Advertiser Disclosure

College Students and Recent Grads

Common Student Loan Debt Relief Scams and How to Avoid Them

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Written By

Students Studying Learning Education
iStock

If you’re looking for relief from your student loans and see a claim that seems too good to be true, it probably is. Knowing that borrowers can find themselves in dire straights, scammers may advertise that you can get some or all of your loans forgiven due to a new law or rule. They may take your money and do nothing. Or, they may not rip you off completely, but charge you a one-time or monthly fee to sign up for a federal program — a program that you could easily sign up for free on your own.

In October 2017, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), 11 states and the District of Columbia launched Operation Game of Loans, which is a coordinated effort to address student loan scams. And in case you thought the reference to “Game of Thrones” was unintentional, the acting chairman Maureen K. Ohlhausen, said, “Winter is coming for debt relief scams that prey on hard-working Americans struggling to pay back their student loans.” The resulting court cases claim that the companies collected over $95 million from student loan borrowers looking for help.

While managing student loans can be tricky, take your time and research a company or person before agreeing to pay for assistance and watch out for scams.

Student loan debt relief scams to watch out for

Some companies provide legitimate help to borrowers who want to better understand or deal with their student loans. But it’s best to be cautious. The scams often involve similar promises or premises, and some of the most common scams include:

Student loan debt elimination/cancellation/settlement scams

One of the most enticing offers involves a promise to eliminate or cancel all your student loan debt. It may sound great, and vaguely possible as you may have heard of legitimate student loan forgiveness, repayment, discharge or cancellation programs. However, a promise that you can quickly get rid of your student loans is almost certainly a scam.

Companies may alternatively claim they can help you settle your debts for less than you owe. However, this is rarely the case. If you stop making payments, or the scammers tell you that they’ll make payments on your behalf, but they don’t, you could be left owning additional money in fees and accrued interest.

Lower monthly payment or interest rate scams

Some companies will ask for upfront enrollment fees or monthly maintenance payments with a promise to lower your monthly payments or reduce your interest rates. The companies may switch your federal repayment plan, which can lower your monthly payments but is also something you can do for free.

Even worse, some companies may request you send your monthly payments to them, instead of your loan servicer, and they simply keep the money and let your loans go into default.

The interest rate on federal loans is locked in when you the loan is disbursed and generally can’t be changed. You may be eligible for a 0.25 percent interest rate reduction on Direct Loans if you sign up for autopay. But again, this is something you can easily do for free by contacting your loan servicers.

Loan consolidation scams

If you have multiple student loans, consolidating (combining) the loans could make it easier to manage your finances and may lower your monthly payment. Eligible federal loans can be consolidated for free through the Direct Loan consolidation program. You may be able to consolidate private student loans by refinancing them with a new student loan.

The scam is when a company charges you hundreds or thousands of dollars to consolidate your loans without offering any additional aid or consultation. The Department of Education (ED) even has a warning on its site about paying others to consolidate your loans since there’s no application fee and the process is easy and free.

There is a lot to consider before consolidating or refinancing student loans. For example, if you consolidate a federal Perkins Loan, it won’t be eligible for the Perkins Loan cancellation and discharge options but may now be eligible for other federal forgiveness programs. Or, after you refinancing federal loans, they won’t be eligible for any federal programs. You may want to pay for an expert analysis of your situation and options. But spending hundreds of dollars to simply have someone else apply for consolidation on your behalf may not be a wise way to spend your money.

Red flags to watch out for

The specifics of a particular scam may vary, but there are a few trends and common themes that can tip you off that something isn’t right. For instance, Joshua Cohen, a student loan attorney based in West Dover, Vermont, says if the claim or offer has Trump or Obama in the name, that’s generally a clear red flag that it’s actually a scam.

Here are a few others to watch out for:

