Can I Refinance a Mortgage When My Home Is for Sale?

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Updated on Monday, March 5, 2018

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If you’re having trouble paying your bills, or if you’d simply like to reduce your monthly expenses, refinancing your mortgage could be a good option. By reducing your interest rate, extending your loan term, or both, you could stand to significantly reduce your monthly payment.

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But refinancing isn’t easy if you’re also in the process of selling your home. Many mortgage lenders may be hesitant to work with you, and there are some rules you’ll have to follow before you can even consider it.

This article explains why you might want to refinance your mortgage while your home is for sale, why lenders might be hesitant to allow it, and how you can maximize your odds of success.

Why You Might Consider Refinancing When Selling Your Home — and Why You Should Think Twice

There are a few situations in which refinancing a home you are trying to sell might seem like a good idea. But there are also some downsides to this approach, and in some situations, those downsides will outweigh any potential benefit.

Here are some of the reasons to consider it, as well as some reasons to think twice.

1. Relieve the burden of two mortgage payments

If you have already moved into a new home and you are now dealing with two mortgage payments, refinancing your older mortgage could be a way to reduce your monthly expenses and make this temporary situation a little more manageable.

One issue with this approach is that the upfront closing costs could outweigh the savings you receive on the monthly payment. This is especially likely if you end up selling your home quickly, as there may not be enough time for you to recoup those upfront expenses.

Dan Green, the founder of Growella and the branch manager for Waterstone Mortgage in Pewaukee, Wis., also warns that refinancing is not a cure-all if you’ve gotten yourself into a difficult financial situation. While it may offer temporary relief, the long-term issue of having to afford two mortgages will remain and you might end up spending a lot of money on something that still leaves you in a tough spot.

2. You can do a no-cost refinance

If you plan on selling your home within the next few months, the typical upfront closing costs associated with refinancing are a big obstacle.

But you may be offered a no-cost refinance in which you’re able to refinance your mortgage without closing costs. And that could be helpful in the right circumstances, as long as you understand the pros and cons.

The term “no-cost” is slightly deceptive because the lender isn’t actually giving you a free pass. They are simply rolling the closing costs into the loan, which increases the amount you’re borrowing and therefore increases the long-term cost of the loan.

The upside is that without the upfront costs, you can start saving money immediately as long as you’re able to lower your monthly payment. If you sell your home relatively quickly, you could end up spending less than if you had kept your original mortgage.

The downside is that since you’re taking out a larger mortgage, you’ll have to pay more the longer you hold it. If you have trouble selling the house or if your plans change and you decide to keep it, you could end up spending more than you would have either with your original mortgage or with a traditional refinance.

3. You’re not planning to sell the home anymore

If your house has been on the market for some time without any success, you might be having some doubts. That may be especially true if you’re in a buyer’s market, leaving you with little leverage for getting the price that you want.

In that case, you might simply decide that you no longer want to sell the house. You may even decide to turn the home into an investment property instead and rent it out to tenants.

According to Green, this is the most suitable reason to refinance while your home is for sale. If your plans have changed, a refinance might be the best way to save money over the long term.

Why lenders are wary of refinancing a home that’s for sale

Even if you decide that refinancing is the right move, you may have trouble finding a lender that’s willing to do it.

Lenders always take on risk when originating a mortgage loan, and some of these risks are even bigger when they’re considering short-term financing.

Default risk

Default risk is the risk that you might not be able to pay the loan back, in which case the lender stands to lose money.

On the one hand, if you are refinancing a mortgage on a home that you are trying to sell, it should theoretically be a short-term loan and that may decrease the odds of default.

If, as Green mentions, you are refinancing in an attempt to relieve some of the stress of a difficult financial situation, you might quickly find yourself in even more financial trouble if you aren’t able to sell your home quickly. And that type of situation could make it harder for you to pay back the loan, which increases the lender’s risk of losing money to default.

Early-repayment risk

According to Casey Fleming, mortgage adviser and author of “The Loan Guide”, lenders make most of their profit when they sell their loans to investors. So in a situation where you’re trying to take out a loan on a property that you’re trying to sell, the lender faces the risk that you’ll pay the loan off early and eliminate their ability to sell it for a profit.

“A lender doesn’t want to book a loan that’s going to be paid off after only a month or two,” said Fleming. “The lender stands to lose quite a bit of money if someone takes out a loan and then sells the property.”

Even if the lender does manage to sell the loan to an investor, part of the sale includes representation and warranties that could cause problems in the case of early repayment.

Fleming said, “The lender represents to the investor that the information in the file is true and correct and affirms that the loan will pay off as planned.”

So if you sell the home and repay the loan within just a few months, the lender may be forced to buy the loan back from the investor, resulting in more losses.

How to improve your odds of refinancing

If you’re still convinced that refinancing is the right move, how can you find a lender who is willing to go through with it while your home is still for sale?

The first step is to be honest. If your home is listed, it will show up on a multiple listings service (MLS) that the lender can easily cross-reference, so you shouldn’t try to hide it.

Beyond that, here are three steps you can take to improve your chances of getting approved for a mortgage refinance.

1. Take your home off the market

Most lenders will require that you remove your listing before they consider refinancing.

For cash-out refinance transactions, Fannie Mae, a government-sponsored enterprise that buys mortgages from lenders, requires that your property must be taken off the market before the loan is disbursed. And for limited cash-out refinance transactions, they require that the borrower confirm their intent to occupy the home.

In other words, for the most part you will not be allowed to refinance your mortgage if you are still planning to sell the home. You must have changed your mind, decided to hold onto it, and taken it off the market.

2. Write a letter of intent

Even if you do take your home off the market, lenders may still be wary of proceeding. In that case, a letter explaining your new intentions may help you secure the refinance you’re looking for.

According to Green, Fannie Mae requires borrowers to sign a letter indicating their intention to occupy the home as a primary residence. In other situations, you might write a letter explaining that you’ve decided to turn the home into a rental property rather than sell it.

Whatever the case, explaining your intention to hold onto the property, and providing evidence of that intention if possible, could help your case. For example, a copy of a lease agreement with a tenant could bolster your case that you are truly planning on using the property as a rental.

Again, it’s important to be honest. If you declare your intention to keep the home and then turn around and sell it right away, you could end up in a lot of trouble.

“If you misrepresent your intentions, you’ve committed mortgage fraud,” said Fleming. “The lender could sue you for damages and the federal government could prosecute you.”

3. Shop around

While most lenders will require that you take your home off the market and leave it off the market in order to refinance, some don’t have those restrictions.

“Banks or credit unions that retain some of their loans rather than sell them might be more willing,” said Fleming. “But only on higher-risk, higher-rate loans.”

If you shop around, you may be able to find a lender who’s willing to refinance even if you keep your home for sale. But there’s no guarantee, and you’ll likely end up with a more expensive loan that could hurt you in both the short and long term.

A good place to start shopping refi offers is through MagnifyMoney’s parent company, LendingTree’s mortgage marketplace.

The Bottom Line

If your home is already listed for sale, or if you plan on selling in the near future, refinancing is a difficult proposition. Many lenders won’t even offer a refinance unless you take your home off the market and those that will refinance often charge you higher interest rates.

In the end, it may be better to simply avoid refinancing if a sale is imminent.

But if you’ve had trouble selling your home and you’re having second thoughts, you can improve your chances of getting approved by taking your home off the market and refinancing in good faith.

Doing so could help you secure a lower monthly payment, a lower interest rate, or both, and free up a little extra cash flow for your other needs.

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