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Mortgage

When Is the Best Time to Buy a House?

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Fall may be the best time to look for a house
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Timing a new home purchase can be tricky. Should you start looking in the spring or in the summer? Should you wait for lower interest rates, or make an offer on a house you love even though the price is higher than what you budgeted? These are a few questions you may be pondering if you’re considering buying a house.

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It’s common to look for cues about the best time to buy from the local housing economy or from what friends and real estate agents say, but the answer often lies closer to home — with an honest look at your personal finances. We’ll delve into some facts and figures to help you answer the question: When is the best time to buy a house?

The best time to buy a house is when you’re financially ready

Your kitchen table may be covered with listings of all the homes you’re interested in, detailed analyses of mortgage interest rate trends, historic home price appreciation and a plethora of other technical financial data about the timing of a home purchase. None of that information will matter if you aren’t financially ready to buy a home.

So how do know when you’re financially ready to buy your home? We’ve come up with five sings to help you determine if your homebuying timing is right.

1. You know your payment comfort zone

Before you ever speak to a loan officer, do some soul searching about your payment comfort zone — that is, how much you can comfortably afford to spend on a monthly mortgage payment alongside other regular expenses. This might be an unfamiliar concept, but taking the time to seriously consider your payment comfort zone may result in a different monthly payment target than the “maximum qualifying” number you’ll receive from a lender.

The Consumer Finance Protection Bureau considers 43% to be the maximum debt-to-income ratio (DTI) to meet the definition of a “qualified mortgage” — the stamp of approval from the regulatory powers that you’ll be able to afford your mortgage. Just multiply your monthly income by .43 and you’ll arrive at the government recommended total debt number. For example, if you earn $6,000 per month, your total debt including your monthly mortgage payment shouldn’t be more than $2,580. But is that really your payment comfort zone?

Start by asking yourself questions like how much do you take home every month after health insurance, retirement savings, local and federal taxes and Social Security deductions? What about your gym membership, the kids’ karate classes and the new organic food regimen that just pushed your grocery budget from $400 per month to $600?

When you start subtracting the realities of your month-to-month budget from your take-home pay, $2,580 of mortgage and other debt may not leave you much breathing room for a sudden pipe burst in a bathroom, or an air conditioner that takes its last breath on the hottest day of the summer.

Once you’ve worked the numbers backward from all of your monthly expenses — not just the ones the lender uses to get you preapproved for a mortgage — you’ll have an honest idea of what you can comfortably afford.

Here’s a side-by-side review of the money left over from a $6,000 monthly income when considering your organic fruit diet, martial artist kids and your monthly commitment to fitness, assuming you take home about 75% of your before-tax income.

Money left over just looking at 43% DTIMoney leftover after expense reality check
$6,000 before tax income$4,500 take-home pay
($2,580) suggested expenses for 43% DTI($600) (gym membership/karate/organic grocery markup)
($2,580) suggested by 43% DTI
$3,420 extra income suggested by lending guidelines$1,320 actual leftover real-life income

If your monthly income before taxes is $6,000 and you buy a house using the 43% rule based on your real life take home pay and additional expenses, you’ll have $1320 left over every month for gas, groceries, utility and all other bills.

Make sure that’s enough cushion for your month-to-month expenses, and if it’s not, start scaling back your monthly payment cushion until you’ve got more breathing room in your monthly budget to comfortably cover your day-to-day spending and other obligations.

2. You know your credit score and it’s as high as possible

Besides your DTI ratio, your credit score is the most important factor in getting you approved for and snagging the best rate on a mortgage. You’ll want to get your credit in good shape before you start shopping for a mortgage.

Start by checking your credit reports for errors because mistakes could be dragging your score down. You’ll want to initiate any disputes to correct errors at least six months before you shop for a mortgage, because lenders will require you to pause any disputes in order to get your mortgage approved.

Next, review your credit scores and the factors that may be bringing them down. (Find them at https://my.lendingtree.com.) While it does take time to improve your score, one way to boost it quickly is to pay down your credit balances. This will improve your utilization ratio, or the amount of credit you’re using compared to the amount of credit available to you. Try to do this at least three to four months before you apply for a mortgage so the credit bureaus have time to reflect any payments you’ve made. And focus on making all your credit payments on time.

3. You have your down payment and emergency fund saved

When you were in the process of determining your payment comfort zone, you probably spent some time crunching down payment numbers. Generally, the more you put down, the lower your overall payment will be.