  • You’re promised all your loans could immediately be forgiven or cancelled. There are programs that may lead to loan forgiveness or cancellation, but they only apply to certain types of loans and the process can take years to complete.
  • There’s an upfront fee. Legitimate companies and individuals may charge fees to help you better understand your situation and options. However, it may be illegal for companies to charge a fee before they’ve done any work. In some cases, the scammers may try to convince you that the initial fee will pay down your debts, but then they actually pocket the money. Also, watch out for companies that ask you to make your monthly payments to them rather than your loan servicer.
  • They promise you relief based on a “new” program. Student loan programs may come and go, but tying an offer to a new program can be a warning sign. “Any company that claims there is a ‘new’ program under the Trump administration is a huge red flag,” says Cohen. “There is no ‘Trump forgiveness,’ nor was there ever ‘Obama forgiveness.’”
  • They pressure you with a limited-time offer. Some companies may tell you that you need to act now otherwise a program may end and you’ll miss out. Cohen says this tactic may be becoming more popular since many people know there haven’t been any new forgiveness programs under President Trump. “What I have seen is, ‘Sign up now before they take forgiveness away,’ or change the laws,” says Cohen. The added pressure can make some people fall for this trick. Cohen says while there are proposals that would end some federal forgiveness programs, they only affect future borrowers.
  • The salesperson isn’t knowledgeable about student loans. Whether you’re meeting with someone in person, on the phone, on social media or via email, do some independent research first and make sure what they say or write matches what you find on official government websites. “If the sales rep can’t explain the options, can’t point to a reference from the Dept of Ed. or offer anything in writing, that’s also a red flag,” says Cohen.
  • You’re asked to share your FSA ID. Your Federal Student Aid ID (FSA ID) is the username and password you use to sign on to federal websites and manage your loans. While it may seem like the same info you use to log into dozens of other sites, your FSA ID may be much more important. It can be used to sign loan agreements, apply for different student loan repayment plans and to consolidate a loan. A company could make irreversible changes to your loans using your FSA ID.
  • You’re asked to give them legal authority. By signing a power of attorney or third-party authorization form, you may be giving the company the legal right to make changes to your loans on your behalf. The company could then change the contact info in your account so you won’t notice that it isn’t paying your bills.
  • They claim to be part of the Department of Education. Scammers may go as far as using the ED’s seal, or a logo that looks like it could belong to a government agency, to gain your trust and try to convince you they can offer something special or exclusive. But that’s not how forgiveness programs work. If you have federal student loans, StudentAid.gov is a reliable and official source of information. With private student loans, contact your servicer before trusting a third party.
  • The company doesn’t act professionally. Misspelled words, grammatical errors, a notice urging you to sign up in all caps or other unprofessional communications could also be a red flag. Even if the company has the best intentions, you may not want to work with it.

Already a victim of a student loan forgiveness scam?

If there are bells going off in your head and you realize that you may have been paying a company that isn’t following through on its promises or offering legitimate help, there are a few steps you can take to help rectify the situation.

1. Stop working with the company
First things first, if you suspect you’ve fallen for a scam you should stop paying the scammers. If you only paid a one-time fee, you may want to contact the company just to let it know you’ll no longer be needing its services. You could also ask for a refund, although the company may not have to give you one.

“If there is any kind of auto payment being made to the scam company, the borrower should call their bank immediately and cancel all future payments,” says Cohen. He says you should then call or write the company to cancel your contract and request a refund.

Also, let your loan servicers, the companies you send payments to, know that you were working with a scammer. If you gave the scammer legal authority to access and make changes to your account, ask the servicer what you need to do to take back full control.

2. Check the status of your loans
In some cases, the scammers take your money and don’t do anything to your loans. But other scammers may make changes to your account that need to be undone.

You can log into your accounts online or call your loan servicers to check the current status of your loans. Look for and ask about any missed payments, changes to your repayments plans and any other changes to the account or loans.

With federal student loans, you can check your loan balances on the National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS) website or by contacting your loan servicer. For private student loans, reach out to the company you were making payments to, which may be different than the company that lent you the money.

3. Tell the FTC and your State Attorney General
You can file a complaint against the company with the FTC, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and your State Attorney General. Filing a complaint could lead to formal legal actions against the scammer, may save other borrowers from falling for the scam and in some cases could lead to refunds for victims.

4. Update your FSA ID.
If you gave the company your FSA ID, you can update your username and password online. You may also want to contact the Federal Student Aid Information Center (you can call them at 1-800-433-3243) if you think the company used your FSA ID to make changes to your federal student loans.

5. Monitor your credit
If you don’t already monitor your credit, you may want to sign up for a free or paid credit monitoring service. The scammers may have stopped making payments on your loans, which could lead to late payments or defaults that hurt your credit. Check your credit reports for these derogatory marks. Although you may not be able to get them removed, it’s good to know where you stand.

You can also add a fraud report to your credit reports by contacting one of the credit bureaus, which you may want to do if you shared your Social Security number or other personal information with the scammer.

Legitimate student loan debt relief strategies

Getting scammed can be frustrating, expensive and put you in a worse position with your student loans. However, there are legitimate paths that you may be able to take towards student loan forgiveness or relief.

Federal repayment plans

If you’re having trouble making payments on federal student loans, look into the federal income-driven repayment plans. Switching plans can lower your monthly payments and depending on your income, family size and where you live your payments may drop all the way to $0 a month. Also, the remainder of your loan balance will be forgiven after 20 to 25 years of making payments on an income-driven plan.

You can use the federal repayment estimator tool to see how switching plans could change your payment amount.

Federal loan consolidation

Consolidating your federal loans may extend your repayment term. Although you’ll wind up paying more overall, this could lower your monthly payments.

Depending on the types of loans you have, consolidating the loans may make them eligible for, or disqualify them from, certain loan forgiveness or cancellation programs. Also, since you’ll receive a new loan that pays off your existing loans, payments that you’ve made towards a forgiveness or cancellation program won’t carry over to your new loan.

