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A Guide to Understanding Bridge Loans

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Getting a bridge loan
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Buying a new home before you can sell your old one can present quite the financial conundrum. This is mostly because you have to come up with the cash for a new property when you don’t have access to the home equity you have already built up in your existing property. That’s where a bridge loan comes in.

What is a bridge loan?

Bridge loans promise to fill the gap or “provide a bridge” between your old residence and the one you hope to buy. They accomplish this by providing temporary financial assistance through short-term lending.

Unfortunately, bridge loans come with pitfalls, some of which can be costly or have long-term financial consequences. This guide will explain the good and the bad about bridge loans, how they work, and some alternative strategies.

How does a bridge loan work?

While bridge loans can come in different amounts and last for varying lengths of time, they are meant to be short-term tools. Generally speaking, bridge loans are temporary financing options intended to help real estate buyers secure initial funding that helps them transition from one property to the next.

Let’s say you found your dream home and need to buy it quickly, yet you haven’t had the time to prepare your current residence for sale, let alone sell it. A bridge loan would provide the short-term funding required to purchase the new home quickly, buying you time to get your current home ready for sale. Ideally, you would move into your new home, sell your old property, then pay off the loan.

Here are some additional details to consider with bridge loans:

  • Your current residence is used as collateral for the loan.
  • These loans may only be set up to last for a period of six to 12 months.
  • Interest rates are higher than those you can get for a traditional mortgage.
  • You need equity in your current home to qualify, usually at least 20 percent.

Also keep in mind that there are several ways to repay a bridge loan. You may be required to start making payments right away, or you may be able to wait several months. Make sure to read the terms and conditions of your loan so you know where your financial obligations begin and end.

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Risks of taking out a bridge loan

Taking out a temporary loan so you can purchase a new home may sound ideal, but as with most financial products, the devil is in the details. While these loans can help in a pinch if you aren’t able to purchase a property through other means, there are notable disadvantages.

They can cost more than alternatives

David Reiss, a professor at Brooklyn Law School and the academic program director at the Center for Urban Business Entrepreneurship, says the biggest downside of these loans is the price tag. Because bridge loans are meant to work for the short term, lenders have a much shorter timeline for turning a profit. As a result, “they typically charge a few percentage points higher than what you would pay with home equity loans,” says Reiss. Not only that, but they come with closing costs that may be expensive, and can vary from loan to loan.

So, even if the loan is short-term, it will likely cost you more than borrowing the money through a traditional mortgage by selling your existing home first, or through other means.

You’re taking on more debt

Another inherent risk with bridge loans: You’re simply borrowing more money. “The loan is secured by your home, so you have another mortgage,” Reiss says. “If you don’t make payments, then you could face late fees and financial turmoil.”

You can’t predict when you’ll sell your home

And if you’re unable to sell your home and your new or old monthly mortgage payments are taking a big chunk of your income, you could have trouble meeting all your financial obligations.

Reiss offers one other scenario in which a bridge loan could spell financial trouble: if the real estate market sours.

“You might assume you’ll sell your home easily, but that isn’t always the case,” says Reiss. “Unexpected events can screw up your plans to sell your home, so if you end up carrying multiple mortgages, you could potentially end up in trouble.”

According to Reiss, taking out a bridge loan could easily leave you with three home loans — your old mortgage, your loan, and your new mortgage — if the housing market slumps inexplicably and you can’t sell.

“This may not be a problem temporarily, but it can cause financial havoc in the long run,” he says. “You’ll be stuck with the unexpected expense of carrying all these mortgages.”

Falling behind on payments can lead to foreclosure on your old home, your new property, or both.

Advantages of a bridge loan

Applicants who are well aware of the risks of this financial product may still benefit from choosing this option. There are notable advantages, Reiss says, especially for certain types of buyers.

They can give you an edge in competitive markets

Bridge loans are “the kind of loan you get when you need to move forward and you can’t do it any other way,” says Reiss. If you are absolutely dead-set on purchasing a property and struggling to make the financials work, then a bridge loan could truly save the day.

This is especially true in housing markets where homes are moving quickly, Reiss notes, since a bridge loan allows you to buy a new home without a sales contingency in the new contract. What this means is, you’re able to write an offer on a new property without requiring the sale of your old home before you can buy.

This can be quite advantageous “in a hot market where sellers are getting lots of offers and you’re competing against other buyers who are paying in cash or making offers without a contingency,” Reiss says.

Bridge loans may be more convenient than the alternatives

Reiss also says that, while there are other loan options to consider for buying a new home, they aren’t always feasible in the heat of the moment. If you wanted to purchase a new home before selling your old home and needed cash, you could consider borrowing against your 401(k) or taking out a home equity loan, for example.

Yes, these options may be cheaper than getting a bridge loan, Reiss acknowledges. The problem is, they both take time. Borrowing money from your 401(k) may take several weeks and plenty of back and forth with your employer or human resources department, and home equity loans can take months. Not only that, but it might be difficult to qualify for a home equity loan if your home is for sale, Reiss says.

“A home equity lender who catches wind of your intent to sell your home may not even loan you the money since it’s fairly likely you’ll pay off the home equity loan quickly, meaning they won’t turn a profit,” he says.

Bridge loans, on the other hand, could be more convenient and timely because you may be able to get one through your new mortgage lender.

Four good reasons to take out a bridge loan

With the listed advantages and disadvantages above in mind, there are plenty of reasons buyers will take on the risk of a bridge loan and use it to transition into a new home. Reasons consumers commonly take out bridge loans include:

1. You want to make an offer on a new home without a sales contingency to improve your chances of securing a deal.

The most important reason to get a bridge loan is if you want to buy a property so much that you don’t mind the added costs or risk. These loans let you make an offer without promising to sell your old home first.

2. You need cash for a down payment without accessing your home equity right away.

A bridge loan can help you borrow the money you need for a down payment. Once you sell your old home, you can use the equity and profit from the sale to pay off your loan.

3. You want to avoid PMI, or private mortgage insurance.

If most of your cash is locked up as equity in your current home, you may not have enough money to put down 20 percent on your new home and avoid PMI, or private mortgage insurance. A bridge loan may help you put down 20 percent and avoid the need for this costly insurance product.

“But you would need to net out the costs of the bridge loan against the PMI savings to see if it is worth it,” says Reiss. “And remember, once you have sold the first home, you could use the equity from that home to pay down the mortgage on your new home and get out of paying PMI.”

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), you may have to order an appraisal to show you have at least 20 percent equity to get PMI taken off your new loan, and even then, it can take several months.

“So, we might be talking about six to 12 months of avoided PMI payments if you were planning on using the equity from your old home to pay down the mortgage on your new home,” says Reiss.

4. You’re building a new home.

A bridge loan can help you pay the upfront costs of building a new home when you aren’t yet prepared to sell your old one because you still need a place to live.

How to qualify for a bridge mortgage loan

Because bridge loans are offered through mortgage lenders, typically in conjunction with a new mortgage, the requirements to qualify are similar to getting a new home loan.
While requirements can vary from lender to lender, you commonly need to meet the following criteria for a bridge loan:

  • Excellent credit
  • A low debt-to-income ratio
  • Significant home equity of 20 percent or more

Typically, lenders will approve bridge loans at the value of 80 percent of both the borrower’s current mortgage and the proposed mortgage they are aiming to attain. Let’s say you’re selling a home worth $300,000 with the goal of buying a new property worth $500,000. In this example, across both loans, you could only borrow 80 percent of the combined property values, or $640,000.

If you don’t have enough equity or cash to meet these requirements — or if your credit isn’t good enough — you may not qualify for a bridge loan, even if you want one.

Fees and other fine print

Before you take out a bridge loan, it’s important to understand all the costs involved. Here are some fees and fine print you should look for and understand:

Fees

Since bridge loans vary widely from lender to lender, the fees involved — and the costs of those fees — can vary significantly as well. Common fees to look for include an origination fee that can be equal to 1 percent or more of your loan value. You will also likely be on the hook for closing costs for your loan, although the amount of those costs can be all over the map based on the terms and conditions included in your loan’s fine print. As example, Third Federal Savings and Loan out of Cleveland, Ohio, offers a bridge loan product with no prepayment penalties or appraisal fees, but with a $595 fee for closing costs. Borrowers may also be on the hook for documentary stamp taxes or state taxes, if applicable. Make sure to check your loan’s terms and conditions.

Prepayment penalties

While it’s unlikely your loan will include any prepayment penalties, you should read the terms and conditions to make sure.

Payoff terms and conditions

Because all bridge loans work differently, you need to be sure when your loan comes due, or when you need to start making payments. You may need to make payments right away, or you might have a few months of wiggle room. Because there are no set guidelines, these terms can vary dramatically among different lenders.

Tips to sell your home quickly and avoid a bridge loan

If you’re on the fence about getting a bridge loan because you’re worried about short-term costs or the added layer of risk, try to sell your home quickly instead. If you’re able to sell, you may be able to access your home’s equity and avoid a bridge loan altogether, while also eliminating the possibility of getting “stuck” with more than one home.

We spoke to several real estate professionals to get their tips for selling your home quickly. Here are their best tips for getting your home ready to sell in a short amount of time:

Tip #1: Do some quick outdoor cleanup and landscaping work, then try to make your home as neutral as possible.

“To get people inside, they need to like the outside of your house,” says Nancy Brook, a Realtor who sells properties with RE/MAX of Billings, Mont. “Trim trees and shrubs, treat weeds, and mow and trim lawns.”

You should also make sure that there’s no chipped or peeling paint, she recommends. “And if your home is anything but a neutral color, you should seriously consider painting it.”

Tip #2: Get rid of half your stuff (or more).

As Brooks notes, most real estate agents suggest that sellers pack up most of their personal items and remove them from the house when they’re trying to sell. This helps people declutter while also making their property more appealing to people who might be turned off by someone else’s personal photos and items.

“Pack up or get rid of rid of paperwork, knick-knacks, personal photos and collections,” says Brooks. “Any furniture that obstructs a walkway should be eliminated. Get rid of any unnecessary dishes, pots, pans and small appliances in your kitchen. All the excess gives a junky appearance.”

Tip #3: Deep-clean from top to bottom.

While cleaning seems like an obvious first step, it is often neglected, notes Trina Larson, RE/MAX Realtor and selling specialist from Potomac, Md.

“You would never purchase a dirty car or a dirty new jacket,” she says. “Get everything as clean as possible, and try to make your house look brand-new.”

Items on your to-clean list should include corners, edges of baseboards, light fixtures, windows inside and out, your home’s siding and anything that isn’t in pristine condition.

Tip #4: Get rid of off-putting smells.

If you want to sell quickly, your house should smell clean and inviting, Larson suggests. “Your first step is to remove every offensive odor,” she says.

Go through each room and take inventory of what you smell. “Pet urine is especially heinous, and there is only way to remove it,” she says. “You have to go in and replace the carpet where the accident happened. Although it might seem like an expensive task, it is worth every penny. No cooking or animal odors.”

Basic cleaning can also help remove smells. The cleaner your home, the fresher it will seem to potential buyers.

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Bottom line: Is a bridge loan worth considering?

If you want to buy a home quickly and don’t have time to sell your home, a bridge loan could help. Likewise, bridge loans can be a good option for people who are moving or building a new home and need the capital to make the sale go through regardless of cost.

On the other hand, such loans may not be the best choice for consumers who don’t want to risk getting stuck with two homes and multiple payments. They’re also a poor choice for buyers who don’t want to pay any additional closing costs or interest payments to get in the home they want.

In the end, only you can decide if the risk of getting a bridge loan for your new home is an acceptable one.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Holly Johnson
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Holly Johnson is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Holly here

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The Pros and Cons of a Credit Union Mortgage

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

co-op shared branching for credit unions
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Though banks are better known, their not-for-profit cousins known as credit unions still command a significant chunk of the mortgage market. During the first quarter of 2019, credit unions originated 8% of mortgages in the United States, according to credit union consulting firm Callahan & Associates.

Often overlooked, credit unions can be a good option when shopping for a mortgage. Joining a credit union can make it possible for you to reap benefits such as lower origination fees or a more competitive interest rate.

This article will explore whether homebuyers might get a better deal from a credit union mortgage and the implications a relationship with a credit union might bring.

How is a credit union different from a bank?

Although credit unions fall under the umbrella of financial institutions, they differ from commercial banks in several key ways.

Banks are typically owned by their shareholders, credit unions are not-for-profit organizations owned by their members. This often translates to better rates and terms on their financial products.

While banks can serve the entire nation, credit unions tend to be community-based institutions that play a significant role in serving people in a local area.

“Credit unions are a really important part of the financial services fabric,” said Barry Zigas, director of housing policy at the Consumer Federation of America in Washington, D.C.

On the other hand, credit unions typically don’t offer the same suite of products that a larger bank is often known for. While you can take advantage of a checking, savings or individual retirement account, for example, you may find it challenging to access financial planning or investment services.

Below we highlight how credit unions stack up against banks.

Credit UnionCommercial Bank
  • Not-for-profit organization
  • Member-owned
  • Typically have higher yields on deposit accounts
  • Typically have lower interest rates on credit and loan products
  • Membership is based on an affiliation or geographical location
  • Smaller branch and ATM networks
  • Federally insured up to $250,000 through the National Credit Union Administration
  • For-profit organization
  • Shareholder-owned
  • Yields are usually lower on deposit accounts
  • Interest rates on credit and loan products are usually higher
  • Anyone can establish a relationship with a bank
  • Larger branch and ATM networks
  • Federally insured up to $250,000 through the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

Getting a mortgage from a credit union

One of the main differences when applying for a mortgage through a credit union rather than a traditional bank is that you must be a member of the credit union before you can attempt to borrow money.

Credit union customers own “shares” in the institution, typically via a $5 deposit held in a particular savings account.

In order to become a member, you must meet the membership requirements outlined by the credit union you’re interested in joining. Credit union members have a common bond, which could be any of the following, according to the National Credit Union Administration:

  • An employer.
  • A geographical location where those interested in joining live, work, worship or attend school.
  • A group membership, such as a homeowners association or labor union.

Family members of credit union customers are also often eligible to join.

One of the key reasons for choosing a credit union: You may be able to save money on lender fees, said Bruce McClary, vice president of communications at the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. A credit union may also be more flexible with credit score requirements than a bank and may offer lower mortgage interest rates.

However, since credit unions are small organizations, there’s the risk that your credit union’s name or ownership could change. Your credit union could also sell the rights to service your mortgage to a third party, which may impact your customer service after your loan closes.

“Even though you may be saving money on origination fees and you may not be paying as many other fees with your mortgage — so it might be more affordable at the onset — you may end up having to deal with a servicer that you weren’t dealing with before, rather than dealing with your credit union,” McClary said.

It’s important to note that bank-originated mortgages can also be sold and handed over to other servicers, so this issue isn’t unique to credit unions.

Still, developing a relationship with a credit union over time — as in, the organization’s representatives are very familiar with you and your finances — could work in your favor when you decide to apply for a mortgage, McClary said.

“Being a member of the credit union might actually put you in an advantage in terms of approval or maybe in terms of negotiating terms of the mortgage in the application process,” he said.

Pros and cons of a credit union mortgage

Consider the following benefits and drawbacks of a credit union mortgage before you choose this type of lender for your home purchase.

Pros

  • Potentially lower origination fees and other lending costs.
  • Mortgage rates may be lower.
  • A greater sense of community, since the institution is member-owned.
  • Potential for more negotiating room during the mortgage lending process.
  • Shared branching benefits, which allow you to use the services of an outside credit union.

Cons

  • You must meet eligibility guidelines to join the credit union and become a member before applying for a mortgage.
  • Credit unions typically have smaller branch networks.
  • There’s the risk of your credit union closing, switching owners or going through some other changes, which can affect how your mortgage is serviced.
  • Typically carry fewer product offerings than traditional banks.
  • May have limited online banking capabilities.

The bottom line

A traditional bank isn’t your only option for getting a mortgage. Depending on what your lending needs are and how much you value building a relationship with your financial institution, a credit union might be right for you.

However, if you’re concerned about mortgage servicing, be sure to check with your credit union for more information about how they plan to handle your mortgage once it’s originated.

“I think consumers who are members of credit unions should certainly go to their credit union and find out what their loan terms are, what the application process is like and maybe even ask, ‘Are these loans that you hold or are these loans that you sell off?’” Zigas said.

Zigas also recommended practicing that same due diligence with other types of mortgage lenders and shopping around.

“It’s a very competitive environment, and there’s no assurance that your credit union will actually be offering you the best possible rate,” he said.

It pays to comparison shop before you settle on a particular mortgage lender. For example, if you were looking to buy a house that required a $300,000 mortgage, you could potentially save more than $42,000 in interest over the life of a 30-year term by shopping for the best rate, according to data from LendingTree’s latest Mortgage Rate Competition Index.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Crissinda Ponder
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Crissinda Ponder is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Crissinda here

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We Downsized Our House So We Could Travel the World

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Purchase agreement for house

You’ve settled into your dream house and have called it home for years. But now you realize your family has more house than it actually needs, plus a large mortgage to match. Is it time to downsize?

The answer depends on what your financial and lifestyle goals are. Below, we share one story about a Florida-based family downsizing their home. Giving up 1,600 square feet allowed them to pay off their mortgage in a fraction of the time and achieve their goals of globe-trotting.

Keith and Nicole’s downsizing story

Keith and Nicole DeBickes loved their house in Delray Beach, Fla., but with more than 3,500 square feet of living space, it was perhaps larger than they actually needed at the time. “One day, I came to the realization that I had a 400-square-foot bathroom that I spent 20 minutes a day in, and we had this big formal dining room and formal living room that we never used,” Nicole said. “And we had a really big mortgage to cover it.”

She also wasn’t thrilled with the schools in the area — or with the idea of paying for private education. She and Keith knew they had to make a change.

The DeBickes (who work as an engineer manager and software engineer, respectively, and make between $100,000 and $200,000 combined annually) put their house on the market and started looking for a smaller home that was zoned for better schools.

They eventually settled on a 1,900-square-foot, four-bedroom house in Boca Raton. “We wanted to buy with the idea that we’d have a much smaller mortgage and we wouldn’t have to pay for private school,” Nicole said. “Then we could do things with our family like travel or retire earlier.”

The couple took out a 30-year mortgage for $110,000 in 2007, much smaller than what they had before. They then refinanced into a 15-year loan for $150,000 in 2009 to remodel their kitchen and upgrade their electrical work.

Pros and cons of downsizing your home

Deciding to downsize your house is a major decision that takes a good amount of effort and planning. Consider the following pros and cons before you choose to move forward.

Pros

  • Reduces your mortgage debt.
  • Potentially reduces other housing-related expenses, such as utilities.
  • Frees up cash to reduce or eliminate non-mortgage debt.
  • Gives you a smaller house to maintain.

Cons

  • Reduces your available square footage, giving you less space than you’re used to.
  • Unless you have enough equity to cover the purchase of your new home, you must qualify for a new mortgage.
  • You’ll have to sell your existing home.
  • You will have to shell out thousands of dollars for both your home sale and new home purchase.

Tips to pay off your mortgage more quickly

The DeBickes didn’t like the idea of having a mortgage on their downsized home. “We didn’t want to be working every month for a mortgage,” Nicole said. “We don’t like debt, and we wanted it to be gone.”

The couple buckled down and started making double and triple payments every month on their home loan. They drove older cars, carpooled to save on gas and maintenance and packed lunches to cut down on their food costs. The family took relatively modest vacations, staying with family or driving to the west coast of Florida.

All their diligence paid off — the DeBickles submitted their last mortgage payment in fall 2013.

If you’re on a mission to be mortgage-free sooner rather than later, here are tips to help you get there:

  • Make extra principal payments each month. Try rounding up your monthly mortgage payment. For example, if your payment is $1,325 every month, pay $1,400 instead or increase the amount by even more, if your budget allows. Be sure to communicate to your lender that you want the extra payments applied to your principal balance and not your interest.
  • Pay biweekly instead of monthly. Split your monthly mortgage payment into biweekly payments. Since there are 52 weeks in a year, you would make 26 half payments, or 13 full payments. Making one extra full payment each year could allow you to shave a few years off your mortgage term.
  • Consider recasting your mortgage. If you have at least $5,000 or $10,000 — depending on your lender’s requirements — you could use that lump sum to recast your mortgage. A mortgage recast allows you to lower your monthly payments by paying your lender a set amount of money to reduce your mortgage principal.
  • Dedicate windfalls to paying down your principal. Every time you get a tax refund, bonus or some other windfall, use it to pay down your outstanding loan balance.

Achieving financial freedom

Although they’re now mortgage-free, the DeBickes were still putting money away like crazy. They eventually quit their jobs (temporarily) and traveled abroad for two years with their boys, who were 10 and 7 in 2015. Without a mortgage payment, they were able to amass the $190,000 they thought they needed to travel for 28 months. “We have been living on one salary and saving or paying off the house with the other for 12 years,” Nicole said.

Despite their hefty savings goals, they’ve been able to take the boys to Europe and Costa Rica, too. “We want to really get them prepared for what travel is going to be like,” Nicole said.

The trip, which is outlined on the family’s website, FamilyWithLatitude.com, took the foursome everywhere from Ireland to France, among other spots. Nicole and Keith “road schooled” their children as they traveled, with the help of Florida’s virtual school program that allows them to take classes online.

They planned to rent their home while they were away, which will help finance part of the trip and cover some house expenses, such as insurance and property taxes. In the meantime, they are maxing out their 401(k)s and taking care of college funds for the boys.

“(In 2014) we were able to purchase the prepaid college plan for my youngest son in a lump sum,” said Nicole, who had already done the same thing for her eldest. “So I know that both boys have good college funds to take care of them.”

The bottom line

If you’re looking to move into a smaller home and save money in the process, it might make sense for you to downsize. Just be sure you’re clear on the benefits and drawbacks, and how the choice to cut down your square footage would align with your personal goals.

In the end, the lack of debt will allow the DeBickes the freedom to not only to travel the globe, but to hang out with the important people in their lives.

“With both of us working, we haven’t been able to spend as much time with the kids as we wanted,” Nicole said. “It’s a real luxury that we can do this. I’m looking forward to spending time together as a family.”

This article contains links to LendingTree, our parent company.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Kate Ashford
Kate Ashford |

Kate Ashford is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Kate at [email protected]

Crissinda Ponder
Crissinda Ponder |

Crissinda Ponder is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Crissinda here

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