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Student Loan Forgiveness Programs for Lawyers

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

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Given a lawyer’s propensity for high salaries, student loan forgiveness for lawyers isn’t often discussed. However, lawyers do have many forgiveness options. This article will cover the numerous ways lawyers can get their loans forgiven.

Before we dig too deep into the matter, it’s worth noting that all federal direct loans and federally guaranteed loans are eligible for loan forgiveness. Federal loans include subsidized and unsubsidized Federal Stafford loans, Federal Direct Consolidation loans, Federal Perkins loans (only when part of a Federal Direct Consolidation loan), and Federal PLUS loans. However, private loans are not forgivable. If you have private law school loans, jump down to our top picks for refinancing your law school debt. Let the proceedings begin.

Income-Based Repayment (IBR)

Under this method, a lawyer is able to keep payments low until the loans are eventually forgiven. Through this program, participants generally don’t pay more than 15% of their ‘discretionary income’ towards student loan repayment. ‘Discretionary income’ is anything you earn above the national poverty level (which is currently $11,490). A person need never pay more than the 10-Year Standard Repayment Plan amount. After 25 years of payments, the outstanding balance will be forgiven. Lawyer or not, everyone should look into this program.

[Learn more about IBR here.]

Federal Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF)

Should you enter these types of careers, your loan may be forgiven:

  • The government (military service included)
  • A 501(c)(3) nonprofit
  • AmeriCorps or Peace Corps position
  • A private public service organization

To qualify for Federal Public Service Loan Forgiveness, loans must be in the William Ford Direct lending program. Loans under the FFEL program can be consolidated into Direct loans. With this program, a lawyer is still required to make 120 monthly payments. At which time, the remaining balances will be discharged in full. 120 payments sound terrifying but if you couple this program with income-based repayment, the dollar amount you’ll be paying is low compared to what you could be paying for these loans.

Department of Justice Attorney Student Loan Repayment Program (ASLRP)

To qualify, you must have at least $10,000 in federal student loans.

Loans which are covered include:

  • Stafford Loans
  • Supplemental Loans
  • Federal Consolidation Loans
  • Defense Loans (made before July 1, 1972)
  • National Direct Student Loans (made between 7/1/72 and 7/1/87)
  • William D. Ford Direct Student Loans
  • Perkins Loans
  • The Nursing Student Loan Program loans
  • The Health Profession Student Loan Program loans
  • The Health Education Assistance Loan Program loans

This is a recruitment and retention program. The DOJ conducts an ‘open season’ recruiting process each spring. Any aspiring or current employee may request consideration. The selection is competitive and even when you are accepted, reexamination of eligibility will occur each spring.

Upon acceptance, you are committed to a 3-year term with the Department of Justice. Anyone who cannot complete a 3-year term in their position (political appointees, occupying attorneys, etc.) shall not be accepted.

Federal loans will be repaid to the issuer, not the lawyer personally. Any attorney who does not complete his or her service obligation will be required to repay the loans that had been forgiven up to the point of resignation. This is a competitive program.

John R. Justice Student Loan Repayment Program

The John R. Justice Student Loan repayment program provides assistance for state and federal public defenders and state prosecutors for at least 3 years. It’s renewable after 3 years. Benefits cannot exceed $10,000 in any calendar year and cannot exceed $60,000 per attorney. Attorneys with the greatest inability to repay their loans have priority.

The program is administered by the states. Funds are given to each state based on its population.

All attorneys hoping to enter into this program must remain in practice for at least 3 years. Application deadline is in the spring. The 2015 deadline was April 13, 2015. There are many loan forgiveness programs for lawyers which come and go. I’m happy to say this program has stood the test of time. It shows no sign of slowing down or disappearing.

Law School Loan Forgiveness Programs

At New York University Law for instance, you can get ALL your federal student loans forgiven. You first need to work in an eligible public interest position. You must remain in a public interest position for 10 years. You cannot make more than $80,000 per year. While those are fairly restrictive requirements, it is pretty spectacular you can become a lawyer without needing to worry about federal student loan repayment.

These programs exist at more than 100 law schools. They are mostly to encourage lawyers to enter public service roles.

See a list of 102 schools by clicking here. Click the links within to read about each school’s loan forgiveness program. No two programs are alike.