Federal loan forgiveness, cancellation and discharge programs

Depending on your loans and situation, you may be eligible for legitimate federal loan forgiveness, cancellation or discharge programs. For example, with the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program, you may be able to get the remainder of your loan forgiven after making 120 payments while working full-time for an eligible nonprofit or government organization.

Loan deferment and forbearance

You may be able to put federal or private student loans into deferment or forbearance. Eligibility can depend on your situation and the type of loan you have. Deferment is often for when you can’t make payments because you return to school, are on a military assignment or working with a public service organization. Forbearance could be granted for economic hardship, perhaps due to a loss of job or medical emergency.

With either deferment or forbearance, you can temporarily stop making payments without incurring late fees or defaulting on the loan. However, your loans in forbearance may continue to accrue interest during these periods.

Get real help managing your student debt

There are also people and organizations that can genuinely help you understand and manage your student loans. Some of them charge fees, but that isn’t necessarily an indication that it’s a scam.

Cohen suggests borrowers start with the free route by checking official government website if you have federal student loans, or your loan servicer’s site for private student loans. “If the borrower is still confused or uncertain, contact a student loan lawyer,” says Cohen. “Most folks don’t need a lawyer, but at least the lawyer is regulated by the State Bar which creates a higher degree of accountability.”

You can also look for assistance from nonprofit organizations. The National Consumer Law Center has a student loan borrower assistance project that you may find helpful. Many nonprofit credit counseling organizations also offer student loan and debt management counseling for a $50 to $200 fee. The National Foundation for Credit Counseling can help you find a certified counselor.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Disclaimer

Student Loan
earnest

Refinance with Earnest

Refinancing rates from 3.21% APR. Checking your rates won’t affect your credit score.

Advertiser Disclosure

College Students and Recent Grads

Top Checking Accounts for College Grads

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Written By

For many college students, their default banking option while in school is a student checking account, which is typically free. Unfortunately, when you graduate you lose those benefits. Many student checking accounts will begin to charge you monthly maintenance fees unless you meet certain requirements.

So, where do you go from there?

Few young adults would turn to their parents for fashion or dating advice and, yet, one of the most common ways we’ve found young people choose their bank account is by going with whichever bank their parents already use. This could be a bigger faux pas than stealing your dad’s old pair of parachute pants.

The bank your parents use may carry fees or have requirements that don’t meet your lifestyle or budget, and make accounts expensive to use.

But where do you even begin to choose the right checking account?

When you’re nearing graduation, start planning your bank transition.

Many banks send a letter in the mail a few months prior to your expected graduation date informing you that your student checking account is going transition to a non-student account. If you’re not careful and you disregard the letter, you may be transitioned into an account that charges a fee if you don’t meet certain requirements.

You can always call the bank and ask to switch to a different account or you can choose a new account that offers more benefits, like interest and ATM fee refunds.

Account Name

Minimum Monthly Balance

Amount to Open

ATM Fee Refunds

APY

Simple$0$0None1.40%
Aspiration Spend and Save Account$0$50Unlimited1.00% APY
Discover Bank$0$0NoneNone, but 1% cash back on up to $3,000 debit card purchases per month
Ally Bank$0$0Up to $10 per statement cycle 0.10% to 0.50% APY depending on balance
Consumers Credit Union (IL) Free Rewards Checking$0$5Unlimited ATM reimbursements4.09% on balances up to $10,000,
0.20% APY on balances between $10,000 and $25,000 and 0.10% APY on balances over $25,000
La Capitol Federal Credit Union Choice Plus Checking$0(if less than $1,000, there is a $8 fee)$50Up to $25 per month4.25% APY on balances up to $3,000 2.00% APY on balances $3,000-$10,000 and 0.10% on balances over $10,000
T-Mobile Money$0$0None4.00% APY on balances up to $3,000, 1.00% APY after that
Partner Colorado Credit Union High Interest Checking$0$0None1.75% APY on balances up to $10,000, 0.25% APY on balances $10,000 - $25,000, 0.05% APY on balances over $25,000

The 5 key things you should look for in a checking account

When you’re shopping around for a new checking account, there are several things you should look for to ensure you’re getting the most value from your account:

  1. A $0 monthly fee: Sometimes banks may say they don’t charge a monthly fee but read the fine print — they may require a minimum monthly balance in order to avoid it. There are plenty of free checking accounts available for you to open, so there’s no reason to stay stuck with an account that charges a monthly fee. Take note, as some accounts may require you to meet certain criteria to maintain a free account like using a debit card, enrolling in eStatements or maintaining a minimum daily balance.
  2. No minimum daily balance: Accounts without minimum daily balances mean you can have a $0 balance at any given time. This may allow you to have a free account without meeting balance requirements — although other terms may apply to maintain a free account.
  3. Annual Percentage Yield: APY is the total amount of interest you will earn on balances in your account. Opening an account that earns you interest on your balance is an easy way to be rewarded for money that would typically sit without earning anything. You should definitely aim to earn a decent APY on your savings account.
  4. ATM fee refunds: You may not be able to access an in-network ATM at all times, so accounts providing ATM fee refunds can reimburse you for ATM fees you may incur while using out-of-network ATMs. Those $3 or $5 charges add up!
  5. No or low overdraft fees: Most banks charge you an overdraft fee of around $35 if you spend more money than you have available in your account. Therefore, it’s a good idea to choose an account that has no or low overdraft fees.

