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What Credit Score Is Needed to Buy a Car?

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Disclosure : By clicking “See Offers” you’ll be directed to our parent company, LendingTree. You may or may not be matched with the specific lender you clicked on, but up to five different lenders based on your creditworthiness.

Credit score to buy a car
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If you want to buy a car, you can probably find someone willing to sell you one and give you a loan, regardless of your credit score. But you might be shocked when you see what it will cost you. Car buyers who need a loan and don’t have a good credit score often end up paying more — a lot more.

Even if you have an average or better credit score, exactly how good it is can dramatically affect how much you pay to finance your car.

Fortunately, by learning about credit scores and how they affect your car loan, you can take steps to make sure you always get your best deal. Read on to learn how.

Buying a car? What’s your credit score?

The better your score, the better the auto loan deal you can get. That’s because if you have a proven track record of borrowing money and paying it as promised, lenders aren’t taking a big chance giving you a loan. They might even compete for your business by offering you low interest rate loans.

If your payment history is sketchier, you’re a riskier bet in the eyes of prospective lenders. You may quit paying, and they’ll have to take steps to collect. Lenders expect compensation for extra risk in the form of higher interest rates.

This chart shows how much your credit score can affect the amount you pay to finance your car.

Average Car Loan Rates by Credit Score, Third Quarter, 2018

Credit Score RangeNew Car LoanUsed Car Loan
781 to 8503.68%4.34%
661 to 7804.56%5.97%
601 to 6607.52%10.34%
501 to 60011.89%16.14%
300 to 50014.41%18.98%
Source: Experian

Do auto lenders use the same credit score as other lenders?

Credit bureaus offer a wide variety of credit scores to help meet lenders’ needs. Because auto lenders place more importance on certain credit information, such as your history of making car payments, the credit score an auto lender sees may be slightly different from the score pulled by other lenders.

What else do auto lenders look at besides my credit score?

Auto lenders look at several factors in addition to your credit history and credit score. According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), they’ll also consider how much income you have, your existing debt load, the amount of the loan you are applying for, the loan term (how long it will take you to pay it back), your down payment as a percentage of the vehicle value, and the type and age of the vehicle you are purchasing.

The most important things car lenders consider when you apply for a loan, however, are your credit score and credit history. “You can even get a car loan when you are unemployed, provided you have a down payment and money in the bank,” said Nishank Khanna, chief marketing officer at Clarify Capital, a business lending firm in New York City.

How can I increase my odds of getting a low-interest car loan?

If you want to get the best deal on a loan, follow these steps before you go to the dealership:

  1. Check your credit report before you look for a car. According to Experian, you should check your credit report at least three to six months before you make a major purchase. This gives you time to correct any mistakes on your report, if needed.
  2. Try to improve your score, if needed. One quick way to pump up your credit score is to lower your utilization rate, preferably by paying down your consumer debt. Even if you’ve never missed a payment, your credit score suffers if you’re using too much of your available credit when lenders report to the credit bureaus. Alternatively, you can ask for a credit limit increase, and instantly improve your utilization rate. (Just don’t use that available credit, or you’ll be worse off than before.)
  3. Avoid making major purchases or applying for other new credit right before you want a car loan. Applying for credit creates “hard inquiries” on your credit report, which can temporarily ding your score. In addition, new debt can change your debt-to-available-credit ratio, or increase your debt load.
  4. Know what you can afford. “Always get a car that you can realistically afford in terms of the car payments, not necessarily what you would like to have,” Khanna said. Stick to your decision, no matter how persuasive the salesperson can be.
  5. Find a cosigner, if necessary. If you have just entered the workforce, for example, you may not have a significant credit history. “You may need to have someone cosign your loan to get a decent interest rate,” Khanna said. A cosigner can be a parent, sibling or even a friend. The cosigner will be liable for the debt if you don’t pay, so make sure you can comfortably make the payments, and that you won’t put the cosigner’s finances at risk if something goes wrong.
  6. Shop around. Sure, it’s easy to apply for a car loan at the dealership. But you probably don’t buy cars without shopping around. Why would you sign up for a car loan at the first place you go? You can even find a good deal and get preapproved for a car loan. As a car buyer, it is wise to make sure that you are getting the best deal that you can qualify for. Consider starting your search with LendingTree, our parent company.  On LendingTree, you can fill out an online form and receive up to five potential auto loan offers from lenders at once, instead of filling out five different lender applications.

