Advertiser Disclosure

Banking

How to Start Saving Money

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any credit card issuer. This site may be compensated through a credit card issuer partnership.

Faced with an unexpected expense, like a car repair or leaky roof, many Americans might not have enough money in the bank to cover the bill. Just over half of U.S. households currently have a savings account, and 29% of households have less than $1,000 saved, according to a MagnifyMoney survey.

Whether putting money away for a rainy day or retirement, good savings habits can prepare you for emergencies and life changes. There are countless ways to build up your savings, from finding ways to cut back on spending to looking for areas where you might be overpaying. The time and discipline you invest implementing them will pay off — quite literally.

How can I start saving money?

If you’re just starting out on the path of building your savings, small changes can add up over time. A review of your budget should uncover items that can deliver larger, immediate gains. Here are more than two dozen money-saving strategies you can adopt for the short-term and the long-term.

Tips for saving money today

1. Set an intention
According to Sergio G. Garcia, associate planner for Quest Capital Management in Dallas, Texas, “saving money is tied to behavior and psychology, so it is important to find a personal focus to drive the savings behavior that works best for you.” Write down the reasons you want to save money, such as buying a house or retiring early, and put it in a place you’ll see every day.

2. Save your spare change
Collect your spare change at the end of the day and put it into a jar — you’ll be surprised at how quickly it can add up. If you use a debit card, some banks, like Bank of America, offer round-up savings plans, automatically moving the change into your savings account. For example, if you spend $19.50, the program will round-up your purchase to $20 and move $0.50 into your savings account.

3. Get a micro-saving app
Similar to saving spare change, you can also link your bank account to a money-saving app that does the savings for you. For example, Acorns automatically rounds up your purchase and moves the change into an investment account.

4. Cut the excess
To save money, you need to know where you’re currently spending it, suggested Matthew Gaffey, senior wealth manager for Corbett Road Investment Management in McLean, Va.: “List and monitor all of your expenses to get a full picture of how much you’re spending and where.” Money management habits will typically shed some light on a few areas that you could reduce or cut, such as unused magazine subscriptions or gym memberships.

5. Adopt a waiting period
The ease of online shopping can be brutal to your budget. Instead of falling for the impulse to make a purchase on the spot, implement a wait policy, such as 24 or 48 hours. You might realize you can live without that item you’re craving.

6. Don’t fall for a “great deal”
It’s hard to resist the lure of a good bargain. But saving 50%, 75% or even 90% isn’t a good deal if you don’t really need it. Instead of focusing on the discount, consider the amount you’re spending and how much you’ll really use the item.

7. Use a cash-back credit card
Some credit cards offer as much as 5% cash back in certain categories, which can add up. For example, the Chase Freedom® offers bonus categories each quarter – Earn 5% cash back on up to $1,500 in combined purchases in bonus categories each quarter you activate. Enjoy new 5% categories every 3 months. Unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases. If you spend the full $1,500 each quarter in the bonus categories you could earn $300 cash back a year. If you were going to make these purchases anyway, this is a good way to save money.

The information related to Chase Freedom® has been collected by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card prior to publication. Terms apply.

8. Find rebates
Before making an online purchase, check cash-back sites like Mr. Rebates or Ibotta and see if the store offers a rebate if you click through the site. You could earn a set cash-back amount or a percentage on a purchase.

Ways to start saving money every month

1. Automate monthly savings
Sign up for automatic savings withdrawals. “Direct deposit from a paycheck is great because then it happens automatically and you don’t even have to think about it,” said Amy Shepard, financial planning analyst at Sensible Money in Phoenix. In addition, she advised, “set reminders to increase your savings periodically, such as every six months or every time you get a raise.”

2. Create specific savings goals
Save for big things, like a vacation or kitchen renovation, by using a bank that allows you to set up separate savings accounts for different goals, said Bethany Griffith, senior financial advisor and partner at Abacus Planning Group in Columbia, S.C. “It can be a great way to jump start savings,” Griffith said. “The visual check-in each time you look at your accounts is a powerful driver for changing behavior.”

