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Here’s What Applying for Multiple Credit Cards Does to Your Credit Score

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication. This site may be compensated through a credit card partnership.

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We frequently hear people are afraid to apply for a credit card because it will cause their credit score to drop. This fear keeps them from getting deals on a balance transfer or finding a new credit card to maximize their spending habits for cash back rewards. At MagnifyMoney, we see properly utilized credit cards as an effective tool to increase financial health. Balance transfers can significantly decrease the money spent on debt; while cashback rewards can easily put some money in your pocket on your everyday spend.

Your credit score shouldn’t just be a trophy sitting on your mantle, it’s something that should be used to make sure you’re getting the best deals. Yes, applying for a new credit card will cause a decrease on your score – usually around five points –because there is a hard inquiry on your credit report. However, we still think in a majority of cases, applying for a credit card is worth your time and minor drop in score.

The members of the MagnifyMoney team (minus Goofski of course) have all applied for multiple cards within the last year and still have high credit scores. Here are our stories:

Nick

I moved back to the US in September 2013.

A combination of nostalgia (I used to run Barclays in the UK), inspired me to apply for the Barclays Arrival in September 2013.

I then started the research for MagnifyMoney.com, and I wanted to personally test the products that we would be recommending to you.

In November 2013, I applied for Chase Slate® and successfully tested a balance transfer.

In May, I applied for two credit cards. I applied for the Fidelity Investment Rewards Card (the highest cashback credit card on the market), and I applied for the PenFed Premium Travel Rewards American Express® Card (this card is no longer available). PenFed has some of the best long-term balance transfer offers out there.  I wanted to see what it was like to join the credit union, apply for the card and execute a balance transfer. They asked for quite a few documents, but it worked out in the end!

Before these four applications, I had not applied for credit in over a year.

My official FICO® score started around 788 in September.  It is now 814.

FICO Credit Meter

 

CreditKarma uses TransUnion, and gives me a score of 766. CreditSesame uses Experian, and it says my credit score is 811.

Why did my score go up?  A credit inquiry is not a big deal.  Credit utilization is a big deal. With these four new credit cards, I added over $50,000 of new “available credit.”  And I haven’t used any of it.  So, my utilization has gone way down.

Brian

I’ve applied for six credit cards in the last year, which earned me about 350,000 points and miles for travel. That might sound extreme, and it’s not for everyone, but my credit score has barely budged.

My FICO® score provided by Barclays has moved from 833 a year ago to 819 now.

My CreditKarma Transunion score has remained flat at 790, while with Experian my score has remained at 750, though with a brief dip to 740 after my first applications a year ago.

Here are the cards I opened:

June 2013 – Ink Bold® Business Charge Card from Chase Bank *This card is no longer available.

June 2013 – Platinum Delta SkyMiles® Credit Card from American Express *This card is no longer available on MagnifyMoney

September 2013 – Ink Plus® Business Credit Card from Chase Bank

January 2014 – United MileagePlus® Explorer Card

January 2014 – Citi® / AAdvantage® Executive World Elite™ Mastercard®

May 2014 – Gold Delta SkyMiles® Credit Card from American Express

promo-cashback-halfI am fortunate to have excellent credit as a starting point, so that’s put me in a good position to take advantage of deals on cards I want to use.

My case might seem extreme, and I’m willing to pay annual fees in order to earn rewards I put to good use with travel.

But it shows that if you have great credit you shouldn’t be afraid to use it to your advantage, whether that’s to get a better rate on debt or to earn bigger rewards.

While some people who are more aggressive about earning rewards like to group applications together on a single day to minimize the impact on their score, I tend to apply when I see offers I think are outstanding and find the time to manage meeting the spending to earn them.

This haphazard approach has served me fine – I’ve experienced no denials and my credit scores have held up well.

Banks want new customers who pay on time and keep their debt in check.

They’re ready to reward you if you’re willing to shop around regularly for better deals.

Credit Rating

Erin

I applied for three credit cards in the last six months after nearly seven years of not applying for any new lines of credit. I opened my first (and for a long time, only) credit card in 2007 when I entered college.