Top overall checking accounts for college grads

For the top overall checking accounts, we chose accounts that have no monthly service fees, no ATM fees, refunds for ATM fees from other banks, interest earned on your deposited balances and with strong mobile banking apps. While there is no all-inclusive account that contains every benefit, the accounts below are sure to provide value whether you want a high interest rate, unlimited ATM fee refunds or 24/7 live customer support.

1. Simple

Cash management app Simple acts as a hybrid checking and savings account with a generous APY and no fees. It features unlimited transfers between your checking account and Protected Goals account, as well as a decent APY of 1.40% on balances in your Protected Goals account. Simple also provides fee-free access to 40,000 ATMs – although it doesn’t rebate ATM fees you might incur from machines outside its vast network. With built-in budgeting tools integrated into its app, Simple is a strong contender for the best checking account for college grads.

SEE DETAILS Secured

on Simple’s secure website

2. Aspiration Spend and Save Account

The Aspiration Spend and Save Account offers a wide range of benefits for account holders and has few fees. The $50 amount to open is fairly low, and once you open your account there is no minimum monthly balance to maintain. Aspiration gives you up to five free ATM withdrawals per month.

As the account name suggests, there are two sides to the account: a spending sub-account and a savings sub-account. The spending side yields no interest, while the savings side earns 1.00% APY. To earn this APY, you must deposit at least $1,000 in the combined account monthly, or maintain a balance of $10,000.

SEE DETAILS Secured

on Aspiration’s secure website

3. Discover Cashback Debit

Cracking our list for the best checking accounts for college graduates is Discover Bank, which takes a unique approach to checking account rewards. Instead of offering an APY on deposit balances, Discover opts for cash back as an incentive to get consumers to sign up for its checking product. The Discover Cashback Debit account offers up to 1% cash back on $3,000 of debit card transactions per month. That coupled with its zero fees and free access to 60,000 ATMs nationwide make it one of the best checking accounts for college graduates.

SEE DETAILS 

Discover Bank's website is secure

Member FDIC

4. Ally Bank

Online bank Ally Bank offers a solid checking account with minimal fees, decent APYs and other attractive perks. Its Interest Checking account charges no monthly maintenance fees and provides free access to Allpoint ATMs nationwide, as well as a $10 reimbursement per statement cycle for any other ATMs fees incurred. Ally Bank’s APY isn’t too shabby, either: You can earn an APY of 0.50% with a $15,000 minimum balance. Other cool features include its Ally Skill for Amazon Alexa, which enables you to transfer money with just your voice.

SEE DETAILS 

Member FDIC

Top high-yield checking accounts for college grads

Since most checking accounts offer little to no interest, high-yield checking accounts are a great way for you to maximize the money that typically would just sit in your account without earning interest. These accounts often offer interest rates that fluctuate depending on how much money you have in the account. However, in order to earn interest, there are some requirements that you may have to meet such as making a certain number of debit card transactions and enrolling in eStatements.

1. Consumers Credit Union (IL) Free Rewards Checking

The Consumers Credit Union (IL) Free Rewards Checking account is just that: Rewarding. It offers a tier-based APY, which includes a 4.09% APY on balances up to $10,000, 0.20% APY on balances between $10,000 and $25,000 and 0.10% APY on balances over $25,000. In order to earn the highest APY, you must complete at least 6 signature-based debit purchases totaling $100 or more, receive at least one direct deposit, ACH debit, or pay one bill through their free bill payment system totaling $500 or more, log into your online banking account and be signed up for eStatements and spend $1,000 or more with a Consumers Credit Union Visa credit card each month. This account has no fees and offers unlimited ATM reimbursements if requirements are met.

SEE DETAILS Secured

on Consumers Credit Union (IL)’s secure website

NCUA Insured

2. La Capitol Federal Credit Union Choice Plus Checking

This checking account has a $2 monthly service fee, which can easily be waived if you enroll in eStatements.

While the terms state a minimum balance requirement of $1,000 and a low balance fee of $8, the fee can be waived if you make 15 or more posted non-ATM debit card transactions per month.

To earn the top interest rate on your checking balance, you just need to make at least 15 or more posted non-ATM debit card transactions per month. There are numerous surcharge-free La Capitol ATMs for you to use, and after signing up for eStatements you can receive up to $25 per month in ATM fee refunds when you use out-of-network ATMs.

