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A review of the IKEA® Visa® credit card

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any credit card issuer. This site may be compensated through a credit card issuer partnership.

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IKEA lovers, rejoice! The Swedish home goods store has unveiled the brand-new IKEA® Visa® credit card that rewards you the most for spending on everything from the popular Billy bookshelf system to its iconic meatballs.

If you’re a regular shopper at IKEA, you’ll get 5% back in rewards on IKEA® purchases, including Traemand installation and TaskRabbit assembly services, 3% back in rewards on dining, grocery and utility purchases, and 1% back in rewards on all other purchases. That’s pretty appealing, because the higher cashback rate not only includes products, furniture and food but it also applies to companies that can help you assemble furniture for those who can’t make heads or tails of IKEA’s infamous instructions.

But be warned: As generous as the rewards are on this card, you can only spend them at IKEA — in $15 increments. So if you’re not an IKEA fan, consider another card that gives you more flexibility in how you spend your cashback rewards.

IKEA® Visa® credit card

IKEA® Visa® credit card

Regular Purchase APR
21.99% Fixed
Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
5% back in rewards on IKEA® purchases, including Traemand installation and TaskRabbit assembly services, 3% back in rewards on dining, grocery and utility purchases, and 1% back in rewards on all other purchases.
Credit required
good-credit
Excellent/Good

Card benefits at a glance

The IKEA® Visa® credit card benefits

Cashback rewards

  • Get 5% back in rewards on IKEA® purchases, including Traemand installation and TaskRabbit assembly services, 3% back in rewards on dining, grocery and utility purchases, and 1% back in rewards on all other purchases.

Pros

  • The card has a $0 annual fee
  • $25 bonus IKEA® Reward Certificate when you spend $500 or more outside of IKEA, Traemand and TaskRabbit within the first 90 days of account opening with your IKEA® Visa® credit card.

Cons

  • Rewards earned on the IKEA® Visa® credit card are issued certificates that can only be used at IKEA.
  • The card doesn’t offer an intro purchase or balance transfer APR.
  • The card’s sign-up bonus isn’t as robust as other cards in the rewards category.

You have to love a credit card that offers both a $0 annual fee and pretty good rewards in popular categories. If you shop at IKEA regularly, then the rewards it offers can add up, especially since there’s no limit on how much you can accumulate. The rewards for dining and groceries are good, and including utility purchases in this tier is great, since most cards don’t even include this category for higher rewards.

What we like about the IKEA® Visa® credit card

One interesting thing about the IKEA® Visa® credit card is that you earn rewards on utility spending. It includes electric, gas (for home heating only), water, sanitary, telegraph services, television, radio and telecommunication services.

The IKEA® Visa® credit card gives new cardmembers a $25 bonus IKEA® Reward Certificate when you spend $500 or more outside of IKEA, Traemand and TaskRabbit within the first 90 days of account opening.

The card automatically enrolls you into the IKEA FAMILY loyalty program, which offers exclusive product discounts and special offers, along with free coffee or hot tea at its restaurants, 30 extra minutes in the Småland Time children’s play room and 90-day price protection on your purchases.

You also get access to Visa’s auto rental collision damage waiver when you use the card. You’ll be reimbursed for damage due to collision or theft up to the actual cash value of most rental vehicles.

Another great thing about the IKEA® Visa® credit card is its foreign transaction fee: None.

What we don’t like about the IKEA® Visa® credit card

The rewards you earn on this card comes with a big catch — you only get them as certificates issued in $15 increments, and they can only be redeemed at IKEA.

While the free shipping offer is nice, delivery areas are limited, depending on the location of the IKEA where the purchases were made. You’re warned that some items may take longer for delivery, and items ordered together may not arrive in the same box. You can’t have food, bistro products or plants delivered. And after Aug. 31, 2018, the offer ends.

If you’re not a big IKEA shopper, there are other cards that offer better rewards in the popular travel category than the IKEA® Visa® credit card. These cards also offer better sign-up bonuses, more flexibility in spending your rewards and more travel and purchase benefits.

An alternative to the IKEA® Visa® credit card

Citi® Double Cash Card – 18 month BT offer

Read Full Review

The information related to Citi® Double Cash Card – 18 month BT offer has been independently collected by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card prior to publication.

Citi® Double Cash Card – 18 month BT offer

Regular Purchase APR
13.99% – 23.99% (Variable)
Annual fee
$0
Rewards Rate
Earn 2% cash back on purchases: 1% when you buy plus 1% as you pay.