It all started in January of 2014 when I used CreditKarma to try and discover my score. After filling out all the information I promptly received a notice that I had a “thin file.”

Considering I opened a credit card in 2007, made a few purchases each month and paid my bill on time and in full, I felt a little baffled as to how I had a thin file.

The single credit card seemed to be part of the reason I had such a thin file because I had no other types of credit. I knew I wasn’t going to take out a loan simply for the sake of diversifying types of credit. Instead, I decided to apply for some new credit cards.

This was pre-MagnifyMoney.com, so I didn’t have our cashback tool as a resource. I ended up with the Discover it® Cash Back because I liked the idea of seeing my FICO® score each month.

In February, my Discover statement said my FICO® score was 790. Within a month, I applied for the Delta American Express card as well as a Banana Republic Visa (which I chronicled in this blog post).

Applying for so many cards after seven years of no new lines of credit probably raised some red flags to lenders. My score dropped from 790 to 750 in two months.

In June, my score already went up 12 points and currently sits at 762. I believe this is because I drastically increased my available credit limit without increasing the amount of money I spent. Now I have a significantly lower utilization rate on my cards, which indicates that I’m a responsible borrow.

Have questions about how to improve your credit score? Explore our building credit section of the blog, tweet us @Magnify_Money or email us at [email protected]

 

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Erin Lowry
Erin Lowry |

Erin Lowry is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Erin at [email protected]

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How (and why) to Request a Credit Limit Increase With Capital One

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Credit Limit Increase with Capital One

Getting a credit limit increase may be beneficial — as long as you maintain responsible spending habits. Here, we’ll tell you how to increase your limit when on a Capital One credit card.

First, it’s important to understand that each credit card company has different requirements for limit increases. Before sharing the criteria Capital One uses to grant or deny a limit increase request, let’s discuss why you might want a credit limit increase in the first place.

How to increase your credit limit with American Express and Barclays

Why increase your Capital One credit limit?

Capital One offers flexible credit cards for personal or business use that provide several benefits and perks, from bonus rewards and Uber ride discounts to  cashback and 0% intro APR promotions. While the perks of using a Capital One credit card are nice, if you are spending near or close to your limit each month, your credit may be taking a negative hit. It’s important to ensure you’re using credit cards for convenience and to improve your credit, not because you need them in order to get by.

Keeping your utilization below 30% of your credit limit each month is ideal for credit-building. Plus, if you are spending less than 30% of your credit limit, it will be easier to pay off the balance in full in month, allowing you to avoid paying high interest rates. Even if your card currently has a 0% APR for a limited time, it’s best to get into the habit of paying off your balance in full each month, because that promotion won’t last forever.

With that being said, a credit limit increase may help improve your credit score, just as long as you don’t inflate your spending. If you keep your spending at the exact same level after the credit limit increase, your utilization will automatically drop. For example, say you spend $300 a month on a card with a $1,000 limit – a 30% utilization rate. You requested an increase and now have a $2,000 limit, but continue to spend just $300 a month. Without doing anything differently, you’ve lowered your utilization to 15%, which could help improve your credit score.

What to know when considering a Capital One Credit Line increase

Capital One allows users to request a credit line increase either online or by phone. Accounts not eligible for a credit line increase include those that are less than three months old, as well as those that have received a credit line increase or decrease within the past six months.

When you submit a credit line increase request, Capital One looks at a variety of factors, such as on-time payment history, average monthly payment amount and your credit score. A credit score of 700 and above is generally considered good.

They will also look at your current utilization rate. If you are responsibly using your card and paying more than the minimum each month, this tells Capital One that you can handle potential increased monthly payments if they offer you a credit increase.

What’s nice about this process is that it will not negatively affect your credit. When you submit a request to increase your credit limit, Capital One will use the information they normally receive from the credit bureaus each month, so your credit report will not be pulled.

How to request a Credit Limit increase with Capital One

Requesting a credit limit increase is easy, and it only takes a few minutes. First, we’ll walk you through how to do it online, then explain how the phone option works.

Step 1

Once you’ve logged in, click on ‘I Want To…”.

Step 2

Under Offers and Updates, click on Request Credit Line Increase.