3. Do a 52-week money challenge
With the 52-week money challenge, you save more every week, and see clearly how savings can add up over the course of a year. Create a weekly savings challenge by saving $1 on the first week, $2 on the second week and continue until you’re saving $52 on the final week of the challenge. In a year you’ll have saved $1,378, not including interest.

4. Create a weekly meal plan
The average American household spends more than $3,400 a year on meals away from home. You’ll be less likely to eat out or order in if you’ve planned your meals for the week. Having a meal plan also helps you create a grocery list to avoid impulse purchases or food that goes uneaten.

5. Review your monthly bills
It’s irritating when your cable or cell phone bill goes up, but that extra $5 or $10 a month can add up to $60 or $120 over the course of a year. Pay attention to your monthly bills. If you see an increase, call and ask why. If you’ve been a customer for a long time, companies will often lower the rate instead of risk losing you.

6. Pay down debt
Americans pay $113 billion in credit card interest each year. If you’re among those that carry a balance, you can get an immediate return on your money by paying it down and eliminating it.

7. Adjust the thermostat
Save as much as 10% a year on heating and cooling by adjusting your thermostat seven to 10 degrees from its normal setting for eight hours a day. This can be while you’re at work or while you’re sleeping — or both, for even more savings. A programmable thermostat can do the work for you, easily paying for itself.

8. Use a price-drop refund app
Several retailers will give you money back if an item you bought goes on sale, but tracking that can be a chore. Use an app like Earny to do the tracking for you automatically. The app also takes care of the claim — Earny claims it saves the average user $75 each year.

Start saving money over the long term

1. Annualize your spending
A latte or vending machine habit might seem harmless, but when you multiply that daily expenditure by five days a week and 50 weeks a year (assuming you take a two-week vacation), it can add up to a substantial sum — one that might not seem worth it when you annualize your spending. Try this with your regular discretionary spending and see what you could do without.

2. Review your insurance
Make a habit to review your property and auto insurance each year. Jeffrey N. Tomaneng, director of financial planning for Sapers & Wallack in Newton, Mass., recently had an agent audit his policies and made changes to save $2,100 a year in premiums — “within a few days we were off to some much needed household savings,” he said.

3. Sell your stuff
The average American has 42 items in their home they no longer use worth an estimated $723. Sell them! Hold an annual garage sale, or list your items on eBay, Mercari or Facebook Marketplace. Someone else can use and enjoy them and you can pocket the money.

4. Shop around for higher interest rates
Your bank savings account may be conveniently attached to your checking, but if the interest rate is negligible you could be leaving money on the table. Look for higher interest-rate savings accounts that can help you build your balance.

5. Review your withholdings
Each year, review your benefits and withholdings and ensure you’re taking advantage of the benefits your company offers, such as flexible spending accounts or matching retirement. If you get a refund each year after tax season, consider adjusting your exemption amounts and stop giving the government an interest-free loan on your own money.

6. Look for discounts
If you’re a member of a professional or alumni association, you may get discounts on business services, insurance or travel. Make a point to review your benefits each year, and use them to find the best deals.

7. Review your credit card benefits
Before you buy that extended warranty or insurance on your rental car, check and see if the credit card you’re using offers it for free as a benefit of being a cardholder. You can save hundreds of dollars by knowing what you’re already offered.

8. Check your credit report
Each year you should order a copy of your credit report to make sure it’s accurate; you may find a discrepancy that could hurt your chances of getting better interest rates on a loan. You’re entitled to a free report each year from each of the reporting agencies, which you can obtain from AnnualCreditReport.com.

Bottom line

Developing any new habit requires behavior changes — changes that can be uncomfortable at first. But getting into the habit of saving money is worth it. Building a nest egg can provide peace of mind. Once you start seeing your balances grow, the numbers will give you the motivation you need to keep going and keep saving.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Stephanie Vozza
Stephanie Vozza |

Stephanie Vozza is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Stephanie here

Advertiser Disclosure

Banking

Review of the Tip Yourself App

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Getty Images

Saving money doesn’t always come naturally, even though it’s one of the best ways to stabilize your finances and live the lifestyle you want without going into debt. Apps like Tip Yourself exist to help you become a better saver.

Founded in 2015, Tip Yourself is a savings platform that allows you to reward yourself for everyday achievements by transferring money into a “Tip Jar” that serves as a savings account. It’s a clever and low-pressure way to save money and incentivize healthy, productive behaviors.