LendingTree
APR

As low as
3.99%

Terms

24 To 84

months

Fees

Varies

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LendingTree is our parent company

LendingTree is our parent company. LendingTree is unique in that they allow you to compare multiple, auto loan offers within minutes. Everything is done online. LendingTree is not a lender, but their service connects you with up to five offers from auto loan lenders based on your creditworthiness.

Avoid dealerships that advertise “no credit check” or “buy here, pay here.” These dealerships specialize in sales to buyers with poor or no credit and make their own in-house loans. According to the CFPB, you may not only pay high interest rates to places that specialize in buyers with poor credit, but you may pay thousands of dollars more for your car than you would elsewhere. If these are the only dealerships where you can get a loan, consider walking away.

“If your credit score is less than 500, you may be better off getting a car you can afford to buy outright with cash,” Khanna said. You can always get a nicer car when your credit improves.

While you’re comparing car loans, remember to pay attention to the total cost of financing your car. Your interest rate is just one factor in determining your total interest expense. You can also reduce your interest cost by making a larger down payment, paying off your car sooner, and by purchasing a less expensive car.

You have plenty to think about when you’re shopping for a car. You shouldn’t have to worry about your loan at the same time you’re checking out features and searching car lots. Get a head start on financing, before you go shopping, and you’ll have one less thing to worry about while you test drive your next car.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Sally Herigstad
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Sally Herigstad is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Sally here

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Building Credit, Credit Cards

Guide to Adding an Authorized User to Your Credit Card

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication. This site may be compensated through a credit card partnership.

Disclaimer: Though we have done our best to research information regarding this topic, be aware that issuing banks may have unique rules and agreement terms that apply to their particular credit card accounts. Contact issuing banks directly for questions on terms and policies relevant to specific credit card accounts.

What is an Authorized User?

An authorized user on a credit card account is any person you allow to access your credit card account. Not to be confused with a joint account holder, an authorized user can only make purchases and, in some cases, have access to certain card benefits and perks. Joint account holdership is becoming extremely rare, but typically occurs when two people apply for a credit card together. In joint account ownership, both people are liable for charges and can access and make changes to a credit card account.

An authorized user can be a spouse, relative, or employee. When you designate an authorized user on your credit card account, this person usually gets a card bearing their name with the same credit card number as the primary cardholder. In this scenario, the primary cardholder is liable for all transactions made by themselves as well as by any authorized user tied to their account.

Why Would You Add an Authorized User to Your Credit Card Account?

There are many reasons you might think about designating an authorized user for your credit card account. It all comes down to convenience and extending benefits that a credit account offers: access to credit, related perks, and credit card rewards, as well as the potential to improve the credit score of the authorized user.

For example, couples that share expenses might find it easier to designate one or the other as an authorized user to avoid passing a single card back and forth to make purchases. Perhaps you have a relative who lives far away, and it would be easier to give them access to your credit account for emergency purchases. You may also have a child that you want to assist in building credit history to increase their credit score. Adding them as an authorized user could help with this, but we’ll cover that more in another section.

Additionally, if you are an employer whose employees need to make purchases on behalf of the company, it would make sense to make them an authorized user. Without this designation, it could be extremely inconvenient for them to not have a company credit card at their disposal.

In some cases, adding an authorized user can also accrue reward points connected to a credit card account. These reward points can be used to make purchases or receive discounted pricing on things like travel and retail products. Typically, points are accrued from reaching credit card spending amounts within a certain time frame. Sometimes, the act of adding an authorized user can garner additional rewards as well.

How Can I Add an Authorized User to My Credit Card Account?

Credit Card Issuer

Age Requirement

American Express

13 or 15 years old, depending on the card

Barclays

13 years old

Bank of America

No minimum age requirement

Capital One

No minimum age requirement

Chase

No minimum age requirement

Citi

No minimum age requirement

Discover

15 years old

U.S. Bank

16 years old

Wells Fargo

No minimum age requirement

As the primary cardholder you are the only person who can designate an authorized user. The authorized user cannot contact the credit card issuer and add themselves to your account. You will have to contact the issuing bank and request to add one or more authorized users to your account.

