Advertiser Disclosure

College Students and Recent Grads

Top Checking Accounts for College Grads

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Top Checking Accounts for College Grads
iStock

For many college students, their default banking option while in school is a student checking account, which is typically free. Unfortunately, when you graduate you lose those benefits. Many student checking accounts will begin to charge you monthly maintenance fees unless you meet certain requirements.

So, where do you go from there?

Few young adults would turn to their parents for fashion or dating advice and, yet, one of the most common ways we’ve found young people choose their bank account is by going with whichever bank their parents already use. This could be a bigger faux pas than stealing your dad’s old pair of parachute pants.

The bank your parents use may carry fees or have requirements that don’t meet your lifestyle or budget, and make accounts expensive to use.

But where do you even begin to choose the right checking account?

When you’re nearing graduation, start planning your bank transition.

Many banks send a letter in the mail a few months prior to your expected graduation date informing you that your student checking account is going transition to a non-student account. If you’re not careful and you disregard the letter, you may be transitioned into an account that charges a fee if you don’t meet certain requirements.

You can always call the bank and ask to switch to a different account or you can choose a new account that offers more benefits, like interest and ATM fee refunds.

Account Name

Monthly Fee

Minimum Monthly Balance

Amount to Open

ATM Fee Refunds

APY

Aspiration Spend and Save Account$0$0$10Unlimited2.00% APY on the balance of the save portion in your account.
Empower Checking Account$0$0$0One out-of-network ATM withdrawal per month1.90%
nbkc bank Personal Account$0$0$5$51.01% APY on all balances
Atlantic Stewardship Bank Cash Back Checking$0$0$1UnlimitedDoes not earn interest. But it does offer 0.50% cash back if you meet requirements
Radius Bank Radius Hybrid Checking$0$0$100Unlimited1.00% on balances from $2,500 to $99,000
One American Bank Kasasa Cash Account$0$0$0None, member of MoneyPass network3.50% APY if requirements are met

0.01% APY if requirements are not met
Orion Federal Credit Union Premium Checking$0, provided you meet qualifications. Otherwise $5$0$0$10 per month4.00% on balances up to $30,000, 0.05% on portion of balances greater than $30,000
TAB Bank Kasasa Cash Rewards Checking$0$0$0Up to $15 in ATM fees reimbursed if minimum account requirements are met4.00% APY on balances up to $50,000
La Capitol Federal Credit Union Choice Plus Checking$2, waived if you enroll in eStatements$0$50Up to $25 per month4.25% APY on balances up to $3,000

2.00% APY on balances $3,000-$10,000

0.10% APY on balances over $10,000 (or on all balances if you don’t make 15 or more posted non-ATM debit card transactions per month)

The 5 key things you should look for in a checking account

When you’re shopping around for a new checking account, there are several things you should look for to ensure you’re getting the most value from your account:

  1. A $0 monthly fee: Sometimes banks may say they don’t charge a monthly fee but read the fine print — they may require a minimum monthly balance in order to avoid it. There are plenty of free checking accounts available for you to open, so there’s no reason to stay stuck with an account that charges a monthly fee. Take note, as some accounts may require you to meet certain criteria to maintain a free account like using a debit card, enrolling in eStatements or maintaining a minimum daily balance.
  2. No minimum daily balance: Accounts without minimum daily balances mean you can have a $0 balance at any given time. This may allow you to have a free account without meeting balance requirements — although other terms may apply to maintain a free account.
  3. APY: Annual Percentage Yield is the total amount of interest you will earn on balances in your account. Opening an account that earns you interest on your balance is an easy way to be rewarded for money that would typically sit without earning anything. You should definitely aim to earn a decent APY on your savings account.
  4. ATM fee refunds: You may not be able to access an in-network ATM at all times, so accounts providing ATM fee refunds can reimburse you for ATM fees you may incur while using out-of-network ATMs. Those $3 or $5 charges add up!
  5. No or low overdraft fees: Most banks charge you an overdraft fee of around $35 if you spend more money than you have available in your account. Therefore, it’s a good idea to choose an account that has no or low overdraft fees.

Top overall checking accounts for college grads

The best checking accounts will have a number of features that are both simple and low cost. For the top overall checking accounts, we chose accounts that have no monthly service fees, no ATM fees, refunds for ATM fees from other banks, interest earned on your deposited balances and with strong mobile banking apps. While there is no all-inclusive account that contains every benefit, the accounts below are sure to provide value whether you want a high interest rate, unlimited ATM fee refunds or 24/7 live customer support.

1. Aspiration Spend and Save Account

The Aspiration Spend and Save Account offers a wide range of benefits for account holders and has few fees. The $10 amount to open is fairly low, and once you open your account there is no minimum monthly balance to maintain — though the more money you keep in your account, the more interest you’ll earn. Keep in mind that you earn the 2.00% APY on the funds you move to savings side of your account.

Another helpful feature is unlimited ATM fee refunds. That means you can either use in-network ATMs (filter by checking “SUM”) and avoid fees, or use any other ATM and be reimbursed for any fees incurred at the end of the month. If you’re looking for an interest checking account with no ATM fees, the Aspiration Spend and Save Account is a solid choice.

LEARN MORE Secured

on Aspiration’s secure website

2. Empower Checking Account

Empower is the mobile banking division of Evolve Bank & Trust. The Empower Checking Account currently offers a very attractive 1.90% APY on your full checking account balance, with neither a minimum deposit to open nor any need to maintain a minimum balance. Empower gives you access to over 25,000 fee-free ATMs nationwide, however you’ll only get one out-of-network ATM fee reimbursed per month. One other drawback: There are no check-writing capabilities with this account.

LEARN MORE Secured

on Empower’s secure website

Member FDIC

3. nbkc bank Personal Account

nbkc has several locations in the Kansas City region. Anyone can sign up for an account, however. This just means if you don’t reside nearby, you’ll have to rely on their online banking system.

The nbkc Personal Account earns interest on your balances and has no hidden fees. Typical checking accounts charge overdraft fees and stop payment fees, among others, but nbkc doesn’t.

The two fees that may apply are for less common transactions — $5 to send domestic wires and $45 to send or receive international wires.

