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What the New DOL Fiduciary Rule Means For You

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Geeting advice on future investments

Seven years in the making, the Department of Labor’s long-awaited Fiduciary Rule finally went into effect June 9.* The full breadth of the rule’s impact won’t officially be felt until January 2018, when advisors must be fully compliant with the rule’s requirements.

The rule survived an upheaval by the Trump administration, which had hinted earlier this year that it might seek to block the rule’s implementation.

Aimed at saving consumers billions of dollars in fees in their retirement accounts, the Department of Labor’s new fiduciary rule will require financial advisers to act in your best interest. However, the final rule includes a number of modifications, including several concessions to the brokerage industry, from the original version proposed six years ago.

Here’s what you need to know about these new rules and how they may affect your money.

*This story has been updated to reflect the rule’s successful release.

What is a Fiduciary?

So what exactly is a fiduciary? According to the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) Board, the fiduciary standard requires that financial advisers act solely in your best interest when offering personalized financial advice. This means advisers can’t put personal profits over your needs.

Currently, most advisers are only held to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s suitability standard when handling your investments. This looser standard allows advisers to recommend suitable products, based on your personal situation. These suitable products may include funds with higher fees — with revenue sharing and commissions lining their own pockets —  which may not reflect your best possible options.

What is Changing Exactly?

Affecting an estimated $14 trillion in retirement savings, the Department of Labor’s new fiduciary rule is meant to help you receive investment advice that will aid your nest egg’s ability to grow. Many investors have been pushed toward products with high fees that quickly eat away at profits.

All financial professionals providing retirement advice will now be required to act as fiduciaries that must act in your best interest. This applies to all financial products you may find in a tax-advantaged retirement accounts. Because IRAs offer fewer protections than employment-based plans, the Department is concerned about “conflicts of interest” from brokers, insurance agents, registered investment advisers, or other financial advisers you may turn to for advice.

Despite these new protections, the Department of Labor also made some key concessions. Previously, brokers were required to provide explicit disclosures about the costs of products to their clients. This included one, five, and ten year projections. However, this requirement has been eliminated. After heavy pushback from the industry, the Department of Labor also agreed to allow the use of proprietary products.

Additionally, the Department of Labor has pushed the deadline for full implementation of their new rules. Firms must be compliant with several provisions by June and fully compliant by January 1, 2018.

Despite all of these concessions, the Department of Labor’s highest official insists the integrity of their rule is still in place.

Exceptions You Should Know About

Although advisers working with retirement investments will no longer be able to accept compensation or payments that create a conflict of interest, there’s an exception many brokers will likely pursue.

Firms will be allowed to continue their previous compensation arrangements if they commit to a best interest contract (BIC), adopt anti-conflict policies, disclose any conflicts of interest, direct consumers to a website that explains how they make money, and only charge “reasonable compensation.” The best interest contract will soon be easier for firms and advisers to use because it can be presented at the same time as other required paperwork.

How These New Rules Might Affect Your Investment Options

Although these new rules don’t call out specific investment products as bad options, it’s expected advisers may direct you to lower-cost products, like index funds, more regularly. New York Times also predicts the new regulations may also accelerate the movement toward more fee-based relationships. They also suggest complex investments like variable annuities may soon fall out of favor.

What Will the Larger Impact of These Changes Be?

Backed by extensive academic research, the Department of Labor’s analysis suggests IRA holders receiving conflicted investment advice can expect their investments to underperform by an average of one-half to one percentage point per year over the next 20 years. Once their new rules are in place, they are anticipating retirement funds will shift to lower cost investments, savings consumers billions of dollars.

What You Can Do To Protect Yourself

Although these new rules are a positive step for consumers, it’s important to remember there are still a wide variety of financial professionals out there. And the quality of the advice you receive can vary greatly based on their level of education, experience, and credentials. In order to find someone who is equipped to handle your unique financial situation, you will still need to do your homework.

You may want to start by looking for a fee-only financial planner. Due to the nature of how they are compensated, fee-only financial planners operate without an inherent conflict of interest. They are paid a fee for the services they provide and they don’t earn commissions from product sales.