Depending on the bank and the technology in place, you may be able to handle this process entirely online. Some banks allow you to log in to your banking portal to designate additional authorized users, create their own bank login and profile as well as determine the level of access you’d like them to have to your account. Levels of access can range from being able to view transactions only to making purchases. If your bank doesn’t have this technology in place, usually a phone call is sufficient.

Adding Authorized Users Online

How to Add an Authorized User to a Chase Credit Card Account:

  1. Log into your Chase credit card account
  2. Under “My Accounts” click “Add Authorized User”
  3. Complete the information requested (see screenshot below for reference)How to Add an Authorized User to a Chase Credit Card Account

How to Add an Authorized User to a Bank of America Account:

  1. Log onto your Bank of America account.
  2. Select the credit card you’d like to change.
  3. Click on the tab labeled ‘Information & Services’
  4. Scroll down to the section labeled “Services”
  5. Click on “Add an authorized user”

How to Add an Authorized User to a Chase Credit Card Account

screen shot 2

How to Add an Authorized User to a Capital One account:

  1. Log onto your Capital One credit card account online.
  2. Under the “Services” tab, click “Manage Authorized Users”
  3. Click “Add New User”

screen shot 6
screen shot 7

How to Add an Authorized User to a American Express credit card account:

  1. Log onto your Amex account online.
  2. Click on “Account services”
  3. From the lefthand menu, select “Card Management”
  4. Under “Account Managers”, click “Add and Manage Users with Account Manager”screen shot 10
    screen shot 11

How to Add an Authorized User to a Citi credit card account:

1. Log onto your Citi credit card account online.
2. Select the “Account Management” tab.
3. Click “Services” from the lefthand menu.
4. Click “Authorized Users”
5. Click “Add an authorized user”
6. Fill in the authorized user’s personal information.

 

screen shot 14

 

 

screen shot 12

How to Add an Authorized User to a Barclays credit card account:

  1. Log onto your Barclays credit card account.
  2. Select the “services” tab.
  3. Under the dropdown menu, select “Authorized users”
  4. Select “Add an authorized user”
  5. Complete the form to add an authorized user.
    screen shot 17screen shot 18screen shot 20

Who Can Be an Authorized User on My Account?

An authorized user can be anyone you choose, whether they are related to you in some way or not. In most cases, the bank will request identifying information such as name, birthdate, Social Security number, and address. Some card issuers require that authorized users meet age requirements, and others do not have age requirements. As always, check with the bank to understand the criteria authorized users must meet for your card.

The Fees

Some credit cards will charge an additional fee for more additional authorized users, while others will offer this benefit at no charge. Make sure you read the fine print in your cardholder agreement so that you are aware of all the fees associated with having one or more authorized users on your account.

Fees can range from less than $100 to a few hundred dollars and beyond each year. Business accounts especially can carry higher fees when multiple authorized users are associated to one account.

Liability

As the primary account holder, you must understand that you are 100% solely liable for any and all charges made on your account by both yourself and your authorized user. If you have been designated as an authorized user, you do not legally share liability for purchases made on the credit card account. However, you may have a personal arrangement with the primary account holder to pay your share of charges when the bill is due.

What Can an Authorized User Do?

This can depend on the level of access you’ve chosen with your card issuer for your authorized user. If there are not varying levels of access to choose from, check with the card issuer to find out exactly what an authorized user can and cannot do.

In most cases, an authorized user cannot make changes to an account. They cannot close an account, request changes in bill due dates, change account information, or request limit increases or a lower annual percentage rate.

Again, this varies from card issuer to card issuer, but there are many other things an authorized user can do.

Here are some possible capabilities based on the terms of your credit card issuer:

  • Make purchases
  • Report any lost or stolen cards
  • Obtain account information
  • Initiate billing disputes
  • Request statement copies
  • Make payments and inquire about fees

Benefits of Adding an Authorized User

As mentioned before, adding an authorized user to a card can be for convenience, accruing rewards, or sharing card perks and benefits. An authorized user can be incredibly convenient in the case that you don’t have your personal card or for some reason don’t have immediate access to it.