Not everyone is going to want to get the rewards offered by the IKEA® Visa® credit card, especially because you can only spend the rewards at IKEA. So for those who want to shop at more than just IKEA and get more flexibility in how they use their cashback rewards, the Citi® Double Cash Card – 18 month BT offer is a good option. (You can check out other top cashback credit card picks here.) It starts with No bonus, so the IKEA® Visa® credit card has the edge there. Your cash back can be redeemed for checks, statement credits or gift cards. There are no caps on the total amount of cash back you can earn with the Citi® Double Cash Card – 18 month BT offer.

The Citi® Double Cash Card – 18 month BT offer comes with benefits that are better than the IKEA® Visa® credit card, including purchase protection and auto rental collision damage waiver. You get access to Citi® Private Pass, which offers special access to buy tickets to events and VIP packages to concerts, sporting events and dining experiences, and Citi® Concierge for help with with travel, shopping, dining, entertainment and personalized service.

You also get access to Citi® Price Rewind, which does a 60-day search for a lower price on purchases made with your card. If a lower price is found, you may receive the difference up to $200 per item, and up to $1,000 per year. Terms apply.

There are other cards that offer higher rewards for travel, dining, groceries and gas. You also have to decide if the rewards on the Citi® Double Cash Card – 18 month BT offer are good enough.

So unless you are obsessed with IKEA, shop there regularly and don’t mind redeeming the IKEA® Visa® credit card’s rewards at the store, the Citi® Double Cash Card – 18 month BT offer may be a better option if you for you, since it offers much more flexibility on spending rewards and gives you more travel and protection benefits.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

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Credit Cards, Reviews

CreditStacks Mastercard Review

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any credit card issuer. This site may be compensated through a credit card issuer partnership.

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The CreditStacks Mastercard offers a unique opportunity for individuals with little or no U.S. credit history – such as recent college graduates or professionals relocating to the U.S. for employment – to be approved for a credit card.

That’s because instead of requiring a Social Security number (SSN) or individual taxpayer identification number (ITIN) as most traditional credit cards do, the CreditStacks Mastercard allows applicants to apply using a valid passport or U.S. government-issued ID, a U.S. visa or a permanent resident “green” card (if applicable), as well as proof of income. The CreditStacks Mastercard also allows you to apply up to 60 days prior to starting your new job in the U.S.

We break down the pros and cons of the CreditStacks Mastercard, and show how it compares to the Capital One® Secured Mastercard®, which is also designed to help individuals establish or rebuild credit.

CreditStacks Mastercard pros

No credit history required. With the CreditStacks Mastercard, you can apply without a Social Security number and with little or no U.S. credit history. Once you obtain your Social Security number, you must provide it within 60 days of account opening. At that point, CreditStacks will begin reporting your credit activity to the Equifax and TransUnion credit bureaus.

Note, if you have been living in the U.S. for more than one year, you will be required to provide a Social Security number when applying for the card. A credit check may also be performed.

Decent credit limit. The CreditStacks Mastercard offers a credit line of up to $5,000 – which is a generous amount for an unsecured credit card that doesn’t require credit history.

Your credit limit will be determined by the proprietary underwriting procedures of CreditStacks, which will consider your current employment situation and additional factors, instead of your credit score.

No annual fee. The CreditStacks Mastercard comes with a $0 annual fee.

Additional CreditStacks Mastercard benefits:

  • Mastercard ID Theft Protection(™). Access free identity theft resolution services, as well as Mastercard ID Theft Alerts(™).
  • Extended warranty. Receive an extended warranty of up to one year past a manufacturer’s warranty of 12 months or less.
  • Purchase protection. If you are dissatisfied with a purchase, you may be eligible to receive a full refund for up to 60 days from the date of purchase.
  • Price protection. Get reimbursed for the difference if you find a lower price for an eligible new item within 60 days of purchase using your CreditStacks Mastercard.
  • Purchase assurance. Cardholders receive coverage if an item is lost, damaged or stolen within 90 days of purchase.
  • Travel protections. The CreditStacks Mastercard offers a MasterRental(R) collision damage waiver, lost or damaged luggage insurance, travel accident insurance, baggage delay insurance and trip cancellation and trip interruption insurance. Plus, receive access to exclusive experiences and offers through Priceless Cities and special travel offers through Mastercard’s online booking tool.
  • Cellphone insurance. If you use your CreditStacks Mastercard to pay your monthly cellphone bill, you can receive coverage against theft or damage of up to $600 per claim and up to $1,000 per 12-month period.

