Advertiser Disclosure

Featured

3 Mistakes People Make When They Need a Car Loan

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Disclosure : By clicking “See Offers” you’ll be directed to our parent company, LendingTree. You may or may not be matched with the specific lender you clicked on, but up to five different lenders based on your creditworthiness.

Car Loan

Does your heart drop into your stomach at the thought of buying a car? The stress of making such a major purchase and, dare I say, negotiating, can tire people out so much, they’re ready to say yes to anything at the dealership in order to get their new car and get out. Knowing the common mistakes people make can help you avoid them — the mistakes, not necessarily the salespeople. So here are the major ones.

Not doing your homework on vehicle value

Don’t just check out the closest place to you when searching for the car you want. Look around for prices, and don’t forget to look up what your trade-in is worth, if you have one. Here we’ll talk about the mistakes people make in not looking up prices for new, used and trade-in vehicles.

Not comparing price on new cars

While it might be tempting to go to that one dealership down the street instead of hopping online to check out the prices of a few dealerships around town, you could lose money doing so.

If you know the car you want, look up what dealers in your area are selling it for. Dealers everywhere advertise how far below MSRP they price their vehicles. MSRP stands for manufacturer suggested retail price, which is largely based on production costs.

The window stickers on cars have to show the MSRP and break down the costs that go into it, including all optional equipment (and how much it costs) that comes with the car. So if you find a model you really like, you can check out the window sticker to see the price variations on different trims for that model. The same type of car may be a few hundred dollars cheaper in a different color.

Once you find an ad for a low price on the vehicle you want in your area, you could either go to the dealership with the lowest price, or take the ad showing the lowest price to the dealership that’s most convenient for you, and ask them to meet or beat it.

Not checking auto guides on used cars

While used cars don’t have an MSRP, there are three industry standards you can use to determine their value: the automotive guides Kelley Blue Book (KBB), Edmunds and the National Automobile Dealers Association’s guide (NADA). Dealers and lenders use them to determine vehicle price and worth.

If the price listed in one of the guides is below the car’s sticker price, then the car is overpriced. Show the dealer or seller that you did your research. The car should be priced around what the guide states is the fair market price based on location and condition. If the seller doesn’t agree to offer you a price near that figure, find another vehicle or another seller.

Not looking up the value of your trade-in

Similar to a used car, you can find the value for your trade-in on an automotive guide. Most guides have a range of values that tell you what you can reasonably expect to get for the car depending on the car’s condition and to whom you sell it. You can usually get more for your trade-in if you sell it yourself.

If you’re up to selling it, you could post it for sale on sites like Facebook Marketplace, Craigslist and Autotrader. Of course, you then have the hassle of replying to prospective buyers and arranging times to meet so they can see and test-drive the vehicle.

Most people prefer to trade in their old vehicle at the dealership, which often offers you a price that is less than what the car is actually worth. In effect, you’re paying the dealership to handle the hassle of selling your car for you.

Just make sure you don’t pay them a whole lot. Look up the value of your trade-in before you go, so you’ll know what it’s worth and the person or dealer buying it won’t get away with underpricing it.

Focusing on the car over the car loan

As shiny and pretty and good-smelling as a new or new-to-you car may be, remember, you’re not just paying for the vehicle, you’re paying for the loan on it. Here are mistakes people make in financing their cars.

Only talking to one lender

Know what APR you can get before you go kick some tires. Having multiple loan offers before you shop around for a car has a couple of advantages.

The first advantage is that you’ll be able to pick the best loan offer. If you just get one loan offer and go with it, you won’t know if you could have received a much better APR with a different lender. Each lender has its own requirements. You may qualify for different APRs depending on the lender.

With an online marketplace like LendingTree you can fill out a short online form and compare rates from up to five auto lenders. It’s important to note that some lenders will do a hard pull on your credit and that this is normal in the auto lending space. Remember that multiple hard pulls will only count as one, so it is wise to have all of your hard pulls done at one time.