Having an authorized user can help a primary user reach limits to earn reward points for some cards. One of the most effective marketing strategies of credit card companies is to offer bonuses and rewards for adding authorized users to your account. Adding another user to your account could add a few thousand extra reward points you would not have earned without adding the user. Then, there’s always the chance that the authorized user will make purchases that contribute even more to your attempt to accrue reward points.

Finally, there are a number of credit cards that offer perks or benefits that can extend to your authorized users. Depending on your credit card, benefits like car rental insurance, lost luggage reimbursement, and extended warranties could apply to all purchases made, including those by your authorized users, on your credit card account.

Benefits of Becoming an Authorized User

Though the credit-reporting landscape is changing, there’s still the potential to “piggyback” on a primary account holder’s credit history for a card in good standing. But not all credit card companies report information to credit bureaus for authorized users in all circumstances. However, to know for sure what will be reported to the credit bureaus in regard to your authorized user status, speak with your card issuer for the details of what information is reported and when to credit bureaus.

Another benefit is having access to more credit. If you are in a bind and have emergencies that come up, access to credit can be helpful. Plus, exercising diligence in managing purchases and bill payment can help you develop good credit habits.

You should also know that being an authorized user may grant you access to certain perks for account holders and their primary users. There are benefits like access to travel lounges, Global Entry or TSA PreCheck application, travel credits, and discounts an authorized user could be privy to as well.

What Could Go Wrong?

If for some reason the credit card account doesn’t remain in good standing, the credit score of both the primary account holder and the authorized user could be affected. If you are a primary account holder, make sure your authorized user understands the terms under which they can make purchases. If they make purchases that cause your payments to be delinquent, your credit score could suffer.

Even if you did not give this person permission to make purchases with your credit card account, the fact that you designated them as an authorized user is evidence that you at some point trusted them with your credit card access. A claim of criminal or fraudulent activity in this instance would be extremely difficult to prove, so choose your authorized users wisely.

Though not as common with an authorized user, your credit score could be negatively affected if an account becomes delinquent. Because tradeline reporting for authorized user accounts to credit bureaus varies from card to card and scenario to scenario, a delinquent account status could still appear on your credit report. If you will be added to someone’s account as an authorized user, find out whether or not the credit history of the account will be reported to credit bureaus under your authorized user status.

Removing an Authorized User from an Account

Either the primary cardholder or the authorized user can remove an authorized user from an account by contacting the credit card issuer. You may be asked to verify your information as well as the information of the primary account holder.

In many cases, only one card number is issued between one or more users. Your credit card company may deactivate the primary cardholder’s credit card number and reissue a new card and number once an authorized user is removed from an account.

If your status as an authorized user does show up on your credit report for the credit account after you’ve been removed from a credit card account, you may have to contact credit bureaus to have it removed.

The Best Way to Manage Shared Credit Access

Designating someone as an authorized user is not something to be taken lightly. Even a small misunderstanding of credit card issuer terms and your own interpersonal credit arrangement can cause problems. Before adding an authorized user to your account, set ground rules around card use that covers access to perks and making purchases.

Some things to consider and discuss with your authorized user include:

  • What is the goal in having the authorized user on the account?
  • Will the authorized user have a physical card?
  • When is it OK to use or not use the credit card to make purchases or access card perks?
  • The credit history of both the primary cardholder and the authorized user
  • Good credit habits that will prevent identity theft and fraud
  • Setting up monitoring alerts with the credit card company or an identity theft protection service

The ability to add an authorized user to a credit card account can be a double-edged sword. On one hand, convenient benefits of access to credit and credit card perks can make life easier in so many ways.

On the other hand, this same convenience can cause problems if both the primary cardholder and the authorized user don’t understand the rules of engagement with each other or the terms set forth by the credit card company.

Adding an authorized user to your account has the potential to be incredibly convenient and mutually beneficial if handled the right way. Make sure you follow best practices to get the most out of this financial arrangement.

Recommended Cards

Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express

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on American Express’s secure website

Terms Apply | Rates & Fees

Read Full Review

Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express

Regular Purchase APR
15.24%-26.24% Variable
Intro Purchase APR
0% for 12 months
Intro BT APR
0% for 12 months
Annual fee
$95
Rewards Rate
6% Cash Back at U.S. supermarkets (on up to $6,000 per year in purchases, then 1%) - that means spending $60 a week at U.S. supermarkets could earn over $180 back per year. 3% Cash Back at U.S. gas stations. 1% Cash Back on other purchases.
Balance Transfer Fee
Either $5 or 3% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater.
Credit required
good-credit
Excellent/Good

Discover it® Cash Back

APPLY NOW Secured

on Discover Bank’s secure website

Rates & Fees

Read Full Review

Discover it® Cash Back

Regular APR
14.24% - 25.24% Variable
Intro Purchase APR
0% for 14 months
Intro BT APR
0% for 14 months
Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
5% cash back at different places each quarter like gas stations, grocery stores, restaurants, Amazon.com and more up to the quarterly maximum, each time you activate, 1% unlimited cash back on all other purchases - automatically.
Balance Transfer Fee
3%
Credit required
good-credit
Excellent/Good

Chase Freedom®

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on Chase Bank’s secure website

Read Full Review

Chase Freedom®

Regular Purchase APR
17.24 - 25.99% Variable
Intro Purchase APR
0% Intro APR on Purchases for 15 months
Intro BT APR
0% Intro APR on Balance Transfers for 15 months
Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
Earn 5% cash back on up to $1,500 in combined purchases in bonus categories each quarter you activate. Enjoy new 5% categories every 3 months. Unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases.
Balance Transfer Fee
Either $5 or 3% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater
Credit required
good-credit

Excellent/Good

Citi® Double Cash Card – 18 month BT offer

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on Citi’s secure website

Read Full Review

Citi® Double Cash Card – 18 month BT offer

Regular Purchase APR
15.74% - 25.74%* (Variable)
Intro BT APR
0% for 18 months on Balance Transfers*
Annual fee
$0*
Rewards Rate
Earn 2% cash back on purchases: 1% when you buy plus 1% as you pay
Balance Transfer Fee
3% of each balance transfer; $5 minimum.
Credit required
good-credit
Excellent, Good

Capital One® Quicksilver® Cash Rewards Credit Card

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on Capital One’s secure website

Capital One® Quicksilver® Cash Rewards Credit Card

Regular Purchase APR
16.24% - 26.24% (Variable)
Intro Purchase APR
0% intro on purchases for 15 months
Intro BT APR
0% intro on balance transfers for 15 months
Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
1.5% Cash Back on every purchase, every day
Balance Transfer Fee
3%
Credit required
good-credit
Excellent/Good

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Aja McClanahan
Aja McClanahan |

Aja McClanahan is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Aja here

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Building Credit

Convert a Secured Card to an Unsecured Credit Card

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication. This site may be compensated through a credit card partnership.

Young couple calculating their domestic bills

A secured credit card is a great way to build your credit history. When no one else will give you a credit card, a secured card offers you the opportunity to improve your credit score in a controlled way. However, at some point the goal is to convert from a secured card to an unsecured card. We will help you decide when is the best time to make that conversion, and how to do it.

When to Make the Switch

The only reason to have a secured credit card is to get a better credit score. Once your score is good enough to get another credit card, you should consider making the switch. Some secured cards, like Capital One, actually show your credit score on your statement every month, which can help you plan.

Once your credit score is 650 or higher, you will have a number of options for a credit card. Once your score is 700, you can pretty much take your pick of any credit card out there.

So, we recommend keeping the secured card for at least a year. After 12 months of positive activity (never spending more than 20% of the available limit and paying on time), you should start looking closely at your score. If it is above 650, you have a very good chance. If your score is above 700, you should definitely switch.

How to Make the Switch

You have 2 options when switching from secured to unsecured:

  1. Your secured card is migrated to a new credit card, or
  2. You apply for a new credit card and close your secured credit card

For the first option, just call your bank directly and ask for a conversion. I helped my wife establish credit with a secured credit card, and I had to pro-actively speak with the bank in order to get the conversion completed. Just make sure you remember to do the following:

  • Ask to be converted to a credit card that does not have an annual fee
  • Ensure that you receive a refund of your original deposit. At Bank of America, I had to chase them a few times before we received our deposit refund
  • Ask to keep the same account number, so that your credit history continues to build

Banks like secured cards, because you are keeping money with them, and they earn interest on that money. They are not always eager to make the conversion for you. If that is the case, then you need to apply for a new card.

If your credit score is less than perfect, you should consider a credit card issued by a department store. For example, Synchrony Bank issues a Walmart Credit Card that has no annual fee and typically approve less than perfect credit scores. You can learn more about that card here.

Store card options:

Walmart Credit Card®

APPLY NOW Secured

on Walmart’s secure website

Walmart Credit Card®

Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
Save 3% on Walmart.com purchases including Grocery Pickup, 2% on Murphy USA & Walmart gas, and 1% at Walmart & anywhere your card is accepted.
Regular Purchase APR
19.15% - 25.15% Variable

Target REDcard™ Credit Card

APPLY NOW Secured

on Target’s secure website

Target REDcard™ Credit Card

Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
5% at Target & Target.com
Regular Purchase APR
25.15% Variable

If your have a good or excellent credit score, find the best cashback credit card for your needs.

Cashback card options:

Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express

APPLY NOW Secured

on American Express’s secure website

Terms Apply | Rates & Fees

Read Full Review

Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express

Regular Purchase APR
15.24%-26.24% Variable
Intro Purchase APR
0% for 12 months
Intro BT APR
0% for 12 months
Annual fee
$95
Rewards Rate
6% Cash Back at U.S. supermarkets (on up to $6,000 per year in purchases, then 1%) - that means spending $60 a week at U.S. supermarkets could earn over $180 back per year. 3% Cash Back at U.S. gas stations. 1% Cash Back on other purchases.
Balance Transfer Fee
Either $5 or 3% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater.
Credit required
good-credit
Excellent/Good

Discover it® Cash Back

APPLY NOW Secured

on Discover Bank’s secure website

Rates & Fees

Read Full Review

Discover it® Cash Back

Regular APR
14.24% - 25.24% Variable
Intro Purchase APR
0% for 14 months
Intro BT APR
0% for 14 months
Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
5% cash back at different places each quarter like gas stations, grocery stores, restaurants, Amazon.com and more up to the quarterly maximum, each time you activate, 1% unlimited cash back on all other purchases - automatically.
Balance Transfer Fee
3%
Credit required
good-credit
Excellent/Good

Chase Freedom®

APPLY NOW Secured

on Chase Bank’s secure website

Read Full Review

Chase Freedom®

Regular Purchase APR
17.24 - 25.99% Variable
Intro Purchase APR
0% Intro APR on Purchases for 15 months
Intro BT APR
0% Intro APR on Balance Transfers for 15 months
Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
Earn 5% cash back on up to $1,500 in combined purchases in bonus categories each quarter you activate. Enjoy new 5% categories every 3 months. Unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases.
Balance Transfer Fee
Either $5 or 3% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater
Credit required
good-credit

Excellent/Good

Do not close your secured card until you are approved for a new credit card. Once you are approved for your new credit card, call the bank that issued your secured card. Tell them that you are going to close the account unless they convert you to a secured card. It is always worthwhile trying to get the conversion, and here you will be making a threat that you will keep. Because, if they don’t convert your card, you will close it. That means you will likely end up in retention unit.

If you do close the card, make sure you receive a refund of the deposit. Closed accounts stay on your credit report for 7 years, so you should not worry about your credit score. The other credit card you opened will help to build your score, so long as you continue to use it responsibly.

If the retention office agrees to convert your card, follow the same advice we gave above: get your deposit refunded, switch to a fee-free credit card, and make sure you keep the same account number.

The purpose of a secured credit card is to establish your credit score. Once you have a good score, you shouldn’t continue to pay fees or keep you money tied up in a deposit with the credit card company.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Nick Clements
Nick Clements |

Nick Clements is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Nick at nick@magnifymoney.com

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