CreditStacks Mastercard cons

No rewards program. The CreditStacks Mastercard does not offer a sign-up bonus or rewards on the purchases you make using the credit card. That said, when trying to build or rebuild credit, it’s best to focus on paying your bill on time and in full (when possible) each month, rather than racking up rewards.

No intro APR on purchases. The CreditStacks Mastercard does not offer a 0% intro APR on purchases – meaning, if you don’t pay your balance in full each month, you will be subject to interest charges at a rate of 15.49% Variable APR.

That said, the card’s ongoing APR for purchases is reasonable – considering that some cards designed for individuals with little or no credit come with APRs upwards of 26.99% (variable).

Compare it to the Capital One® Secured Mastercard®

Similar to the CreditStacks Mastercard, the Capital One® Secured Mastercard® is designed for individuals with little or no credit. However, because it is a secured credit card, the Capital One® Secured Mastercard® requires a refundable security deposit of $49, $99 or $200, for an initial credit line of $200.

If you deposit more money before your account opens, you may be eligible for a higher credit line, up to $1,000. Additionally, you can be given access to a higher credit line after demonstrating responsible card usage by making your first five monthly payments on time.

While the Capital One® Secured Mastercard® does not require U.S. citizenship to apply, it does require a valid SSN or ITIN, as well as a residential address in the U.S. or a U.S. military location.

See how the cards compare side-by-side in the table below.

CreditStacks Mastercard vs. Capital One® Secured Mastercard®

 CreditStacks MastercardCapital One® Secured Mastercard®
Annual fee$0$0
Rewards rateN/AN/A
Credit lineUp to $5,000$200-$1,000
Deposit requiredNone$49, $99 or $200
Regular purchase APR15.49% Variable26.99% (Variable)

The Capital One® Secured Mastercard® also comes with a number of benefits, including auto rental collision damage waiver, travel accident insurance, extended warranty and 24-hour travel assistance services. As a Capital One member, you will also have access to virtual card numbers and account alerts from Eno, as well as access to your credit score and fraud monitoring through CreditWise.

But if you plan to carry a balance on your card, you’ll be better off with the CreditStacks Mastercard, since the Capital One® Secured Mastercard® comes with a substantially higher APR of 26.99% (Variable).

Read our: Capital One Secured Mastercard review

Which credit card is best for me?

If you haven’t yet established credit in the U.S., the CreditStacks Mastercard could be a good fit. In addition to not requiring a Social Security number for approval, the card helps build your credit by reporting to two major credit bureaus.

But if you’re in the market for a secured credit card and already have a SSN or ITIN, the Capital One® Secured Mastercard® is a good alternative. While the card offers a much lower credit line than the CreditStacks Mastercard, it does offer a variety of useful benefits that aren’t common for a secured credit card.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

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Credit Cards, Featured, News

Average U.S. Credit Card Debt in 2020

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

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Credit card balances are at all-time highs, and absent any other relief, the recent rate cuts by the Federal Reserve will do little to slow down growth in total balances that borrowers carry month to month. And while it’s still too early to know for certain, the cash crunch many households are experiencing in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic may mean even greater average monthly balance increases than in recent years.

We’ve updated our statistics on credit card debt in America to illustrate how much consumers are now taking on.

  • Americans paid banks $121 billion in credit card interest in 2019. That’s up 7% from $113 billion in interest paid in 2018, and up 56% since 2014.
  • In February 2020, the average APR on credit card accounts assessed interest was 16.61%. Although the Federal Reserve has cut the key Federal Funds rate by two percentage points since mid-2019, the more recent cuts aren’t yet reflected in lower interest assessed to balances carried from month to month.
  • Total revolving credit balances are $1.05 trillion, as of February 2020. The vast amount of this balance is from spending on credit cards from banks and retailers, while $83 billion comes from revolving balances, such as overdraft lines of credit.
  • Americans carry $687 billion in credit card debt that isn’t paid in full each month. This estimate includes people paying interest, as well as those carrying a balance on a card with a 0% intro rate.
  • 43.2% of credit card accounts aren’t paid in full each month. Those who don’t pay in full tend to have higher balances, which is why the percentage of balances not paid in full (71%) is higher than the percentage of accounts not paid in full (43.2%).
  • The average credit card balance in 2019 was $6,194 for individuals with a credit card. That’s an increase from $6,040 in 2018.

