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Life Events, Mortgage

How to Buy a House With a Friend — The Right Way

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Not everyone can afford to buy a home on their own, especially if they’re managing student loan debt or don’t have a high salary. Fortunately, if you and a friend share the common goal of owning a home, there may be a path forward.

For good friends or cohabiting couples, buying a home together can help both parties boost their net worth or simply achieve homeownership.

However, purchasing a home together isn’t as simple as signing some paperwork and splitting the bills. The key to a successful co-homeownership arrangement is to set yourselves up for success from the get-go.

The content below is your guide to buying a house with a friend — the right way.

Is it a good idea to buy a house with a friend?

Before you get too excited about buying a home with your BFF, take the time to determine whether the decision makes sense for the both of you.

If either of you can’t afford or qualify to buy a house on your own, then it might make sense to buy with a friend, said Michael Becker, a branch manager with Sierra Pacific Mortgage in Lutherville, Md.

However, this decision shouldn’t be made lightly. Buying a house with somebody means entering into a legal contract — a lot like getting married. You need to make sure you have similar philosophies on finances, similar life goals, and the desire to both stay in the home for at least a few years.

You’ll also want to discuss living arrangements, routines and schedules — just like you would a prospective roommate. In fact, you might consider living together in a rental property before deciding to buy a home together.

Getting started buying a home with a friend

First, you need to be clear on where you both stand financially. Do you each have a proven track record of paying your bills on time? Are you keeping balances low on your credit cards? Do you have steady employment and income?

You’re entitled to pull your credit report from each of the three credit reporting bureaus — Equifax, Experian and TransUnion — once every year at no cost to you. You’ll also need to have an idea of where your credit scores stand, preferably by taking advantage of a service that offers a free credit score.

Before you start house shopping, you’ll want to know how much house you and your friend can afford based on your combined creditworthiness and income. That’s where a mortgage preapproval comes in.

A preapproval is a letter from a mortgage lender that says you’re conditionally eligible to borrow money to purchase a home. You’re given an estimated loan amount and interest rate. Having this information not only helps you better understand what types of homes might fit in your price range, but also helps home sellers take you more seriously as prospective buyers.

Creating a co-ownership agreement

You’ll want to settle on a co-ownership agreement before you start the homebuying process. Make it plain and get in writing how you’ll split equity in the home, who will be responsible for maintenance costs and what will happen if there’s a major life event such as death, marriage or having children.

“It’s important to talk about it and what your plans are if the relationship breaks down,” Becker said. “If somebody dies, what do you want to do with the house?”

A real estate attorney can help you set up an official co-ownership agreement.

Questions every co-ownership agreement should answer

The co-ownership agreement you draft and sign will need to address the issues surrounding your joint homeownership. Here are the main questions the agreement should answer:

Q What happens if one of you wants out?

Your agreement should outline an exit plan in case one or both of you want out of the property. This can get extremely complicated. For example, what if one of the co-owners wants to be bought out by the other co-owners?

Let’s say you’ve got three people on a mortgage and on the title to a property. If the other two can come up with the money for the equity, you’ve solved that problem.

If you wanted to sell your interest in the property, however, the co-borrower would need to refinance the mortgage to remove your name from the paperwork. If they don’t refinance the loan and start missing mortgage payments, you’ll still be on the hook and your credit profile will be affected, even if you’ve moved on from that home.

Keep in mind that whomever refinances needs to qualify again for the mortgage. If you decided to buy a home together because you couldn’t originally qualify for or afford a mortgage on your own, you still might not qualify to own after a refinance, unless your financial circumstances have improved dramatically.

If you can’t refinance, you all may decide to arrange for the departing owner to rent out their living space in the household — then you’d need to take time to find a tenant.

Q What happens if one of you suffers a job loss?

You’ll want to be prepared to fulfill your financial obligations if someone loses their income. That’s why it’s recommended to create a shared emergency fund, which you can draw from if one of you runs into financial issues (or, of course, to handle any maintenance needs). You can establish the contributions and rules surrounding a shared emergency fund in your co-ownership agreement.