 

Step 3

Fill out the short form to the best of your ability, then click Submit Request.

In some cases, Capital One says they can approve credit limit increase requests immediately. If they do not, you will be taken to a confirmation page. As stated on the confirmation page, Capital One will notify you with the outcome of your request in two to three business days if you are signed up for a paperless account, or within 10 business days if you receive paper statements.

If you prefer to request a credit line increase by phone, you can call 1-800-955-7070 and choose the ‘More Options’ prompt to get to the credit line increase request option.

What’s next?

If you’re denied a credit limit increase, Capital One allows you to apply again at any time, but there’s no guarantee your request will be approved. It’s best to work on addressing the reason or reasons why you were declined in the first place.

In addition to making payments on time, and making more than the minimum payment each month, Capital One recommends you keep your income and employment information up to date, as these factors are crucial for determining  if you’re eligible for a credit limit increase. They will also help you to build a strong credit score overall.

If you’re approved, your new credit line will be available immediately. Try to stick to responsible spending habits, and continue using your card wisely.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Chonce Maddox
Chonce Maddox |

Chonce Maddox is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Chonce at [email protected]

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Do Credit Builder Loans Actually Work?

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

If you have no credit or bad credit, getting a loan may seem impossible.

When lenders are considering a loan application, their main concern is whether the applicant can pay the loan back. If there is no loan repayment history, or a record of late payments or loan defaults, a lender will likely determine that the applicant is too risky.

A credit builder loan is one way you can start building a strong credit history that should eventually help qualify you for other loans.

What is a credit builder loan?

Building good credit, whether you are starting from scratch or repairing a bad credit history, requires patience. You’ll need to put in the work to show lenders you are a consistently reliable borrower who makes on-time debt payments.

A credit builder loan is a great way to begin establishing a good credit history. Here’s how it works:

A financial institution such as a credit union, which typically issues credit builder loans, deposits a small amount of money into a secured savings account for the applicant. The borrower then pays the money back in small monthly installments — with interest — over a set period of time. At the end of the loan’s term, which typically ranges from six to 24 months, the borrower receives the total amount of the credit builder loan in a lump sum, plus any interest earned, if the lender offers interest.

LendingTree
APR

As low as 3.99%

Credit Req.

Minimum 500 FICO®

Minimum Credit Score

Terms

24 to 60

months

Origination Fee

Varies

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on LendingTree’s secure website

LendingTree is our parent company

Advertiser Disclosure

LendingTree is our parent company. LendingTree is unique in that you may be able to compare up to five personal loan offers within minutes. Everything is done online and you may be pre-qualified by lenders without impacting your credit score. LendingTree is not a lender.


A Personal Loan can offer funds relatively quickly once you qualify you could have your funds within a few days to a week. A loan can be fixed for a term and rate or variable with fluctuating amount due and rate assessed, be sure to speak with your loan officer about the actual term and rate you may qualify for based on your credit history and ability to repay the loan. A personal loan can assist in paying off high-interest rate balances with one fixed term payment, so it is important that you try to obtain a fixed term and rate if your goal is to reduce your debt. Some lenders may require that you have an account with them already and for a prescribed period of time in order to qualify for better rates on their personal loan products. Lenders may charge an origination fee generally around 1% of the amount sought. Be sure to ask about all fees, costs and terms associated with each loan product. Loan amounts of $1,000 up to $50,000 are available through participating lenders; however, your state, credit history, credit score, personal financial situation, and lender underwriting criteria can impact the amount, fees, terms and rates offered. Ask your loan officer for details.

As of 28-Feb-2019, LendingTree Personal Loan consumers were seeing match rates as low as 3.99% (3.99% APR) on a $10,000 loan amount for a term of three (3) years. Rates and APRs were based on a self-identified credit score of 700 or higher, zero down payment, origination fees of $0 to $100 (depending on loan amount and term selected).

How a credit builder helps boost credit

A credit builder loan helps borrowers build credit by providing an opportunity  to make small monthly payments. As the lender reports regular loan payments to credit reporting agencies, your credit history will show you can make regular, on-time loan payments over the life of a loan.

