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What Is Preferred Stock?

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

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Investing is one of the best ways to grow your nest egg — and one of the only ways to make more money without logging extra hours at work.

But it also can be pretty confusing. Once you figure out what the stock market is and how it works, you still have to learn about the different types of assets out there. You’ll also want to do your research before you make any purchases.

Even if you feel fairly confident about investing in stocks, you may not realize that these basic securities actually come in two different flavors: common and preferred.

So what is preferred stock, and why would you consider investing in it? Read on to learn more about this unique asset category and the benefits that make it attractive to some investors.

Preferred stock vs. common stock

In many ways, preferred stock and common stock are the same. In both cases, you purchase a small “share” of ownership in the company, which has the potential to create profit based on the success of the enterprise.

But as the name suggests, preferred stock owners enjoy preferential treatment in some regards. Although they may not be eligible to vote on shareholder issues like those who own common stock, they’re paid fixed dividends on a regular basis — and they’re paid immediately after bonds but before common stock.

That means buying preferred stock puts you at a lower level of risk since your dividends outrank common shareholders’ if the company should fail or endure major losses. Of course, that pendulum swings in both directions: Since the dividends on preferred stocks don’t fluctuate with the company’s market value, you may miss out on higher earnings if the company should see a sweeping success.

You can think about preferred stock as a kind of hybrid between common stock — which is the stock you’re probably thinking about when you talk about the market — and fixed-interest securities like bonds. Preferred stock offers a way to invest in equity that provides some of the same security as other fixed-interest securities. However, preferred stocks generally offer higher growth potential than bonds do, and in many cases, they can be held indefinitely (as opposed to the predefined, shorter-term lifespans of most bonds).

 Common StockPreferred Stock
Dividend PayoutDecided by boardPaid at regular intervals
Dividend AmountDetermined by profitability of company/market performanceFixed dividend amount that may respond to changes in interest rate
Voting Privileges for ShareholdersLikelyUnlikely or reduced
Callability (Issuer Can Recall)NoYes
Par ValueNoYes
RiskinessModerate to highHigher than bonds but lower than common stock
Growth PotentialHighHigher than bonds but potentially lower than common stock

Pros and cons of preferred stock

Like any other prospective investment, preferred stock comes with both benefits and drawbacks to consider before you add it to your portfolio.

Benefits of preferred stock

  • Predictability. Preferred stock is paid on a regular basis and often at a fixed dividend rate, which means you’ll have a better idea of what to expect as far as returns are concerned than you might with common stock.
  • Less vulnerability to market volatility. Although preferred stocks’ fixed dividend rates can respond to changing interest levels, these securities have a face value, sometimes known as a “par value,” like bonds. Unlike common stocks, their worth is not determined by market fluctuations.
  • More security in the case of insolvency. Because preferred stock dividends are paid before those of common stocks, you’ll be in a better position to recoup your losses should the company you’re investing in fail.

Drawbacks of preferred stock

  • Reduced or nonexistent voting rights. Unlike common stocks, preferred stocks may not come with voting rights for shareholders — or may confer only reduced voting privileges.
  • Less exponential growth potential. Although you generally know what you’re getting in return for your investment in preferred stock, your growth potential usually is capped at the predefined dividend payout. In the case of an outstanding success, you might have earned more if you’d purchased common stock.
  • In many cases, the issuer has the right to recall or redeem preferred stock at a preset price after a certain amount of time. This is known as “callability” and can create unexpected shifts in your long-term investing strategy.

When is preferred stock advantageous?

As you can see, preferred stock inhabits a bit of a gray area. It’s usually not considered as safe as a bond and doesn’t offer quite as much earning potential as common stock.

So when is it a good idea to choose this hybrid option?

  • Investing in preferred stock might be a good option for those who have a low risk tolerance but still would like to see greater returns than those available through bonds.
  • Preferred stock can create a source of steady income, which can be attractive to investors with higher cash-flow needs or a shorter investment horizon.
  • Preferred stock can add another layer of diversification to your portfolio, which can help your investments withstand market fluctuations and dips.

However, it’s important to keep in mind that preferred stock is a more advanced sort of investment than common stock or even bonds — which is why it’s purchased less frequently than common stock, said Malik S. Lee, certified financial planner at Felton & Peel Wealth Management.

Although the differences we’ve outlined above hold true generally, preferred stocks vary considerably in their individual features, which means it’s extra important to do your research before you make an investment. For example, not all preferred stocks are callable, but some are; dividends might be cumulative (i.e. stackable if one is deferred) or noncumulative.