A good rule of thumb is to stash away three-to-six months’ worth of living expenses. If you each save that much individually, you can pool up to a year’s worth of expenses for a rainy day.

Q How will you split the bills?

The co-ownership agreement also needs to address how you all will split up housing costs. Should you put some of the bills in one person’s name and some in the other’s name? What about opening a joint account and contributing a set amount to it for monthly bill payments?

Don’t forget about maintenance, repairs and escrow payments. You’ll want to be prepared for increases in your property taxes and homeowners insurance, should they come.

Applying jointly for a mortgage

Once you’ve decided that you and your friend will apply for a mortgage together, there are several things to keep in mind about the mortgage application process.

Although you’ll be co-borrowers on the same loan, you’ll each fill out your own mortgage application, Becker said. All of your information will be listed separately, including information about your income and existing debts. Once your applications go through underwriting, your and your friend’s information will be merged.

Based on this information, your lender will make adjustments to the mortgage rate you’re quoted. The more money you and your friend can contribute as a down payment, the better your mortgage rate tends to be. Similarly, higher credit scores will put you in a better position to get a competitive rate.

Whose credit scores do lenders use?

A lender will consider both of your credit scores during the underwriting process, which means a person with a lower credit score could drag down your collective credit score, leading to a lower mortgage rate.

When you apply for a mortgage individually, your credit scores are pulled from the three credit reporting bureaus and the lender uses the middle credit score — the second highest score — to help determine your estimated mortgage rate. In the case of a joint mortgage application, the lender will pull all three scores for each applicant, take the two middle scores and use the lowest of the two.

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Choosing the right homeownership structure

When you buy a home, you’ll get a title, which proves the property is yours. The paper the title is printed on is called a deed, and it explains how you, the co-owners, have agreed to share the title. The way the title is structured is important because it details what happens when one of the co-owners needs to part with the property.

The two most common ways to approach joint homeownership are tenants in common and joint tenants with rights of survivorship.

Tenants in common

Tenants in common (TIC), also referred to as tenancy in common, is the title structure most unrelated people use when buying a home. TIC outlines who owns what percentage of the property and allows each owner to control what happens if they pass away. For example, a co-owner can pass their share onto any beneficiaries in a will and their wishes will be honored.

The TIC allows co-owners to own unequal shares of the property (60/40, 75/25, etc.), which can come in handy if one owner will occupy a significant majority or minority of the shared home. For example, if two friends decide to buy a multifamily home, but one friend pays more because one friend’s space has much more square footage than the other friend’s space, they can split their shares of the home accordingly.

Pros of a TIC structure

  • Ownership can be unevenly split. You can own as much or as little as you want of the property as long as the combined ownership adds up to 100%. So, if you’re putting up 60% of the down payment, you can work it out with the other co-owner(s) to own 60% of the property on the title.
  • You don’t have to live there. You can own part of the property without living there. This is relevant for someone who simply wants to be a partial owner, but doesn’t want to live at the property.
  • You get to decide what happens to your share after you pass away. The TIC allows you the flexibility to decide what happens to your interest in the property in the event you pass away. You can decide if it will go to the other co-owners or to an heir. Regardless, the decision is yours.

Cons of a TIC structure

  • You could pay more housing costs compared to your friend if you have a larger ownership share. Because a TIC doesn’t require a 50/50 split, if you use more of the home’s square footage than your friend, you could shoulder a larger portion of the monthly mortgage payment and other bills.
  • Co-owners can sell their interest without telling you. Co-owners in a TIC can sell their interest in the property at any time, without the permission of others in the agreement. However, if they are also on the mortgage loan, they are still on the hook to make payments.

Joint tenants with rights of survivorship

In a joint tenants with rights of survivorship (JTWROS) structure, you and your friend would have equal shares in the property — a 50/50 split. This title structure differs from the TIC in that in the case of one co-owner’s death, the deceased party’s shares will be automatically absorbed by the living co-owner. For this reason, this type of structure is more common among family members or unmarried couples looking to purchase a home together.

