You did your research and found out auto insurance will be about $80 a month, taxes are 9%, maintenance/gas costs average out to $30 a month and you have an auto loan preapproval with 5% APR. That means you’ll probably spend about $140 to pay for the things you need for the car, which leaves about $200 for your monthly car payment.

How to get a total price based on monthly budget. This is the easy part! There are tons of auto loan calculators that help you figure this out. This LendingTree auto affordability calculator lets you put in your monthly payment, APR and how long the loan is, and tells you the car price you can afford. This will be the car price tag you should be seeking.

If you want to learn more about budgeting for the car that suits you best, you can check out other MagnifyMoney stories: How Much Car Can I Afford, The 20/4/10 Rule and The Best Auto Loans: 2018 New & Used Car Loan Rates.

Disclaimer: This article may contain links to LendingTree, which is the parent company of MagnifyMoney.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Jenn Jones
Jenn Jones |

Jenn Jones is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Jenn at [email protected]

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Auto Loan, Reviews

Review: Wells Fargo Auto Loan

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Wells Fargo Auto Loan

If it’s time to get a new or used car, it’s time to do your research. Perhaps you’ve picked out the car of your dreams and you want to figure out the best way to pay for it.

When it comes to financing a vehicle, you have a ton of choices. Wells Fargo, founded in 1852, is one of many places to consider getting an auto loan from.

Wells Fargo Auto, a division of Wells Fargo Bank, serves more than 3 million auto loan customers throughout the United States.

About Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo offers new and used vehicle financing through its network of 11,000 active car dealerships, but it’s possible to apply with the bank directly if you’re interested in financing outside of the dealership or refinancing an existing auto loan. You could also use a Wells Fargo personal line of credit or loan to buy a car from a private seller or buy out your leased vehicle, but you may have to pay an annual fee or origination fee. A home equity loan or line of credit is another possibility but puts your home at risk should you default on your car payments.

It’s worth noting that Wells Fargo continues to compensate auto loan customers who were charged for insurance they didn’t need or add-ons after their car loans were repaid or their vehicles repossessed. The bank’s redress program came after a December 2018 settlement with attorneys general from all 50 states calling for $422 million to be repaid to auto loan customers.

Wells Fargo: At a glance

  • Loan terms up to 72 months
  • Loan amounts between $5,000 and $100,000 for new and used auto loans.

Because a majority of Wells Fargo’s loans are through dealerships, what’s known as indirect lending, you may not know your exact rate or terms until you apply through a dealership. A Wells Fargo spokesperson said rates are based on a number of factors, including the borrower’s credit history. While the best rates and terms tend to go to those with the best credit, it’s possible to be approved with less-than-stellar scores at Wells Fargo.

Wells Fargo also offers loans for those looking for specialty vehicles like motorcycles or recreational vehicles. Existing customers may be eligible for a discount if they use autopay to make their vehicle payments from a Wells Fargo consumer checking account.

A closer look at Wells Fargo auto loans

Highlights of Wells Fargo auto loans

  • Multiple ways to pay: You could make your car payment through the bank’s online eServices function, automatic loan payments or at any Wells Fargo branch.
  • APR discount: Wells Fargo offers a 0.25% discount for existing customers who use a consumer checking account to make automatic payments on its car loans.

Lowlights of a Wells Fargo auto loan

  • Mix of direct and indirect loans: While it’s possible to apply directly through Wells Fargo for an auto loan, most of its auto lending is through dealerships.
  • Negative press: In addition to fines Wells Fargo has had to pay in regards to its auto loan customers, it has been fined for the way it treated mortgage customers as well. In all, the bank has agreed to pay billions in settlements and consent orders.

How to apply

As we’ve already mentioned, most customers apply through one of 11,000 dealerships in the Wells Fargo network. But applying outside of the dealership is possible — a Wells Fargo spokesperson said customers may call or visit a branch for more options. It’s possible to apply for a refinance loan online, in person or by calling 800-289-8004. We’ll talk more about refinance loans in more detail, below.