SEE DETAILS Secured

on La Capitol Federal Credit Union’s secure website

NCUA Insured

3. T-Mobile Money

Wireless carrier T-Mobile has forayed into finance with a checking account, T-Mobile Money. The account offers a generous APY of 4.00% on balances up to $3,000, with balances over that threshold earning 1.00% APY. In order to receive the higher APY, you must meet the following requirements: Be enrolled in a qualifying T-Mobile wireless plan, be registered for perks with your T-Mobile ID and have deposited at least $200 in qualifying deposits to your checking account within that current calendar month. T-Mobile Money does not reimburse for out-of-network ATM fees, but it does not charge any maintenance fees.

SEE DETAILS Secured

on T-Mobile Money’s secure website

Member FDIC

4. Partner Colorado Credit Union High Interest Checking

Despite its name, Colorado Credit Union is open to anyone who makes a $5 donation to the Partner Colorado Foundation. Currently, it’s offering an APY of 1.75% on balances in its High Interest Checking account ranging from $0 to $10,000. Meanwhile, balances between $10,000 and $25,000 earn an APY of 0.25%, while balances over $25,000 earn an APY of 0.05%. In order to earn the high APY, you must meet the following requirements: Make at least 20 debit card transactions of at least $5 per month, receive eStatements and use mobile or online banking. There are no minimum balance requirements for this account, and there is no fee when using your PIN for purchases.

SEE DETAILS Secured

on Partner Colorado Credit Union’s secure website

NCUA Insured

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Advertiser Disclosure

Best of, College Students and Recent Grads, Credit Cards

Best Student Credit Cards May 2020

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any credit card issuer. This site may be compensated through a credit card issuer partnership.

Written By

Getting a credit card while you’re in college can set you up for financial success, provided you avoid racking up unnecessary charges. If you are over 18 and have a steady income, applying for a card now will kick start your credit history, and you can start building that all-important credit score.

Learning how to choose and use the right student credit card is relatively simple. Make sure you avoid annual fees and go with a bank or credit union you can trust. When you get the card, make sure you use it responsibly and pay the balance in full and on time every month. If you do these things consistently over time, you can leave school with an excellent credit score. And if you want to rent an apartment or buy a car, having a good credit score is very important.

Discover it® Student Cash Back

Magnify Glass Pros

  • Good Grades Reward program: Did you study extra hard this year? If you’ve gotten a 3.0 GPA or higher for an entire school year, Discover will reward you with an extra $20 statement credit. You can get this statement credit for up to five years in a row as long as you’re still a current student when you apply.
  • Free FICO® score: Just like how you have grades for your classes, your FICO® score is your “grade” for your credit. Credit cards have a huge effect on your FICO® score. You can watch how your new credit card affects your score over time with a free FICO® score update on your monthly statement.
  • 5% cash back: You can earn up to 5% cash back at different places that change each quarter, on up to $1,500 in purchases every quarter that you activate. Past categories have included things like Amazon purchases, restaurants, and ground transportation. Even if you don’t buy something in the bonus category, you’ll still earn 1% cash back on all other purchases.
  • Cash back match at end of your first year: In addition to rotating 5% cash back categories, new cardmembers will also get an intro bonus. When your first card anniversary comes around, Discover will automatically match your cash back rewards you earned during your first year.

Cons Cons

  • Remember to sign up for bonus categories: Even though this card comes with a great cash back rewards program, it comes with a catch: you’ll need to manually activate the bonus places each quarter. You can do this by calling Discover or logging in to your account online. If you forget, you’ll still earn 1% cash back if you make any purchases in the qualifying categories.
  • Gift certificates only available at certain levels: You can redeem your rewards for many things such as Amazon purchases, a statement credit, or a donation to a charity, to name a few. But, if you’d like to get a gift card instead, you’ll need a cash back balance of at least $20 saved up in your account.
Bottom line

Bottom line

The Discover it® Student Cash Back offers great benefits for college students, such as a rewards program for good grades and a free FICO® score so you can learn about your credit firsthand. Its cash back rewards program is our favorite. No other card for students (that we could find) offers the opportunity to earn up to 5% cash back. And with no annual fee, this is our top pick.

Read our full review of the Discover it® Student Cash Back

Journey® Student Rewards from Capital One®

Magnify Glass Pros

  • 1.25% cash back if you pay on time: Each purchase you make earns a flat-rate 1% cash back on all purchases; 0.25% cash back bonus on the cash back you earn each month you pay on time. This makes it handy for people who want as simple a card as possible. And it rewards great behavior.
  • Higher credit lines after on-time payments: If you’re approved for this card, you’ll receive a credit line of at least $300. If you make five on-time payments in a row, you can call Capital One and ask them to increase your credit line.
  • No foreign transaction fee: This is a great card to take overseas, because you won’t have to pay any foreign transaction fees. Most cards charge an average 3% foreign transaction fee, but Journey allows you to use your card abroad without being charged extra fees.