If you were buying a home with a family member instead of your friend and would like your relative to automatically absorb your share of the property in the event of your untimely death, you’d go with this option. Even if you have it written in your will to pass your interest to another beneficiary, that likely wouldn’t be honored.

A joint tenants agreement requires these four components:

  1. Unity of interest: Co-owners must all have equal ownership interest.
  2. Unity of time: Co-owners must all acquire the property at the same time.
  3. Unity of title: Co-owners must all have the same title on the home.
  4. Unity of possession: Co-owners must all have the same right to possess the entirety of the home.

Pros of a joint tenants structure

  • Everyone owns an equal share in the property. There’s no arguing over shares if you go with a joint tenants’ arrangement, since it requires all co-owners to have an equal interest. So each co-owner has the same right to use, take loans out against or sell the property.
  • No decisions to make if someone dies. There’s nothing for co-owners or family members to fight over after you pass away. Your ownership shares are automatically inherited by the other co-owners when you pass away, regardless of what might be written in a will.

Cons of a joint tenants structure

  • Equal ownership. Equal ownership can be a con as much as it’s a pro. If you’re going to occupy more than 50% of the space, or put up more of the mortgage or down payment, you may want to own more than your equal share of the property. If that’s a concern, a TIC agreement is best.
  • No outside beneficiaries. In the event of your death, your co-owning friend would receive your share of ownership in the home, which means you can’t grant your ownership share to an heir in your will.

Pros and cons of buying a house with a friend

Still not sure if you and your friend should buy a home together? Consider the following pros and cons before making your decision.

Pros of joint homeownershipCons of joint homeownership
  • Gives you the chance to enter the housing market sooner than if you’d waited until you could buy on your own.
  • Lenders consider the lowest middle credit score between you and your co-borrower, which might impact how good of a mortgage rate you’ll get.
  • Potentially increases your buying power, as two separate incomes are being considered for the mortgage.
  • You’re both on the hook for the mortgage payments every month — a half payment won’t satisfy your lender.
  • Provides you with a choice in how you’ll structure homeownership.
  • If one of you wants out, the other has to refinance. If they can’t qualify for a mortgage alone, this could create problems for you both.

The bottom line

It sounds like a fun idea to own a home with a friend, but there are several considerations to work through before you get entangled in a contract that will impact you both financially and personally.

The biggest mistake you can make is letting feelings take over, Becker said. This applies to pre- and post-homeownership decisions.

“It should be very calm, cool, planned out, thought out,” he said. “Sometimes when those relationships end, people let their emotions get the best of them.”
Know (and get it in writing) where you each stand on taking title, paying bills, filing taxes and establishing a way out — should life change for either of you.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Crissinda Ponder
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Crissinda Ponder is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Crissinda here

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Life Events

The States With the Hardest Working Women

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Americans take pride in their work ethic, but do women in some states put more hours into taking care of their finances, families, homes and communities?

To find out, we analyzed microdata from the American Time Use Survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which asks respondents how many minutes they spent performing different kinds of activities during the previous workday. We averaged the responses of women in the categories across non-leisure activities, which include: the maintenance of the home, work or career, caring for family members or other community members, shopping and volunteer activities.

Because not every person participates in every activity, the time spent on these activities may seem low. For example, the average hours spent working across the states is about three hours – a workday that few will find familiar. That’s because not every woman works, and not every woman with a job works full-time or works Monday through Friday. These numbers also account for the fact that plenty of working people go through stretches of unemployment or underemployment.

For that reason, we also looked at the breakdown of the work status of women in each state. Overall, we expect that women who didn’t spend the previous day at a job spent more time doing other things, such as shopping for their households or volunteering.

This is most likely an understatement of how much time women are spending working, because we didn’t include every possible activity — such as time spent on school work, time spent hiring services, or time spent on self-care — and because some respondents may have taken the day off, or even be retired.