Most credit builder loans are small, ranging from $300 to $1,000, which means they also have small monthly payments. Interest rates vary by bank, so be sure you compare all your options to get the best rate.

To apply for a credit builder loan, you can visit a local lender’s branch or apply online. Because you won’t receive any money until the loan is paid in full, credit builder loans are typically easy to qualify for.

What to watch out for

Credit builder loans are not free, so be sure to ask about fees and interest rates. Some lenders may charge an application fee, and interest rates vary widely among lenders. While some offer rates in the single digits, other lenders’ rates may be significantly higher.

Where to get a credit builder loan

Here are examples of a few types of credit builder loans.

Credit unions

Many credit unions list details of their loans online and provide an online application.

1st Financial Federal Credit Union, for example, offers these terms:

  • Minimum Loan Amount: $300
  • Maximum Loan Amount: $1,000
  • Loan Term: 12 months
  • Interest Rate: 12%
  • Payment history reported to credit bureaus
  • 50% of interest refunded back with on-time payments

Banks

Some regional or local banks offer credit builder loans with the intention of helping clients build a good credit score as they work toward good financial health.

The Sunrise Banks Credit Builders Program, for example, places loan funds into a Certificate of Deposit (CD) for the borrower. The CD earns interest as the borrower repays the loan, which can be withdrawn when it’s paid in full. Consumers can borrow $500, $1,000 or $1,500, and they are assigned a repayment schedule of monthly principal and interest payments. Payments are reported to Experian, Transunion and Equifax.

Self Lender

Self Lender, based in Austin, Texas, is designed to help consumers increase their financial health. Working in partnership with multiple banks, Self Lender offers a credit-builder account that is essentially a CD-backed installment loan. In other words, you open a CD with the bank and they extend a line of credit to you for the same amount. When you make payments, they report it to the credit bureaus.

The money you put in the CD itself is what secures the loan.

Self Lender offers four loan amounts, each with 12 or 24 month terms. Borrowers can receive loans of $525 to $1,700. Fees vary from $9 to $15. See Self Lenders website for more details.

Pros of credit builder loans

  • A credit builder loan forces you to save money, as you are essentially making payments into a savings account.
  • Credit builder loans are secured by the money the bank has deposited for you, so they are typically easy to apply for.
  • When the loan is paid off, you will receive a payment in the amount of the loan. Some lenders also pay you dividends, or refund a portion of your interest.
  • You will develop good savings habits through a credit builder loan, which requires you to set aside money every month for a loan payment.
  • As you make payments on time every month, you’ll develop financial discipline that you apply to bigger loans.

Cons of credit building loans

  • Late or missed payments will be reported to credit reporting agencies, which could hurt your credit score.
  • They aren’t all free. For one, Self Lender charges a $15 non-refundable administrative fee.

Learn more:

Why your credit score matters

Credit scores are calculated by using your credit report, which is a record of your credit activity that includes the status of your credit accounts and your history of loan payments. Many financial institutions use credit scores to determine whether an applicant can get a mortgage, auto loan, credit card or other type of credit. Applicants with higher credit scores typically qualify for larger loans with lower interest rates and better terms.

Three federal credit bureaus, Equifax, Experian and Transunion, collect information from data providers and lenders, and use it to calculate your credit score.

Consumers typically have multiple credit scores. The two key scores are FICO and VantageScore.

FICO scores

FICO scores represent the likelihood that a borrower will pay back a loan on time. Scores range from 300 to 850, and over 90% of lending decisions in the U.S. are influenced by an applicant’s FICO score.

Five factors determine a consumer’s FICO score:

  • Payment history (35%)This is a record of your loan payment, and notes whether they were on time, late or missed.
  • Amounts owed (30%)Also known as utilization, this shows how much you use your credit limit. For example, if you have a credit card with a $15,000 limit and you have a debt of $3,000 on the card, your utilization is 20%. Ideally, your utilization should be less than 30% on all debts combined.
  • Length of credit history (15%)This measures the length of time you’ve had credit. If you opened your first credit card 20 years ago when you were a college student, for example, your credit history likely would be slightly higher than someone who took out their first loan a year ago.
  • New credit (10%)New credit looks at how frequently you’ve inquired about your credit and opened new accounts. For example, when you open a new credit card, your credit score could be slightly lower for six months before going back up.