Credit card use

  • Number of Americans who actively use credit cards: 184 million as of 2019, according to TransUnion.
  • Number of Americans who carry credit card debt month to month: 77 million.
    • We estimate 42% of active card users carry debt month to month, based on the Fed’s Survey of Consumer Finances.

Credit card debt

  • Total credit card debt in the U.S. (not paid in full each month): $687 billion
  • Average APR: 16.61% (also excludes those with a 0% promotional rate for a balance transfer or purchases). This estimate comes from the Federal Reserve’s monthly reporting of APRs on accounts assessed interest by banks.

The above estimates only include the credit card balances of those who carry credit card debt from month to month — they exclude balances of those who pay in full each month.

Credit card balances

  • Total credit card balances: $1.05 trillion as of February 2020, an increase of 3.3% from February 2019. This includes credit and retail cards, and a small amount of overdraft line of credit balances.
  • Average number of credit cards per consumer: 3.1, according to Experian. This doesn’t include an average of 2.5 retail credit cards.
  • Average credit card balance: $6,194. The average consumer has $1,155 in balances on retail cards.

The above figures include the credit card statement balances of all credit card users, including those who pay their bill in full each month.

Who pays off their credit card bills?

In 2019, fewer accounts were paid in full than accounts with a balance carried from month to month. According to the American Bankers Association:

  • Revolvers (carry debt month to month): 43.2% of credit card accounts
  • Transactors (use card, but pay in full): 31.1% of credit card accounts
  • Dormant (have a card, but don’t use it actively): 25.6% of credit card accounts

Delinquency rates

Delinquency rates peaked in 2009 at nearly 7%, but in 2019 delinquency rates were 2.6%, historically well below the long-term average.

Credit card debt becomes delinquent when a bank reports a missed payment to the major credit reporting bureaus. Banks typically don’t report a missed payment until a person is at least 30 days late in paying. When a consumer doesn’t pay for at least 90 days, the credit card balance becomes seriously delinquent. Banks are very likely to take a total loss on seriously delinquent balances.

Debt burden by income

Those with the highest credit card debts aren’t necessarily the most financially insecure. According to the 2016 Survey of Consumer Finances (the most recent data available), the top 10% of income earners who carried credit card debt had nearly twice as much debt than the average borrower.

However, people with lower incomes have more burdensome credit card debt loads. Consumers in the lowest earning quintile had an average credit card debt of $2,100. However, their debt-to-income ratio was 13.9%. On the high end, earners in the top decile had an average of $12,500 in credit card debt, though their debt-to-income ratio was just 4.8%.

A look at American incomes and credit card debt

Income percentileMedian incomeAverage credit card debtCredit card debt-to-income ratio
0%-20%$15,100$2,10013.9%
20%-40%$31,400$3,80012.1%
40%-60%$52,700$4,4008.3%
60%-80%$86,100$6,8007.9%
80%-90%$136,000$8,7006.4%
90%-100%$260,200$12,5004.8%

Source: 2016 Survey of Consumer Finances data

Although high-income earners have more manageable credit card debt loads on average, they aren’t taking steps to pay off the debt faster than lower-income debt carriers. If an economic recession leads to job losses at all wage levels, we could see high levels of credit card debt in default.

Generational differences in credit card use

In Q2 2019, Generation X cardholders had the highest credit card balances. The average cardholder from this generation had a balance of $8,215, according to Experian. Baby boomers held an average balance of $6,949, comparatively.

At the other end of the spectrum, millennials — who are often characterized as frivolous spenders — held significantly lower credit card balances, at $4,889. They also carry fewer (3.2) of credit cards in their wallets. Generation X carry 4.3 credit cards and baby boomers have 4.8 credit cards, on average.

How does your state compare?

Using data from Experian, as well as data from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York Consumer Credit Panel and Equifax, you can compare average credit card balances by state.

Differences in credit card debt by generation

In 2019, Generation X had more credit card debt, on average, than baby boomers, as those in their mid-40s typically have the largest amount of expenses relative to both younger and older consumers.

Methodology

In February 2020, MagnifyMoney collected and analyzed credit card data from government and industry sources, including the American Bankers Association, Federal Reserve, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., Experian, TransUnion and Equifax, to determine average credit card balances, interest rates, usage and delinquency rates.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.