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Guide to Getting the Best Rate on Your Mortgage

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Guide to Getting the Best Rate on Your Mortgage

A house is the single largest asset that most Americans will ever buy. The median price of a home sold in the United States is up to $301,300, and the median household income of a homeowner is $60,000. This means that a house now costs more than five times the income of a typical homebuyer.

With prices so high, it’s more important than ever to find a great rate on your mortgage. Finding the lowest rate can save you tens of thousands of dollars over the lifetime of a loan. But finding the best rates on the loans with the right features can be a challenge. In this guide we’ll teach you how to find the best mortgage rates.

Finding the best rate on a mortgage

When it comes to buying a house, you don’t just need to house hunt; you need to shop for a mortgage. According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), just 53% of Americans shop for mortgages, but comparing lenders has a huge payoff. Saving 1% on your rate will save you tens of thousands of dollars over the life of your loan. Your mortgage can make or break the affordability of a house, and it’s up to you to find the best rates. These are the steps you can take to find the best rates.

Compare rates using the CFPB’s handy tool

The CFPB offers a tool that allows you to compare the prevailing interest rates on various types of loans. To use the tool, you need to know your credit score, the amount you intend to borrow, and how much money you have for a down payment.

By exploring the different options, you can determine the best rates in your state, and the most common rates.

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This tool will give you an idea of the rate landscape in your state. However, you still need to do work to get the best rates.

Next, find lenders that offer the lowest rates

Once you know the lowest interest rates, you can find the lenders offering those rates through search engine queries. Enter the following formula: “State Mortgage, X% Interest Rate, Loan Type.”

For example, “Alabama Mortgage, 3.75% Interest Rate, 30-Year Fixed Rate.”

The bank or credit union with the best rate should emerge near the top of the search rankings. You will find mortgage comparison websites that will help you connect with the banks. Mortgage comparison websites can be a helpful resource, but they require your contact information. If you use a comparison site, expect to receive phone calls or email solicitations.

Continue to cross-reference the rates from comparison sites with information from the CFPB. The rates on a mortgage comparison site should be as good as those on the CFPB’s site.

If a lender has already pre-approved you, they may be willing to match the lowest rate. Talk with your loan officer about the rate you saw on the CFPB’s website. Ask them to match the rate. If they will, the conversation saves you time and money.

Get pre-approved for a mortgage from multiple banks

Once you find the banks with the best rates, consider getting pre-approved for mortgage rates from a few different banks. A pre-approval means that a bank plans to give you a loan at a given rate. You will need to submit documentation to a loan officer to get pre-approved. Typical documentation includes W-2 forms, tax returns, credit reports, and evidence of assets.

The bank will review your documentation and give you a pre-approval letter. The letter explains how much you can borrow and at what rate. If you’re denied at this stage, you can find out why.

A pre-approval is not a contract. It is not subject to underwriting or an appraisal. Rates can change after you get a pre-approval. That’s why we recommend getting multiple pre-approvals if you can.

When you’re pre-approved, a bank will give you a letter that you can submit with offers on a home. Home sellers want to see a pre-approval letter because it means that you’re likely to have access to the financing to close a deal.

Once you have pre-approvals in hand, start shopping for houses. You can submit a bid and negotiate a price using your pre-approvals.

Request loan estimates from lenders

Once a seller accepts your bid, request loan estimates from all the banks that pre-approved you.

A loan estimate is a three-page document that contains an estimated interest rate, monthly payments, and closing costs for the specific loan. It explains everything you need to know about the loan if you choose to move forward.

Compare all the loan estimates before committing to a particular mortgage lender. Loan estimates allow you a true apples-to-apples comparison of interest rates.

A loan estimate isn’t a contract. The bank may deny the loan based on the home’s appraisal values or due to underwriting problems. But a loan estimate will allow you to make an informed decision.

Factors that influence your interest rate

Shopping for a mortgage isn’t the only way to find the best interest rate. You can influence the rate by controlling these factors.

Credit score

The better your credit history, the better your rate will be. In some cases, the difference can be a full percentage point or more. Fixing your credit score is one of the best ways to influence your mortgage rate. Depending on your credit history, you might be able to fix your credit score on your own within a few months.

When you’re shopping for a mortgage, pay your bills on time and keep your credit usage low. Try to use 10% or less of your total available credit. Don’t close old credit accounts or apply for new accounts when mortgage shopping. These actions promote a high credit score while you shop for a mortgage.

Down payment & PMI

In general a bigger down payment means a lower interest rate.

If you put down at least 5%, you will probably qualify for the lowest advertised rates. But don’t confuse the lowest interest rates with the lowest cost financing. Most banks require you to purchase private mortgage insurance (PMI) if you don’t put at least 20% down on a home. PMI adds about .5%-1% per month on your mortgage. You won’t be able to remove PMI until you’ve built up at least 20% equity in your home. You build equity when your home rises in value and when you pay down your mortgage.