You can use 32,000+ MoneyPass® ATMs in the U.S. for free, and if you use out-of-network ATMs you’ll be reimbursed up to $12 a month. This account is a good choice if you want a checking account that has minimal fees and earns interest.

LEARN MORE Secured

on nbkc bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

Top free checking accounts for college grads

Free checking accounts are a great way to save on the monthly service fees many banks charge if you don’t meet deposit or balance requirements. The checking accounts listed below are all free, and if there are requirements, they’re minor like enrolling in eStatements or using a debit card. These accounts can be a good choice if you often have a fluctuating or low account balance and don’t want to worry about maintaining the requirements big banks impose to keep their accounts free.

1. Atlantic Stewardship Bank Cash Back Checking

Atlantic Stewardship Bank is headquartered in New Jersey and donates 10% of its profits annually to Christian and nonprofit organizations. Its Cash Back Checking account has a minor opening deposit and basic requirements for you to meet to get the added perks.

*When you make 12 debit card transactions each cycle and enroll in online banking and eStatements, you can receive unlimited ATM fee refunds and the chance to earn rewards at 0.50% cash back on debit card purchases.

LEARN MORE Secured

on Atlantic Stewardship Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

2. Radius Bank Radius Hybrid Checking

Radius Bank is a community bank headquartered in Boston. The Radius Hybrid Checking account is free as long as you open the account with the required deposit and meet three simple requirements: Enroll in online banking, receive eStatements and choose to receive a debit card. Unlike other checking accounts that require you to make a certain number of debit card transactions a month, Radius Bank does not. In addition to simple requirements, there are unlimited ATM fee refunds at the end of each statement cycle.

LEARN MORE Secured

on Radius Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

3. One American Bank Kasasa Cash Account

One American Bank may be a tiny community bank based in Sioux Falls, SD, but its Kasasa Cash Account packs a big punch. Available nationwide, this checking account earns an impressive 3.50% APY on balances up to $10,000. Best of all, the account is totally free, and as a member of the MoneyPass ATM network, One American Bank gives you fee-free access to thousands of ATMs nationwide. Kasasa accounts are a special class of bank product that help smaller banks compete against larger rivals by providing high-yielding rates and other features desired by consumers.

To earn your Kasasa reward APY, for each monthly qualification cycle simply do the following: Make at least 12 debit card purchase transactions of at least $5.00 each that post and settle to your account; receive electronic bank statements, account notices and disclosures; and log in to online banking at least one time.

LEARN MORE Secured

on One American Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

 

Check out our full list of the best free checking accounts.

Top high-yield checking accounts for college grads

Since most checking accounts offer little to no interest, high-yield checking accounts are a great way for you to maximize the money that typically would just sit in your account without earning interest. These accounts often offer interest rates that fluctuate depending on how much money you have in the account. However, in order to earn interest, there are some requirements that you may have to meet such as making a certain number of debit card transactions and enrolling in eStatements.

1. Orion Federal Credit Union Premium Checking

An excellent choice for recent graduates looking for a high-yield checking account is Orion Federal Credit Union’s Premium Checking account, which promises customers 4.00% APY on balances up to $30,000.

You also need to keep in mind that because Orion FCU is a credit union, you have to jump through some additional hoops to access the high APY:

  • Pay $10 to one of five organizations approved by Orion to become eligible for membership in the credit union
  • Deposit $25 in a special savings account with Orion to officially become a member
  • Make an electronic deposit of at least $500 every month into your Premium Checking account
  • Make at least 8 signature based debit card transactions — not PIN-code based debit transactions — each month.

LEARN MORE Secured

on Orion Federal Credit Union’s secure website

NCUA Insured

2. TAB Bank Kasasa Cash Rewards Checking Account

Based in Ogden, UT, TAB Bank’s Kasasa Cash Checking account is a great choice for recent graduates. You can earn a very competitive 4.00% APY by meeting a few simple requirements: Have at least one direct deposit, ACH payment, or bill pay transaction posted to the account during each billing cycle; and make at least 15 debit card purchases. Even better, the bank will reimburse up to $15 in ATM fees per month from making withdrawals outside their ATM network.

LEARN MORE Secured

on TAB Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

3. La Capitol Federal Credit Union Choice Plus Checking

This checking account has a $2 monthly service fee, which can easily be waived if you enroll in eStatements.

*While the terms state a minimum balance requirement of $1,000 and a low balance fee of $8, the fee can be waived if you make 15 or more posted non-ATM debit card transactions per month.

To earn the top interest rate on your checking balance, you just need to make at least 15 or more posted non-ATM debit card transactions per month. There are numerous surcharge-free La Capitol ATMs for you to use, and after signing up for eStatements you can receive up to $25 per month in ATM fee refunds when you use out-of-network ATMs.

LEARN MORE Secured

on La Capitol Federal Credit Union’s secure website

NCUA Insured

Check out our full list of the best high-yield checking accounts.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

James Ellis
James Ellis |

James Ellis is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email James here

Advertiser Disclosure

College Students and Recent Grads

Guide to Paying for College in 2019

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Tuition rates have been steadily rising over the years, and the cost of college has never been so high. According to College Board, the cost of tuition and fees at public four-year colleges is more than three times what it was 30 years ago. At private four-year colleges, the cost has more than doubled since 1988.

But even though higher education is expensive, a college degree remains valuable. In fact, those who hold a bachelor’s degree make an average of $1 million more over the course of their lives than those who don’t, according to the Department of Education. So a degree can still worth investing in — but first you need to know how to pay for it.

To that end, we’ll explore the costs of college and how you can piece together scholarships, grants, savings and student loans to fund your education.

Part I: How Much Does College Cost?

When you first look at the cost of tuition and fees, room and board and meal plans, most colleges appear oppressively expensive. But appearances can be deceiving. The first number you see is the “sticker price,” and it’s usually much more than you end up shelling out for your education.

The number you actually pay — the net price — is lower for most students. Net price is how much the school charges minus the amount of financial aid you’re awarded.

Net price vs. sticker price

If you already know how much financial aid you’ll be receiving, you can subtract that number from your school’s nominal cost of attendance. The difference will be your net price.