Once you’ve narrowed down your options you’ll want to ask about their credentials, what types of clients they work with, what types of services they offer, while carefully checking their background and references. Like any professional working relationship, you’ll want to feel comfortable with someone you are receiving financial advice from, so it’s important to make sure your personalities and priorities are aligned. Remember, no one cares more about your money than you do. That’s why it’s essential to carefully vet anyone who is working with you to secure a healthier financial future.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Kate Dore
Kate Dore |

Kate Dore is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Kate at [email protected]

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Best of, Eliminating Fees

4 Digital Banks That Treat You and Your Money Well

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

4 Digital Banks That Treat You and Your Money Well

If you are still banking with a physical bank, it may be time to go digital instead. Digital banks offer several benefits and features that physical banks can’t, or don’t, offer due to the cost of operating a physical location. Because online banks don’t have these overhead costs, they can offer more benefits to help customers save money on fees, and earn more money via interest too.

There are several online banks from which financially savvy customers can choose from these days. If you are looking to go digital with your banking, here are a few good options to consider.

Ally Bank

Interest Checking Account
Ally is a digital bank with a full range of services, including online savings accounts, money market accounts, CDs, IRAs, checking accounts, credit cards, and more. It has also been named the “Best Online Bank” 5 years in a row from 2011 to 2015 by Money Magazine.

Ally has become a popular place for people to store their savings in an online savings account due to the great interest rates on savings accounts and money market accounts. These accounts offer daily compounded interest, FDIC insurance deposits, and no monthly maintenance fees.

Checking accounts with Ally Bank allow customers to earn interest on their money, which is something that is not as common with physical banks.

Customers of Ally Bank also enjoy the ability to use any of the 43,000+ Allpoint ATMs in the U.S. for free. Plus, Ally Bank reimburses up to $10 per statement cycle for fees incurred at other ATMS. It also offers exceptional customer service with 24/7 live customer care.

Charles Schwab

High Yield Investor Checking Account
Charles Schwab is another bank that started offering more digital products for its customers, including checking and savings, lending, and investing.

The High Yield Investor Checking account is a popular choice for many customers as Schwab offers this account with no ATM fees worldwide and unlimited ATM reimbursement for fees incurred each billing cycle. It also offers no account minimums or monthly services fees, and easy banking 24/7 with Schwab Mobile. The Schwab Bank High Yield Investor Checking account is linked to your existing Schwab One brokerage account so you can manage both accounts with one login.

The interest rate on the Schwab Bank High Yield Investor Checking account is 0.15% APY no matter your balance, but you do have to open a Schwab One brokerage account in order to use a Schwab Bank High Yield Investor Checking account. There are no fees or minimum balance for the Schwab One brokerage account, and you can transfer funds between the two accounts for free.

Schwab also offers a High Yield Investor Savings account with no minimum balance or monthly service charge. The interest rate is 0.35% APY on all balances. It also qualifies for the unlimited ATM fee rebates.

USAA

USAA members USAA offers checking accounts, savings accounts, credit cards, and many different loan products for cars, homes, and more.

USAA offers free checking with a minimum opening balance of $25. After you open a free checking account, there is no minimum balance, no monthly service fee, overdraft protection, fee bill pay, and free ATMs nationwide. USAA reimburses up to $15 in ATM fees per month.

Like most digital banks, USAA offers interest on its checking accounts, although it is lower than many competitors at only 0.01% APY. Its savings accounts offer rates of 0.05% APY to 0.15% APY depending on the balance of your account.

There is a catch: you need military affiliation to be able to open an account. This can include a connection through a family member, such as a parent or spouse.

Capital One 360

360 Checking Capital One 360 offers “no fees, no kidding” checking and savings accounts with no fees and no minimums. While it doesn’t offer ATM fee reimbursement, Capital One does offer a unique feature compared to many other digital banks: the ability to deposit cash into your checking or savings account with select Capital One ATMs in a 360 Café or Capital One Bank location.

The interest rates on a 360 Checking account range from 0.20% APY to 1.00% APY, depending on your balance.

  • $0 – $49,999.99: 0.20% APY
  • $50,000 – $99,999.99: 0.75% APY
  • $100,000 or more: 1.00% APY

The interest rate on a 360 Savings account is 1.00% APY.

If you’re a Capital One credit card customer, you can also conveniently access both your credit card information and Capital One 360 banking information with a single sign-on.

Another unique feature of Capital One 360 is the ability to create multiple savings account with any nickname you choose. You can also use their “My Saving Goals” section to make automatic savings deposits and set goals for your various savings accounts.

Which Digital Bank Is Right for You?