If you have a down payment less than 5%, you’ll need to look at FHA loans or VA loans. VA loans don’t require PMI, but you will have to pay an upfront financing fee. This is a fee that doesn’t help you build equity, but VA loans have competitive rates for people who don’t have a down payment. Check the fee schedule for VA loans to see if the financing fee is worth it to you.

FHA loans require just a 3.5% down payment, but FHA loans have require mortgage insurance premiums (MIP). The MIP is an upfront fee (usually 1.75% of the total mortgage) and monthly interest rate hike of around .5%. You can’t get rid of MIP unless you get rid of your FHA loan.

Location

Buyers looking for a mortgage in a rural area may see higher rates compared to equally qualified buyers in nearby urban areas. Most lenders have less familiarity with lending in rural areas. This leads to higher rates. In rural settings, you may get the best rates from nearby banks and credit unions.

Rates also differ on a state-by-state basis. States that have laws that make foreclosure difficult tend to have higher mortgage rates than states with looser foreclosure laws. Likewise, states that require lenders to have a physical presence in the state raises interest rates.

Loan size

Interest rates on small mortgages (less than $50,000) tend to be higher than rates on typical mortgage sizes. Small mortgages are less profitable than other loans, and many banks won’t issue this size mortgage. Borrowers may need to work with local banks or credit unions or government lending programs to find a micro-mortgage.

At the other end of the spectrum, jumbo mortgages tend to track closely to conforming loan interest rates. Banks can’t sell jumbo loans in the secondary market, so they are riskier for the bank compared to other mortgages. Usually, banks compensate higher risk with higher interest rates. However, the rigorous underwriting on jumbo loans may drive many poor prospects out of the market.

Length of loan (Loan term)

Mortgages with shorter terms have lower rates than those with longer terms. A longer term represents more risk for the bank. Banks compensate their risk with higher interest rates. This doesn’t mean that a shorter term loan is always the right choice. Choose the loan term that fits your needs before you compare rates. That way you’ll get the best interest rate on the right mortgage for you.

Fixed or variable rates

Adjustable-rate mortgages put more risk onto borrowers. You’ll initially pay a lower interest rate if you take out an adjustable-rate mortgage, but the rate might increase.

When you’re considering an adjustable-rate, learn when and how the interest rate adjusts. Most loans adjust based on a set index. In a low interest rate environment, you can expect rates to increase, but you need to guess how much. Weigh whether the low rates now are worth a potential high rate in the future.

Conforming vs. FHA vs. VA vs. conventional

The company that backs your loan may seem unimportant, but it influences your rate.

Conforming loans (those that can be purchased by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, the largest purchasers of mortgage loans in the U.S.) tend to have the lowest interest rates. Despite their low interest rates, conforming loans are profitable for banks. Banks can easily sell conforming loans to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac and reinvest the proceeds in making more loans. Conforming loans require at least a 5% down payment and good credit. For conforming loans, put 20% down to avoid paying PMI.

FHA loans have more lenient down payment and credit standards. They tend to be expensive for well-qualified buyers. However, an FHA loan may be the right option if you have a low down payment or a poor credit score. Only you can determine if the extra cost is worth it for you. VA loans are available to veterans, and they charge an upfront fee. However, they offer competitive rates for first-time homebuyers. If you can qualify for a VA loan, look into it as an option.

Conventional loans can’t be purchased by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. They require more shopping around to find the best rates. Not every lender issues conventional loans. If you qualify, the rates should be competitive with rates on conforming loans.

If you’re taking out a jumbo mortgage, you need to qualify for conventional underwriting. Likewise, condo buyers may need to qualify for a conventional loan. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will not purchase a mortgage if the property is part of an association that has more than 50% renter occupants.

Buying points

Many lenders offer to let borrowers buy “discount points” off of a mortgage. This means that you pay a set fee in exchange for the lender to lower your rate. In some circumstances buying discount points makes sense. Divide the cost of the point by the change in your monthly payment. This will tell you the number of months it takes for the prepayment to pay off (in terms of savings). If you expect to stay in the house significantly longer than the payoff period, go ahead and purchase the points. Otherwise, pay the higher interest.

Closing costs

An advertised interest rate doesn’t account for your total cost to borrow money. Most banks make their real money by charging closing fees. Banks might charge loan origination fees, recording fees, title inspection fees, underwriting fees, and application fees.

All the financing charges will be disclosed on a loan estimate. The loan estimate will also provide you with an annual percentage rate (APR), which expresses the total cost of borrowing money including the financing fees.

Special programs

Cities and states often issue special interest rates on loans for homebuyers who meet certain criteria. For example, Raleigh, N.C., subsidizes a $20,000 down payment loan for low-income, first-time homebuyers in distressed neighborhoods. Check your city, county, and state websites to see if you qualify for special rate programs. These programs often have favorable borrowing terms in addition to great rates.

Accelerating payments

Some borrowers cut their total interest costs by accelerating their mortgage payoff. If you make a half mortgage payment every two weeks, you’ll make an extra mortgage payment every year. This cuts a 30-year mortgage down to 23 years.