Colleges are required to have a net price calculator on their websites to help you estimate costs. Before using one of these calculators, however, keep these points in mind:

  • The numbers they produce will be estimates only and aren’t guaranteed.
  • Some calculators base their calculations on in-state tuition. If you’re an out-of-state student, your costs could be higher.
  • Some calculators also factor in financial aid opportunities available to first-year students. There’s usually more funding for freshmen, so you can expect your subsequent three years to be more expensive than your first one.

Nonprofit vs. for-profit schools

For-profit schools tend to cost a good deal more than non-profit schools, even private non-profit schools. This is partly because for-profit schools offer less institutional aid (financial aid given through the college itself). Instead, they rely heavily on federal financial aid for the funding of their students’ education.

As a result, students who attend for-profit schools generally wind up with more student loan debt after graduation. At for-profit schools, 88% of graduates had loans, and the average debt burden was $39,950. At private nonprofit schools, those numbers were lower, with 75% of graduates having loans, and at an average total debt of $32,300.

Before going into debt for a for-profit school, be careful to weigh net prices at nonprofit institutions. Remember, the sticker price won’t necessarily be what you end up paying. Also note that nonprofit institutions will usually offer more scholarships and grants, reducing the number of loans — and therefore debt — you have to take on.

Public vs. private school tuition

Undoubtedly, the sticker prices for public colleges tend to be lower than that of private institutions. However, some private schools also have large endowments providing substantial student aid at the institutional level.

For example, Cornell University offers significant grants to students from low-income families. In an example generated by the university, a traditional student from a household with under $40,000 in annual income could receive a Cornell grant of $41,911.

In this example, the student’s net price is only $2,700 for one year at this Ivy League university.

Also note that private college institutional aid can also be extended to students from middle-income families as well, even if they don’t qualify for a large amount of aid through federal programs.

Part II: How to Pay for College

There are several different ways to find money for college expenses. If you stay on top of financial aid application deadlines and have a high GPA and strong test scores, you may be able to shave many thousands of dollars off your cost of attendance.

In this section, we’ll cover the most common sources of college funding.

Understanding the FAFSA: The key to financial aid

Paying for College
Source: iStock

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is likely the single most important document you’ll fill out as a college student.

Why? Because you need to submit the FAFSA to access the majority of financial aid options we’re going to cover in this guide. These include:

  • Grants
  • Work-study opportunities
  • Federal student loans
  • Direct PLUS Loans for parents

Not only will the FAFSA tell you how much aid you’re eligible for through the federal government, but it’s also usually a required step to getting institutional financial aid from your college or university.

How to fill out the FAFSA

It’s important to remember that you don’t have to pay to file the FAFSA — it’s entirely free. Go to https://fafsa.gov/ to create a Federal Student Aid account and start your application.

Important: You must fill out a FAFSA every year you attend college in order to receive aid.

Learn more with our in-depth FAFSA Guide >

Expected Family Contribution

The Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is how much the federal government determines you or your parents should be able to contribute to your education costs. This number is then used to figure out how much aid the government is willing to extend to you.

For example, to qualify for a full Pell Grant in the 2019-20 school year, your family’s Expected Family Contribution can’t be higher than $5,576.

FAFSA deadlines

Filing for aid for the 2019-2020 school year began in Oct. 1, 2018 but remains open until June 30, 2020. For the 2020-2021 year, you can file anytime after Oct. 1, 2019.

Ideally, you should apply as soon as possible, as the aid is doled out on a first-come, first-served basis, and some awards can in fact run out of funds.

You should also note that some states have stricter deadlines than the federal government; be sure to check your state’s deadline to be sure you get your application in on time.

Student Loans: Explained

Paying for College
Source: iStock

Another form of aid distributed by the federal government is student loans. You will know which federal student loans you qualify for after you fill out your FAFSA.

Because student loans have to be repaid with interest, they should only be pursued after you’ve exhausted all grant, scholarship and work-study options.

Types of federal student loans

As an undergraduate student, there are a variety of federal student loans you may be offered.

Direct Loans, both subsidized and unsubsidized, come with the advantage of income-driven repayment options, as well as deferment, forgiveness and cancellation programs.

Try to max out your federal student loan eligibility before turning to private loans. Federal student debt typically has better rates than private loans, as well as those flexible repayment options.

Private student loans

If federal student loans aren’t enough, you can turn to private student loans for college financing. These loans from banks, credit unions and online marketplace lenders might not have the same generous repayment programs, though some do have deferment options in certain situations, such as unemployment.

Private loans come with variable or fixed interest rates. If you take out a variable interest rate loan, the rate could go up over the course of your loan. Fixed interest rates, meanwhile, remain stable throughout the course of repayment.

Should I get a cosigner?

If you haven’t established credit yet, you’ll likely need a cosigner to qualify for private student loans. If you’re a non-traditional student and have a less-than-stellar credit history, you’ll also probably benefit from having a cosigner.

Borrowers with very good credit scores can skip the cosigner, but if you do decide you need some help, look for loan options with a cosigner release. This lets the cosigner off the hook after a certain period of time — generally once your payment history has allowed you to establish a better credit history yourself.

How much should I borrow?

You don’t want to borrow more than you can reasonably afford to pay back. Certain professions that require extensive education, like law and medicine, will have considerably more student loan debt than other professions. But while these kinds of professions are likely to garner higher incomes, there is no guarantee — recent reports show stagnation in doctors’ salaries and a difficulty in finding employment amongst lawyers.

Others, such as teaching, might require a master’s degree but won’t necessarily lead to an entry-level salary that makes up for all your educational expenses.

Before taking on a lot of debt, talk to professionals in your target field to get a sense of the entry-level pay and rate of salary growth over the course of a career. While using online sources to find this information is great, it’s not going to replace the knowledge of a professional working in the field.

You can then plug that number into CollegeBoard’s Student Loan Calculator, along with how much money you intend to borrow. It will analyze the figures and tell you if your monthly payments will exceed 10% to 15% of your income — which is generally considered to be the maximum you should allot to student loan payments.

If you take out federal student loans, you may be able to borrow more, as most loan options allow you to pay based on your income level. Just be careful not to bury yourself in debt — you don’t want to be paying student loans into your 70s.

Scholarships

Scholarships are among the most valuable forms of financial aid, since they give you free money for school that you never have to pay back. They’re a little different from grants (see below) and come in various forms. Here are features to look for:

Merit-based vs. need-based scholarships

While the majority of grants are need-based, most scholarships are merit-based. There may be maximum income levels or priority given to those in dire financial straits, but for most scholarships, you’ll be judged based on your achievements.