In short, “they’re complicated,” as Lee put it. “Each preferred stock will have different characteristics to it. You’ve really got to dive into the prospectus and look into what you’re buying.”

Should you invest in preferred stock?

Ultimately, the only person who can decide if preferred stocks are right for your investment portfolio is you. (Although talking with a qualified financial advisor probably wouldn’t hurt, either.)

If you do decide to invest in preferred stocks, you’ll purchase them the same way you would common stocks or other securities: through a brokerage firm, which may levy certain trading and commissions costs at the time of purchase. To learn how to get started, check out our step-by-step guide to investing for beginners.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Jamie Cattanach
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Jamie Cattanach is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Jamie here

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Best Online Brokers for Beginner Investors 2019

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

If you’re an investing novice, learning how to put money in the markets can seem overwhelming. There are countless online services at your disposal, which can make it challenging to pick the right one and get started.

Not sure where to begin? Let’s take a closer look at the best online brokers and the best robo-advisors. Both product categories offer low fees, lots of flexibility and functionality that simplifies the investing process. Either can make it simple to take your first steps in the world of investing.

Deciding whether you need a robo-advisor or an online broker is straightforward. If you prefer to actively manage your investments, an online broker is what you’re looking for. A broker’s job is to help you buy and sell securities, and many brokers offer educational and research resources to help beginners learn. Below we’ve included our top online brokers for beginners.

If you prefer a more hands-off approach to your investments, go with a robo-advisor. These automated investing services put your money into diversified portfolios of stocks and bonds that are customized to your needs. Best of all, they charge low annual fees. Since computer algorithms do the hard work, you’re freed from actively managing your investments. See below for our top robo-advisors for beginning investors.

How we chose the best investment platforms for beginners

We regularly review the landscape of investment services. For this review, we began with a selection of brokers and robo-advisors that represent the best in the industry. For the brokers, we evaluated 20 different services in our latest round; for the robo-advisors, we evaluated 19 different services. We then distilled each list down to the top four choices. All of the brokers and robo-advisors listed below are worth considering, with those at the top of each category scoring best.

The things we weighed most heavily when ranking the best online brokers were trading fees, account minimums, the diversity of investment products offered (stocks, bonds, exchange-traded funds or ETFs, and mutual funds), and low account fees (annual fees, transfer fees, and inactivity fees). To determine our list of the best robo-advisors, we focused on management fees and account minimums, and also considered ease of use and customer support.

See our methodology article for a more detailed explanation of how we create our rankings.

The best robo-advisors for beginners

Robo-advisor

Annual Management Fee

Average Expense Ratio (moderate risk portfolio)

Account Minimum to Start

Wealthfront

0.25%

0.09%

$500

Charles Schwab Intelligent Portfolios

0.00%

0.14%

$5,000

Betterment

0.25% (up to $100,000); 0.40% ($100,000.01 or more)

0.11%

$0

SoFi Automated Investing

0.00%

0.08%

$1

Wealthfront: Low fees, high cash management APY

Wealthfront Advisers LLC Wealthfront is one of the most visible names in the robo-advisor space, and its low annual cost and free financial planning tools make it a great fit for beginners. The $500 minimum deposit to open an account is higher than peers, many of whom have no minimum. If you would like to fund your account but also want to keep some money on the sidelines, Wealthfront offers a cash management account with an attractive 2.51% APY. Wealthfront intentionally offers very little opportunity for human interaction on its platform. This keeps fees low, but could be a drawback for those who want personalized attention or who have complicated tax situations.

Wealthfront Highlights:

  • $500 minimum to start investing is beginner-friendly
  • Low fees: 0.25% management fee; 0.09% avg ETF expense ratio
  • 20 portfolios available to fit a variety of investing goals, from conservative to aggressive
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Charles Schwab Intelligent Portfolios: Backed by a major brokerage

The Charles Schwab Corporation Charles Schwab Intelligent Portfolios is a great choice if you’d like to start with automated investing but anticipate becoming more actively involved in managing your investments over time. Note that Intelligent Portfolios requires a relatively steep $5,000 minimum deposit to start investing. Also, do not be misled by the 0% management fee, as it’s not the only cost involved using this robo-advisor.

Intelligent Portfolios requires users to hold 6% to 30% of deposited funds in a cash management account that offers a 0.67% APY. This requirement will eat into overall returns in years where the market returns above 0.67%. And this is on top of an average 0.14% expense ratio for a moderate-risk portfolio.