State-Specific Loan Repayment Programs (LARPs) for Lawyers

Perhaps your school doesn’t offer a loan forgiveness program. Good news, the state your school resides in may still offer a program to you. Twenty-four states (plus the District of Columbia) offer state-specific loan repayment assistant programs. Click on each state to pull up more information. The states include:

Arizona, District of Columbia, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Vermont, and Virginia.

Note: This list is current as of 6/11/15. However, please check with your state before getting too excited about a state plan. Some states such as Kansas only offer the program if you practice in certain counties. Right now Kansas only offers the program in 50 of the state’s 105 counties. Kentucky, Nebraska, Missouri, and Washington’s programs are temporarily suspended due to lack of funding.

Closing Arguments

It’s worth noting how many loan forgiveness programs for lawyers lose their funding:

  • The John R. Justice Prosecutors & Defenders Incentive Act: Unfunded
  • The Legal Assistance Loan Repayment Program: Unfunded
  • The Loan Forgiveness for Service in Areas of National Need: Unfunded

However, the programs listed in this article seem to be here to stay!

To close, it’s worth repeating that it wouldn’t be right if teaching was the only profession eligible for student loan forgiveness. Rightly so, savvy lawyers can get assistance as well. Bundle as many of these forgiveness programs together as possible and you’ll be doing just alright. Who says lawyers have to be burdened with massive amounts of debt?

Check Out Our Top Picks for Refinancing Student Loans

LenderTransparency ScoreMax TermFixed APRVariable APRMax Loan Amount 
SoFiA+

20


Years

3.89% - 8.07%


Fixed Rate*

2.54% - 7.12%


Variable Rate*

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
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on SoFi’s secure website

EarnestA+

20


Years

3.89% - 7.89%


Fixed Rate

2.54% - 7.27%


Variable Rate

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
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on Earnest’s secure website

CommonBondA+

20


Years

3.67% - 7.25%


Fixed Rate

2.69% - 7.43%


Variable Rate

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
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on CommonBond’s secure website

LendKeyA+

20


Years

3.49% - 8.93%


Fixed Rate

2.67% - 8.96%


Variable Rate

$125k / $175k


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
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on LendKey’s secure website

Laurel Road BankA+

20


Years

3.50% - 7.02%


Fixed Rate

3.23% - 6.65%


Variable Rate

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
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on Laurel Road Bank’s secure website

Citizens BankA+

20


Years

3.89% - 9.99%


Fixed Rate

2.98% - 9.72%


Variable Rate

$90k / $350k


Undergraduate /
Graduate
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on Citizens Bank (RI)’s secure website

Discover Student LoansA+

20


Years

5.74% - 8.49%


Fixed Rate

4.99% - 7.99%


Variable Rate

$150k


Undergraduate /
Graduate
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on Discover Bank’s secure website

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College Students and Recent Grads, Pay Down My Debt

Sample Goodwill Letter to Remove a Late Student Loan Payment from Your Credit Report

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Businessman Holding Document At Desk

If you’ve pulled your credit report recently and discovered that there’s been a late payment reported on your student loans, you might be wondering what you can do to recover. Late payments can damage your credit, especially if you stop paying your loans for an extended period of time.

We’ve already gone over the repercussions of delinquency and default, but now let’s take a look at another method of repairing your credit report — sending a goodwill letter to your creditor.

What is a goodwill letter?

A “goodwill letter” is a simple way to repair your credit report, and it can be used for both federal and private loans. The purpose of a goodwill letter is to restore your credit to good standing by having a lender or servicer erase a lateness on your credit report.

Typically, those who have experienced financial hardship due to unexpected circumstances have the most success with goodwill letters. They allow you to ask if your student loan servicer can empathize with the situation that caused the lateness and erase it from your report.

It can also be used when you think the late payment is an error — for example, if you were in deferment or forbearance during the time of the late payment and weren’t required to make any payments, or if you know you’ve never been late on a payment before.

What makes a convincing goodwill letter?

If you’ve been looking for a goodwill letter that will work well, we have some tips on what you should include in your letter:

1. An appreciative tone

It’s important that the entire tone of your letter comes off as thankful and conscientious. If you were actually late on your payments due to extenuating circumstances, taking an angry tone probably won’t help your case.