Many of these awards require you to maintain a certain GPA, and almost all will involve some type of essay, portfolio or video submission.

If your family’s income doesn’t help you establish a strong financial need, don’t lose hope. There are plenty of scholarships out there that have no financial requirements and are completely based on your essay — on rare occasion, they won’t even ask about grades.

Recurring vs. one-time scholarships

Most scholarships only last one semester or one school year. However, there are some you can apply for that will cover your entire tenure as an undergrad. Keep in mind, though, that these options are likely to require you to maintain a certain GPA throughout your studies.

How do I find scholarships?

The first place you can look is your financial aid office. Many schools have endowments, not just for grants, but for scholarships as well.

After you’ve exhausted scholarship options at your school, look in other places, such as:

  • Professional organizations in the field you want to enter
  • Professional organizations or unions your parents may belong to
  • National student organizations related to your major
  • Potential future employers — especially if they’re a larger company
  • Groups within the community you grew up in
  • Organizations based on your ethnicity or heritage
  • Religious organizations
  • Organizations related to any extracurricular activities or hobbies

You can look for scholarships on specialty search engines, like Fastweb, CollegeBoard and Scholarships.com, but you’ll find a ton of competition. On the other hand, if you search for scholarships focused on what makes you unique, you might find a dramatically smaller applicant pool, boosting your chances of winning an award.

How soon should I start applying?

Start applying for scholarships as soon as possible. It is even possible to fund your entire education this way, though you would have to fill out a lot of applications and write a lot of essays. The sooner you get started, the better.

Each scholarship has a window, which is typically opened annually or once a semester, during which you can file an application. While high school sophomores will be able to apply for some scholarships, opportunities really start opening up in your junior year.

Beware of scholarship displacement

Although scholarships can be a great tool for paying for college, you also need to be careful about scholarship displacement. Some colleges will take away some need-based aid if you have a lot of outside scholarship help. Before applying far and wide to scholarships, it could be worth checking with your financial aid office to see if it engages in this practice.

Grants

A grant, like a scholarship, is money you never have to pay back, unless you drop out of school or violate the terms of the agreement some other way. For undergraduates, grants are typically need-based.

In order to qualify for federal grant programs, you must fill out the FAFSA and meet eligibility requirements. Here are some types of federal grants, along with other opportunities from your state or school:

Pell Grants

Federal Pell Grants are distributed based on income-eligibility only. They can be awarded regardless of whether you’re in school full-time, half-time or less than half-time.

For the 2019-20 school year, the maximum Pell Grant award is $6,195 for full-time students. Pell Grant awards are distributed in two parts over two semesters.

Students taking summer courses might also receive a summer Pell Grant, which is an additional 50% of your full award to spend on summer studies. This extra grant money can be particularly helpful for community college students whose course of study typically runs through the summer.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOGs) are available to students with financial needs in excess of what the Pell Grant can address. These funds are distributed to schools upfront and then awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. Notably, not all schools participate, so you would need to consult your school’s financial aid office.

The maximum award is between $100 and $4,000, depending on your personal financial situation.

Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grants

If you lost a parent or guardian while they were serving in the military in Iraq or Afghanistan after 9/11, you may qualify for the Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant — which offers funds almost equal to that of a full Pell Grant — regardless of your family income.

To qualify, you must:

  • Meet all Pell Grant requirements, except for the EFC requirements.
  • Have been 24 years old or younger and enrolled in college at least part-time at the time of your parent or guardian’s death.

TEACH Grants

If you’re planning on becoming a teacher, you may be interested in a Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant.

In order to qualify, you must be enrolled in a TEACH-eligible program. Not all schools participate, and the ones that do determine which of their programs qualify for TEACH Grants, so be sure to sit down with your financial aid counselor to determine your eligibility.

When you accept a TEACH Grant, you’re agreeing to serve four out of your first eight years in the workforce in a high-need specialization in a low-income area. You can also meet this obligation by teaching at a Bureau of Indian Education school.

High-need specializations include:

If you do not keep your promise to serve in this capacity, your grant will turn into a Direct Unsubsidized Loan, which will have to be repaid.

The maximum grant amount is $3,752 if disbursed after Oct. 1, 2018 and before Oct. 1, 2019. For grants paid out after Oct. 1, 2019 and before Oct. 1, 2020, the maximum award is $3,764.

State grants

Your state government may also issue need-based grants. Generally, you will be redirected to your state’s application page at the end of your FAFSA application, but if you want to check out your options beforehand, you can find information from your state’s department of higher education here.

Institutional grants

Your college or university may also issue need-based grants. While your EFC is not likely to be measured in the same way, a FAFSA application is still required.

Some colleges, though typically not Ivy League schools, will also offer merit-based grants. Your grades will likely be a factor here.

Work-Study Programs

Work-study programs are another form of aid that will not be accessible unless you complete your FAFSA.

Many schools participate in federally backed work-study programs for students with financial need. With work-study, you’re assigned a set amount of hours working for the school, in a community service role, or in a field relevant to your course of study.

You should get a paycheck at least once per month, and you can often choose whether to receive the funds directly or to have it applied against any money you owe the school.

529 college savings plans

529 accounts are tax-advantaged accounts to help you save for future college expenses. Contributions go in after you’ve paid taxes on your income. That money is invested and grows tax-free — as long as you spend the money on qualified educational expenses.

Types of 529 accounts

Not all 529 accounts are created equal. They are issued under state law, and each state has its own specific rules on how 529 accounts can be used. However, some states will let you purchase their 529 accounts even if you aren’t a state resident.

There are two basic kinds of 529 accounts:

College Savings Plans

The College Savings Plan structure allows your money to grow in traditional investments, as made available by your state. You can use this money to pay for school at almost any U.S. institution — and even at some schools abroad.

With a College Savings Plan, whatever you have saved can be applied toward any allowable educational expenses, though you’ll have to cover the remaining costs after exhausting the money from your 529.

A good example of a College Savings Plan is Utah’s 529 plan, which even offers a few investment options insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.

Prepaid Tuition Plans

Prepaid Tuition Plans allow you to save for tomorrow’s college at today’s rates. There may be different tiers of saving for different types of schools.

