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What Happens After a Fed Rate Cut

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

The federal funds rate is a monetary policy tool wielded by the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) to help regulate the economy. When the FOMC changes the federal funds rate, financial accounts’ rates change accordingly. For example, when the Fed makes a rate cut, you’ll notice savings account rates dropping soon after.

While the Fed isn’t cutting rates yet in 2020, we’re still feeling the effects of its last cut in October 2019, the third rate cut in as many meetings. Banks and other financial institutions are still adjusting their rates, although widespread cuts have softened.

What is the federal funds rate?

The federal funds rate is the Federal Reserve’s main tool for managing interest rates in the United States. Fed funds is the main benchmark for the interest rates on every financial product on the market, including savings accounts, personal loans, mortgages and credit cards.

To put it more precisely, the federal funds rate is the narrow range of interest rates at which banks and credit unions trade federal funds — the balances they hold at Federal Reserve Banks — with each other overnight. The effective federal funds rate is the weighted average of the rates that banks negotiate with each other. Financial institutions use the effective federal funds rate as the benchmark for setting interest rates on all of their other lending and deposit products.

When the federal funds rate goes up, interest rates on financial products also go up. So when the federal funds rate is high, savers rejoice because it means better returns on their deposit accounts. But it also means it’s more expensive for consumers and businesses to borrow money, putting downward pressure on economic activity and inflation, the Fed’s main enemy. It also makes it harder for borrowers to get loans when APRs are higher.

And when the federal funds rate goes down, institutions lower their rates, enabling consumers and businesses to borrow more money at lower rates, thereby driving more economic activity. On the other hand, those looking for the best savings rates, including the best rates on certificates of deposit (CDs), will be disappointed as deposit account rates fall.

What happens after a Fed rate cut?

A Fed rate cut causes a downward shift in deposit account rates. Back in July 2019, industry-wide interest rate cuts on savings and other deposit account types began almost immediately in the wake of that month’s rate reduction.

“When the Fed cuts rates, you’ll see many online banks react within a few weeks,” said Ken Tumin, founder of DepositAccounts.com, also LendingTree-owned. “Reductions in average online savings account rates usually follow close on the heels of a Fed rate cut, within a month or two.”

As for brick-and-mortar bank rates, they also see small drops, but since their rates are already so low, their bottom line will hardly be affected.

How a Fed rate cut affects certificates of deposit (CDs)

Looking at historical CD rates confirms that we can expect deposit account interest rates to drop soon after a cut is announced. Tumin recalls that the rate cuts came quickly after the Fed cut rates in 2007. This was especially true for certificates of deposit, which tend to follow the federal funds rate rather closely. Back then, amid the financial crisis, rates followed until CD rates dropped below 2%, while savings accounts were earning less than 1%.

Below, you can see how closely the average 6-month CD rate followed the federal funds rate until the chaos of the financial crisis peak.

This time around, we’ll probably see more rate cuts like we’ve already been seeing for CDs. However, it’s more important to keep an eye on the Fed’s future outlook for the federal funds rate to determine where CD rates are going.

“If the Fed paints a deteriorating picture of the economy, that will increase the odds of several more rate cuts to come,” Tumin said. “That will put more downward pressure on CD rates, especially the longer-term ones like the 3-, 4- and 5-year CDs.”

How a Fed rate cut affects your credit card and mortgage

A Fed rate cut can help you pay off your credit card bills. Most major credit card issuers will lower their APRs accordingly within one or two billing cycles.

“It won’t move the needle much if [the Fed] only [cuts rates] once — since it’s only 0.25% — but any reduction is helpful when you have credit card debt,” said Matt Shulz, senior industry analyst at CompareCards, another LendingTree-owned site. Lowering your credit card’s variable rate means your credit card balances will accrue less in interest, possibly making it easier to pay down.

A lower federal funds rate will also affect adjustable-rate mortgages and HELOCs, as they’re based on short-term rates. “These should decline in tandem with the federal funds rate,” said Tendayi Kapfidze, lead economist at LendingTree.

Fixed-rate mortgages are less affected by the federal funds rate, instead tracking the 10-year Treasury rate. “A Fed funds cut will likely have little impact on fixed mortgage rates at this point,” Kapfidze said.

Why is the Fed cutting rates?

The Fed looks closely at several factors when considering whether to raise or cut the federal funds rate, including wages, employment, consumer spending and global markets. If the data points to a strong, growing economy, when employment is high and inflation is stable, the Fed may choose to raise the federal funds rate. Again, because that tightens access to money, it tends to slow down growth and prevent overheating. It also helps people save their money more efficiently in their savings accounts.

At the moment, we’re seeing the economy continue to grow at a moderate pace. It’s nowhere close to overheating, but outside risks like slowing global growth and trade negotiations threaten its overall health. In response, the Fed has remained patient, declining to make any changes since its last cut in October 2019.