VantageScores

VantageScore, which also measures your credit risk, is used by 20 of the 25 largest financial institutions. As is the case with FICO scores, higher Vantage scores lead to better loan opportunities. VantageScores range from 300 to 850, and are available for free online. VantageScore takes six factors into account.

Extremely influential

  • Payment history

Highly influential

  • Your age and type of credit (maintaining a mix of accounts over a long time is beneficial)
  • Percentage of your credit limit used (utilization)

Moderately influential

  • Your total debt balance

Less influential

  • Recent credit inquiries and credit behavior (don’t open a lot of new accounts at one time)
  • Available credit

How do I get my credit score?

There are numerous ways to get your FICO and VantageScore for free. Check out our guide on Ways to Get Your Free FICO Score.

Other ways to build credit

Credit builder loans aren’t the only way to establish a good credit score. Here are some other options if you don’t want to take out a loan.

Secured credit cards

Like credit builder loans, secured credit cards are an easy way to build or rebuild credit history. The application process is the same, but secured credit cards require a deposit between $50 and $300 into a separate account. The bank then issues a line of credit that is typically equal to the deposit, allowing you to build a credit history without putting the lender at risk.

Many secured credit cards allow you to “graduate” and move to a traditional credit card after you’ve proven you can make payments consistently. Lenders will report your payments to credit reporting bureaus, and some offer autopay, online payments and alerts to help ensure you pay your monthly bill on time.

Keep in mind: Some secured credit cards have annual fees and APRs as high as 25%.

Unsecured personal loans

Unsecured personal loans can be easy to qualify for, and can help you build credit. These loans typically range from between $2,000 and $50,000, and some lenders will offer them to borrowers with lower credit scores.

The borrower will receive the money in a lump sum upfront, and can then use the money to repay the loan.

Using an unsecured personal loan to build credit, however, can be risky. Many unsecured personal loans come with origination fees, and interest rates can be high, which means the loan can be an expensive way to build credit.

LendingTree
APR

As low as 3.99%

Credit Req.

Minimum 500 FICO®

Minimum Credit Score

Terms

24 to 60

months

Origination Fee

Varies

SEE OFFERS Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website

LendingTree is our parent company

Advertiser Disclosure

LendingTree is our parent company. LendingTree is unique in that you may be able to compare up to five personal loan offers within minutes. Everything is done online and you may be pre-qualified by lenders without impacting your credit score. LendingTree is not a lender.


A Personal Loan can offer funds relatively quickly once you qualify you could have your funds within a few days to a week. A loan can be fixed for a term and rate or variable with fluctuating amount due and rate assessed, be sure to speak with your loan officer about the actual term and rate you may qualify for based on your credit history and ability to repay the loan. A personal loan can assist in paying off high-interest rate balances with one fixed term payment, so it is important that you try to obtain a fixed term and rate if your goal is to reduce your debt. Some lenders may require that you have an account with them already and for a prescribed period of time in order to qualify for better rates on their personal loan products. Lenders may charge an origination fee generally around 1% of the amount sought. Be sure to ask about all fees, costs and terms associated with each loan product. Loan amounts of $1,000 up to $50,000 are available through participating lenders; however, your state, credit history, credit score, personal financial situation, and lender underwriting criteria can impact the amount, fees, terms and rates offered. Ask your loan officer for details.

As of 28-Feb-2019, LendingTree Personal Loan consumers were seeing match rates as low as 3.99% (3.99% APR) on a $10,000 loan amount for a term of three (3) years. Rates and APRs were based on a self-identified credit score of 700 or higher, zero down payment, origination fees of $0 to $100 (depending on loan amount and term selected).

The bottom line

While credit building loans can be a key step in establishing a strong credit history, it’s imperative that you make all your payments in full and on time. When you are committed to building a strong financial future, successfully paying off a credit builder loan can be a significant factor in someday getting favorable terms on a mortgage and other loans.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Marty Minchin
Marty Minchin |

Marty Minchin is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Marty here

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