Here’s what the bank will want to know about you and your car:

  • Personal information: Address, contact information, date of birth and Social Security number.
  • Country of citizenship information
  • Marital status (Wisconsin only)
  • Housing information: Whether you rent or own and for how much as well as information about previous recent addresses
  • Income information: Your occupation, gross monthly income and previous employer
  • Information about your car: Year, VIN, mileage and remaining loan balance. You can find out your remaining loan balance by calling your current lender.

The fine print on an auto refinance loan

The only way to make sure you’re getting the best deal on a loan for a new car or to refinance the one you have is to shop around. Make sure a refinance really is in your best interest and that you understand Wells Fargo’s criteria before you sign:

  • Minimum loan amount of $7,500
  • Co-signers allowed
  • Not offered in Alaska, Arkansas, Hawaii, Louisiana, North Dakota or Washington, D.C.
  • May be difficult to get approved if your vehicle has more than 100,000 miles or is 8 years or older.

Once you have applied, Wells Fargo will contact you by phone, mail or email. You’ll have the option of signing and returning the loan package by mail or finishing the process online.

Who is a Wells Fargo auto loan best for?

Wells Fargo auto loans can be a good fit for those in the market for a new or used vehicle, or folks looking to refinance a current loan. It may be the best option for existing Wells Fargo customers looking to refinance — it’s possible to apply directly through the bank, online and, if you’re willing to make auto payments, you may score a lower interest rate.

A Wells Fargo auto loan might be good for anyone shopping for a new or used car as well, but the only way to make sure you’re getting the best rate, particularly if it’s one offered through the dealership, is by comparing it with your preapproval offer from another bank, credit union or online lender.

A Wells Fargo auto loan is not a good fit for anyone interested in a private party auto loan. For those, look to competitors such as Lightstream, Bank of America or a credit union.

Lindsay Martell contributed to this report.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

MagnifyMoney
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Have a question to ask or a story to share? Contact the MagnifyMoney team at [email protected]

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Auto Loan, Reviews

Review: Bank of America Auto Loan

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Bank of America Auto Loan

The history of Bank of America dates back to more than two centuries, but that doesn’t mean its banking services are stuck in the past. In recent years, Bank of America has modernized its service offers by adding mobile auto lending services that allows buyers to choose a car and a car loan in one place. Yes, you can apply for its loans in person at a branch or over the phone, but it’s hard to beat the speed and convenience of applying from home or anywhere you use your smartphone.

According to Bank of America, you could receive a loan decision within 60 seconds of applying, which is about as fast an approval as you can get from any lender, whether in person or online. But don’t be so quick to gloss over the details. While you may get approval decision within a minute, you might not be getting your lowest rates. Bank of America offers competitive rates for new car financing and a discount for certain customers, but other lenders may be able to beat Bank of America when it comes to used car loans and refinancing.

About Bank of America

Bank of America’s online auto buying experience starts when you submit an electronic application through its website where you have the option to use your loan approval to shop for and buy your car through Bank of America’s network of participating dealerships. Once you get your loan approval you can visit the Bank of America website or use the banking app to search a national inventory of more than one million cars, then visit dealerships for test drives and to finish the paperwork.

You can also use a Bank of America loan to buy a vehicle outside of the network. The bank offers loans for:

For specific rates for used and new cars as well as loans you could use to refinance your existing car or to buy out your leased vehicle, see the chart below.

Bank of America: At a glance

  • Loan amounts starting at $7,500
  • Terms between 12 and 60 months

Bank of America offers a wide variety of loans, but its loans aren’t available for specialty vehicles such as motorcycles or RVs. Financing is available to residents of all 50 U.S. states who borrow a minimum of $7,500 ($8,000 in Minnesota), but it can’t be used to buy cars that are over 10 years old or with more than 125,000 miles.

Advertised rates for new car loans are comparatively low, but to find the lowest APR for your loan you’ll need to do some comparison shopping. Rates vary depending on what kind of purchase you’re making, where you shop and the condition of your credit, with the lowest rates available for buyers with excellent credit when they purchase a new car from a dealer. Bank of America advertises much higher rates for private party purchases.