“A lower federal funds rate is seen as helpful to the future health of the economy,” Tumin said. A Fed rate cut, after months of weakening data, would hopefully breathe life back into the economy.

Note: This article includes links to DepositAccounts.com, which is also owned by LendingTree.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

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Banking

How Much Will My Stimulus Check Be? Calculate Your Payment

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic continues to batter the economy — prompting the stock market to plummet and unemployment claims to spike — the U.S. federal government is throwing taxpayers a life raft, in the form of stimulus checks.

Congress has passed a $2 trillion relief bill that aims to provide emergency assistance to individuals, families and businesses affected by the coronavirus pandemic, including one-time payments made to individuals. The amount of money you can expect to see from Uncle Sam, though, is based on a number of factors, ranging from how much money you make to how many children you have.

Who qualifies for a stimulus check?

Under the relief bill — dubbed the CARES Act — most adults who have a valid Social Security number will be able to qualify for a stimulus check, with the size of that check based on your 2019 or 2018 tax return.

You must file a simple tax return if you don’t usually file a return: You also qualify for a stimulus check if you receive Social Security benefits for disability, retirement or Supplemental Security Income, according to the AARP. If you typically do not file a tax return because you receive Social Security benefits or have a low income, however, you will need to file a simple tax return to receive your cash payment.

You must fall below income thresholds: The bulk of those who do not qualify for a stimulus check will likely be high-earners: Under the CARES Act, if you’re an individual with no children who earns over $99,000 or are a married couple that filed jointly and are making more than $198,000, you are not eligible to receive a stimulus check.

You cannot be claimed as a dependent of someone else: Additionally, in order to receive a stimulus check, you cannot be claimed as a dependent of someone else. That’s noteworthy, and may mean that millions of dependents who are not children under the age of 17 could end up missing out on relief checks. As the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities points out, filers only receive an additional $500 for each child under 17, which could be problematic for people who support dependents like the elderly, adults with disabilities and college students.

You must have a valid Social Security number: To receive a rebate check, each member of the household (including children) is also required to have a valid Social Security number. Per the Center on Budget Policy and Priorities, this may mean that households of certain immigrant families with children who are U.S. citizens could still be denied a stimulus check.

How much are the stimulus checks?

The amount of your stimulus check is based off of your adjusted gross income, as well as how many children under the age of 17 you have. Here’s how the one-time, non-taxable payments break down:

  • Up to $1,200 per adult
  • Up to $2,400 for couples filing joint returns
  • $500 per child under the age of 17

However, the checks start to decrease by $5 for every additional $100 of income beyond the following income thresholds:

  • $75,000 for individuals
  • $112,500 for head of households (typically single parents)
  • $150,000 for couples who filed a joint return

Certain individuals with higher adjustable gross incomes aren’t eligible to receive a stimulus check at all. The checks completely phase out at the following income thresholds:

  • $99,000 for individuals with no children
  • $198,000 for married couples with no children

How does the government determine how much I get?

The government will determine the size of your cash payment based on the adjusted gross income (or your total gross income minus certain deductions, such as 401(k) contributions) and information reported on your 2019 tax return. For those who have not filed a 2019 tax return, tax returns from 2018 may be used instead to determine your check amount.

If you don’t typically file taxes and have no income – and instead rely on Social Security benefits – you are still eligible to receive a stimulus check. However, in an update on March 30, the IRS stated that those who “typically do not file a tax return will need to file a simple tax return to receive an economic impact payment.” This includes low-income taxpayers, senior citizens, Social Security recipients, some veterans and individuals with disabilities who are otherwise not required to file a tax return. They will not owe tax.

When will I get my stimulus check?

According to the CARES Act, the cash payments should be made as “rapidly as possible.” On March 30, the IRS announced that the distribution of the payments will begin within the next three weeks.

It’s also worth noting that if you have signed up for direct deposit with the IRS and have chosen to have your tax refunds deposited electronically — as opposed to receiving your tax refunds by mail as a paper check — you will likely receive your stimulus check faster, too.

Still, experts have been critical of that timeline, and have instead said the payment process could take months, not weeks. In 2009, for example, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) took three months to send out checks to households as a cushion during the Great Recession.

How will I receive my stimulus check?

You can expect your stimulus check from the IRS to be either directly deposited into your bank account or mailed to you, based on the method in which you requested to receive your tax refund. However, the IRS also announced that in the coming weeks, the Treasury Department plans to open a web-based portal in which people can share their banking information with the IRS, enabling them to receive their payments via direct deposit as opposed to waiting for a check in the mail.

If you have filed your 2019 or 2018 taxes, there is no action needed from you, and the IRS will issue your payment automatically. In fact, the IRS is actually asking consumers not to contact them about the stimulus checks, stating it will make details available on its website.