Our analysis revealed that depending on regional cultural norms and employment opportunities, the hardest working women in America spend their time serving their families and communities in diverse ways.

Key takeaways

  • Women in North Dakota are the hardest working in America, spending an average of 8.9 hours a day on non-leisure activities.
  • Women in Washington, D.C. and Vermont take the second and third spots, with averages of 8.3 and 8.2 hours, respectively.
  • Women in Arkansas spend the least time on non-leisure activities, at an average of 6 hours a day.
  • Women in Alabama, West Virginia and Louisiana follow closely, each with an average of 6.1 hours.
  • Women in Washington, D.C. and the Dakotas are the most likely to work full time and women in Utah, West Virginia and Idaho are the least likely.
  • Women in Hawaii are the most likely to work for a full year and women Alaska are the least likely.
  • Women in Vermont spend the most time volunteering and women in Montana spend the least.
  • Alaskan women spend the most time on housework (3.7 hours), while women in Washington, D.C. spend the least (1.3 hours). (But they spend the most time at work).

States with the hardest working women

1. North Dakota

While the women of North Dakota may not spend the most time in the workplace, they’re pretty darn close. They spend 4.6 hours per weekday at work versus Washington, D.C.’s average of 4.9 hours. However, in North Dakota, women spend more time at other labor- and service-related tasks in a capacity which their cosmopolitan counterparts in the nation’s capital do not.

Spending more time at volunteer efforts, household tasks and caring for family members, North Dakota’s women come out on top as the hardest working women in America, putting in an average of 8.9 hours per weekday across activities.

This study isn’t the first of ours where North Dakota broke the top 5. In our ranking of the happiest states, North Dakota came in at No. 5.

2. District of Columbia

Clocking in at 8.3 hours per weekday spent on non-leisure activities, the women of Washington, D.C. are generally career-oriented. (Notably, Washington, D.C. landed the top spot in our ranking of the best cities for working women). Washington, D.C. is the only area we’re measuring, however; it’s essentially a metro rather than an entire state, which may skew how we view the data. The population is more urban and suburban than rural, which may lead to different cultural norms surrounding career expectations and the availability of jobs in the first place.

Women in the District of Columbia spend the least amount of time on housework when compared to other women across the country, and also spend comparatively very little time volunteering. They do have the unfortunate honor of spending the most time in the car in order to get these tasks done, falling behind only the women of Wyoming. (While in Wyoming you’re likely to drive long distances with little traffic in order to get to work, the beltway in DC Is the exact opposite: You’ll more likely to spend a lot of time sitting in gridlock to travel shorter distances than you are in other parts of the country.)

3. Vermont

Women in Vermont may not spend as much time at their nine-to-five (3.5 hours per day) as their peers in North Dakota (4.6 hours per day) and Washington, D.C. (4.9 hours per day) but they do spend a significant amount of their time volunteering (31 minutes per day) and caring for those outside of their own family (15 minutes per weekday).

Travel between daily activities is also a prominent time-consuming task for women of Vermont. With 55 minutes per weekday spent commuting between different non-leisure tasks, the state is second only to Washington, D.C. and Wyoming in terms of commute times.

4. Alaska

The women of Alaska spend dramatically more time taking care of the home than women in other states — nearly four hours per weekday. With an additional hour spent on housework per day than any other state, Alaskan women are the keepers of the homefront.

Women in Alaska also spend more time commuting between non-leisure tasks than most (54 minutes per weekday), though not more than the women of Vermont, Wyoming and Washington, D.C.

5.  Nebraska

Nebraska women spend almost as much time keeping house (2.5 hours per weekday) as they do in the workforce (3.2 hours per weekday). Time spent volunteering (20 minutes per weekday), commuting (42 minutes per day) and caring for family members (25 minutes per weekday) might not be as high as in some of the other states on this list, but cumulatively, they are enough to get the hardworking women of Nebraska into our top 5.