Cons Cons

  • High APR: This card carries an APR of 26.99% (variable). That’s almost twice as high as some other student credit cards, such as the Wells Fargo Cash Back CollegeSM Card with an APR as low as 12.90% - 22.90% Variable. It’s just one more incentive to pay off your bill in full each month.
Bottom line

Bottom line

We really like this card because it actively rewards you for developing good credit-management behavior by offering a small cash back bonus for on-time payments. In addition, the cash back program is straightforward with no confusing categories to remember or opt into, making this card a good option for students who want a simple, flat-rate card.

Read our full review of the Journey® Student Rewards from Capital One®

Best Intro Bonus

Wells Fargo Cash Back CollegeSM Card

The information related to Wells Fargo Cash Back CollegeSM Card has been independently collected by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card prior to publication.

Wells Fargo Cash Back CollegeSM Card

Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
3% cash rewards on gas, grocery, and drugstore purchases for the first 6 months, 1% cash rewards on virtually all other purchases
Regular Purchase APR
12.90% - 22.90% Variable
Credit required
excellent-credit
Good/Excellent

Magnify Glass Pros

  • APRs as low as 12.90% - 22.90% variable APR: Depending on your credit, your interest rate could be between 12.90% - 22.90% variable APR, but there is no guarantee you’ll receive the lower rate. This is a lower variable APR range than most student cards, and can help if you aren’t able to pay your balance in full one month.
  • Intro Rewards Bonus: 3% cash rewards on gas, grocery, and drugstore purchases for the first 6 months, 1% cash rewards on virtually all other purchases.
  • Access to credit education: Wells Fargo provides you with all sorts of tools and information to learn about things like credit, budgeting, and expense tracking. While this is a nice feature, it’s not exclusive to Wells Fargo. You can get this information from free tools such as Mint, or even reading books and blogs. But it is pretty handy having it right at your fingertips when logged in to your account.

Cons Cons

  • Need to be a Wells Fargo member to apply online: You can go into any one of the 6,000+ branches and apply for the card. You can also apply online, but you’ll need to be an existing Wells Fargo customer. However, anyone can open a checking account online with a minimum deposit of $25.
  • High bars for some cash back redemption options: There are a lot of redemption options available through Wells Fargo’s own online cash back rewards mall. However, if you’d just like straight cash, you have a few options. You can request a direct deposit into your Wells Fargo checking account, savings account, or Wells Fargo credit card (if applicable) in $25 increments, or request a paper check in $20 increments. That can take a long time to accumulate if you’re not spending much with your card.
Bottom line

Bottom line

The Wells Fargo Cash Back CollegeSM Card is a relatively simple card with a great intro bonus of 3% cash rewards on gas, grocery, and drugstore purchases for the first 6 months, 1% cash rewards on virtually all other purchases In addition, the low variable APR is handy for those who think they’ll be carrying a balance on their credit card from month to month at some point in the future. This is generally something we recommend against, but if you can’t avoid it, the Wells Fargo Cash Back CollegeSM Card is your best bet.

Read our full review of the Wells Fargo Cash Back CollegeSM Card

Bank of America® Travel Rewards Credit Card for Students

Magnify Glass Pros

  • Unlimited rewards. Earn unlimited 1.5 points for every $1 you spend on all purchases everywhere, every time and no expiration on points.
  • Flexible rewards redemption. You can redeem your points for a statement credit to pay for flights, hotels, vacation packages, cruises, rental cars or baggage fees. Plus, this card doesn’t restrict you to a particular airline or chain of hotels.
  • Free FICO score. Keep track of your credit score via online banking or Bank of America’s mobile app.
  • Chance to earn more rewards. Have an active Bank of America checking or savings account? Then this card offers a chance to get a 10% customer points bonus on every purchase. The card is also eligible for the benefits of the Preferred Rewards program, though that program is based on banking and/or investment balances that might be too high for many college students to qualify for.
  • Foreign transaction fee? There is none.

Cons Cons

  • Points are not worth as much when redeemed for cash back. When redeemed for a travel credit, each point is worth $0.01. However, if redeemed for cash back, points are only worth $0.006 each. For example, 2,500 points redeemed for travel would be worth $25. The same number of points redeemed for cash back would be worth $15.
Bottom line

Bottom line

If you’re looking for a student card offering travel rewards, the Bank of America® Travel Rewards Credit Card for Students could be a good option. With an annual fee of $0 and points that can be redeemed for travel with any airline or stays with any hotel line, this card gives you options.