That said, this robo-advisor has an exceptionally detailed description of their ETF selection methodology. Intelligent Portfolios users also get access to Charles Schwab’s 300 U.S. branch locations, where you can talk to advisors and handle administrative tasks in person.

Charles Schwab Intelligent Portfolios Highlights:

  • Schwab offers many additional account types and services for investors looking to expand beyond robo-advising down the road
  • 0% management fee, though you do need to hold a portion of your portfolio in cash and an avg 0.14% expense ratio still applies
  • Over 300 physical branch locations for in-person assistance
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Betterment: Great choice for smaller balances

Betterment Holdings Inc. Betterment is another good choice for beginner investors, offering strong features at low cost, with no minimum deposit. Their step-by-step account creation process translates your financial goals into investment recommendations, helping to ensure that your portfolio fits your objectives. The annual management fee for accounts under $100,000 is 0.25%, plus an average 0.11% expense ratio, which is in line with peers. Unfortunately, accounts over $100,000 will see the annual management fee jump to 0.40% — so if you are managing more than $100,000, you may want to consider a different robo-advisor.

Betterment Highlights:

  • $0 minimum to open an account makes it easy
  • Low 0.25% management fee for account balances under $100,000 plus low 0.11% avg ETF expense ratio
  • Premium features available for account balances greater than $100,000, including unlimited access to Betterment’s financial advisors
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SoFi Automated Investing: Low costs, great perks

SoFi Securities LLC SoFi Automated Investing aims to minimize fees and eliminate investing friction points, and they succeed at both. The firm’s 0% management fee and ultra-low 0.08% average expense ratio makes it one of the most competitively-priced robo-advisors in the market. Beginners will find the free access to SoFi financial advisors as an especially valuable perk. Others include free career counseling and discounts on loans.

The main downside with Automated Investing is that SoFi’s portfolios are less customizable than those of competing services. It offers only five risk levels to choose from, as opposed to at least 10 available with other services. SoFi does not offer tax loss harvesting.

SoFi Automated Investing Highlights:

  • Rock-bottom fees: 0% management fee, plus 0.08% avg expense ratio
  • Free access to financial advisors
  • SoFi also offers brokerage accounts for investors looking to trade individual stocks or ETFs
Learn moreSecured
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Best online brokers for beginners

Broker

Fee per trade

Commission-free ETFs

No-transaction-fee Mutual Funds

Charles Schwab

$4.95

514

3,457

Fidelity

$4.95

503

3,636

TD Ameritrade

$6.95

571

3,887

E-Trade

$6.95

277

4,222

Charles Schwab: Full-featured offering

The Charles Schwab Corporation Charles Schwab can support your investing journey from your first steps as a novice through to advanced trading strategies. Schwab has no account minimum, charges only $4.95 per trade in commissions, and allows you to trade many products commission free. Accounts come equipped with a suite of tools to help you construct your portfolio and pick the correct mutual funds, ETFs and stocks. Schwab also offers 24/7 phone support and has over 350 branches if you need in-person help.

Charles Schwab Highlights:

  • Affordable trading with $4.95 per trade commissions and no minimum deposit to open an account
  • More than 500 commission-free ETFs and over 3,000 no-transaction-fee mutual funds
  • Robust research tools for beginners include analyst reports and screeners for stocks, bonds, mutual funds and ETFs
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Fidelity: Strong mutual funds options

Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC Fidelity is well known for its retirement offerings and has a lot to offer beginners. Their $0 minimum to open an account, low $4.95 per trade commission and excellent selection of commission-free ETFs and mutual funds make this service a great choice for new investors. Beginners looking to learn about investing will appreciate Fidelity’s stock screening tools, library of analyst reports and portfolio selection tools. Fidelity also offers clients exclusive access to several proprietary mutual funds that have no transaction fees and 0.00% expense ratios.

Fidelity offers strong customer support with representatives available by phone 24/7 and at over 190 branch locations if you need in-person help. Some reviews on their site suggest that response times can lag for support though. Low fees, no minimum to start and a large menu of investments to choose from make Fidelity a compelling option for beginners.

Fidelity Highlights:

  • $0 minimum to open an account and no fees on account transfers
  • Tons of low-fee options: Over 500 commission-free ETFs and more than 3,600 no-transaction fee mutual funds
  • Stock screening tools, analyst reports, and portfolio selection tools will be helpful for beginners
Learn moreSecured
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TD Ameritrade: Broad offering of investments

TD Ameritrade TD Ameritrade’s long-standing commitment to helping clients access financial markets make it a strong choice for beginners. TD Ameritrade offers a wide assortment of commission-free mutual funds and ETFs, helpful customer service and educational tools. Beginners starting with stocks and bonds will appreciate TD Ameritrade’s analyst reports, charting tools and watch lists. Another upshot is that there is no minimum deposit required to open an account.