2. Take responsibility

You want to be convincing and honest. Take responsibility for the late payment, and explain why it happened. They need to sympathize with you. Saying you just forgot isn’t going to win you any points.

3. A good recent payment history

Besides sympathy, you want to gain their trust that you will continue to make payments. If your lender sees payments being made on time before and after the period of financial hardship, it might be more willing to give you a break. When you have a pattern of late payments, on the other hand, it’s more difficult to convince them that you’re taking this seriously.

4. Proof of any errors and relevant documents

If you’re writing about a mistake that occurred, still be friendly in tone, but back up the errors with documentation. You’ll need proof that what you’re saying is true. Unfortunately, errors are often made on credit reports, and it may have been a clerical error on behalf of your servicer. If you have any written correspondence with them, you’ll want to include it.

5. Simple and to the point

The last thing to keep in mind is to craft a short and simple letter. Get straight to the point while telling your story. The people reviewing your letter don’t want to read an essay, and the easier you make their lives, the better.

Sample goodwill letter No. 1

Below is a sample goodwill letter for student loans to give you an idea of how to structure your own:

To whom It may concern:

Thank you for taking the time out of your day to read this letter. I just pulled my credit report, and discovered that a late payment was reported on [date] for my account [loan account number].

During that time, my mother fell terminally ill, and I was the only one left to care for her. As such, I had to leave my job, and my savings went toward her health care expenses. I fell on very rough times after she passed away, and was unable to make my student loan payments.

I realize I made a mistake in falling behind, but up until that point, my payment history with you had been spotless. When I was able to gain employment once again, I quickly resumed paying my student loans, making them a priority.

I’m not proud of this black mark on my record, but it’s the only one I have, and I would be extremely grateful if you could honor this request to remove the lateness from my credit report. It would help me immensely in securing other lines of credit so that I can further improve my credit score.

If the lateness cannot be removed entirely, I would still be appreciative if you could make a goodwill adjustment.

Thank you.

Sample goodwill letter No. 2

If you’re writing a letter because the lateness on your credit report is inaccurate, then try something similar to this:

To whom it may concern:

Thank you for taking the time to read this letter. I recently pulled my credit report and found that [Loan servicer] reported a late payment regarding my account [loan account number].

I am requesting that this late payment be assessed for accuracy.

I believe this reporting is incorrect because [list the supporting facts you have]. I have included the documentation to prove that [I made payments during this time / that my loans were in forbearance/deferment and didn’t require any payments].

Please investigate this matter, and if it is found to be inaccurate, remove the lateness from my credit report.

Thank you.

Make sure you provide as many personal details as possible — without making the letter too long, of course. You should also include your name, address and phone number at the top of the letter in case your loan servicer needs to reach you immediately.

Where to send your goodwill letter

Now that your letter is written, it’s time to send it. This can be done either by fax or by mail. Most student loan servicers have their contact information on their website, but you can also look on your billing statements to see if they specify a different address.

Additionally, you can try calling the credit bureau where the lateness was reported to see if they can give you the contact information you need.

It’s important to mention that goodwill letters are not a means to immediate success. Unfortunately, it often takes several attempts to correspond with servicers and lenders to get them to acknowledge that they received a letter from you.

Your best bet is to get a personal contact at the company who has the power to erase the late payment from your credit report.

If all else fails, try as many different communication methods as possible. Phone, mail, fax, live chat (if your servicer offers it) and email them. Several people who have tried this report that it’s possible to wear your servicer down with a decent amount of requests.

Addresses and fax numbers to try

Here are some addresses and fax numbers for several of the larger servicers, as listed on their websites. Again, it may also be worth phoning your servicer to get the name of someone there that can help you. If you have federal student loans, you can also check this Federal Student Aid page for more contact information.