It is not the most robust or sophisticated savings tool, but it’s a great way to develop a savings mindset and consistently put money toward your goals. However, you will not earn interest on your Tip Jars, so it’s not a good long-term savings tool.

What is Tip Yourself?

Tip Yourself is a money-saving app that lets you reward yourself throughout the day when you accomplish tasks or achieve small goals. Ideally, you’ll get in the habit of saving by making incremental, consistent changes to how you manage your money. Every time you knock a loathsome task off your to-do list, you can double the dopamine hit by transferring money into your Tip Jar. You feel accomplished and save money, reinforcing two good behaviors.

A basic account is free and allows you to create up to two Tip Jars to save for different purposes. Tip Yourself Pro is the premium version, and it allows you to set up 10 jars. Those include an Automated Tip Jar and one dedicated to a savings challenge, as well as a Hidden Tip Jar to help curb spending impulses. The company earns money on Pro subscriptions and on interest accrued in users’ Tip Jars.

Your Tip Jar is linked to your checking account and is insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation up to the legal limit through Tip Yourself’s partner, nbkc bank, which holds the funds in your Tip Jar. The accounts are secured with 256-bit SSL encryption — the same protocol that’s used by banks. Once you link a checking account, you can only withdraw to that account.

Pros of the Tip Yourself app

It’s a low-cost service. You can sign up for free, and the app doesn’t charge transaction or service fees, so you never lose money on your tips. The minimum tip is $1, so there’s no reason not to save. Even Tip Yourself Pro (more below) can be affordable at $9.99 a year.

You can build good habits. By rewarding yourself for personal and professional victories, you develop a saving habit and motivate yourself to continue working toward non-financial goals as well.

It’s easy to use. The sign-up process is simple and quick, and you can familiarize yourself with the app in just a few minutes. The simplicity of the app and its features keeps the focus on saving and makes it easy to get into a routine of tipping yourself.

You can always withdraw funds. You don’t have to wait until you’ve accrued a certain amount of savings to dip into your cash. As soon as the money hits your account, you can initiate a withdrawal. There are no minimum or maximum withdrawal amounts, and you can make as many transfers as you want.

Follow inspirational posts on the social feed. The beauty of this app is that you’re rewarding yourself for good behaviors — and so is everyone else on the app. Your social feed is populated with other people sharing their life wins, such as going back to school, making time to exercise and taking care of long-overdue chores. You can also follow particular members to curate your feed. If you don’t want to share all the tips you give yourself, you can set those transactions to private, and they’ll only be visible to you.

Cons of the Tip Yourself app

Tips take several days to clear. Tip Yourself uses Automated Clearing House (ACH) transfers to move money from your bank account to your Tip Jar, a process that takes about three days to complete.

You don’t earn interest. The Tip Jar is a great place for holding money, but not for earning it. You won’t accrue any interest, no matter how long you leave the money in the account.

The social feed can be distracting. While seeing other people’s money wins can be a great motivator, having yet another social feed to scroll through can feel like a time-suck. The app defaults to showing your feed when you log in, so it’s difficult to avoid. But it’s easy to navigate to the other features, so it may not be a deal-breaker.

There’s a limit to how much you can tip. Tips are capped at $250, so if you wanted to give yourself a bonus for a job well-done, you’ll need to do so through another account. Still, the app seems to work best for small wins, so the tip cap doesn’t lessen the account’s value too much.

It’s difficult to get in touch with the company. Although Tip Yourself has an email contact button on every page, this MagnifyMoney writer reached out and did not receive a response. Two phone calls to the company’s number, which isn’t intuitive to find, went unanswered and messages were not returned. Tip Yourself’s Instagram, Facebook and Twitter accounts also seem to be updated infrequently.

How to open a Tip Yourself account

You can only sign up for an account through the app, so your first step is to download it from either Google Play or the App Store. Then you’ll need to create an account, which takes less than a minute. If you want to keep it really simple, you can sign up using your Facebook account, or you can create new credentials for Tip Yourself. In the latter case, you’ll just need to input your name, email address and a password.