TD Ameritrade’s high $6.95 per trade commission is a drawback, though beginners are unlikely to be placing enough trades for this to have a large impact. With 24/7 phone support and branches spread across the country for in-person help TD Ameritrade is solid broker choice for beginners.

TD Ameritrade Highlights:

  • Keep fees low with nearly 4,000 no-transaction-fee mutual funds and over 550 commission-free ETFs
  • $0 minimum to open an account
  • Current TD Bank account holders may qualify for special promotions based on amount deposited including free trades and account rebates
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E-Trade: Good research options

E-Trade Securities LLC E-Trade is a well-known online broker and offers a wide assortment of available investments for beginners. The $500 minimum to open an account and high $6.95 trading fees could deter folks with a small amount to invest, though. E-Trade’s breadth of no-commission ETFs and mutual funds offers a wealth of choices for first-time investors step into the market. E-Trade’s mobile tools stand out for dynamic charting and easy access to research materials. For investors seeking to automate a portion of their portfolio E-Trade also offers their Core Portfolios robo-advisor product for a 0.30% management fee.

E-Trade Highlights:

  • Respectable selection of low-fee options with over 250 commission-free ETFs and more than 4,000 no-transaction-fee mutual funds
  • Mobile tools feature beginner-friendly charting, research, and trading
  • E-Trade’s robo-advisor, E-Trade Core Portfolios, is available for users who’d like to automate a portion of their portfolio
Learn moreSecured
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FAQs about online brokers

A robo-advisor is an automated service that selects investments for you utilizing sophisticated computer algorithms. Robo-advisors help investors take advantage of the best parts of wealth advising — like diversification and asset allocation — without incurring the cost of hiring a human advisor to manage your accounts.

Most robo-advisors begin the investing process by asking you a series of questions about your assets, investing history and investing goals to help establish the right balance in your investment portfolio. Then the robo-advisor automatically manages your money and sets you on the path to achieve your financial objectives.

When considering which robo-advisor to choose, you should evaluate several different things:

  • Minimum Balance: The minimum amount you need to invest can help you narrow the field of robo-advisors. A number of newer robo-advisors have no minimum to start, while the ones offered by the traditional large brokerage houses will typically require an initial deposit of several thousand dollars.
  • Fees: Even small fees can add up to thousands of dollars of lost returns over time. The top-rated robo-advisors in our ranking typically charge a flat yearly management fee of 0.00% to 0.50% of your deposited balance. In addition to the management fee, robo-advisors also charge investors an expense ratio to cover fees that ETF companies charge for the funds that make up your portfolio. Average expense ratios typically range from 0.08% to 0.15%.
  • Ease of use: When you create your account, ask yourself: Do I understand what the robo-advisor is telling me? Can I easily figure out how to deposit and withdraw money? Do their planning tools help me understand how much I need to invest and when? If the answer is no to any of these, you might be better off going with another option.

Online brokers help you purchase and trade investments on your own, without the need for an advisor or investment manager. Online brokers put you in the driver’s seat. Instead of relying on a particular firm’s recommendations, you can select the stocks, mutual funds and bonds that work best for you. Online trading is also convenient; you can manage your assets from anywhere, without having to wait on anyone else. Even better, online brokerage accounts tend to be more cost-effective than traditional brokerage accounts because they often have fewer fees.

Keep in mind that the earlier you get started with investing in markets, the more your money can grow. Even if you have only a small amount to invest, investing with an online broker can help you lay a strong foundation to build wealth. Start with what you can afford and contribute regularly to begin boosting your returns. Before you start investing, be sure that you’ve paid down high-interest debt and saved enough money for an emergency fund. This will ensure that you can avoid potential losses from having to withdraw your investments early in case of big, sudden expenses.

While there’s always risk with investing, online brokerages are typically quite safe. Most brokerage sites will have a section on their website that details their security measures. Your accounts are also often protected by the Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC), which helps safeguard you against the loss of your investments if the brokerage closes.