LendingTree
APR

As low as
3.99%

Terms

24 To 84

months

Fees

Varies

SEE OFFERS Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website

LendingTree is our parent company

LendingTree is our parent company. LendingTree is unique in that they allow you to compare multiple, auto loan offers within minutes. Everything is done online. LendingTree is not a lender, but their service connects you with up to five offers from auto loan lenders based on your creditworthiness.

By shopping around, you can easily avoid a major way dealerships make money. Dealers can often increase the APR on a loan you get through them. For example, the dealer might be able to charge you 7% APR, with 5% going to the lender and the 2% on top going to the dealer. If you don’t talk to multiple lenders and see what you can get, you won’t know you actually qualify for 5% APR and you’re likely to say yes to the 7% APR.The second advantage of comparing offers is that you’re able to plan your budget more accurately. With a loan offer in hand, you’ll know how much you can borrow, what your APR is and thus what price range you can consider when looking at vehicles.

If you do have poor credit, your APR will probably be a significant part of what it costs for you to get a car. There are ways to find a car loan with bad credit, so plan and budget for it, so it doesn’t surprise you. No matter what you think your credit is, you should check it before you apply for loans, which you can do for free on LendingTree.

Refusing to talk finance with the dealer

Some people will bring a loan offer to a dealership and refuse to talk with the dealership financing office. This is mistake. Not asking the dealership to beat a loan offer means you could be leaving money on the table.

The dealership wants you to finance through them. Lenders often give dealerships a finder’s fee for each customer who gets a loan from them through the dealership. Unlike the first way dealers can make money on a loan (by increasing your APR), this way works to your advantage, as the dealer will want to beat the loan offer you have, because the lender they partner with will often pay them for it.

Overall, the dealer might not be able to beat your loan offer. But whether they can or can’t, by asking them to beat it, you’ll know you got the best deal.

Focusing on monthly price

Many people’s main considerations when buying a vehicle is down payment and monthly payment. Those are the two biggest factors because it’s the easiest way to understand how the loan and the car impacts their financials directly. However, if you focus on monthly price instead of total price, you’re giving the dealer the opportunity to hide extra products in there.

For example, if you tell the dealer you want a monthly payment of $321, and it turns out the loan with the car you want comes to $290 a month, the dealer can turn around and say, ‘Hey, I have great news, you can have a $321 car payment that includes an extended warranty! Sign here.’

All of a sudden, you just spent $1,500 on an extended warranty, which you may not know much about or even want.

There are many “add-ons” available at dealerships, including extended warranties and insurances such as GAP, life and disability. All of these things can be useful depending on the person and the vehicle. But don’t simply accept them. A monthly payment increase of $20 might not sound like much, but over six years, plus the APR you’re paying to finance it, certainly adds up. You can negotiate these products prices, so talk about how much each costs overall, not monthly.

Rolling over negative equity

If you have a trade-in car, the first thing you should do after consulting an automotive guide to find how much the car is worth is to find out how much you owe. If the car is worth less than what you owe, you have negative equity.

The most popular way to handle this is to add the difference, or “roll over” the negative equity, to your new loan. Financially, this isn’t a great idea. You’re less likely to get a good deal on your new loan because the loan is for more money than what the new car is worth. This can also get you stuck in a trap in which every time you want a new car, you’re stuck with the negative equity from the car before it.

There are a few ways to take care of negative equity, and here are some recommendations on what to do if you’re trapped in a bad car loan.

Ignoring your budget or not having one

If you know you can only afford $321 a month in a car payment (not including car insurance), don’t let someone persuade you to take on a $400 a month payment. If the loan you qualify for on the car you like can only be as low as $400 a month, that means you need to find a different car to like. You don’t want to be skipping meals in order to pay for it, or not be able to make the payments and have it repossessed.

In order to confidently decide what you can afford, you first need to figure out your budget. A good rule is that all of your bills (rent, insurance, car payment, etc.) should be about 50% of your income. So look at your income and the bills you already have to see the margin between what all your bills add up to and the 50% amount of your income. That difference is a car payment you could comfortably afford.