Best Credit Union Card

Altra Federal Credit Union Student Visa® Credit Card

Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
Earn double Reward Points on every dollar of purchases in the first 60 days after opening your new account, then 1 point per dollar spent.
Regular Purchase APR
15.90% Fixed

Magnify Glass Pros

  • $20 reward for good credit card usage: If you can maintain your account in an “exceptional way” for your first year, you’ll get a bonus $20 reward on your card’s anniversary. All you have to do is not have any late payments, don’t charge over your card’s limit, and use your card for at least six out of twelve months.
  • Up to $500 random winner each quarter: It’s like playing the lottery, except you don’t have to buy a lottery ticket. Each quarter Altra will choose one student cardholder at random and pay back all of their purchases from the previous month, anywhere between $50 to $500.
  • Earn rewards: For the first 60 days after you open your account, you’ll earn 2 points per dollar spent. After that you’ll earn 1 point per dollar spent. You can redeem these points for cash back, merchandise through their online rewards mall, or travel.
  • Redeem points for a lower interest rate: If you’ll need a car in the future, this might be a good credit card to get. You can trade in 5,000 points for a 0.25% reduction, or 10,000 points for a 0.50% reduction on an auto loan through Altra Federal Credit Union. That could end up saving you a ton of cash in the long run.

Cons Cons

  • 1.00% of each transaction in U.S. dollars foreign transaction fee: This is definitely one card to leave at home if you’ll be traveling or studying abroad. Most credit cards charge a 3% foreign transaction fee, so this is on the low side. Still, it’s not too hard to find a student credit card with no foreign transaction fee, such as the Discover it® Student Cash Back or the Journey® Student Rewards from Capital One® card.
  • Must join Altra Federal Credit Union: Luckily, anyone can join, but it might take a bit of legwork on your part compared to a bank. If you don’t meet certain membership eligibility criteria, you can join the Altra Foundation for $5. Then you’ll need to open a savings account with a minimum $5 deposit that must remain in the account while you have your card open.
Bottom line

Bottom line

If you’re a student who doesn’t mind working with a credit union, Altra provides a card that has several rewards benefits. This card is a good option if you may be taking out an auto loan in the next few years, since you’ll benefit from a reduced interest rate by trading in your rewards points. In addition to earning rewards, using this card responsibly can help you build credit.

Read our full review of the Altra Federal Credit Union Student Visa® Credit Card

Discover it® Secured

Magnify Glass Pros

  • Cashback program: This card has a feature uncommon to other secured cards — a cashback program. You earn 2% cash back at gas stations and restaurants on up to $1,000 in combined purchases each quarter. Plus, earn unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases – automatically.
  • Cashback Match™: Discover will match ALL the cash back you’ve earned at the end of your first year, automatically. There’s no signing up. And no limit to how much is matched (new cardmembers only). This is a great added bonus that increases your cash back in Year 1.
  • Automatic monthly reviews after eight months: Discover makes it easy for you to transition to an unsecured card with monthly reviews of your account starting after eight months. Reviews are based on responsible credit management across all of your credit cards and loans.

Cons Cons

  • Security deposit: You need to deposit a minimum of $200 in order to open this card, which is pretty standard for a secured card. This will become your credit line, so a $200 deposit gives you a $200 credit line. If you want a higher credit limit, you need to increase your deposit. The security deposit is refundable, meaning you will receive your deposit back if you close the card, as long as your account is in good standing.
Bottom line

Bottom line

The Discover it® Secured is great for students who want to build credit. This card easily transitions you to an unsecured card when the time is right, and you can earn cash back. With proper credit behavior, you’ll soon be on your way to an unsecured card.

Read our full review of the Discover it® Secured

Best for No Credit History

Deserve® EDU Mastercard

Deserve® EDU Mastercard

Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
1% unlimited cash back on ALL purchases
Regular Purchase APR
20.24% Variable
Credit required
bad-credit
Good/Fair/Limited

Magnify Glass Pros

  • No credit history required: You can qualify for this card without any credit history, making this a great option for students new to credit. You don’t even need a Social Security number when applying.
  • Reimbursement for Amazon Prime Student*: This card will reimburse you for the cost of a year of Amazon Prime Student (valued at $59). You need to charge your membership to this card to qualify, and you will not be reimbursed for subsequent years’ membership fees.
  • No foreign transaction fee: Whether you travel abroad or study abroad, you can rest easy: There are no foreign transaction fees with this card.

Cons Cons

  • Low cash back rate: The rewards program has a subpar 1% unlimited cash back on ALL purchases. You can do better with some of the other cards mentioned in this post. Though as a student, rewards shouldn’t be your primary focus — instead, build your credit so you can qualify for better non-student cards. (Note that if you’ve applied without an SSN, you won’t build credit with this card until you link an SSN to your account.)
Bottom line

Bottom line

The Deserve® Edu Mastercard for Students is a great choice for students who are looking to build credit. Deserve markets their cards for those who may have trouble qualifying for credit, and students who fall into this category may more easily qualify for this card than for cards from traditional banks. You can earn cash back, and receive a great promotional offer of a year of Amazon Prime Student for free*.

Also ConsiderAlso Consider

Golden 1 Platinum Rewards for Students

Golden 1 Credit Union Platinum Rewards for Students:

This credit card offers a snazzy rewards program: rather than accumulate points, you’ll get a cash rebate instead. All you have to do is make a purchase. At the end of the month, you’ll get a rebate of 3% of gas, grocery, and restaurant purchases, and 1% of all other purchases deposited back into your Golden 1 savings account at the end of the month. Anyone who lives or works in California is eligible for credit union membership.