When shopping for an online broker, there are a few factors to keep in mind before making a decision:

  • Fees: While you can’t control the returns on your investments, you can control what you pay in fees. Look for an online brokerage that offers low trading fees; some even offer free trades on select investments or if you meet certain account usage criteria.
  • Investment advisory services: While online brokerage companies give you flexibility, it can be helpful to check in with a professional once in a while. Some give you the option to connect with an investment advisor to help you stay on track.
  • Research tools: Access to research tools can help you choose the right investments. Look for an online broker that offers research tools to help you analyze and choose investments based on past performance and professional recommendations.
  • Investment mix: You want to be able to invest in a wide range of investments, including stocks, mutual funds, exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and bonds.
  • Customer service: Customer service can be key, especially if you have trouble with your account. You want an online broker with easy-to-use customer service tools so you can get the help you need quickly.

Many online brokers allow you to invest in a wide range of investments, including stocks, bonds, mutual funds and ETFs. Online brokerage accounts offer you a great deal of flexibility, so you can invest in what makes sense for you.

To begin investing and trading online, you have to open an account with an online brokerage firm. To do so, click on the company’s website and select “open an account” or “apply now.” The site will prompt you to enter your personal information, such as your name, address, employment details, Social Security number and proof of identity. Next, you’ll be asked to enter your bank details so you can make an initial investment and set up recurring deposits if desired. Verifying your account can take a few days, but then your account will be in effect and you can begin investing your money.

About our ranking

Please see the full lists below of brokers and robo-advisors that we considered for this ranking.

All brokers considered:

Ally Invest
Charles Schwab
Fidelity
Firstrade
Interactive Brokers
J.P. Morgan You Invest
Just2Trade
Lightspeed
Merrill Edge
Robinhood
E-Trade
eOption
SogoTrade
Stash
T. Rowe Price
TD Ameritrade
TradeStation
USAA Investments
Vanguard
Zacks Trade

All robo-advisors considered:

Acorns
Ally Invest Managed Portfolios
Betterment
Charles Schwab Intelligent Portfolios
E-Trade Core Portfolios
Ellevest
Fidelity Go
Folio Investing
FutureAdvisor
Merrill Guided Investing
Motif
Personal Capital
SigFig
SoFi Automated Investing
TD Ameritrade
Vanguard Personal Advisor Services
Wealthfront
Wealthsimple
WiseBanyan

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Joshua Rowe-Heupler
Joshua Rowe-Heupler |

Joshua Rowe-Heupler is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Joshua here

Kat Tretina
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Kat Tretina is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Kat here

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Ally Invest Managed Portfolios Review 2019

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Ally Invest Managed Portfolios is a robo-advisor option from a trusted online-only financial institution.

It can make managing your money simple: Just answer a few basic questions about your goals and risk tolerance and your funds are invested for you. However, while fees are competitive, they aren’t the lowest among other robo-advisors’ offerings.

If you don’t mind the lack of bonus for opening the account, and you want to take a hands-off approach to building wealth, Ally Invest may be a good option.

Ally Invest Managed Portfolios
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The Bottom Line: Ally Invest Managed Portfolios is a decent robo-advisor that’s competitive with other managed portfolios online. But its lack of tax-loss harvesting, and fees that slightly exceed competitors may prompt you to look elsewhere if you’re not already an Ally customer.

  • The minimum deposit to invest in Ally Invest Managed Portfolios is $100
  • The management fee is 0.30%, no matter how high your account balance
  • Customer service is available 24/7, but there are no local branches to visit

Who should consider Ally Invest Managed Portfolios?

If you’re looking for a robo-advisor that allows you to build a diversified portfolio without a lot of advanced knowledge about investing, Ally Invest Managed Portfolios has you covered.

You’ll answer a few questions about your age; timeline for investing and risk tolerance; and whether you’re investing for retirement, wealth-building or a big purchase. Then, Ally Invest comes back with a recommended portfolio you can accept or tweak.

You can open a joint, custodial or Individual taxable account with Ally Invest Managed Portfolios, or can opt for a Traditional IRA, Roth IRA or Rollover IRA. Unfortunately, unlike with Ally Invest’s self-directed accounts, there’s no promotion or bonus for transferring funds into a managed portfolio. And, you’ll need quite a bit of money to get started — more than many competitors in the robo-advisor industry require.

Still, if you don’t mind the lack of brick-and-mortar locations and marginally higher fees, Ally Invest is a worthy competitor to consider when looking for help managing your money.