Nelnet

Documents related to deferment, forbearance, repayment plans or enrollment status changes:

Attn: Enrollment Processing

P.O. Box 82565

Lincoln, NE 68501-2565

Fax: 877-402-5816

Great Lakes

Great Lakes

P.O. Box 7860

Madison, WI 53707-7860

Fax: 800-375-5288

Sallie Mae

Sallie Mae

P.O. Box 3229

Wilmington DE 19804-0229

Fax: 855-756-0011

Navient

For anything other than federal loans, check here

Navient – U.S. Department of Education Loan Servicing

P.O. Box 9635

Wilkes-Barre, PA 18773-9635

Fax: 866-266-0178

Cornerstone

P.O. Box 145122

Salt Lake City, UT

84114-5122

Fax: 801-366-8400

FedLoan

For letters and correspondence

FedLoan Servicing

P.O. Box 69184

Harrisburg, PA 17106-9184

Fax: 717-720-1628

EdFinancial

For FFELP and private loans, check here

Edfinancial Services

P.O. Box 36008

Knoxville, TN 37930-6008

Fax: 800-887-6130

Documents to include with your goodwill letter

Don’t let your efforts go to waste by forgetting to send documentation with your letter. Here’s a quick checklist of what you should include:

  • The account number for your loan
  • Your name, address, phone number and email
  • Statements showing proof that you paid (if you’re disputing a late payment)
  • Documentation showing that you’ve paid on time at all other points aside from when you experienced financial hardship (if that’s the case)
  • Identifying documentation so your servicer knows you sent the request

Also note that if you’re mailing anything, you should send it by certified mail with a receipt requested. This way you’ll know whether your letter made it to the servicer.

What to expect after submitting your goodwill letter

Once you submit your goodwill letter, you should hear back from your creditor with a decision in a few weeks. If two to three weeks have passed without word, follow up via email or phone call.

As you know, there’s no guarantee that your goodwill letter will work. The decision to remove a negative mark from your credit report is entirely in the hands of your creditor.

If your creditor rejects your petition, you’ll have to accept the ding on your credit report and take other steps to boost your credit. But if they agree to repair your credit, you should see the delinquency removed from your report and your credit score increase as a result.

A higher credit score can make life a lot easier, whether you want to take out a loan, open a credit card or, in some cases, even rent an apartment. For student loan borrowers, a strong credit score also opens the door to student loan refinancing, a savvy strategy that lets you restructure your debt, possibly changing your monthly payment and potentially saving money on interest.

If your credit score rebounds and you want to take proactive steps to conquer your student debt, refinancing could be the answer you’ve been looking for, so long as you no longer need the protections that come with federal loans.

Either way, though, make sure to keep up with student loan payments so you don’t end up with a delinquent account dragging down your newly repaired credit score.

Resources

If you’re interested in exploring goodwill letters further — and the results that others have had — check out these websites:

  • Ed.gov: They cover disputes, what to do about them and how to go about rectifying them here.
  • ConsumerFinance.gov: If you have loans with a private lender, and your lender had reported you as late when you weren’t, you can file a complaint with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) to see if they can help you.
  • myFico Forums: The forums on myFico are populated with helpful individuals that might be able to give you contact information for certain servicers. There are some people reporting success with goodwill letters, and they may be willing to share their letters with others upon request.

It’s worth the time to write a goodwill letter

If you’ve discovered that a late payment has been reported on your credit, and it’s because you fell on hard times or is inaccurate, it’s worth trying to get it erased. These dings on your credit are there to stay for seven to 10 years. That’s a long time, especially if you’re young and hoping to buy a house or a car in the near future. It’s a battle worth fighting.

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FedLoan Consolidation or Refinancing: Which Is Best for Your Student Loans?

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

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If your FedLoan Servicing repayment isn’t going as you had hoped, you might be staring at two seemingly similar options: Both FedLoan consolidation and private loan refinancing would consolidate or group your federal education debt, making for a more straightforward repayment.

But that’s where similarities between consolidation and refinancing end. If you’re unsure about which to go with, read on for the details.

What to know about FedLoan consolidation

Consolidation involves taking out a direct consolidation loan to repay your original federal student loan debt, and it could solve a number of problems.

Most notably, you could make a single monthly payment to one servicer instead of a handful of them (if you have multiple federal loans serviced by various companies). Although that won’t save you any money, it could bring you much appreciated simplicity.

Through federal loan consolidation, you could also expect the following benefits:

  • Choose your new loan servicer, whether that’s FedLoan or a competitor.
  • Become eligible or retain eligibility for Income-Driven Repayment (IDR) plans and Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF).
  • Lower your monthly payment by switching from the 10-year standard repayment plan to an IDR plan.
  • Lock in a fixed interest rate (if any of your older federal loans were tagged with a variable rate).

The benefits aren’t bereft of fine print, however. When you consolidate loans you’ve already started repaying, for example, you reset the clock on any progress toward forgiveness via IDR or PSLF. Also, none of your private loan debt (if you have any) can be combined via a direct consolidation loan.