Making extra payments early in the life of your loan will help you achieve 20% equity faster. This will allow you to drop PMI payments or refinance at a lower rate.

Determining a budget for your loan

Finding a great rate on a loan that you can’t pay back is a sure way to destroy your credit. Before you apply for a loan, establish a realistic budget for your monthly mortgage payment. Avoid borrowing more than you can comfortably pay back.

When banks approve you for a mortgage, they will lend based on your current debt-to-income ratio without considering your other costs of living. Lenders have some limits, but you need to establish your own limits. Most of the time, lenders will not extend mortgage loans to borrowers whose monthly debt liabilities eat up more than 43% of their gross monthly income.

To understand debt-to-income ratio, consider this example. A person with a $60,000 annual income and a $500 monthly car payment applies for a mortgage.

A bank will allow them to carry a debt load up to $2,150 per month (($60,000/12)*43%). The bank subtracts the $500 from the maximum allowed debt load and determines that this person can afford $1,650 in house payments each month.

The bank in this example determines that $1,650 a month is an affordable budget.

No matter how large a loan you can get, you need to be a savvy consumer. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau recommends that your entire housing payment (including taxes, insurance, and association dues) should take up no more than 28% of your gross income.

The CFPB’s advice may seem too strict, but you need to determine your non-mortgage-related cost of living before committing to a new loan. Calculate costs like income taxes, transit expenses, and child care or education costs. If you pay alimony or for out-of-pocket health care, consider those costs too. Plus, you’ll need to factor in the costs of home maintenance. Experts recommend setting aside 1%-3% of your home’s purchase price for maintenance and upgrades.

A 43% debt-to-income ratio may be manageable for people who expect a significant salary bump in the near future. But for many, such a high ratio could get you into credit trouble.

If you’re seriously shopping for houses, use Zillow’s advanced affordability calculator to determine how much mortgage makes sense for you. You can also learn if buying makes financial sense by using the Rent vs. Buy Calculator from realtor.com.

Before you start shopping for houses, determine how a mortgage will fit into your budget. Don’t succumb to pressures to overextend your budget. A burdensome mortgage has the power to turn a dream house into a nightmare. You can avoid the nightmare by planning ahead.

Determining loan features you want

In addition to establishing a budget, you need to understand how to find the right features on a mortgage. A great rate on a bad mortgage could spell financial ruin. When you’re shopping for loans, ask yourself these questions:

How long will you stay in the home?

Some buyers purchase houses with the intention of staying just a few years. Someone who plans to sell in a few years might consider a lower interest rate adjustable mortgage. However, an adjustable-rate mortgage is risky for someone who intends to live in a home long term.

How risky is your financial situation?

Do you and your partner have two steady jobs and a large cash cushion? In such a stable situation, you might feel comfortable putting 20% down. You might also feel good locking into a 15-year mortgage to save on interest.

People with less stable income and finances might feel more comfortable with a smaller down payment and a longer payoff period. This will mean paying PMI and higher financing costs, but they can be worth it for peace of mind.

Do you expect to have better cash flow in the future?

If you think that you’ll have more accessible cash flow in the future, you can borrow near the higher end of your limits today. An interest-only loan will allow you to get into a house with lower payments now and higher payments in the future. Of course, you need to be realistic about your future expectations. Your future income may be more modest than you hope, or you may face high costs in the future. An interest-only loan could leave you trapped in a house if housing prices decline.

Even if you expect a higher income, borrowing near the top end of your budget could keep you “house poor.” If the raise doesn’t pan out, you’ll be stuck in a house that you can’t comfortably afford.

Do you have access to other sources of financing?

Alternative sources of financing like a home equity line of credit make a loan with a balloon payment more viable. Alternative financing means that you’ll have options if your original mortgage payoff plan falls through.

Anyone considering a balloon payment loan should have a solid lead on alternative financing before they take out the loan.

How much cash do you have for a down payment?

You can purchase a house with almost no money down. For example, the Federal Housing Association (FHA) offers “$100 Down” home financing on select HUD homes, or down payments as low as 3.5% for FHA-backed loans. Veterans can purchase homes using $0 down VA loans.

On the other hand, if you have more money to put down, you may qualify for a conventional mortgage or a mortgage backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. The more cash you have, the more options you have for loan types.

Do you have compelling uses for cash outside of a home down payment?

Putting a large amount of money down on your home locks up the cash. You can access home equity through a home equity line of credit, but that introduces a new element of risk. Even if you have a large amount of cash, you may not want to use it to fund a down payment. For example, you may want to hold cash for an emergency fund, to start a business, or to fund some other purchase.

If you have a compelling reason to hold onto cash, you may intentionally narrow your mortgage search to low down-payment options.

How quickly do you want to pay off your house?

A paid-off home might be your top financial priority. In that case, you might want to look for options with a short payoff period. For example, you might prioritize the forced savings of a 15-year mortgage. You might even aim to payoff a 5/1 ARM before the first rate adjustment if you have sufficient cash.