Determine how much you will get from your stimulus check

To find out how much you can expect to receive from your stimulus check, reference the table below.

What you should do with your stimulus check

As many Americans face furlough or unemployment as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, a recent survey by MagnifyMoney found that most people intend to use their stimulus checks on necessities, like paying bills and buying groceries.

Many experts recommend keeping the money you receive from your rebate liquid, like in an emergency savings account, which should have enough funds to cover three to six months’ worth of living expenses.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

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Banking

ACH Transfers: Explained

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

ACH transfers in action
iStock

You may have come across the term ACH when looking at different banking options or making certain banking transactions.

ACH stands for Automated Clearing House, which is a network and processing system that financial institutions use to transmit funds electronically between banks and credit unions. ACH transfers help to cut down on costs and processing times.

ACH transfers can include depositing funds directly to your account (transfers in, or credits to you), or transferring money out of your account to make payments (debits to you). For example, when your employer deposits your paycheck to your bank instead of handing you a paper check, that is an ACH transfer. Other direct deposits made by ACH transfer can include income tax refunds or other types of refunds. ACH direct payments (transfers out) often are used when you pay credit card or retailers’ bills (either one-off or recurring).

How long does it take for an ACH transfer to process?

ACH debit and credit transactions tend to process pretty fast. The National Automated Clearing House Association (NACHA) has operating rules that specifically require ACH credits — when you receive money — to settle within one-to-two business days. ACH debits — when you pay money — will settle the next business day. In most cases, all ACH transfers are settled within the same business day. But that doesn’t mean that money will land in your bank account that quickly. It could take as long as a few days, depending on your bank or credit union’s rules and regulations.

ACH money transfers — rules and fine print

Most financial institutions don’t charge a fee for incoming or outgoing ACH transfers. However, you are limited to six withdrawals per month for a savings account based on the Regulation D rule. So, if you go over that limit, your bank or credit union may charge you what’s known as an excess transaction fee.

Another fee you may encounter is a non-sufficient funds (NSF) fee — when you don’t have enough funds to cover the amount you’re transferring. Whether this fee is charged at all, and its amount, depends on the financial institution, so it’s best to check with yours.

Also depending on the financial institution, the limits on transfer amounts will differ. NACHA imposes a $25,000 daily limit on individual transactions. In other words, if you make multiple transactions, each one is limited to $25,000 in a single day. If you go over that amount, then your transfer will be processed the next day.

Wire transfers vs. ACH transfers

Both wire and an ACH transfers involve one financial institution sending funds to another one. Although both are electronic transfers, wire transfers use a different network, called Fedwire, and can involve transfers within the U.S. or internationally. Wire transfers are sent directly from one physical place to another, whereas ACH transfers are sent through a network.

In addition to making a wire transfer at a bank, you may make it at a nonbank provider — companies specifically designed to help you send money domestically or abroad. These companies may not require you to give your bank information. Instead you’ll need the receiver’s name, your personal details and the cash upfront that you intend to send. With an ACH transfer, on the other hand, don’t have this option.

Free and fast ways to transfer money

ACH transfers aren’t the only way to send or receive money. There are many other options that allow you to get almost instant access to funds with no fees involved. Two of these are cited below.

Zelle

Zelle is a peer-to-peer payment service where users can receive, send or request money to and from other bank accounts by using either an email address or phone number. This works even if the sender and receiver use different banks. Zelle claims that it can send money within minutes for no fee.

Many banks already offer Zelle via their existing online platform or mobile banking app. So, you may access it that way. However, if your bank does not have Zelle embedded in its system, then you may download Zelle’s own mobile app, create an account and use it to send and receive money.

Popmoney

Similar to Zelle, Popmoney is is a payment service that may be available at your bank (via their mobile or online banking services) for free. All you need is the recipient’s email address or phone number and you can send money. If you decide to use the service via PopMoney’s website, you’ll be charged $0.95 per transaction. There is also a monthly limit of $5,000 if transfering from a bank account and $1,000 if doing so with a debit card. If you’re using PopMoney via your financial institution, you’ll need to check with them to see what their limits are.

Tips for sending money safely

When sending money online, you want to be sure that you’re sending the money to the right person and that your own personal details are protected. Sounds obvious, but for example, double check your Wi-Fi connection to make sure that it’s secured. Of course you don’t want hackers to steal your sensitive information.

You’ll also want to ensure that you are sending money to a reputable place. NACHA created a booklet to help consumers spot scams and fraudulent behavior, such as merchant impersonations — that is, when someone pretends to be a company and states that you owe money on a purchase or a bill.

If you find fraudulent activity in your account, notify your bank as soon as possible. Sometimes you can reverse your ACH transfer if you accidentally sent the wrong amount or you suspect that there’s been an error.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.