Compare Auto Loans
 New from dealerUsed from dealerUsed from private party*RefinanceLease buyout*
Bank of America3.19%3.39%5.99%3.99%4.19%
Chase4.24%4.24%N/A4.89%N/A
LightStream3.99%3.99%4.99%3.99%4.99%
*Bank of America lease buyout and private party loan rates are current as of Sept. 18, 2019.

If you bank with Bank of America or have an investment account with its wealth management subsidiary, Merrill, you may be eligible for lower rates. Preferred Rewards members get a rate discount at 0.25% for Gold members, 0.35% for Platinum members and 0.50% for Platinum Honors members.

Your eligibility for Preferred Rewards is based on the average asset balances held by Bank of America and/or Merrill over the three months prior to your application, with a minimum average balance requirement of $20,000. You can enroll for free to see if you’re eligible.

A closer look at Bank of America auto loans

Advantages of Bank of America auto loans

  • Loan approval offers lock in your terms for 30 days. That gives you time to shop around and find the car you want.
  • No application or origination fees, unlike some other lenders.
  • No prepayment penalty, meaning you can pay off your loan early and potentially save on interest charges without being penalized.

Disadvantages of Bank of America auto loan

  • Other lenders’ rate discounts may be easier to qualify for than the Preferred Rewards’ discount. PenFed Credit Union, for example, offers a discount to customers who use its car buying service, which can mean new car loan rates as low as 1.49%*.
  • Loan preapproval isn’t available. That means you’ll likely have to take a hard inquiry into your credit, and possibly lose a few points from your credit scores, just to see the loan terms you’re being offered. However, it’s always a good idea to compare auto loan rates and applying to multiple lenders doesn’t hurt your credit any more than it does to apply to one, as long as you do so within a 14-day window.

How to apply for a Bank of America auto loan

Completing an application online is a straightforward process, and if you’re already a bank member you can choose to have some of the application prefilled. Whether you apply online, in person or over the phone by calling 844-892-6002, you’ll need to submit the following information to complete an application:

  • Name
  • Address
  • Social Security number
  • Employment information
  • Income
  • U.S. citizenship status
  • Email address

You may be asked to submit some of the following information to complete your application, if applicable:

  • Purchase agreement/bill of sale
  • Registration
  • Title
  • Vehicle make, model and year
  • Mileage
  • VIN number
  • Lease buyout instructions
  • Proof of income
  • Federal tax returns
  • W-2s

To apply in person, you can make an appointment through the website or walk into a bank branch and talk to a representative. Setting an appointment allows you to avoid waiting and helps ensure a specialist will be prepared with the information you need.

Once you’ve submitted your application, loan decisions are quick. Even if further review is needed after you submit your application, you’ll receive an email with your decision by the end of the following business day.

The fine print

  • Loans are only for cars purchased through franchise dealerships or private parties, which does not include independent dealerships except for CarMax, Hertz Car Sales, Enterprise Car Sales and Carvana.
  • If you apply online, you’ll get the details of your approval via email. Make sure to look them over, including interest rates and repayment terms for new versus used car purchases, before you begin car shopping.
  • Loans are available with payment terms lasting up to 60 months. While a longer term can lower your monthly payment, it can cost a lot more in interest charges. Make sure to do the math before agreeing to a long-term repayment.

Who is a Bank of America auto loan best for?

Savvy car shoppers know that using bank or credit union-backed financing for an auto purchase is generally a better option than going through a dealership. But it can be difficult to arrange bank financing and complete a car purchase without putting in the time to contact several different lenders and visit multiple lots.

If you want the security of financing with a large bank with branches around the country, or even from your pre-existing Bank of America account profile, Bank of America auto loans might be the solution for you. They offer some of the same perks as dealership financing, allowing you to apply for a loan and shop for a car, all within the same platform.

But some extra legwork usually pays off: Comparing rates with other banks, plus credit unions and online lenders is the only way to make sure you’re getting the best deal possible.

*Rate and offer current as of June 1, 2019 and are subject to change. Promotional rate is not available to refinance existing PenFed car loans. Terms apply.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Sarah Brady
Sarah Brady |

Sarah Brady is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Sarah here