For example, Pennsylvania’s Guaranteed Savings Plan 529 option currently allows you to buy credits at today’s rates. These credits will be valid when your child goes to school in the future — even if tuition rates have skyrocketed.

One thing to be careful of with Prepaid Tuition Plans is that if you save at the state school level, and your child ends up not wanting to attend a state school when they graduate from high school, you could run into some funding problems. Pennsylvania allows you to change your investment tier at any time, but this is a potential point of friction you should consider if you decide to go with this type of 529.

You’ll also notice that price per credit is quite high at Ivy League schools. As discussed earlier with the example of Cornell, Ivy League schools tend to have extensive grants. If you’re making a median income, saving in this manner may reduce your child’s future institutional aid, costing you more money than you would have had to pay without the dramatic savings.

What can I use my 529 account for?

You can only use the money in your 529 account for qualified educational expenses. If you use the money for anything else, you will have to pay taxes on the withdrawal.

Qualified educational expenses include:

  • Tuition and fees*
  • Room and board — though you must be enrolled at least half-time to claim this expense
  • Books
  • Technology required for school — including internet access
  • Other required equipment and materials, as assigned by your instructor

*Some Prepaid Tuition Plans cover tuition and fees only.

How to make a 529 withdrawal

Most programs allow you to make a withdrawal online or via postal mail. Your 529 account issuer will not keep records of how that money was spent. Producing documentation to show that the money was spent on educational expenses falls squarely on your shoulders.

Pros of 529 accounts:

  • Studies show that regardless of how much you save, the fact that you are saving for college makes your child more likely to attend college.
  • If you have a high enough income level, your child might not qualify for need-based financial aid. Saving in a 529 plan is a generous investment in their future, given that they won’t have as many funding opportunities available to them.
  • Because you are investing, your money is likely to grow — and it will grow federally tax-free. This means you won’t have to save as much in a College Savings Plan in order to meet your goals.

Cons of 529 accounts:

  • The amount you have saved could reduce institutional aid — especially if you open the account in your child’s name. Open the account in your name and list your child as a beneficiary instead.
  • When saving in a Prepaid Tuition Plan, do your best to ensure you’re saving at a level your child will actually be able to use. If they don’t end up going to school in state, you could hit a bump in the road if you’ve been saving at state school tuition levels.
  • Because you are investing, there’s no guarantee of growth. You could conceivably lose money in a 529 account.

FAQ

To see if your college degree is worth the cost, you need to figure out the net price of your education and your expected salary. A good tool to crunch these numbers is the College Scorecard, provided by the Department of Education, which shows data on net cost of attendance, alumni salaries and debt upon graduation.

Be wary of relying too heavily on the data here, though. Your future salary, for instance, likely depends more on your major and profession than on the undergraduate institution you attended. Often, an even better way to figure out potential future earnings is by talking with someone who is already working in your field.

Technically, you’re only allowed to spend federal student loans on educational expenses. These can include:

  • Tuition and fees
  • Room and board
  • Books, supplies and equipment
  • Transportation while at school
  • Dependent child care expenses

Unlike with 529 funds, no one will be monitoring how you spend your federal loan money. However, if you end up having the money to go on shopping sprees after you’ve paid for all of the above expenses, you’re probably borrowing too much. Consider returning the money rather than paying interest on it after you graduate.

If you’re borrowing from a private lender, check your loan agreement for any restrictions on how you can spend your private student loans.

Most of the time, you don’t have to live in on-campus housing. Some colleges and universities require their traditional freshmen to live on campus, but even these stipulations can sometimes be worked around if you’re commuting from your parents’ home.

If at all possible, yes, try to make student loan payments while you’re still in school. Make an effort to pay the interest at least, so it won’t accrue while you’re in school (or during your grace period or deferment) and cost you more money in the long run.

The only time when in-school payments don’t matter is when you have Direct Subsidized Loans — those loans won’t accrue interest while you’re in school. Even then, making principal payments early isn’t a bad thing if you can swing it.

If you take out a Direct Loan, you’ll be assigned one of nine loan servicers and will make payments through that assigned servicer.

Those who have taken out Perkins Loans may repay them directly through their school or via a loan servicer designated by their school.

Likewise, you can repay private loans directly to your lender or assigned servicer.

If you miss one payment on your federal student loans, you will have to make it up within 90 days — otherwise you’ll get reported to the credit bureaus.

If you miss several payments on your Direct Loans and don’t make payments for 270 days, you will be in default, which puts you at risk of not only being reported to the credit bureaus, but also losing all benefits of federal student loans, such as income-driven repayment options. You could also end up in court.

The consequences for missing payments on Perkins Loans and private student loans depend on the agreement you signed prior to disbursement. Private lenders can report you to the credit bureaus as soon as you’re 30 days late with a payment.

If you can’t afford your Direct Loans, apply for an income-driven repayment plan. These plans cap your maximum payment at a percentage of your disposable income to ensure that they are affordable.

If you have a private loan, you may want to look into refinancing for lower monthly payments.
And if you have a Perkins Loan, set up an appointment with your financial aid office or loan servicer to discuss your options.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Brynne Conroy
Brynne Conroy |

Brynne Conroy is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brynne here

Rebecca Safier
Rebecca Safier |

Rebecca Safier is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Rebecca here

Disclaimer
Advertiser Disclosure

Student Loan
earnest

Refinance with Earnest

Refinancing rates from 2.14% APR. Checking your rates won’t affect your credit score.

Advertiser Disclosure

Best of, College Students and Recent Grads, Credit Cards

Best Student Credit Cards September 2019

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Getting a credit card while you’re in college can set you up for financial success, provided you avoid racking up unnecessary charges. If you are over 18 and have a steady income, applying for a card now will kick start your credit history, and you can start building that all-important credit score.

Learning how to choose and use the right student credit card is relatively simple. Make sure you avoid annual fees and go with a bank or credit union you can trust. When you get the card, make sure you use it responsibly and pay the balance in full and on time every month. If you do these things consistently over time, you can leave school with an excellent credit score. And if you want to rent an apartment or buy a car, having a good credit score is very important.