A 20% down payment will help you avoid mortgage insurance on a conventional loan, but even if you don’t have that much saved, every extra 5% down will save you money. Mortgage insurance (also called private mortgage insurance or PMI) protects lenders against losses if you default on your loan. The less you put down, the more PMI you pay monthly on a conventional mortgage.

The table below illustrates the impact every additional 5% down makes on a $200,000 house if you have a 760 credit score and take out a 30-year fixed rate of 4.25% on a conventional loan in Arizona.

Down paymentLoan amountMonthly mortgage insuranceTotal monthly PIMI (Principal/interest/mortgage insurance)
5%$190,000$193.17$1,127.86
10%$180,000$130.50$1,015.99
15%$170,000$66.58$902.88
20%$160,000$0$787.10

In addition to your down payment, financial planners often recommend having three to six months’ worth of basic expenses in an emergency fund. Lenders also like to see extra money in the bank so they know you have the funds on hand to make extra payments or cover unexpected home repair expenses.

4. Your job is stable

It’s easiest to qualify for a mortgage if you have a salaried job or a full-time hourly position. If you have a position that only has a temporary base pay that will end in the near future, you may have a hard time getting approved. If you’ve been in a commissioned or self-employed position for at least two years and show enough income to qualify on your tax returns, then this is a good time to buy.

5. You plan to stay in your current location for 5-7 years

You may hear the expression buying a home is one of the biggest investments you’ll make. The most disciplined investors also talk about looking at the long term versus the short term.

When it comes to real estate, the “5-year home sale rule” refers to the fact that you have a better chance of recouping the cost of buying a home if you stay in the home for at least five years. By that time, you’ll have made 60 mortgage payments, and in most cases, you’ll see home values in your area gradually rise.

The combination of these factors usually results in a sweet spot for reselling after five years. This is important because as a home seller, you’ll be paying all of the real estate commissions for the services agents provide to sell your home. Those fees can be as high as 6% or more, and that’s money that comes off the top of the profit you make.

The example below shows how the 5-year rule works. It assumes you put down 5% on a $250,000 home with mortgage rate of 4.25%, the market appreciates 6% per year for the next five years (it has averaged 7-8% per year since 2007-08), and selling costs total 8%.

Year since purchaseHome value at 6% annual appreciation*Principal balanceTotal equitySelling costs 8%Net profit at sale
1$265,000$233,496.07$31,503.93$21,200$10,303.93
2$280,900$229,318.61$51,581.39$22,472$29,109.39
3$297,754$224,960.12$72,793.88$23,820.32$48,973.56
4$315,619$220,412.74$95,206.26$25,249.52$69,956.74
5$334,556$215,668.28$118,887.72$26,764.48$92,123.24
*Average appreciation rate since the 2007-08 financial crisis

It’s best to buy when rates are heading down

It’s impossible to know exactly what interest rates are doing, but if you see a lot of news about rates dropping, it’s worth it to get a payment quote. From December 2018 to August 2019, mortgage rates offered for many mortgage programs dropped nearly one percentage point, which has a huge impact not only on your monthly payment, but on how much interest you pay over the life of the loan.

We’ll look at how a one percentage point reduction in the interest rate can make a monthly payment difference for a $150,000, $250,000 and $350,000 loan. Using the 5-year rule, we’ll also look at how much extra equity and interest savings you realize by the time you make your 60th payment (12 months of payments x 5 years = 60 payments).

Loan amountMonthly payment at 4.75%Monthly payment at 3.75%Monthly payment savingsInterest savings over 5 years at 3.75%Extra equity at 5 years
$150,000$782.47$694.67$87.80$7,399.24$2,131.38
$250,000$1,304.12$1,157.79$146.35$12,331.08$3,552.30
$350,000$1,825.77$1,620.90$204.87$17,264.88$4,973.22

The bigger the loan amount, the more the impact on your monthly payment savings, total interest costs and equity build up. This makes shopping around for a mortgage and locking in a rate when you find the best deal even more important.

It’s best to buy when home prices are leveling off

The price you pay is just as important as the interest rate when it comes to buying. When home prices level off or rise at a slower pace, sellers tend to put their houses on the market at a more rapid pace, as they worry they may miss out on getting top dollar if prices stall out.

That’s good news if you’re a buyer, because more houses for sales may mean lower prices. Sellers may also consider contributing toward your closing costs or help you buy discount points to get a lower rate. This is also known as a “buyer’s market,” because it tends to be more advantageous to buyers than sellers.

Sales price also affects how much money you need to put down, so getting the best price will help you leave some of that down payment money in the bank to build up your emergency fund even further. Here’s an example of the effects of a 5% difference in price on your down payment, and assuming the seller is willing to pay 3% of your closing costs.