Before you finalize your sign-up, you’ll need to agree to the privacy policy and terms of use. However, if you click on either one to read, the app may kick you back to the home screen where you’ll need to input your sign-up information again. The privacy policy and terms of use are linked on the website, so you can read them before signing up, but it’s a bit cumbersome if you’re unable to do so in the app.

Once you’re logged in, you’ll be prompted to link your checking account to the app. You don’t have to link accounts right away if you just want to browse the app’s features, but you’ll need to add a checking account to fund your Tip Jar. It’s best to link the account as soon as possible, because the app initiates two micro-deposits to verify your checking account, and it can take a few days for those to clear. After verification is complete, you can start tipping yourself. You’ll need your checking account to be linked and verified before you can add new Tip Jars, as well.

All users can set up a Standard Tip Jar and designate what they’re saving for and how much they want to save. Tip Yourself provides Quicktip Savings Buttons in the app, in the amounts of $2, $5 and $10, so you can easily reward yourself when you feel you deserve it. Or, you can set a higher amount if you want to kick your savings into high gear.

If you want to close a Tip Jar, perhaps because you reached your goal and no longer need it, you’ll need to move any remaining balance to another Tip Jar. You’re required to have at least one Tip Jar open at all times.

If you opt for a Pro account, you’ll be able to set up special Tip Jars, such as the Hidden Tip Jar and the Savings Challenge jar. The Savings Challenge encourages you to save $1,378 throughout the course of a year by setting up weekly tip transfers that increase incrementally. In Week 1, you tip yourself $1. In Week 2, you tip $2. In Week 3, your amount is $3 — and so on. It’s a neat way to save and to overcome the idea that you need to make massive transfers to build savings.

With the Hidden Tip Jar, you set a savings goal and tip yourself as usual, but you won’t see your balance until you’ve hit your goal. The logic is that not being able to see what you have will reduce your urge to spend before you’ve hit your savings target.

Pro users can also set up an Automated Tip Jar, which allows you to add set-and-forget tips to that account and have them transfer in on a weekly or monthly basis. If you opt for a monthly tip, you can choose whether it transfers at the beginning, middle or end of the month, so you can plan around your pay schedule. Or, you can schedule a weekly tip for yourself on the day of your choosing.

How much does Tip Yourself cost?

A basic account is free and includes two Tip Jars. Upgrading to Tip Yourself Pro will cost $9.99 a year and gives you access to 10 Tip Jars.

If you just want to build the habit of saving money generally, you’ll be fine with a free account. But if you’re the type of person who likes to create multiple funds for specific purposes, you’ll want to upgrade to the Pro option.

How Tip Yourself stacks up to the competition

You might be wondering why you’d download the app, much less pay for it, when you may be able to create multiple savings accounts with your bank.

As noted above, your Tip Jar isn’t a long-term savings account. It’s a temporary place to stash your money while you save toward specific goals. Psychologically, setting aside small amounts of money feels more doable than trying to build up your bank account.

The fact that you can reward yourself for other positive behaviors, such as going to the gym, eating healthy or finishing an assignment before your deadline, reinforces good habits in different areas of your life through small, sustainable wins.

However, Tip Yourself does seem less robust a service than, say, Digit. Also a money-saving app, Digit offers automated savings, in which the platform assesses your finances every day and transfers money into your savings accounts based on what you can afford to spare. Like Tip Yourself, Digit offers unlimited withdrawals, but it also provides overdraft protection and a 1% savings bonus after you’ve used the app to save for three consecutive months.

Digit also allows you to set however many savings goals you choose, whereas Tip Yourself limits basic users to two Tip Jars and Pro users to 10. At $5 a month, Digit is costlier than Tip Yourself, but the extra expense may be worth it for the broader range of features.

As far as app usability, the two platforms are pretty much tied. Tip Yourself’s app is rated 4.7 in the App Store and 4.4 on Google Play. Digit’s App Store ranking is also 4.7, while its Android rating is nearly on par at 4.3.

The bottom line: Is the Tip Yourself app worth it?

If you struggle with saving money or budgeting for things such as vacations, holiday gifts or just a general rainy day fund, Tip Yourself is a good tool for establishing the habit. By linking everyday accomplishments with tipping yourself, you make saving part of your routine. You also reduce the stress of money management by saving toward specific goals.