The common rule of thumb about auto finance is that for every $1,000 you finance, your monthly payment goes up by $15, depending on your interest rate. Say the car you like costs $20,000, and taxes bring the cost up to $22,000 (taxes, tag and license fees can add up to 10% of sticker price, depending on the state). That rule of thumb would tell you to budget roughly $330 for a monthly payment ($15 x 22 = $330). Or you could do the longer math: Most car loans are for 72 months (6 years), and if you figure your loan APR will be 5%, then your monthly payment would be $355. Obviously, the rule of thumb is just that — a guideline. Doing the exact calculation or using a loan calculator can help you budget more precisely.

Doing things too quickly

Car buying can be a large and stressful event, so it’s understandable why you would want it over with quickly. However, you shouldn’t treat the process as you would ripping off a bandage.

Not walking away

If you’re unsure about a car or an auto loan and want time to think on it, take the time to think on it. Leave the dealership and take a break. Make sure you’re making the right decision for yourself, and don’t feel terribly pressured into making one quickly.

A salesperson might tell you the car want today could be gone tomorrow if you leave without buying it. That’s true, that specific car could be sold. Yet manufacturers make thousands of vehicles a day and people trade in used cars all the time. You can always find another to suit your needs, which would be better than getting stuck in something you don’t completely like or can’t afford.

Being rude to salespeople

Ultimately, the people at the dealership are the people you’re relying on to provide a service. This article has covered what some of the more unsavory people at dealerships can do, but it does not account for the hard work and true customer care many dealership employees do put into helping car buyers.

Many of the veteran salespeople in the car business are there because they enjoy and specialize in helping you make one of the largest financial decisions in your life. If you’re uncommonly rude to them, you might discover that it takes longer to do everything, and that it may be harder to negotiate on price — basically, it’s in everyone’s best interest to practice common courtesy. Take advantage of a good salesperson’s expertise, and don’t allow the others to take advantage of you.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Jenn Jones
Jenn Jones |

Jenn Jones is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Jenn at jennifer@magnifymoney.com

TAGS: ,

Advertiser Disclosure

Featured

Survey: People Are More Concerned About Equifax Data Breach Than Facebook Scandal

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

The Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal is certainly the bigger headline grabber these days, but in a new survey by MagnifyMoney, we found more than half of Americans — 54%— are more concerned about the September 2017 Equifax breach than the social media snafu.

Based on our survey, which polled 1,000 U.S. adults, the knowledge that information like your Social Security Number and past addresses are in the hands of hackers is slightly more disconcerting than the idea of a political consulting firm using your Facebook data to influence an election. The survey was conducted March 27-28, just days after news broke about the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal and several months since the Equifax breach was first made public.

Despite these concerns, half of Americans have taken NO action to protect their data since the Equifax breach.

As far as the Equifax scandal is concerned, 50% of Americans say they haven’t taken any action to protect their sensitive information in the months since the September 2017 breach. The most reported action was simply checking one’s credit report for shady activity, which only 22% of respondents reported having done. Ten percent have closed unused credit accounts, frozen or locked their credit files (8%) or changed their ATM PIN information (7%).

1 in 4 people are considering no longer using the internet or apps to access bank/financial accounts:

Among those who currently access accounts online, about a quarter of respondents said they are considering no longer accessing their bank and financial accounts with mobile apps or via the internet. To get an idea of what kind of impact that may make, in 2016, the Federal Reserve reported 43% of all mobile phone owners with a bank account had used mobile banking. That figure jumps up to 53% among smartphone owners with a bank account.

Facebook could lose a substantial portion of its fan base

1 in 5 Americans surveyed are considering deleting their Facebook account post-data scandal. The remainder said they would take other precautions, such as using the social media platform less often, using the “share” button less and removing things they have “liked” in the past.