Sales price5% down payment10% down payment3% seller paid costs
$200,000$10,000$20,000$6,000
$210,000$10,500$21,000$6,300
$220,000$11,000$22,000$6,600

If you can buy a home for $200,000 versus $220,000, you’ll save $1,000 in down payment (assuming you’re putting 5% down), and the seller can potentially pay $6,000 in closing costs. The most common signs that the market is turning in your favor are “For Sale” signs. If you start seeing more of them popping up in your area or in a neighborhood you’ve had your eye on for a while, chances are you’re entering a buyer’s market.

The best times of the year to buy a home

Spring and summer are the most popular times to buy. Summer can be especially expensive for families to buy because sellers know there is pressure to find something and get settled before the start of the school year. Conversely, fall and winter are slower seasons for home sales. As a buyer, there are some months and even days when you might be able to save a bundle of cash if you’re able to make an offer and close during unpopular selling months.

The October homebuying advantage

October consistently ranks in the top three months for buyers, according to an analysis by ATTOM Data Solutions that examines dates from 2011 to 2018 during which sellers were least likely to charge a premium for single-family homes and condos. During this time, sellers are likely to accept premiums that are one-half to two-thirds lower than the highest premium months of the year (March to July).

With kids back in the full swing of school, sellers lose a big pool of prospective buyers, giving you an advantage as a prospective homebuyer.

December is the next best month for buying power

While many people are in the thick of holiday events and get togethers, homebuying may be the furthest thing from their minds. Sellers who need to sell in December will often give buyers extra motivation to consider their homes during the holiday season, and buyers prepared to forgo a cocktail party or two may be rewarded with substantial benefits.

Ringing in the new year with a cheaper home in January

If your New Year’s resolution includes home ownership, January may be a great month to look as well, according to ATTOM’s data. While most people are signing up for gym memberships, focusing on house hunting may save thousands of dollars in home costs instead of inches off your waistline.

Final thoughts about timing a home purchase

The good thing about home prices and interest rates is that they tend to move slowly, giving you time to prepare yourself for the homebuying journey. In order to take advantage of deals to buy a house, you need to have your financial house in the best shape possible.

Not only will you potentially save money with a lower rate or price on the home you buy, but the loan approval process will be much easier if you buy within your means and are able to demonstrate strong credit scores, solid income and plenty of money in the bank.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

By clicking “See Rates”, you will be directed to LendingTree. Based on your creditworthiness, you may be matched with up to five different lenders in our partner network.

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Mortgage

How to Recover From Missed Mortgage Payments

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

understanding good faith estimate vs loan estimate
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The best way to ensure your credit stays in great shape is to pay your monthly bills — especially your mortgage — on time. That’s because payment history plays the biggest factor in determining your credit score. Still, unexpected events — such as a job loss or medical emergency — can occur, causing you to miss a payment or two.

If that’s the case, you’re not alone. In fact, mortgage delinquencies (loans with past-due payments) have increased from their 2018 levels, according to the latest National Delinquency Survey from the Mortgage Bankers Association.

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So can you bounce back from a missed mortgage payment? The answer is yes, but there’s work involved. Below, we explain how to recover from missed mortgage payments, including repairing your credit, and what you need to know to avoid losing your home.

How many payments can you miss before foreclosure?

Days late

What happens?

1

Your grace period kicks in.

15

You’re charged a late fee.

30

Your servicer reports the late payment to the credit bureaus.

45

Your servicer assigns a representative to work with you on foreclosure prevention.

60

You’re charged a second late fee.

90

Your servicer sends you a demand letter, giving you 30 days to catch up. You’re charged a third late fee.

120

The foreclosure process typically begins, though it could start sooner.

The number of mortgage payments you can miss before foreclosure — the action a bank or mortgage lender takes to repossess a property — is initiated varies from lender to lender, but the process can begin as early as 60 days after your first missed payment. (Check your state’s foreclosure laws online.)

 Being a day late on your next mortgage payment likely won’t alarm your mortgage servicer. In fact, most offer a grace period — generally 15 days — before they charge a late fee, which is typically a percentage, often around 5%, of the principal and interest portion of your monthly payment. You can find specific details about your grace period and late fee on the promissory note you signed as part of your mortgage closing documents.

 Once you’re 30 days late, it’s likely your mortgage servicer will report that information to the three major credit reporting bureaus: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. Your credit score will be negatively impacted as a result (more on this later). You can also expect your servicer to contact you directly no later than 36 days after your past-due payment to discuss getting you current on your mortgage again.