How to undertake FedLoan consolidation

If the pros outweigh the cons in your case, file your FedLoan consolidation application at StudentLoans.gov. According to the website, most applicants are able to complete the necessary forms in less than 30 minutes.

If you elect to keep FedLoan as your servicer, you can track your application progress via your MyFedLoan account. A resolution should arrive within four to six weeks.

FedLoan Servicing

What to know about student loan refinancing

When you consolidate your federal debt, your new loan’s rate will be a weighted average of your previous federal loans’ rates, rounded up to the nearest one-eighth of 1%.

Via student loan refinancing, however, you could reduce the collective interest rate of your federal debt — and (unlike with consolidation) your private student loans, too — potentially cutting it by whole percentage points.

That’s the greatest difference between FedLoan consolidation and private refinancing — and it explains why many creditworthy borrowers save hundreds even thousands of dollars on interest when working with a private lender.

Say you have four federal loans with FedLoan Servicing worth $35,000 accruing interest at an average rate of 7.00%. Now say you have sterling credit and stable income (or a cosigner who does). By refinancing to a rate of 5.00%, you’d save $4,218 on interest over the next decade.

To be eligible for such savings, however, you — and your cosigner, if you have one — must submit to a credit check. Only applicants with strong credit gain access to the lowest rates advertised by competing lenders. This stands in contrast to consolidation, which has no such credit requirements, making it a more accessible option.

If you have the finances to qualify for refinancing, you could enjoy other benefits besides a lower interest rate, including:

  • Leaving the federal student loan system behind and starting fresh with a top-rated private lender of your choice
  • Selecting fixed, variable or hybrid interest rates
  • Lowering your monthly payment in exchange for lengthening your repayment term and paying more interest overall
  • Releasing the cosigner on your undergraduate private student loans

The cons, however, are just as consequential. In exchange for the perks of private refinancing, you’ll lose access to all federal loan protections. This includes mandatory forbearance (should you need to pause your payments), IDR programs and forgiveness programs like PSLF.

Because refinancing is irreversible once you sign your loan agreement, it’s wise to weigh these plusses and minuses in advance.

How to refinance your FedLoan debt

If you elect to refinance, you can initiate the process by shopping around for the  best possible loan terms. You might also delay your search to improve your credit or find a cosigner who can help you qualify for the very lowest rates.

Once you’ve selected a refinancing lender — whether it be a bank, credit union or online-only lender — it would pay off your FedLoan (and any other eligible education debt). Then your lender would issue you the newly refinanced loan as a fresh start on your repayment.

Try crunching some numbers on our student loan refinancing calculator to estimate your savings (or cost), plus your new monthly payment, when comparing lenders’ quotes.

Should you pick FedLoan consolidation or FedLoan refinancing?

If you have poor credit and no cosigner in sight, you might already have your answer. Consolidation won’t save you money, but it will simplify your repayment, and it’s accessible to all federal loan borrowers.

With strong credit, you might also have the option of refinancing on the table. Whether it’s right for you, however, is another story.

As you’ll see, picking between consolidation and refinancing for your FedLoan debt (or any other loans, for that matter) isn’t just about what you’ll get. It’s about what you’re willing to give up.

This chart might help you as you consider which strategy is best for your situation:

What’s your repayment goal?Do you need federal protections?Your better option is probably ...
Switch to a single monthly payment (for your federal loans only)YesConsolidation
Switch to a single monthly payment (for both federal and private loans)NoRefinancing
Reduce your interest rateNoRefinancing
Work with a new loan servicerYesConsolidation
Work with a new lenderNoRefinancing
Choose a variable interest rateNoRefinancing
Lower your monthly paymentYesConsolidation
Lower your monthly paymentNoRefinancing
Make income-based payments and work toward loan forgivenessYesConsolidation

If you’d like to switch loan servicers, have a single monthly payment and reduce your interest rate, refinancing could deliver all three benefits.

But if you’re not willing to yield your government-exclusive loan options (such as IDR and PSLF), then you could settle for two out of three: Consolidation would allow you to work with a new servicer and achieve a simpler repayment, but not lower the rate.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Andrew Pentis
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Andrew Pentis is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Andrew here

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