What should I look for in a student credit card?

The most important thing to consider when looking for a student credit card is that it charges no annual fee. You should never have to pay to build your credit score. Fortunately, most student cards don’t charge you an annual fee, but it’s still something to watch out for.

The second most important thing you should keep an eye out for are tools that help you learn about credit or even promote good credit-building habits. For example, some student credit cards will give you a free monthly FICO® score update. You can use this freebie to see in real time how your credit score changes as you build credit history by keeping the card open, or paying down your credit card balance, for example.

The last thing you should be considering when picking out a student credit card is the rewards program. I know, I know, it seems counterintuitive. But stick with me — I’ll show you why in the next question.

Why shouldn’t I be concerned about maximizing my rewards while in college?

Rewards cards are nice to have. But if you’re a college student, here’s the truth: you probably won’t spend enough to earn meaningful rewards.

Why? With a good rewards program, you can earn points or cash back. A small percentage of your monthly spending can add up quickly. However, given the tight budget that most college students live on, it will probably take a while to earn meaningful rewards. For example, if you earn 1.25% cash back and spend $300 a month on your card, you would earn $45 of cash back during the year.

College students are very good at making good use of $45. And our favorite card offers a great cash back rewards program. Just don’t expect to earn a lot of cash back, given the tight budget of a college student.

Why should I get a credit card as a college student?

There are a lot of great reasons why you should get a credit card, as long as you can commit to using it responsibly.

The single biggest reason why you should get a credit card as a college student is because you can start establishing a credit history now. When you graduate from college, you will need a good credit score to get an apartment. And your future employer will likely check your credit report. Building a good credit history while still in college will help prepare you for life after graduation.

Getting a credit card while in college can also train you to develop good credit habits now. But you need to be honest with yourself. If you find that you can’t avoid the temptation of maxing out your credit card, you might want to switch to a debit card or cash.

Finally, getting a credit card now can be the motivation you need to start learning about credit. These skills aren’t hard to learn, and they could save you thousands or even hundreds of thousands of dollars later in life (when you want a mortgage, for example).

What is the CARD Act and why should I care about it?

Many years ago, credit card companies would market on college campuses. You could get a free beer mug or t-shirt in exchange for a credit card application. And you would be able to qualify for a credit card without having any income. The Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure (CARD) Act was signed into law in May 2009 to change a number of practices.

How did the CARD Act change student credit cards?

The CARD Act made a lot of changes in how credit card issuers do business with students. One of the biggest changes was requiring students to be able to demonstrate an ability to pay. If you are under 21 and do not have sufficient income (a campus job, for example), you would need to get a co-signer.

In addition, colleges must now limit the amount of credit card marketing on campus. The days of free t-shirts and pizzas in exchange for credit card applications are gone. But that doesn’t mean it is impossible for a college student to get a credit card. Some highly reputable banks and credit unions still offer student cards. And building a good credit score while still in college is still highly recommended.

How can I protect myself from racking up debt?

When used properly, credit cards are a very convenient method of repayment. However, when not used properly, you can end up deep in credit card debt. It is important to establish a healthy relationship to credit now, with your first credit card.

You should try to ensure that you pay off your credit card bill in full and on time every month. Ideally, you should set up an automatic monthly payment. And to keep yourself on track, take advantage of alerts offered by most credit card companies. You can even get daily text messages reminding you of your balance.

How can I automate my credit card usage?

If all of this sounds confusing, don’t worry. There’s actually a way you can automate your payments so you never even have to bother with the hassle of using a credit card. All it takes is a few minutes of upfront work.

First, you’ll need at least one recurring monthly bill of the same amount, such as Netflix or Spotify. Log in to your account and set up an automatic payment each month using your credit card. Make a note of how much your monthly bill costs.

Next, log in to your bank account. Set up a second automatic payment to go to your credit card each month for the same amount as the bill. If your bank doesn’t offer the option to set up automatic payments, you may also be able to set up your credit card to automatically withdraw the amount of the bill from your bank.

Because you know this bill will be for the same amount each month (barring any price increases), you can literally just leave this running in the background each month on autopilot. You don’t even have to carry your credit card in your wallet if you don’t want to. Then, when you graduate, you’ll automatically have an improved credit score!

What happens to my student credit card when I graduate?

Congratulations! You’ve made it to the finish line. But what about your student credit card? You may choose to hold on to your student card since it might be your oldest credit account and this can play a part in your credit score. If you close your student credit card account, it will reduce your average age of credit accounts and could hurt your credit score. Instead of closing the account, you can ask your student card issuer if there is an option to upgrade your card.

The information related to Bank of America® Travel Rewards Credit Card for Students and Deserve® Edu Mastercard for Students has been independently collected by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card prior to publication.

Here is a summary of our favorite cards:

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.