It seems to work best for smaller-scale goals rather than major expenses, and you won’t find a full suite of budgeting or money management features here. However, the low cost and ease of use make Tip Yourself an accessible, helpful app for saving on your own terms and beginning to take control of your spending.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Casey Hynes
Casey Hynes |

Casey Hynes is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Casey here

Advertiser Disclosure

Banking

Review of Moven: A Mobile Bank Account

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Getty Images

Founded in 2011, Moven is a fintech company that attempts to use immediate prompts, such as spending reviews each time you make a purchase, to positively impact its users’ financial habits.

It is not a bank itself, but Moven partners with CBW Bank to offer users prepaid cards. These cards act similarly to many cash management accounts, sans any interest.

If you’re looking for a high return on the money in your checking account, look elsewhere. But if you’re looking for an app that could potentially alter your spending habits for the better, you may want to give Moven a closer look.

What does Moven offer?

You can use Moven through your existing bank account or as a fully functional prepaid account that offers direct deposit of your paycheck.

As you spend and save, Moven will learn your money habits. From there, it will anticipate spending across categories such as groceries, transportation and dining. This will be tracked on your Spending Meter, which will track your spending progress within each category.

Every time you make a purchase, the Moven app will show you how you’re doing according to the anticipated budget. If the Spending Meter is green, you’re doing all right. If it’s yellow, you are approaching your expected spending. But if it’s red, you know you need to address your spending as soon as possible. Moven also looks at your daily spending in general and will give you color-coded information on spending spikes throughout the month.

If you have short-term savings goals, Moven provides a feature called “Moven Stash” where you can put this money aside until you need it for rent, a road trip or whatever your goal may be. It won’t earn any interest.

Moven debit account

The Moven account comes with a debit card and the ability to issue checks, albeit electronically. (Checks can be written for between $10 and $4,000.) This account does not pay interest, but it is insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation up to the legal limit.

The most complicated part of this account is its loading limits. If you are getting your paycheck deposited directly into your Moven account, there is no limit on how much you can deposit at once. However, there are maximums — and minimums — on other methods of account funding.

When you initially open your account, you must deposit between $50 and $500. Every time you reload your card, you must add between $10 and $2,500 for Automated Clearing House (ACH) transfers other than paychecks that are deposited directly. If that ACH transfer is coming from another bank, it will be limited to $1,000. If you’re doing a card-to-card transfer, you must stay between $10 and $750. The maximum you can load through Moven in a month is $10,000 (again, direct deposit paychecks are an exception).

You may also choose to make deposits via cash at convenience stores in the MasterCard rePower network. Moven does not charge a fee for this type of deposit, but the MasterCard rePower location will. Your funds will be available immediately.

Finally, you can deposit checks via your phone using the Ingo app. The standard fee for cashing a check with Ingo is $5. Depending on how many checks you cash a month and the type of check (personal, payroll or government), fees for checks beyond $125 to $500 vary from 1% to 5%. If you can wait 10 days to access your funds, the fee will be waived.

Daily ATM withdrawals are capped at $500, while total daily spending is limited to $10,000. You will not run into any overdraft fees since Moven will not approve a purchase if there are insufficient funds in your account. It’s impossible to overdraw.

Moven budgeting and spending tools

To figure out if your Spending Meter should display green, yellow or red, Moven projects your spending. It does this by averaging your past spending by category. That means the longer you have your account, the more accurate the average will be. By the same token, the longer you use your account, the less impact a particularly good or bad month will have on your average.

In addition to the color-coded notifications and Moven’s algorithm that learns to predict your projected spending, the Stash feature allows you to budget. You can set expenses as milestones, whether they’re mundane things, such as a utility bill, or once-in-a-lifetime expenses, such as your best friend’s baby shower. By scheduling these, you can ensure you’ve budgeted for both expenses ahead of time.

How much does Moven cost?

Moven doesn’t charge many of the fees you usually see, such as maintenance or overdraft fees. But some of its fees are not as common elsewhere.

Let’s take the account closure fee, for example, which is not a fee you find on all checking accounts. You’ll pay $10 at Moven to shut your account.