You’ll also receive a Notice of Default, as mentioned in your promissory note, by the 45th day you’re late on the mortgage payment. The notice gives you a deadline to pay the past-due amount, which must be at least 30 days after the notice date. If you miss that deadline, your servicer can demand that you repay your outstanding mortgage balance, plus interest, in full.

Your mortgage servicer will also assign someone on its team to work with you on foreclosure prevention options once you’re 45 days late. This information will be communicated to you in writing. We’ll discuss available options in the next section.

 Once you’re 60 days late, you’ll be charged a second late fee, as you’ve missed two payments. Your servicer will send you another notice by the 36th day after the second missed payment. This same process applies for every month you’re behind.

 At 90 days late, your servicer will likely send you a demand letter telling you to bring your mortgage current within 30 days. You’ll likely be charged another late fee.

 If you’re not able to catch up on payments by the 120th day, the foreclosure process typically begins. Your mortgage servicer’s attorney will contact you and you’re now responsible for repaying the outstanding loan balance, interest and late fees, plus your servicer’s legal fees, if any.

Once your servicer’s attorney files a foreclosure lawsuit with your county court to resell the home and recoup the money owed, the attorney schedules a foreclosure sale date. You’re notified in writing about the sale and given a move-out deadline. The sale information may also be advertised in your county’s newspaper or on its website.

There’s still a chance you can keep your home if you pay the amount owed, along with any applicable legal fees, before the foreclosure sale date.

What to do when you’ve missed mortgage payments

There are several ways to recover from missed mortgage payments before reaching the point of losing your home. Here are some options:

  • Forbearance: Your mortgage servicer agrees to temporarily reduce or suspend your monthly mortgage payment for a set amount of time. Once the forbearance period ends, you’ll repay the total amount that was reduced or suspended.
  • Modification: This is the process of changing your loan’s original terms. A mortgage modification might involve extending your loan term, lowering your mortgage interest rate or switching from an adjustable-rate to a fixed-rate mortgage. The goal is to reduce your monthly mortgage payment to a more affordable amount.
  • Repayment: Your servicer agrees to let you spread out your late payments over the next several months to bring your mortgage current. When you make your monthly mortgage payments, you add a portion of the past-due amount to each of those payments until you catch up.

Options to leave your home without going through foreclosure include a deed-in-lieu of foreclosure and short sale. A deed-in-lieu of foreclosure, also known as a mortgage release, allows you to give up ownership of your home in exchange for no longer being responsible for your outstanding mortgage debt. You may be able to rent the home for up to a year after going through the process and receive up to $3,000 to help you relocate.

A short sale allows you to sell your home for a price that is less than the amount you owe on your mortgage. Depending on the final sales price, you either pay off a portion of your mortgage balance or the entire amount. If you go this route, be sure you won’t be responsible for the remaining balance if the short sale proceeds aren’t enough to cover the full amount you owe.

How late mortgage payments affect your credit

Late payments start to affect your credit once you’ve been delinquent for 30 days or more. Depending on which credit score range you’re in before your past-due payments are reported to the bureaus, your score could drop by anywhere from 60 to 110 points, according to research by FICO. Being 90 days late could lower your score by another 20 points or more.

It can take up to three years to fully recover from a credit score drop after being 30 days late on your mortgage, FICO’s research found. That time can increase to seven years once you’ve been 90 days late.

Here’s what you should know about repairing your credit by yourself.

What about late mortgage payment forgiveness?

If you’ve otherwise had a good payment history on your mortgage and have only been late once, you could try writing a goodwill letter to your mortgage servicer to have the late payment information removed from your credit reports. The purpose of the letter is to ask your lender to forgive the late mortgage payment by erasing the negative information from your credit report.

Your goodwill letter should include your name, contact information and account number. Be sure to keep your letter concise. Make note of your good payment history prior to this point and explain what led to the late payment. Demonstrate the steps you’re taking to prevent late payments in the future and end the letter requesting removal of the late payment details from your credit reports. Thank your servicer for their consideration and print, sign and mail your letter to your servicer’s address.

Once the late payment is taken off your credit reports, your credit scores will eventually increase, as long as you continue to make on-time payments. Remember the letter is simply a request — your servicer isn’t required to forgive a late mortgage payment.

The bottom line

Falling behind on your mortgage can be a frustrating and scary experience, particularly if you’re facing the threat of foreclosure.

The smartest thing you can do is be proactive about getting back on track instead of waiting for your mortgage servicer to reach out. If you think you’ll be behind soon or are already a few days behind, now’s the time to contact your lender and review your options.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

By clicking “See Rates”, you will be directed to LendingTree. Based on your creditworthiness, you may be matched with up to five different lenders in our partner network.

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Life Events, Mortgage

What Is Mortgage Amortization?

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

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One of the biggest advantages of homeownership versus renting is each mortgage payment gradually pays off your mortgage and builds equity in your home. The difference between your home’s value and the balance of your loan is home equity, and your equity grows with each payment because of mortgage amortization.

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Understanding mortgage amortization can help you set financial goals to pay off your home faster or evaluate whether you should refinance.

What is mortgage amortization?

Mortgage amortization is the process of paying off your loan balance in equal installments over a set period. The interest you pay is based on the balance of your loan (your principal). When you begin your payment schedule, you pay much more interest than principal.

As time goes on, you eventually pay more principal than interest — until your loan is paid off.

How mortgage amortization works

Understanding mortgage amortization starts with how monthly mortgage payments are applied each month to the principal and interest owed on your mortgage. There are two calculations that occur every month.

The first involves how much interest you’ll need to pay. This is based on the amount you borrowed when you took out your loan. It is adjusted each month as your balance drops from the payments you make.

The second calculation is how much principal you are paying. It is based on the interest rate you locked in and agreed to repay over a set period (the most popular being 30 years).

If you’re a math whiz, here’s how the formula looks before you start inputting numbers.

Fortunately, mortgage calculators do all the heavy mathematical lifting for you. The graphic below shows the difference between the first year and 15th year of principal and interest payments on a 30-year fixed loan of $200,000 at a rate of 4.375%.

For the first year, the amount of interest that is paid is more than double the principal, slowly dropping as the principal balance drops. However, by the 15th year, principal payments outpace interest, and you start building equity at a much more rapid pace.

How understanding mortgage amortization can help financially

An important aspect of mortgage amortization is that you can change the total amount of interest you pay — or how fast you pay down the balance — by making extra payments over the life of the loan or refinancing to a lower rate or term. You aren’t obligated to follow the 30-year schedule laid out in your amortization schedule.

Here are some financial objectives, using LendingTree mortgage calculators, that you can accomplish with mortgage amortization. (Note that MagnifyMoney is owned by LendingTree.)

Lower rate can save thousands in interest

If mortgage rates have dropped since you purchased your home, you might consider refinancing. Some financial advisors may recommend refinancing only if you can save 1% on your rate. However, this may not be good advice if you plan on staying in your home for a long time. The example below shows the monthly savings from 5% to 4.5% on a $200,000, 30-year fixed loan, assuming you closed on your current loan in January 2019.

Assuming you took out the mortgage in January 2019 at 5%, refinancing to a rate of 4.5% only saves $69 a month. However, over 30 years, the total savings is $68,364 in interest. If you’re living in your forever home, that half-percent savings adds up significantly.

Extra payment can help build equity, pay off loan faster

The amount of interest you pay every month on a loan is a direct result of your loan balance. If you reduce your loan balance with even one extra lump-sum payment in a given month, you’ll reduce the long-term interest. The graphic below shows how much you’d save by paying an extra $50 a month on a $200,000 30-year fixed loan with an interest rate of 4.375%.

Amortization schedule tells when PMI will drop off

If you weren’t able to make a 20% down payment when you purchased your home, you may be paying mortgage insurance. Mortgage insurance protects a lender against losses if you default, and private mortgage insurance (PMI) is the most common type.

PMI automatically drops off once your total loan divided by your property’s value (also known as your loan-to-value ratio, or LTV) reaches 78%. You can multiply the price you paid for your home by 0.78 to determine where your loan balance would need to be for PMI to be canceled.

Find the balance on your amortization schedule and you’ll know when your monthly payment will drop as a result of the PMI cancellation.

Pinpoint when adjustable-rate-mortgage payment will rise

Adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) are a great tool to save money for a set period as long as you have a strategy to refinance or sell the home before the initial fixed period ends. However, sometimes life happens and you end up staying in a home longer than expected.

Knowing when and how much your payments could potentially increase, as well as how much extra interest you’ll be paying if the rate does increase, can help you weigh whether you really want to take a risk on an ARM loan.

The bottom line

Mortgage amortization may be a topic that you don’t talk about much before you get a mortgage, but it’s certainly worth exploring more once you become a homeowner.

The benefits of understanding how extra payments or a lower rate can save you money — both in the short term and over the life of your loan — will help you take advantage of opportunities to pay off your loan faster, save on interest charges and build equity in your home.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

By clicking “See Rates”, you will be directed to LendingTree. Based on your creditworthiness, you may be matched with up to five different lenders in our partner network.