How important is the monthly payment?

A lot of people prioritize a low monthly payment above any other factor. You can achieve a low payment by avoiding fees (like PMI), finding the lowest possible interest rate, and extending the terms of the loan. Even more important than those factors is borrowing an amount that you can easily afford under most circumstances.

Common mortgage terms

Sometimes the most difficult part about shopping for a mortgage is understanding the terms that lenders use. Below we’ve defined a few of the most common mortgage terms that you should know before you sign a loan.

  • Interest Rate – The amount charged by a lender for a borrower to use the loaned money. This is expressed as a percentage of the total loan amount.
  • APR – The annual percentage rate is the total amount that it costs to borrow money from a lender expressed as a percentage. The APR factors in closing costs and other financing fees.
  • Amortization Schedule – A table that shows how much of each payment goes to the principal loan balance versus the interest portion of the loan.
  • Term – A set period of time over which a fixed loan payment will be due (often 15 or 30 years).
  • Fixed-Rate Mortgage – A mortgage where the interest rate stays the same for the entire term of the loan.
  • Adjustable-Rate Mortgage – A mortgage where the interest rate changes based on factors outlined in the loan agreement. Often, the adjustment is tied to a certain publicly available interest rate like the Federal Exchange Rate. Adjustable-rate mortgages are considered riskier than fixed-rate mortgages due to the potential volatility of payments. Adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMS) include:
    • 1-Year ARM – A mortgage where the interest rate adjusts up to once per year for the life of a loan.
    • 10/1 ARM – A mortgage where the interest rate is fixed for ten years and then increases up to once per year for the remaining life of the loan.
    • 5/1 ARM – A mortgage where the interest rate is fixed for the first five years of the loan and then increases up to once every year for the life of the loan.
    • 5/5 ARM – A mortgage where the interest rate is fixed for the first five years of the loan and then increases up to once every five years for the life of the loan.
    • 5/25 ARM – Also known as the five-year balloon mortgage. A 5/25 loan is a subprime loan with a fixed rate for the first five years of the loan. If a borrower meets certain standards (usually a record of on-time payments), they will receive the right to refinance the remaining 25 years on an adjustable-rate mortgage. Otherwise, the bank requires a “balloon” or remaining balance payment after five years.
    • 3/1 ARM – A mortgage where the interest rate is fixed for the first three years of the loan and then increases up to once per year for the life of the loan.
    • 3/3 ARM – A mortgage where the interest rate is fixed for the first three years of the loan and then increases up to once every three years for the life of the loan.
    • Two-Step Mortgage – A mortgage that offers a fixed interest rate for a fixed period of time (usually 5 or 7 years). After the fixed period, the rate adjusts to current market rates. Often, the borrower can choose either a fixed rate or an adjustable rate during the second step.
  • Interest-Only Mortgage – A mortgage where a borrower pays only the interest on a loan for a fixed period (usually 5-7 years).
  • PMI – Private mortgage insurance is a product that protects a bank if you default on your mortgage. Lenders often require borrowers with less than 20% equity to purchase PMI.
  • Jumbo Mortgage – A mortgage that is larger than the standards for a “conforming loan” set by government-backed agencies. In most parts of the U.S. a jumbo loan must be larger than $417,000. In some of the highest cost of living areas, a jumbo is in excess of $625,000.
  • Fannie Mae – The Federal National Mortgage Association is a government-sponsored enterprise that purchases mortgages that meet certain criteria from banks that issue the mortgages.
  • Freddie Mac – The Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation is a government-sponsored enterprise that purchases mortgages that meet certain criteria from banks that issue the mortgages.
  • Conforming Loan – A mortgage that meets the funding criteria of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The most stringent criteria is the loan size.
  • FHA Loan – A loan guaranteed by the Federal Housing Administration. Qualifying standards are not as stringent, but the fees are higher. In addition to a monthly premium (similar to PMI), borrowers pay a “borrowing” premium when they take out the loan.
  • VA Loan – A mortgage guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Veterans can purchase houses with a $0 down payment when using a VA loan, provided the veteran meets other lending criteria.
  • Conventional Mortgage – A mortgage that is not guaranteed by any of the federal funding agencies. Certain homes or condominiums will only qualify for a conventional mortgage financing option.
  • Down Payment – The initial payment that a homebuyer supplies when purchasing a home with a mortgage.
  • Balloon Mortgage – A mortgage where a borrower pays fixed payments for a period of time (usually 5 or 7 years) after which the balance of the loan is due. This is considered a high-risk loan.

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Hannah Rounds
Hannah Rounds |

Hannah Rounds is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Hannah here

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The Guide to Getting a Mortgage After Foreclosure

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

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Home foreclosure rates have reached their lowest points in nearly two decades. Just 4% of mortgages nationally are in some stage of delinquency, including foreclosure, according to the latest analysis from real estate data firm CoreLogic. Still, this adds up to thousands of homeowners facing this type of loss every year.

If you’ve recently gone through a foreclosure, it’s never too early to start preparing your finances and credit profile to re-enter the mortgage market. You’ll have to wait up to seven years before your credit score recovers, but there’s plenty to do in the meantime.

There are several mortgage options available with varying eligibility requirements, and some have shorter waiting periods that you may be able to take advantage of, if you qualify. This article will guide you through getting a mortgage after foreclosure.

How foreclosure affects your credit

Having a mortgage foreclosure on your credit reports is a major credit event that negatively affects your credit history and scores. Your credit scores could suffer a 100-point drop, or more.

The three major credit reporting bureaus — Equifax, Experian and TransUnion — begin reporting your foreclosure once a lender says you’ve missed your first payment. That’s when the seven-year time clock starts ticking.

Research from Fair Isaac Corporation, the company that created FICO scores, found that a hypothetical consumer who had a 780 credit score before a foreclosure could see their score decline by 140 to 160 points, to a range of 620 to 640, once the foreclosure hits their credit profile. A consumer who started out with a 680 credit score could see their score drop to a range of 575 to 595 after foreclosure.

Most mortgage programs have a required minimum credit score that ranges from 580 to 640 to qualify. Most also have set waiting periods for prospective homebuyers who have lost a home to due to foreclosure before they can apply for a new mortgage.

How to get approved for a loan after foreclosure

Each mortgage program has its own set of guidelines and requirements for buyers pursuing homeownership again after suffering a foreclosure. Keep reading for a rundown of how each program handles past foreclosures.

Conventional loans

Conventional loans are mortgages that aren’t guaranteed or insured by any federal agency. However, they are generally purchased by government-sponsored entities Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and thus conform to their guidelines. They usually have higher credit and income standards than government mortgage programs.

In order to qualify for a conventional mortgage after going through a foreclosure, you must first complete the required waiting period. The standard waiting period for conventional loans is seven years. However, extenuating circumstances may qualify you after three years.

Fannie Mae defines extenuating circumstances as isolated events that are beyond a borrower’s control and lead to an income reduction or increase in financial obligations, such as a job loss. You will need to provide your loan officer with a letter explaining why you had no reasonable alternatives other than defaulting on your mortgage.

Freddie Mac requires loan files with extenuating circumstances to contain the following information:

  • A written statement about the cause of your financial difficulties to explain the outside factors beyond your control.
  • Third-party documentation confirming the events detailed in your statement were an isolated occurrence, significantly reduced your income and/or increased expenses, and rendered you unable to repay your mortgage.
  • Evidence on your credit report and other documentation in the mortgage file of the length of time since completion of your foreclosure to the date of application and of completion of the recovery time period requirements.

Generally speaking, conventional lenders require a minimum credit score of 620 and a maximum debt-to-income ratio of 45%. A traditional down payment is 20%, though it’s possible to qualify for certain conventional loans with a down payment as low as 3%. Borrowers who make down payments of less than 20% are responsible for paying private mortgage insurance as part of their mortgage payments.

FHA loans

Insured by the Federal Housing Administration, FHA loans are often one of the first options foreclosed-upon borrowers turn to. If you’ve gone through a full foreclosure and repaired your credit, you may be eligible for an FHA loan in just three years.

In most cases, borrowers must have at least a 580 credit score and a 3.5% down payment to qualify for an FHA loan. The absolute minimum credit score is 500, though the minimum down payment increases to 10% of the home price for anything less than 580. The maximum debt-to-income ratio is 43%, though borrowers with higher DTI ratios can be approved with compensating factors.

Although FHA loans require significantly lower down payments and look for lower credit scores than conventional mortgages, most loans are insured by annual and upfront mortgage insurance premiums, which will increase your monthly mortgage payment.

Upfront mortgage insurance premiums cost 1.75% of the loan amount for the majority of FHA loans. Annual mortgage insurance premiums cost between 0.45% and 1.05%, depending on the mortgage term, loan amount and down payment percentage. And unless you put down 10% at closing, you’ll pay annual mortgage insurance for the life of your FHA loan. The only other option to get rid of mortgage insurance is to refinance into a conventional mortgage after building at least 20% equity.

VA loans

VA loans are guaranteed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and allow veterans and active military members to purchase a home with as little as zero down payment. It’s a compelling benefit, but an underutilized one: 1 in 3 home-buying veterans doesn’t realize they have a homebuying benefit.

Depending on your service commitment and duty status, you may be eligible for a VA loan after foreclosure. This program also allows veterans who have experienced foreclosure to get a new loan more quickly than other programs — the waiting period is only two years.

An important thing to note is that if you borrowed a VA loan to purchase the home you lost to foreclosure, you lose your entitlement, or the loan guaranty that protects the lender in the event you default on the VA loan. During the foreclosure process, the VA must pay a claim to your lender equal to the amount of your entitlement.

To have your VA entitlement restored after foreclosure, you’ll need to repay the VA in full for the claim amount it previously paid out to your lender, in addition to completing the waiting period. This must be done before you can again qualify for a VA loan.

Although VA loans are more lenient on credit history than conventional loans, lenders generally look for a credit score of at least 620.

USDA loans

The U.S. Department of Agriculture provides guaranteed loans to low and moderate-income homebuyers looking to purchase a house in a designated rural area. Eligible borrowers can use the loan to build, improve and rehabilitate or relocate a home.

It’s possible to qualify for a USDA loan after a foreclosure with a three-year waiting period. You must have at least a 640 credit score, though you may be approved with a lower score. The maximum debt-to-income ratio is 44%.

Use the USDA’s property eligibility tool to determine whether an address falls within a designated rural area.

Non-QM loans

For borrowers who don’t fit the standards for conventional loans or those backed by the federal government, another product has emerged — non-qualified (non-QM) loans. These loans are backed by hedge funds and private equity firms, and the additional risk associated with them usually is reflected in larger down payments or higher interest rates.

With non-QM loans, a lender’s primary concern is your ability to repay, and many don’t require a waiting period for foreclosed-upon borrowers.

Depending on how much time has passed since your foreclosure, most loans require at least 20% down, enough money in the bank as a reserve to cover future payments, and an extensive history of documented income.

For example, Atlanta-based non-QM lender, Angel Oak Home Loans, has a program specifically dedicated to serving foreclosed-upon borrowers with bad credit. Their Home$ense program was created specifically for homebuyers who were caught in the recession and mortgage crisis.

Home$ense allows you to begin the application process immediately after your foreclosure has settled. They offer 5/1 adjustable-rate mortgages and 30-year fixed-rate mortgages, each requiring a minimum 10% down payment. The minimum credit score needed to qualify is 500, and they can approve up to $1 million for your loan.

Comparing mortgage costs after foreclosure

A foreclosure can majorly damage your credit score — and your score is a primary factor that lenders determine the interest rates they’ll offer you. Even a small change in mortgage rates can have a big impact on the amount you’ll pay.

For a score that went from 780 down to 620 after foreclosure, your monthly and lifetime costs increase significantly on both conventional and FHA mortgages.

The example below assumes a 30-year mortgage on a $200,000 home with a 20% down payment, or $40,000.

Conventional loan

 780 credit score620 credit score
Loan amount$160,000$160,000
Interest rate3.84%5.43%
Monthly payment$749.18$901.45
Total interest cost$109,705$164,521
Total loan cost after 30 years$269,705$324,521

The difference in interest for conventional loans at each credit score is nearly $55,000.

The next example assumes a 30-year FHA mortgage on a $200,000 home with a 3.5% down payment, or $7,000.

FHA loan

 780 credit score620 credit score
Loan amount$193,000$193,000
Interest rate3.84%5.43%
Monthly payment$903.70$1,087.37
Total interest cost$132,331$198,454
Total loan cost after 30 years$325,331$391,454

The cost difference between the two credit score tiers is just over $66,000.

Based on these examples, you can potentially save money by waiting to buy a home until you’ve improved your credit score above 620.

Remember, your credit score, home price and down payment will all affect your interest rate. It’s also important to ask about points, mortgage insurance and closing costs, which are not included in these examples.

Financial risks after foreclosure

Foreclosures have financial impacts that can stretch beyond the damage done to your credit scores. If you’ve had a foreclosure, you need to be aware of the risks associated with deficiency judgements. This is when your mortgage lender tries to recoup any losses they incurred after selling your home in a foreclosure auction.

In some states, lenders have the ability to hire debt collectors to go after your remaining debt, court fees and attorney’s fees, plus any interest that has accumulated.

How does a deficiency judgement work? Say you originally took out a mortgage loan of $250,000, but the value of the home decreased to only $150,000 after the financial crisis. If you foreclosed at that point and your lender sold your home at its current value, the $100,000 difference between the loan balance and the price it sold for would be the deficiency balance.

Although deficiency judgements are not a common problem right now, they could come back to haunt you once you’ve recovered from a foreclosure, secured a better job and have started rebuilding savings. Deficiency judgements are still allowed in most states, and the statutes of limitation range from 30 days to 20 years.

You won’t know it’s coming until you receive a court notice, and many times your debt will no longer be with the original lender. Interest may become one of the largest expenses, especially if your debt is old. And once there is a judgement, you’re on the hook for the unpaid balance.

Boosting your approval chances after foreclosure

Regardless of which type of mortgage you decide to pursue after foreclosure, cleaning up your finances will help the entire process go more smoothly. Consider the following tips to help boost your chances at mortgage approval.

Pay down credit card debt
Paying off your credit card debt completely is one of the fastest ways to improve your credit scores. But if you can’t quite pay it all off yet, work on paying down each card to a balance that equal less than 30% of your credit limit. Once you’ve paid down your credit card debt, you should see the change reflected in your credit score in a couple months.

Don’t apply for other credit
Resist the temptation of increasing your debt burden by applying for additional credit products. This includes car loans, store-branded credit cards and other types of financing. Your debt-to-income ratio is one of the most important factors lenders look for when trying to determine your eligibility for a mortgage — it’s arguably more important than your credit score.

Avoid new blemishes on your credit report
Prioritize establishing and maintaining on-time payments for all your debt obligations. You wouldn’t want to begin new waiting periods for negative events to be removed from your credit reports again.

The bottom line

Losing a home to foreclosure can be a devastating experience, but don’t let it stop you from trying your hand again at homeownership in the not-too-distant future. It’s important to take time to explore all available options, selecting a program that best fits your current financial situation and securing the best possible terms.

Our guide was designed to offer you a comprehensive overview of the options that are currently available, but it’s always a great idea to conduct a bit of your own research. As more borrowers prepare to enter the market in the coming months and years, additional mortgage options may continue to emerge.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Crissinda Ponder
Crissinda Ponder |

Crissinda Ponder is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Crissinda here

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Guide to Getting a Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Mortgage

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Couple Celebrating Moving Into New Home With Champagne

Not all homebuyers have the money to make a traditional 20% down payment. The perception that you need one is one of the main financial obstacles that can discourage people from pursuing homeownership.

In reality, there are several options for buyers who want to get a mortgage but can only pull together a small down payment. One of the best ones, particularly for first-time homebuyers, is an FHA loan.

This article offers you a guide to getting an FHA mortgage, including details on how to qualify and the costs to consider.

Understanding the FHA mortgage program

FHA mortgages are insured by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), part of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The program is a key way that people of moderate income can become homeowners. Nearly 83% of homeowners who borrowed an FHA loan in 2018 were first-time homebuyers, according to a report from HUD.

FHA mortgages are funded by FHA-approved lenders and then insured by the government. This backing protects lenders from loss if borrowers default. Because of this protection, lenders can be more lenient with their qualifying criteria and can accept a significantly lower down payment.

You can get approved for an FHA mortgage with as little as a 3.5% down payment and a credit score of 580. You may also qualify with a credit score as low as 500, though you’ll need to put down 10% instead.

On a $200,000 home, that comes out to a down payment of $7,000 to $20,000 when taking out an FHA loan, depending on your credit score.

Keep in mind you’ll also be responsible for closing costs, which typically cost 2% to 5% of a home’s purchase price. Closing costs are necessary to complete your transaction, and include services such as appraisals and home inspections. However, you may be able to negotiate to have some of these costs covered by the seller.

Is an FHA loan right for you?

FHA loans are particularly suited for several different types of homebuyers.

First-time homebuyers, who often have lower credit scores and smaller available down payments, tend to gravitate to FHA loans. Additionally, boomerang buyers — people who lost a home in the past due to a bankruptcy, foreclosure or short sale — might also benefit from an FHA loan.

Negative credit events such as foreclosure can drop credit scores by more than 100 points in many cases, and there’s typically a waiting period of three years before you’re eligible to buy a home again. Once that’s up, the lower credit score requirements of the FHA loan program could help you become a homeowner again.

Types of FHA mortgages

The FHA offers both 15- and 30-year mortgages, each with fixed rates or adjustable rates.

With a fixed-rate FHA mortgage, your interest rate is consistent through the loan term. You know what your principal and interest payment will be for the life of the mortgage. However, your overall monthly payment may increase or decrease slightly based on your homeowners insurance, mortgage insurance premium and property taxes.

Adjustable-rate FHA mortgages start out with a low and fixed interest rate during an introductory period of time, usually five years. Once the introductory period ends, the interest rate will adjust annually, which means your monthly mortgage payments may increase based on market conditions.

A unique situation where signing up for a low, adjustable-rate FHA mortgage could make sense is if you plan to sell or refinance the home before the introductory period ends and the interest rate changes. Otherwise, a fixed-rate FHA mortgage has predictable principal and interest payments and may be the better option.

FHA loan limits

The FHA imposes a limit on the amount of money that homebuyers are allowed to borrow each year. For 2019, the FHA loan limits for one-unit properties are $314,827 in most U.S. counties and $726,525 for high-cost areas. You can find your county’s loan limit information for one- to four-unit properties by using the FHA’s lookup tool.

Qualifying for an FHA loan

Besides the low down payment, an undeniable benefit of the FHA mortgage is the low credit score requirement. You may qualify for a 3.5% down payment with a credit score of 580 or higher. You can qualify with a minimum credit score of 500, but you’ll have to make at least a 10% down payment.

Your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio is another key metric lenders use when determining whether you can afford a mortgage. DTI measures the percentage of your gross monthly income that is used to repay debt. Lenders consider two DTI ratios when determining your eligibility — the front-end (housing debt) ratio and the back-end (total debt) ratio.

Your front-end ratio is the percentage of your income it would take to cover your total monthly mortgage payment. Lenders typically like to see a front-end ratio of no more than 31%.

Your back-end ratio illustrates the percentage of your income that covers your total monthly debts. Lenders prefer a back-end ratio of 43% or less, but may approve a higher ratio if you have compensating factors, such as a higher credit score or a larger down payment.