While Moven doesn’t charge any ATM fees when you use the STAR network, you may incur a fee if you use an ATM outside of this network. The fee would be charged by the out-of-network ATM owner. The STAR network has over 40,000 surcharge-free ATMs across the country, so finding one might not be difficult.

Moven doesn’t charge to replace your card — at least not the first two times a year. If you lose your card more often than that, the fee is $4.99 for each subsequent incident. If you want expedited shipping on your replacement card, there is a $30 fee.

Moven is not a great account to use if you’re traveling internationally or to an area where U.S. dollars aren’t accepted. Moven has several fees on these transactions, and they can compound.

First, you’ll have to pay an EFT fee of 1% every time you use your Moven account outside of the U.S. If you’re using an international ATM, you’ll have to pay an additional 1% fee.

Regardless of how you’re accessing your Moven account, you will also have to pay a 3% currency exchange fee when you are charged in a currency different than U.S. dollars. That means that if you’re making an international transaction, the fees could be 1% if there’s no currency conversion. Otherwise, it’d be 4%.

Here’s a breakdown of Moven’s fees:

Moven Fees
Monthly feeNone
Maintenance feeNone
Overdraft feeNone
ATM feesNone, unless charged by an out-of-network ATM owner
International ATM withdrawal fee1%
Card replacement fee2 free replacements per year; each subsequent replacement is $4.99
Paper statement fee*$5
Expedited shipping on card replacement$30
Account closure fee$10
EFT surcharge1%
Currency conversion fee3%
*Statement will only be printed upon request. Fees accurate as of October 4, 2019.

The Moven mobile app experience

Moven’s mobile app is the entire reason to get an account. The app notifies you of where you stand with your money in real time, creating an immediate prompt that can help you modify your behavior. At any point, you can check your spending and see if you’re in red, yellow or green, curbing your purchases as necessary.

The app doesn’t just track the money in your Moven account, either. While one reason to link your personal banking account to Moven is to establish a funding source, another is that the app can track all of the spending on your linked accounts. It can also track credit card spending, though you cannot fund your Moven account with a credit card.

The app will split your expenditures into three categories: wants, needs and other. The wants category includes line items such as travel, dining and entertainment. Needs are things such as rent, utilities and health care expenses. In the other category, you’ll have miscellaneous line items such as gifts, business expenses and account transfers.

This gives you a holistic picture of your spending habits, income flow and how you can improve your money habits. In fact, you don’t have to open an account with Moven at all. You can use the app to track your spending with accounts you already have with other financial institutions — if you want to go that route.

As with other mobile-only apps, you don’t have a branch you can visit if you have any banking-related questions, so keep that in mind as you compare your options.

How to open a Moven account

To use Moven, you must be a U.S. citizen aged 18 or older with a Social Security number. You need a mobile device that runs on Android 4.1 or above, or iOS 8 or above.

While you can easily and quickly create your Moven profile via desktop, you will need to download the app via the App Store or Google Play to use all the features. If you do decide to use the account to track your spending in real time with the Spending Meter, it will take seven to 10 business days to receive your card.

If you need assistance during the process, you can get in touch with Moven via email or phone.

The pros and cons of Moven

Pros

  • Immediate spending alerts serve as reminders to adjust your money habits
  • You can link external accounts, potentially allowing you to track all your spending
  • No maintenance, overdraft or domestic ATM fees charged by Moven
  • Easy to open an account and use the app

Cons

  • No interest
  • Requirements for minimum and maximum deposits
  • Numerous fees for international travelers
  • Can deposit cash, but you will pay a fee
  • Fee charged to close your account

Who should use Moven?

If you’re trying to change your spending habits, Moven can provide reinforcement. These behavioral goals are what would motivate the ideal user to download the app.

If you’re attempting to earn interest on your savings, access financial charting tools that allow you to incorporate your retirement savings or other investments or handle a lot of cash, this account is likely not a great fit for you.

This is even truer if you travel internationally regularly or you’re planning an extended stint abroad. While you’re outside the U.S., you will get hit with fees every time you spend money.

Moven isn’t a great place to grow your cash, but it can be a great way to modify undesirable spending habits in real time.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Brynne Conroy
Brynne Conroy |

Brynne Conroy is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brynne here