Hardest working women: Full rankings

Want to see where your state ranks? Here are the full rankings for America’s hardest working women.

A closer look at women in the workplace

Women work hard across all sectors, picking up the slack not only when it comes to earning an income, but also stepping up when the home needs tending to or a family member needs one-on-one care.

All of this work is important, but if you want to see the raw numbers concerning only hours spent in the traditional workplace, here is how the states rank:

Managing your money

Balancing the demands of womanhood is no easy feat. While cultural norms are changing, women are still largely expected to serve in unpaid capacities, such as housekeeper, personal care assistant and personal shopper. When you add employment on top of this, it can be a lot to handle.

While trying to juggle it all, there’s one task that always needs to be on your priority list: Your personal finances. Whether you’re in D.C. and working in a full-time capacity or struggling to find work in West Virginia, you’re going to need to budget. The tools outlined here help automate the budgeting process, saving you time as you evaluate what you can and cannot afford in your busy, day-to-day life.

If you’ve gone a while without budgeting, or you are simply in a bad financial situation due to lack of local employment opportunities, there’s a good chance you’re sitting in some debt. If that debt has become too much for you to handle or is sitting on a high-interest credit card, your financial situation is likely to get worse rather than better. One solution to this problem is debt consolidation.

However you choose to manage your finances and balancethem with other priorities, take time to appreciate the hard work you put in day to day.

Methodology

Using microdata from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ American Time Use Survey, analysts created statewide averages for female for the years 2015 through 2017 in the following categories:

  • Household tasks
  • Caring for family members
  • Caring for non-family members
  • Work and work-related activities
  • Consumer shopping
  • Volunteering
  • The sum of time spent traveling for all the activities above

The work status of women in each state was derived from the Census Bureau’s 2017 5-Year American Community Survey and is limited to women between the ages of 16 and 64.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Brynne Conroy
Brynne Conroy |

Brynne Conroy is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brynne here

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Life Events

The Most Popular Retirement Destinations for Seniors

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Many of us look forward to that sweet day when we’ll never have to set an alarm again. You have no boss, no deadlines and no meetings. Most of us would agree that retirement sounds pretty awesome. Which is why it is so important to plan for it properly.

When it comes time to choose where to live, cost of living and general livability for retirees are typically the two main concerns. In past studies, we have endeavored to look at a cross section of retirees’ concerns, so we can rank the best places to retire. But sometimes, the best places to retire doesn’t always line up with where retirees actually move. We hope to shed some light on senior retiree preferences by finding the top retirement destinations. Here’s a look at the most tempting locations.

Key findings

  • The top 25 retirement destinations is dominated by Arizona and Florida metros. Those two states account for 15 of the 25 metro areas with highest net migration of retirees.
  • The Phoenix metro area was the runaway favorite. This area attracted 19,550 new seniors. Only about 12,421 opted to leave. That left a net influx of 7,129 retired seniors making Phoenix their home.
  • Only two metro areas not in Arizona or Florida made it to the top 10: Milwaukee and Nashville, Tenn. Milwaukee saw a net influx of 3,924 retirees, while Nashville gained 2,831.
  • The busiest and least-affordable metros saw the largest loss of retirees. Cities like New York, Los Angeles, Seattle and San Francisco tend to lose those who left the workforce. This exodus of retirees does slightly help balance population crises in cities like San Francisco which lost 2,731 retirees.
  • Weather and a sense of “affordability” aren’t the only factors attracting retirees. Florida and Tennessee in particular, and Arizona to a lesser degree, have extremely retiree-friendly tax laws. Florida does not tax any kind of retirement income and has relatively low property and sales taxes. Likewise, Tennessee does not tax social security income, which, apart from the BBQ and music, may explain why Nashville is a top 10 retiree destination.
  • California experiences the biggest loss of retirees. Of the 18 California metro areas we analyzed, 14 saw a net decrease in retirees.