As digital banks become more popular, it can be difficult to determine which one might be the best fit for you. Of course, it depends on several factors, such as the features and services you most value, how you plan to use your account, and more. No matter which digital bank you choose, the important thing is that you are making the right decision for you and your money.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Kayla Sloan
Kayla Sloan |

Kayla Sloan is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Kayla here

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Eliminating Fees, Reviews

FamZoo Review: a Virtual Family Bank to Teach Kids About Money

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

FamZoo Review

When it comes to banking, most kids learn the hard way just how expensive their mistakes can be — with every sting of an overdraft fee or bounced check. Parents who would rather teach their kids how to manage their money without the risk of fees might consider FamZoo, a virtual family banking program. For a modest subscription fee, FamZoo provides the tools parents need to teach their kids about money management and banking.

Is FamZoo worth the cost?

In this review we cover:

  • What is FamZoo?
  • FamZoo Fees
  • FamZoo Benefits
  • Who Should Consider FamZoo?
  • FamZoo Drawbacks

What is FamZoo?

FamZoo is a “Virtual Family Bank” that allows parents to teach their kids about banking

FamZoo

without requiring kids to pay fees (as a parent, you will pay a monthly subscription fee).

FamZoo has two versions. The first version is a virtual IOU account that formalizes and tracks money flowing between parents and kids, but is not a bank at all. The second version gives prepaid debit cards to parents and kids that can be used anywhere that debit cards are accepted (including ATMs). Both versions cost the same amount for parents.

In addition to basic banking, FamZoo offers family oriented features. For example, family member can request reimbursements from other family members, and parents can offer loans to their kids and teach them to pay back loans in installments. With parent approval, money moves between family accounts instantaneously. FamZoo allows parents to fund allowances, and it helps kids divide their money between saving, spending, loan repayment and giving. As a parent, you can set a parent paid interest rate to encourage savings.

If you opt for prepaid debit cards, the cards will not allow your kids to overdraft, and parents and kids have access to a website to check balances, to review transaction history and more. Kids can also withdraw money fee free from in network ATMs.

FamZoo Fees

Subscription fee: Parents pay $5.99 per month (or $60 for 2 years with pre-payment) for up to four prepaid debit cards including a parent loading card. If you want more than four cards (for example to separate giving, saving and spending accounts, or if you have more kids), you pay a one-time $2 fee per card. If you lose a card, you can receive a replacement card for free.

Aside from the monthly subscription fee and the one-time extra card fee, FamZoo does not assess any fees, even if you manage to overdraft (which is possible if your transaction “settles” for an amount greater than was initially assessed).

Load fees: Depending on which financial products you use, as a parent, you may pay a fee to load your card. If you have access to Wells Fargo Sure Pay, Dwolla or PayPal, you can transfer money to your FamZoo account for free, or you can fund the account for free via direct deposit from your paycheck. Other loading options cost between $.95 and $7.00 per transaction. The institution where you initiate the transaction charges these fees, but FamZoo doesn’t add any extra fees.

ATM fees: FamZoo is part of the MoneyPass ATM network and withdraw cash at no fee. However, FamZoo warns that the other institutions usually charge a fee for out-of-network ATM use, and these fees aren’t reimbursed.

FamZoo Benefits

Parents have control: FamZoo is a stripped down bank that gives parents banking control, but it also has a few mainstream financial benefits. For example, MasterCard Zero Liability Protection backs FamZoo cards which means that they have fraud protection. Like other debit cards, they offer transparency, the ability to freeze an account if the card is lost or stolen, and the ability to track spending. And, each account has its own routing and account number so kids can get their paychecks deposited like it’s a regular bank account.

Helps teach saving and budgeting: The primary benefit of FamZoo is the way helps parents raise financially savvy kids. The software allows you to teach your kids to track expenses, set budgets, and split money into various accounts (a modern version of the envelope system). As a parent, you can add complexity (adding interest, loans, etc.) as your kids mature.

FamZoo Drawbacks

False sense of real-world banking fees: FamZoo puts guardrails in place, so kids don’t get hurt when they fail to manage their money well (they can empty out their bank account, but they won’t pay overdraft charges and they cannot go into debt except to their parents), but parents who use the software also need to teach their kids about banking fees outside of FamZoo. This will be especially important as teens set up their first checking accounts.

Who should use FamZoo?

FamZoo suits parents with kids who don’t yet have jobs or their own bank accounts who want to teach their kids financial principles. FamZoo makes teaching basic finances easy, and if your kids make mistakes, they don’t have to pay outsized fees.

Parents of early elementary through early high school will appreciate the valuable teaching opportunities that FamZoo provides, and parents with older teens and college students can advantage of transferring money with ease.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Hannah Rounds
Hannah Rounds |

Hannah Rounds is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Hannah here