Facebook and Equifax scandals: A quick primer

Facebook: In the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal, a Russian-American developer, Aleksandr Kogan, built a Facebook quiz that was able to exploit a loophole in Facebook’s app interface. The loophole helped to gather information on not only the 250,000+ people who took the quiz, but on all their friends, too — without their knowledge. Cambridge Analytica obtained that data and sold it to Strategic Communication Laboratories, a British consulting firm that worked on the Trump campaign, although the data’s sale was prohibited by Facebook. SCL group touts it’s an expert in “psychological warfare” and “influence operations.” The main issue here is the loophole that led to the initial access to users’ friends’ Facebook data. As of this writing, Facebook’s Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg is said to testify before Congress regarding the data scandal on April 10th.

Equifax breach: In September 2017, Equifax, one of three major credit reporting agencies, announced hackers obtained the sensitive data of about 143 million Americans, or about 44% of the population. The stolen information was sensitive information like names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and, in some instances, driver’s license numbers that thieves can use to commit identity and financial fraud. Equifax later announced about 2.5 million additional U.S. consumers were potentially impacted. Then in March 2018, it announced an additional 2.4 million people were impacted by the cybersecurity breach, bringing the total about 148 million people, or roughly 45% of the American population.

What to do to protect your data

Although the survey reports 54% of respondents were more concerned about their data being stolen in the Equifax breach, the same survey shows many Americans have taken little to no precautions to protect themselves from said identity thieves.

You are your first line of defense against identity theft. If you want to make sure you’ve done your part to protect your sensitive data and avoid the hassle of dealing with the aftermath of identity theft, you may consider taking at least one of the following precautions:

Sign up for credit monitoring

Credit monitoring services can let you easily see the information on your credit report so you can look out for any shady activity. Several free and paid services exist to help you keep tabs on your credit report. Free options include credit monitoring offered through LendingTree (the parent company of MagnifyMoney), Credit Karma, Discover, Mint, Wells Fargo and Capital One®. Some identity theft protection services like the ones offered through myFICO charge a monthly fee to monitor your credit year-round and provide identity theft insurance.

Temporarily lock your credit report with a credit lock

You can use a credit lock to restrict access to your credit report, making it difficult for other new credit accounts to open in your name. You can lock your credit for free with two of the three major credit reporting bureaus. TransUnion offers TrueID which lets you instantly lock and unlock your report online or via a mobile app. It also offers free credit monitoring. Equifax’s Lock & Alert does the same thing. Experian’s CreditLock service acts similarly but it is not free. It’s included in the agency’s $24.99 a month CreditWorks Premium service.

Freeze your credit report with a credit freeze

A credit freeze does the same thing as a credit lock does as it prevents anyone from applying for credit in your name until the freeze is removed. A credit freeze is different from a credit lock in that it’s not a company product, but a feature the credit bureaus are required to offer by law. In some states, you will need to pay a fee to freeze or unfreeze your credit report. Because the service is guaranteed by law, it may give consumers more rights in the event that fraud happens after a freeze is put in place. However, it can be much more difficult to remove a freeze. You can thaw a freeze if you need to apply for credit, for example, but in some cases, the credit bureau may ask you to mail them a letter requesting a thaw, which can take days to arrive. A credit lock requires less hassle.

Make a plan to respond to identity theft

Make sure you know what to do in the event your identity is stolen. Having a plan in play may help you notice the theft sooner, and minimize the damage and stress it can cause. Credit monitoring can help you find out about theft sooner rather than later. Here’s a guide on identity theft resolution, so you know what to do in case you see anything suspicious.

 

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Brittney Laryea
Brittney Laryea |

Brittney Laryea is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brittney at brittney@magnifymoney.com

TAGS:

Advertiser Disclosure

Featured

This Place Sure Has Changed: Which Cities Have Changed the Most?

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

A MagnifyMoney analysis looks at a decade of data to determine which communities are undergoing dynamic transformations, and which are standing still.

The cities that have changed the most in 10 years

“This place has changed” is a refrain you often hear from a city’s longtime residents. But change is a curious, inconstant thing; as some communities undergo great transformations, others seem frozen in time.