Ally Invest Managed Portfolios fees and features

Amount minimum to open account
  • $100
Management fees
  • 0.30%
Account fees (annual, transfer, inactivity)
  • $0 annual fee
  • $50 full account transfer fee
  • $50 partial account transfer fee
  • $0 inactivity fee
Current promotions

Ally Invest offers a $50 cash bonus plus free trades if you deposit or transfer at least $10,000. Bonuses go up from there and increase up to a cash bonus of as much as $3,500 if you deposit or transfer at least $2 million in assets.

Account types
  • Individual taxable
  • Traditional IRA
  • Roth IRA
  • 529 Plan
  • Joint taxable
  • Rollover IRA
  • Rollover Roth IRA
  • Coverdell Education Savings Account (ESA)
  • Custodial Uniform Gifts to Minors Act (UGMA)/Uniform Transfers to Minors Act (UTMA)
  • SEP IRA
  • SIMPLE IRA (Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees)
  • Trust
Portfolio
  • Ally managed portfolios cover 3 asset classes and 9 major market segments
Automatic rebalancing
Tax loss harvesting
Offers fractional shares
Ease of use
Mobile appiOS, Android, Windows Phone
Customer supportPhone, 24/7 live support, Chat, Email

Strengths of Ally Invest Managed Portfolios

Ally Invest Managed Portfolios has some significant advantages worth considering:

  • Investing in a diversified portfolio is easy. You’ll answer basic questions about your investment goals and Ally Invest will suggest a portfolio with an appropriate mix of U.S. and foreign bonds, international and U.S. stocks, and cash. You can also tweak the suggestions Ally Invest Managed Portfolios makes, so you take on more or less risk based on your comfort level.
  • Ally requires a low minimum deposit of just $100 to open a managed portfolio account. While some of Ally’s competitors (such as Betterment) don’t have a minimum deposit requirement at all, $100 still falls on the very low side of the scale and makes this account extremely accessible to new investors.
  • Ally Invest Managed Portfolios offers automatic portfolio rebalancing. This helps to ensure you remain invested in the right mix of assets if certain investments under- or over-perform.
  • Customer service. Ally Invest offers phone, Email, and chat support. Customer service agents are available 24/7 with little or no wait. Agents will do their best to provide answers, although it may take a little time if your questions are technical since you may need to be transferred to an investment advisor.

Drawbacks of Ally Invest Managed Portfolios

You’ll also want to consider the potential downsides of choosing Ally Invest Managed Portfolios.

  • Ally Invest Managed Portfolios charges fees that are slightly higher than several competitors. You’ll pay .30% for Ally’s robo-advisor service, compared with .25% for Betterment’s digital account or for Wealthfront.
  • Ally Invest Managed Portfolios currently does not offer tax loss harvesting, which involves selling investments at a loss to offset taxable gains (although they do offer tax advantaged portfolios which add municipal bonds to Ally’s core portfolios). Competitors such as Betterment do offer this feature. However, Ally representatives indicate tax loss harvesting is expected to be rolled out in 2019 and investors with managed portfolios will be able to transition their accounts into a portfolio with tax loss harvesting.
  • No physical branches. If you’d prefer to go into a branch for local customer support, you’ll need to look elsewhere, such as E-Trade, which has more than 30 branches across the country.
  • Mobile apps aren’t very advanced. While Ally Invest allows you to use mobile apps on iPhone and Android phones to access basic account information, the offered apps aren’t as feature-rich as competitors such as Betterment.

Is Ally Invest Managed Portfolios safe?

Whenever you invest your money, there’s a risk you may lose some or all of it. This is no different with Ally Invest Managed Portfolios. The assets your robo-advisor invests you in could decline in value and your portfolio could lose money.

But Ally Invest is as safe as any trusted online brokerage, and there’s little risk of losing assets if the investment firm goes bankrupt. Ally Invest is in compliance with regulatory requirements according to FINRA’s Broker Check tool. Ally Invest is also a member of the FDIC and SIPC, both of which ensure cash in bank and brokerage accounts respectively.

Final thoughts

Ally Invest Managed Portfolios is a viable choice for investors looking for an easy, hands-off way to invest — especially with its low $100 minimum deposit requirement. Ally also promises to offer a broad range of socially-responsible portfolios, which should interest investors who want to consider more than just financial returns. But the lack of a promotional offer, higher management fees, and the fact tax loss harvesting isn’t currently offered makes Ally a less-than-ideal option for investors looking for the most affordable way to build a diversified portfolio. If you want a lower-cost option that does offer tax-loss harvesting, consider robo-advisors such as Betterment or Wealthfront.

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Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Christy Rakoczy
Christy Rakoczy |

Christy Rakoczy is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Christy here

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