Our Top Pick

Discover it® Student Cash Back

APPLY NOW Secured

on Discover Bank’s secure website

Rates & Fees

Read Full Review

Discover it® Student Cash Back

Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
5% cash back at different places each quarter like gas stations, grocery stores, restaurants, Amazon.com and more up to the quarterly maximum each time you activate, 1% unlimited cash back on all other purchases - automatically.
Regular APR
14.99% - 23.99% Variable
Credit required
fair-credit
Fair/New to Credit

Magnify Glass Pros

  • Good Grades Reward program: Did you study extra hard this year? If you’ve gotten a 3.0 GPA or higher for an entire school year, Discover will reward you with an extra $20 statement credit. You can get this statement credit for up to five years in a row as long as you’re still a current student when you apply.
  • Free FICO® score: Just like how you have grades for your classes, your FICO® score is your “grade” for your credit. Credit cards have a huge effect on your FICO® score. You can watch how your new credit card affects your score over time with a free FICO® score update on your monthly statement.
  • 5% cash back : You can earn up to 5% cash back at different places that change each quarter, on up to $1,500 in purchases every quarter that you activate. Past categories have included things like Amazon purchases, restaurants, and ground transportation. Even if you don’t buy something in the bonus category, you’ll still earn 1% cash back on all other purchases.
  • Cash back match at end of your first year: In addition to rotating 5% cash back categories, new cardmembers will also get an intro bonus. When your first card anniversary comes around, Discover will automatically match your cash back rewards you earned during your first year.

Cons Cons

  • Remember to sign up for bonus categories: Even though this card comes with a great cash back rewards program, it comes with a catch: you’ll need to manually activate the bonus places each quarter. You can do this by calling Discover or logging in to your account online. If you forget, you’ll still earn 1% cash back if you make any purchases in the qualifying categories.
  • Gift certificates only available at certain levels: You can redeem your rewards for many things such as Amazon purchases, a statement credit, or a donation to a charity, to name a few. But, if you’d like to get a gift card instead, you’ll need a cash back balance of at least $20 saved up in your account.
Bottom line

Bottom line

The Discover it® Student Cash Back offers great perks for college students, such as a rewards program for good grades and a free FICO® score so you can learn about your credit firsthand. Its cash back rewards program is our favorite. No other card for students (that we could find) offers the opportunity to earn up to 5% cash back. And with no annual fee, this is our top pick.

Read our full review of the Discover it® Student Cash Back

Best Flat-Rate Card

Journey® Student Rewards from Capital One®

APPLY NOW Secured

on Capital One’s website

Journey® Student Rewards from Capital One®

Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
1% Cash Back on all purchases; 0.25% Cash Back bonus on the cash back you earn each month you pay on time
Regular Purchase APR
26.96% (Variable)
Credit required
fair-credit
Average/Fair/Limited

Magnify Glass Pros

  • 1.25% cash back if you pay on time: Each purchase you make earns a flat-rate 1% Cash Back on all purchases; 0.25% Cash Back bonus on the cash back you earn each month you pay on time. This makes it handy for people who want as simple a card as possible. And it rewards great behavior.
  • Higher credit lines after on-time payments: If you’re approved for this card, you’ll receive a credit line of at least $300. If you make five on-time payments in a row, you can call Capital One and ask them to increase your credit line.
  • No foreign transaction fee: This is a great card to take overseas, because you won’t have to pay any foreign transaction fees. Most cards charge an average 3% foreign transaction fee, but Journey allows you to use your card abroad without being charged extra fees.

Cons Cons

  • High APR: This card carries an APR of 26.96% (Variable). That’s almost twice as high as some other student credit cards, such as the Wells Fargo Cash Back CollegeSM Card with a rate as low as 13.40% - 23.40% Variable APR. It’s just one more incentive to pay off your bill in full each month.
Bottom line

Bottom line

We really like this card because it actively rewards you for developing good credit-management behavior by offering a small cash back bonus for on-time payments. In addition, the cash back program is straightforward with no confusing categories to remember or opt into, making this card a good option for students who want a simple, flat-rate card.

Read our full review of the Journey® Student Rewards from Capital One®

Best Intro Bonus

Wells Fargo Cash Back CollegeSM Card

The information related to Wells Fargo Cash Back CollegeSM Card has been collected by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card prior to publication.

Wells Fargo Cash Back CollegeSM Card

Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
3% cash rewards on gas, grocery, and drugstore purchases for the first 6 months, 1% cash rewards on virtually all other purchases
Regular Purchase APR
13.40% - 23.40% Variable
Credit required
excellent-credit
Good/Excellent

Magnify Glass Pros

  • Interest rates as low as 13.40% - 23.40% Variable APR: Depending on your credit, your interest rate could be between 13.40% - 23.40% Variable APR, but there is no guarantee you’ll receive the lower rate. This is a lower variable APR range than most student cards, and can help if you aren’t able to pay your balance in full one month.
  • Intro Rewards Bonus: 3% cash rewards on gas, grocery, and drugstore purchases for the first 6 months, 1% cash rewards on virtually all other purchases
  • Access to credit education: Wells Fargo provides you with all sorts of tools and information to learn about things like credit, budgeting, and expense tracking. While this is a nice feature, it’s not exclusive to Wells Fargo. You can get this information from free tools such as Mint, or even reading books and blogs. But it is pretty handy having it right at your fingertips when logged in to your account.

Cons Cons

  • Need to be a Wells Fargo member to apply online: You can go into any one of the 6,000+ branches and apply for the card. You can also apply online, but you’ll need to be an existing Wells Fargo customer. However, anyone can open a checking account online with a minimum deposit of $25.
  • High bars for some cash back redemption options: There are a lot of redemption options available through Wells Fargo’s own online cash back rewards mall. However, if you’d just like straight cash, you have a few options. You can request a direct deposit into your Wells Fargo checking account, savings account, or Wells Fargo credit card (if applicable) in $25 increments, or request a paper check in $20 increments. That can take a long time to accumulate if you’re not spending much with your card.
Bottom line

Bottom line

The Wells Fargo Cash Back CollegeSM Card is a relatively simple card with a great intro bonus of 3% cash rewards on gas, grocery, and drugstore purchases for the first 6 months, 1% cash rewards on virtually all other purchases In addition, the low variable APR is handy for those who think they’ll be carrying a balance on their credit card from month to month at some point in the future. This is generally something we recommend against, but if you can’t avoid it, the Wells Fargo Cash Back CollegeSM Card is your best bet.

Read our full review of the Wells Fargo Cash Back CollegeSM Card

Bank of America® Travel Rewards Credit Card for Students

Magnify Glass Pros

  • Unlimited rewards. Earn unlimited 1.5 points for every $1 you spend on all purchases everywhere, every time and no expiration on points.
  • Flexible rewards redemption. You can redeem your points for a statement credit to pay for flights, hotels, vacation packages, cruises, rental cars or baggage fees. Plus, this card doesn’t restrict you to a particular airline or chain of hotels.
  • Free FICO score. Keep track of your credit score via online banking or Bank of America’s mobile app.
  • Chance to earn more rewards. Have an active Bank of America checking or savings account? Then this card offers a chance to get a 10% customer points bonus on every purchase. The card is also eligible for the benefits of the Preferred Rewards program, though that program is based on banking and/or investment balances that might be too high for many college students to qualify for.
  • Foreign transaction fee? There is None.

Cons Cons

  • Points are not worth as much when redeemed for cash back. When redeemed for a travel credit, each point is worth $0.01. However, if redeemed for cash back, points are only worth $0.006 each. For example, 2,500 points redeemed for travel would be worth $25. The same number of points redeemed for cash back would be worth $15.
Bottom line

Bottom line

If you’re looking for a student card offering travel rewards, the Bank of America® Travel Rewards Credit Card for Students could be a good option. With an annual fee of $0 and points that can be redeemed for travel with any airline or stays with any hotel line, this card gives you options.

The information related to Bank of America® Travel Rewards Credit Card for Students has been collected by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card prior to publication.

Best Credit Union Card

Altra Federal Credit Union Student Visa® Credit Card

APPLY NOW Secured

on Altra’s secure website

Read Full Review

Altra Federal Credit Union Student Visa® Credit Card

Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
Earn double Reward Points on every dollar of purchases in the first 60 days after opening your new account, then 1 point per dollar spent.
Regular Purchase APR
15.90% Fixed

Magnify Glass Pros

  • $20 reward for good credit card usage: If you can maintain your account in an “exceptional way” for your first year, you’ll get a bonus $20 reward on your card’s anniversary. All you have to do is not have any late payments, don’t charge over your card’s limit, and use your card for at least six out of twelve months.
  • Up to $500 random winner each quarter: It’s like playing the lottery, except you don’t have to buy a lottery ticket. Each quarter Altra will choose one student cardholder at random and pay back all of their purchases from the previous month, anywhere between $50 to $500.
  • Earn rewards: For the first 60 days after you open your account, you’ll earn 2 points per dollar spent. After that you’ll earn 1 point per dollar spent. You can redeem these points for cash back, merchandise through their online rewards mall, or travel.
  • Redeem points for a lower interest rate: If you’ll need a car in the future, this might be a good credit card to get. You can trade in 5,000 points for a 0.25% reduction, or 10,000 points for a 0.50% reduction on an auto loan through Altra Federal Credit Union. That could end up saving you a ton of cash in the long run.

Cons Cons

  • 1.00% of each transaction in U.S. dollars foreign transaction fee: This is definitely one card to leave at home if you’ll be traveling or studying abroad. Most credit cards charge a 3% foreign transaction fee, so this is on the low side. Still, it’s not too hard to find a student credit card with no foreign transaction fee, such as the Discover it® Student Cash Back or the Journey® Student Rewards from Capital One® card.
  • Must join Altra Federal Credit Union: Luckily, anyone can join, but it might take a bit of legwork on your part compared to a bank. If you don’t meet certain membership eligibility criteria, you can join the Altra Foundation for $5. Then you’ll need to open a savings account with a minimum $5 deposit that must remain in the account while you have your card open.
Bottom line

Bottom line

If you’re a student who doesn’t mind working with a credit union, Altra provides a card that has several rewards benefits. This card is a good option if you may be taking out an auto loan in the next few years, since you’ll benefit from a reduced interest rate by trading in your rewards points. In addition to earning rewards, using this card responsibly can help you build credit.

Read our full review of the Altra Federal Credit Union Student Visa® Credit Card

Best Secured Card

Discover it® Secured

APPLY NOW Secured

on Discover Bank’s secure website

Rates & Fees

Read Full Review

Discover it® Secured

Annual fee
$0
Minimum Deposit
$200
Regular APR
24.99% Variable
Credit required
bad-credit
New/Rebuilding

Magnify Glass Pros

  • Cashback program: This card has a feature uncommon to other secure cards — a cashback program. You earn 2% cash back at restaurants or gas stations on up to $1,000 in combined purchases each quarter. Plus 1% cash back on all other credit card purchases.
  • Cashback Match™: Discover will match ALL the cash back you’ve earned at the end of your first year, automatically. There’s no signing up. And no limit to how much is matched (new cardmembers only). This is a great added bonus that increases your cash back in Year 1.
  • Automatic monthly reviews after eight months: Discover makes it easy for you to transition to an unsecured card with monthly reviews of your account starting after eight months. Reviews are based on responsible credit management across all of your credit cards and loans.

Cons Cons

  • Security deposit: You need to deposit a minimum of $200 in order to open this card, which is pretty standard for a secured card. This will become your credit line, so a $200 deposit gives you a $200 credit line. If you want a higher credit limit, you need to increase your deposit. The security deposit is refundable, meaning you will receive your deposit back if you close the card, as long as your account is in good standing.
Bottom line

Bottom line

The Discover it® Secured is great for students who want to build credit. This card easily transitions you to an unsecured card when the time is right, and you can earn cash back. With proper credit behavior, you’ll soon be on your way to an unsecured card.

Read our full review of the Discover it® Secured

Best for No Credit History

Deserve® EDU Mastercard

APPLY NOW Secured

on Deserve’s secure website

Deserve® EDU Mastercard

Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
1% unlimited cash back on ALL purchases
Regular Purchase APR
20.74% Variable
Credit required
bad-credit
Fair/Good Credit or No Credit

Magnify Glass Pros

  • No credit history required: You can qualify for this card without any credit history, making this a great option for students new to credit. You don’t even need a Social Security number when applying.
  • Reimbursement for Amazon Prime Student*: This card will reimburse you for the cost of a year of Amazon Prime Student (valued at $49). You need to charge your membership to this card to qualify, and you will not be reimbursed for subsequent years’ membership fees.
  • No foreign transaction fee: Whether you travel abroad or study abroad, you can rest easy: There are no foreign transaction fees with this card.

Cons Cons

  • Low cash back rate: The rewards program has a subpar 1% unlimited cash back on ALL purchases. You can do better with some of the other cards mentioned in this post. Though as a student, rewards shouldn’t be your primary focus — instead, build your credit so you can qualify for better non-student cards.
Bottom line

Bottom line

The Deserve® Edu Mastercard for Students is a great choice for students who are looking to build credit. Deserve markets their cards for those who may have trouble qualifying for credit, and students who fall into this category may more easily qualify for this card than for cards from traditional banks. You can earn cash back, and receive a great promotional offer of a year of Amazon Prime Student for free*.

The information related to Deserve® Edu Mastercard for Students has been collected by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card prior to publication.

Also ConsiderAlso Consider

Golden 1 Platinum Rewards for Students

Golden 1 Credit Union Platinum Rewards for Students:

This credit card offers a snazzy rewards program: rather than accumulate points, you’ll get a cash rebate instead. All you have to do is make a purchase. At the end of the month, you’ll get a rebate of 3% of gas, grocery, and restaurant purchases, and 1% of all other purchases deposited back into your Golden 1 savings account at the end of the month. Anyone who lives or works in California is eligible for credit union membership.

What should I look for in a student credit card?

The most important thing to consider when looking for a student credit card is that it charges no annual fee. You should never have to pay to build your credit score. Fortunately, most student cards don’t charge you an annual fee, but it’s still something to watch out for.

The second most important thing you should keep an eye out for are tools that help you learn about credit or even promote good credit-building habits. For example, some student credit cards will give you a free monthly FICO® score update. You can use this freebie to see in real time how your credit score changes as you build credit history by keeping the card open, or paying down your credit card balance, for example.

The last thing you should be considering when picking out a student credit card is the rewards program. I know, I know, it seems counterintuitive. But stick with me — I’ll show you why in the next question.

Why shouldn’t I be concerned about maximizing my rewards while in college?

Rewards cards are nice to have. But if you’re a college student, here’s the truth: you probably won’t spend enough to earn meaningful rewards.

Why? With a good rewards program, you can earn points or cash back. A small percentage of your monthly spending can add up quickly. However, given the tight budget that most college students live on, it will probably take a while to earn meaningful rewards. For example, if you earn 1.25% cash back and spend $300 a month on your card, you would earn $45 of cash back during the year.

College students are very good at making good use of $45. And our favorite card offers a great cash back rewards program. Just don’t expect to earn a lot of cash back, given the tight budget of a college student.

Why should I get a credit card as a college student?

There are a lot of great reasons why you should get a credit card, as long as you can commit to using it responsibly.

The single biggest reason why you should get a credit card as a college student is because you can start establishing a credit history now. When you graduate from college, you will need a good credit score to get an apartment. And your future employer will likely check your credit report. Building a good credit history while still in college will help prepare you for life after graduation.

Getting a credit card while in college can also train you to develop good credit habits now. But you need to be honest with yourself. If you find that you can’t avoid the temptation of maxing out your credit card, you might want to switch to a debit card or cash.

Finally, getting a credit card now can be the motivation you need to start learning about credit. These skills aren’t hard to learn, and they could save you thousands or even hundreds of thousands of dollars later in life (when you want a mortgage, for example).

What is the CARD Act and why should I care about it?

Many years ago, credit card companies would market on college campuses. You could get a free beer mug or t-shirt in exchange for a credit card application. And you would be able to qualify for a credit card without having any income. The Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure (CARD) Act was signed into law in May 2009 to change a number of practices.

How did the CARD Act change student credit cards?

The CARD Act made a lot of changes in how credit card issuers do business with students. One of the biggest changes was requiring students to be able to demonstrate an ability to pay. If you are under 21 and do not have sufficient income (a campus job, for example), you would need to get a co-signer.

In addition, colleges must now limit the amount of credit card marketing on campus. The days of free t-shirts and pizzas in exchange for credit card applications are gone. But that doesn’t mean it is impossible for a college student to get a credit card. Some highly reputable banks and credit unions still offer student cards. And building a good credit score while still in college is still highly recommended.

How can I protect myself from racking up debt?

When used properly, credit cards are a very convenient method of repayment. However, when not used properly, you can end up deep in credit card debt. It is important to establish a healthy relationship to credit now, with your first credit card.

You should try to ensure that you pay off your credit card bill in full and on time every month. Ideally, you should set up an automatic monthly payment. And to keep yourself on track, take advantage of alerts offered by most credit card companies. You can even get daily text messages reminding you of your balance.

How can I automate my credit card usage?

If all of this sounds confusing, don’t worry. There’s actually a way you can automate your payments so you never even have to bother with the hassle of using a credit card. All it takes is a few minutes of upfront work.

First, you’ll need at least one recurring monthly bill of the same amount, such as Netflix or Spotify. Log in to your account and set up an automatic payment each month using your credit card. Make a note of how much your monthly bill costs.

Next, log in to your bank account. Set up a second automatic payment to go to your credit card each month for the same amount as the bill. If your bank doesn’t offer the option to set up automatic payments, you may also be able to set up your credit card to automatically withdraw the amount of the bill from your bank.

Because you know this bill will be for the same amount each month (barring any price increases), you can literally just leave this running in the background each month on autopilot. You don’t even have to carry your credit card in your wallet if you don’t want to. Then, when you graduate, you’ll automatically have an improved credit score!

What happens to my student credit card when I graduate?

Congratulations! You’ve made it to the finish line. But what about your student credit card? You may choose to hold on to your student card since it might be your oldest credit account and this can play a part in your credit score. If you close your student credit card account, it will reduce your average age of credit accounts and could hurt your credit score. Instead of closing the account, you can ask your student card issuer if there is an option to upgrade your card.

Here is a summary of our favorite cards:

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Lindsay VanSomeren
Lindsay VanSomeren |

Lindsay VanSomeren is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Lindsay here