MagnifyMoney looked at nine elements of local change from 2006-2016 among the 50 largest metros in the United States, creating a Change Score (0-100) for each. The score factors in such measures as the changes in commute times, income, house prices, crime rates, building permits and more.

Change isn’t necessarily a good or bad thing. Big growth in commute times and rents can be negative, but they can also be a function of positive developments like job and income growth. Similarly, places without as much change could be more attractive to people working their way up the salary ladder or those retirees on fixed incomes, offering more affordable housing and less congestion.

But change often brings underlying challenges to the forefront, prompting communities to make tough calls on things that could hamper positive transformations going forward, like diversification of industries, infrastructure investment and tax policy.

MagnifyMoney is highlighting these places to encourage discussion in communities dealing with rapid change.

  1. Austin, Texas (90.4). Austin is a magnet for change, with the fastest job growth in the nation (+40% since 2006), 60% of residents moving since 2010, and a 54% rise in house prices since 2006, the most of the 50 metros ranked. Relatively lower living costs than tech centers like the San Francisco Bay Area and Seattle, along with a combination of satellite offices of larger tech companies, a burgeoning startup scene and no state income tax all contribute to Austin’s change leadership. The lowest-ranked element of Austin growth, building permits (No. 25 of 50), explains some of the outsize housing price appreciation.
  2. Dallas-Fort Worth (89.7). Dallas isn’t tops for change in any of the nine categories we looked at, but it ranks high because it’s in the top 10 for five categories, and ranks no lower than No. 19 (growth in rent, at 31% since 2006) for any single category. Dallas-Fort Worth’s top rank is for the decline in its crime rate, No. 4 (and down 43% from 2006).
  3. Houston (86.2). Houston rounds out the trio of big Texas cities at the top of the change list, led by housing factors. It ranks No. 2 for house price appreciation, at 38% from 2006, and No. 3 for building permit expansion. It lags on crime rate change (-27% from 2006), on which it ranked  No. 23 of 50 metros.
  4. Nashville, Tenn. (84.8). Ranking fifth in the nation for employment growth (24%) and building permit expansion, Nashville is the most changed city outside Texas in our ranking. In all, 53% of Nashville residents report moving since 2010, and median nominal income is up 26% from 2006. More challenging, median rent growth has far outpaced income growth, up 38% since 2006.
  5. Tie: Portland, Ore., and Denver (83.9).  Income, rent and commute times are where Portland ranks highest for change. Portland’s median rent of $1,158 a month is up 52% from 2006, while median income is up 31%, an impressive figure, but one that leaves many stretched in the face of rapidly rising rents. Commute times are up 12% on average from 10 years ago. As for Denver, its story is one of rising housing costs outpacing big job growth.  It ranks No. 2 for rent increases of 60% and No. 3 for house price increases of 35% in 10 years. Employment growth of 23% ranked No. 6, while income growth of 31% also ranked No. 6 of the 50 metros examined.

Places that changed the least

  1. Birmingham, Ala. (61.1) Birmingham ranks in the bottom half of change for all nine metrics we analyzed, and notably lags in employment growth, at 3% in the 10 years between 2006 and 2016. House prices, a double-edged sword, are down 2% from their 2006 level as of 2016, while commute times are identical to levels seen at the start of the 10-year period.
  1. Milwaukee (61.7) Milwaukee also lags in employment growth, at 4% in 10 years, but it’s one of the few areas where rent growth hasn’t significantly outpaced income growth, with median rent up 19% in 10 years (while incomes rose 15% over the same period).
  1. New Orleans (63.4) While New Orleans is third from the bottom in terms of change, in the wake of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, it has made big progress in one key metric; employment is up 30% since 2006, giving this city a No. 3 ranking among the 50 largest metros for growth. Where it lags is in metrics where too much change is a negative: rent growth and commute-time growth. Median rent in the New Orleans area is up 17% in 10 years, ranking No. 48 out of 50, while commute times are up just 1%, ranking No. 47.

What about the tech-heavy Bay Area?