Most popular retirement destinations

Phoenix stole the number one spot that retirees are flocking to. But if you prefer less desert and more beach, Tampa, St. Petersburg and Clearwater, Florida came in second place. If you’d take a lake over a beach any day, Lake Havasu City in Arizona made its way into the top 10. And thanks to their low cost of living, midwestern cities may be the perfect place to spend your golden years.

If the top 10 is sounding a little crowded for your taste, you could hop on over to the Pacific Northwest. Slightly less popular – but still highly ranked – is Portland and surrounding metro areas in Oregon and Washington. The Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro area in Oregon and Washington ranked 11th place. And Eugene, Oregon was also highly ranked as the 19th most popular retirement destinations for seniors. We have to say, Portland has a pretty stellar reputation. We found in a previous study, that Portland ranks seventh as one of the best places to live in America if you’re looking for a balanced lifestyle.

The South is looking mighty appealing too. Of course, plenty of spots in Florida made the list, but so did Nashville, Tenn. Who’s ready for some BBQ? If you desire even more southern charm, check out the Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin region of South Carolina.

Humidity got you down? Golden coast California didn’t make it into the top 10. Hint: high real estate prices. But sunny San Diego ranked 23rd, which is not too shabby.

Least popular retirement destinations

The New York metro area ranked number one in our list of the least popular retirement destinations for seniors. Chicago, Philadelphia and Los Angeles didn’t fare too well either.

Dream locations like Honolulu, Hawaii, and Orlando, Florida didn’t rank as highly as one would think. And on a not so surprising note, bustling metro areas full of workers bees weren’t desirable spots either. Apparently, there is a lot less need for early bird specials in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Atlanta, New York, Seattle and Chicago.

Be prepared for retirement with these tips

Preparing to retire is a big financial undertaking. One you should take seriously and plan for. Consider these tips as you prep for retirement.

Take advantage of catch-up contributions: If you find yourself over the age of 50 and getting ready to retire but fell behind on saving money, you may want to take advantage of catch-up contributions. Usually, the maximum contribution limit to a 401(k) is $18,500 and to an IRA is $5,000. But for those over 50 years of age, catch-up contributions are more flexible, allowing those total contribution limits to be $24,500 and $6,500, respectively.

Adjust your budget: Tightening your budget so you can see how you’ll live on your new income can help you prepare for the adjustment to life in retirement. You may want to consider saving for unexpected expenses like travelling, assisting family and friends and the potential need for medical care or the option of living in an assisted living facility.

  • The 4% withdrawal rule: Generally you’ll need to withdraw around 4% from your nest egg each year. This means that if you have $1 million saved for retirement, you would withdraw $40,000 each year for costs like food and medical supplies. This is just one way of looking at the expected cost of retirement.
  • 75% of income rule: You can also follow the principle of the 75% of income rule. This guideline advises that you should spend between 75% to 85% of your current annual income each year in retirement. Generally your expenses drop after retirement, so ideally this should be enough income for you to live comfortably.

Review and pay off debt: Taking care of debt before you retire is something to seriously plan for. Seniors with credit card debt have a net worth worth of 43% less than those without credit card debt. The high interest rates associated with credit cards can destroy nest egg income.

Because the average credit card interest rate is 14%, seniors who have credit card debt (on average, $4,786) will pay an average of $670 every year for interest charges. With the average investment portfolio not earning more than 8% every year, seniors will on average earn only $4,508 from their portfolio. Sadly, this means that credit card interest can eat up more than 15% of a nest egg income.

Methodology

Data comes from Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS). In order to rank the top retirement destinations for seniors, researchers looked at two metrics. Specifically we looked at the number of residents over 65 who were out of the labor force who moved into a metro area and compared it to the number of over 65 residents who were out of the labor force who moved out of a metro area. Those two numbers were then combined to create a net migration figure. This study is ranked based on that net migration figure.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Jacqueline DeMarco
Jacqueline DeMarco |

Jacqueline DeMarco is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Jacqueline here

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