You’ll also need to have a steady income and proof of employment for the last two years. Additionally, the home you’re purchasing via FHA must also be your primary residence, at least for the first year.

FHA mortgage insurance

At first glance, an FHA mortgage probably seems like the ultimate hack to buying a home with minimal savings. The flip side to this is you must pay mortgage insurance premiums (MIP) in exchange for your lower down payment.

Remember, FHA-approved lenders offer mortgages that require less money down and flexible qualifying criteria because the Federal Housing Administration will cover the loss if you default on the loan. The government doesn’t do this for free.

FHA mortgage borrowers must “put money in the pot” to cover the cost of this backing through upfront and annual mortgage insurance premiums. The upfront insurance premium costs 1.75% of the loan amount and can be rolled into your mortgage balance.

The annual mortgage insurance premium is divided into 12 installments and paid monthly as part of your mortgage payment. The annual premium ranges from 0.45% to 1.05%, based on your loan term, loan amount and loan-to-value ratio (LTV).

Your LTV is a metric that compares your loan amount to your home’s value. It also represents the equity you have in the property. For example, putting 3.5% down means your LTV would be 96.5%. In other words, you have 3.5% equity in the home, and your loan is covering the remaining 96.5% of the home value.

Here’s the annual MIP on a 30-year FHA mortgage (for loans less than or equal to $625,500):

  • LTV over 95% (you initially have less than 5% equity in the home) – 0.85%
  • LTV under 95% (you initially have more than 5% equity in the home) – 0.8%

As you can see, starting off with a smaller down payment will cost you more in mortgage insurance premiums. Additionally, in most cases, you’ll pay annual MIP for the life of your loan.

However, if your LTV was less than or equal to 90% at time of origination — meaning you made a down payment of at least 10% — you can cancel MIP after 11 years.

FHA loans vs. conventional loans

Government-backed home mortgages like the FHA loan are special programs serving borrowers who might not qualify for a traditional mortgage.

Conventional mortgages are offered by lenders and banks and typically follow Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac’s mortgage standards. Fannie and Freddie are government-sponsored enterprises that buy loans from mortgage lenders and banks that fit their requirements.

The qualifying criteria bar for conforming loans is usually set higher. For instance, you typically need to have at least a 620 credit score to qualify for a fixed-rate conventional loan. However, credit score minimums vary by lender, but in any case, a score above 620 will be necessary for the most competitive interest rates.

A misconception about conventional mortgages is that borrowers must have 20% for a down payment to qualify. Mortgage lenders may accept less than 20% down for a conventional mortgage if you have a high credit score and pay their version of mortgage insurance premiums, which is called private mortgage insurance (PMI).

Similar to FHA mortgage insurance, PMI is a private insurance policy that protects the lender if you default. Be careful not to confuse the two types of insurance policies.

If you have PMI on a conventional mortgage, you’re able to request the removal of those insurance payments when you build up 20% equity in your home. On the other hand, the mortgage insurance premiums for most new FHA mortgages can’t be removed unless you refinance.

When to choose a conventional mortgage instead

Choosing an FHA loan can be a shortcut to homeownership if you don’t have much cash saved or the credit history to get approved for a conventional mortgage. Still, the convenience comes at a price that can follow you for the entire loan term.

Furthermore, putting a small sum down on a home means it will take you quite some time to build up equity. A small down payment can also increase your monthly payments and interest rate.

Homebuyers with a strong credit score should consider saving a bit more money and shopping for a conventional home loan first before thinking an FHA mortgage is the only answer to a limited down payment.

If you plan to put down at least 5% toward your home purchase and have a good or excellent credit score, it might make sense to borrow a conventional mortgage instead. A conventional home loan with PMI may not require the same upfront insurance payment as the FHA home loan, so you can find some savings there. Plus, you’re capable of getting rid of PMI without refinancing.

There are a few conventional mortgage programs that allow a 3% down payment, including Fannie Mae’s HomeReady program and Freddie Mac’s Home Possible program. These products also have cancellable mortgage insurance.

Shopping for an FHA loan

So, you’ve reviewed all the information and determined that an FHA loan is right for you. Once you’re ready to start the homebuying process, one of the most important things on your to-do list is shopping around.

Gather quotes from multiple FHA-approved lenders to find the most competitive rate. If you’re unfamiliar with the approved lenders in your area, you can use the HUD’s lender list search to locate them.

Comparison shopping for the best mortgage rate can save you thousands in interest over the life of your loan, according to research from LendingTree, which owns MagnifyMoney. Be sure you also compare the various other costs associated with borrowing a mortgage, including lender fees and title-related expenses.

Don’t rush to a decision. If you’re still not sure which mortgage type will be the most cost-effective for you, ask each lender you shop with to break down the costs for a comparison.

This article contains links to LendingTree, our parent company.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Crissinda Ponder
Crissinda Ponder |

Crissinda Ponder is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Crissinda here

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