With the rapid growth of tech companies in the last decade or so, there is some expectation that San Francisco and San Jose, the two metros that comprise the greater Bay Area, would rank higher on change than Nos. 24 and 10, respectively.

They are ranked Nos. 1 and 2, respectively, on income, Nos. 2 and 1 on commute-time growth, and Nos. 5 and 1 on rent growth, indicating significant shifts. The median income in San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin and East Bay is up 37% in 10 years, while in the South Bay (San Jose) it’s up 36%, both leading the metros in our ranking.

Meanwhile, commute times increased 18% across both the San Francisco and San Jose metros, also ranked No. 1 of 50 metros, on top of already high levels of congestion from the peak of the last business cycle.

But house prices, while setting records and sitting among the most expensive in the country, have not grown as much over 10 years as other metros like Dallas, Houston, and Austin, which had less of a run-up during the housing boom of the mid-2000s.

San Jose ranked No. 20 for house price growth since 2006, while San Francisco ranked No. 47, using an index that accounts for all communities in the metro, not just desirable suburbs and neighborhoods that have seen outsize appreciation.  And crime rates have not declined as rapidly in the Bay Area as in other parts of the country, further limiting change rankings, with San Francisco ranking No. 44 for change in its crime rate.

Ranking Highlights

Commute times

% change in commute times, 2006 – 2016

  1. San Francisco +18%
  2. San Jose + 18%
  3. Los Angeles +12%
  4. Boston +12%
  5. Portland +12%

Employment

Employment change, 2006 – 2016

  1. Austin +40%
  2. Raleigh +32%
  3. New Orleans +30%
  4. San Antonio +29%
  5. Nashville +24%

Income

Median income change, 2006 – 2016

  1. San Francisco +37%
  2. San Jose +36%
  3. Austin +34%
  4. Oklahoma City +31%
  5. Portland +31%

House prices

House price index change, 2006 – 2016

  1. Austin +54%
  2. Houston +38%
  3. Denver +35%
  4. Las Vegas -34%
  5. Dallas +32%

Rent

% change in median rent, 2006-2016

  1. San Jose +68%
  2. Denver +60%
  3. Seattle +55%
  4. Portland +52%
  5. San Francisco +49%

Recent moves

% of residents who moved into their residence in 2010 or later

  1. Las Vegas 66%
  2. Phoenix 61%
  3. Austin 60%
  4. Orlando 58%
  5. Denver 56%

Median age

Change in median age of residents, 2006 – 2016

  1. Riverside, Calif. +3.4 years
  2. Phoenix +2.8 years
  3. Sacramento, Calif. +2.6 years
  4. Detroit +2.4 years
  5. Los Angeles +2.3 years

Methodology

We looked at nine factors to assess change, including:

  • Commute times — the percentage change in average commute times reported for each metro area in the U.S. Census American Community Survey, released in September 2017 and covering 2006-2016.
  • Building permits — The number of residential building permits issued, 2007-2016, as a percentage of the 2006 base of households, using data from the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
  • Median age — The change in median age of residents, 2006-2016, via the American Community Survey.
  • Employment — The percentage change in people employed from 2006-2016, via the American Community Survey.
  • Income — The percentage change in nominal median household income, 2006-2016, via the American Community Survey.
  • House prices — The percentage change in the nominal house price index, 2006-2016, via the Federal Housing Finance Agency.
  • Rent  — The percentage change in median rent from 2006 – 2016, via the American Community Survey.
  • Crime rate — The percentage change in the crime rate from 2006-2016, via the Federal Bureau of Investigation  Uniform Crime Reporting program.
  • Recent moves — The percentage of residents who moved into their current residence in 2010 or later, via the American Community Survey.

Ranks for each of the nine factors were evenly weighted to create a Change Score for each metro, from 0-100, with 100 representing the top score.

 

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

MagnifyMoney
MagnifyMoney |

Have a question to ask or a story to share? Contact the MagnifyMoney team at info@magnifymoney.com

TAGS: