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The Best Mortgages That Require No or Low Down Payment

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

If you’re considering buying a home, you’re probably wondering how much you’ll need for a down payment. It’s not unusual to be concerned about coming up with a down payment. According to Trulia’s report Housing in 2017, saving for a down payment is most often cited as the biggest obstacle to homeownership.

Maybe you’ve heard that you should put 20% down when you purchase a home. It’s true that 20% is the gold standard. If you can afford a big down payment, it’s easier to get a mortgage, you may be eligible for a lower interest rate, and more money down means borrowing less, which means you’ll have a smaller monthly payment.

But the biggest incentive to put 20% down is that it allows you to avoid paying for private mortgage insurance. Mortgage insurance is extra insurance that some private lenders require from homebuyers who obtain loans in which the down payment is less than 20% of the sales price or appraised value. Unlike homeowners insurance, mortgage protects the lender – not you – if you stop making payments on your loan. Mortgage insurance typically costs between 0.5% and 1% of the entire loan amount on an annual basis. Depending on how expensive the home you buy is, that can be a pretty hefty sum.

While these are excellent reasons to put 20% down on a home, the fact is that many people just can’t scrape together a down payment that large, especially when the median price of a home in the U.S. is a whopping $345,800.

Fortunately, there are many options for homebuyers with little money for a down payment. You may even be able to buy a house with no down payment at all.

Here’s an overview of the best mortgages you can be approved for without 20% down.

Type of Loan

Down Payment Requirement


Mortgage Insurance

Credit Score Requirement

FHA

FHA

3.5% for most

10% if your FICO credit score is between 500 and 579

Requires both upfront and annual mortgage insurance for all borrowers, regardless of down payment

500 and up

SoFi

SoFi

10%

No mortgage insurance required

Typically 700 or higher

VA Loan

VA Loan

No down payment required for eligible borrowers (military service members, veterans, or eligible surviving spouses)

No mortgage insurance required; however, there may be a funding fee, which can run from 1.25% to 2.4% of the loan amount

No minimum score
required

homeready

HomeReady

3% and up

Mortgage insurance required when homebuyers put down
< 20%; no longer required once the loan-to-value ratio reaches 78% or less

620 minimum

homeready

USDA

No down payment required

Ongoing mortgage insurance not required, but borrowers pay an upfront fee of 2% of the purchase price

640 minimum

FHA Loans

An FHA loan is a home loan that is insured by the Federal Housing Administration. These loans are designed to promote homeownership and make it easier for people to qualify for a mortgage. The FHA does this by making a guarantee to your bank that they will repay your loan if you quit making payments. FHA loans don’t come directly from the FHA, but rather an FHA-approved lender. Not all FHA-approved lenders offer the same interest rates and costs, even for the same type of loan, so it’s important to shop around.

Down payment requirements

FHA loans allow you to buy a home with a down payment as low as 3.5%, although people with FICO credit scores between 500 and 579 are required to pay at least 10% down.

Approval requirements

Because these loans are geared toward lower income borrowers, you don’t need excellent credit or a large income, but you will have to provide a lot of documentation. Your lender will ask you to provide documents that prove income, savings, and credit information. If you already own any property, you’ll have to have documentation for that as well.

Some of the information you’ll need includes:

  • Two years of complete tax returns (three years for self-employed individuals)
  • Two years of W-2s, 1099s, or other income statements
  • Most recent month of pay stubs
  • A year-to-date profit-and-loss statement for self-employed individuals
  • Most recent three months of bank, retirement, and investment account statements

Mortgage insurance requirements

The FHA requires both upfront and annual mortgage insurance for all borrowers, regardless of their down payment. On a typical 30-year mortgage with a base loan amount of less than $625,500, your annual mortgage insurance premium will be 0.85% as of this writing. The current upfront mortgage insurance premium is 1.75% of the base loan amount.

Casey Fleming, a mortgage adviser with C2 Financial Corporation and author of The Loan Guide: How to Get the Best Possible Mortgage, also reminds buyers that mortgage insurance on an FHA loan is permanent. With other loans, you can request the lenders to cancel private mortgage insurance (MIP) once you have paid down the mortgage balance to 80% of the home’s original appraised value, or wait until the balance drops to 78% when the mortgage servicer is required to eliminate the MIP. But mortgage insurance on an FHA loan cannot be canceled or terminated. For that reason, Fleming says “it’s best if the homebuyer has a plan to get out in a couple of years.”

Where to find an FHA-approved lender

As we mentioned earlier, FHA loans don’t come directly from the FHA, but rather an FHA-approved lender. Not all FHA-approved lenders offer the same interest rates and costs, even for the same type of loan, so it’s important to shop around.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has a searchable database where you can find lenders in your area approved for FHA loans.

First, fill in your location and the radius in which you’d like to search.

Next, you’ll be taken to a list of FHA-approved lenders in your area.

Who FHA loans are best for

FHA loans are flexible about how you come up with the down payment. You can use your savings, a cash gift from a family member, or a grant from a state or local government down-payment assistance program.

However, FHA loans are not the best option for everyone. The upfront and ongoing mortgage insurance premiums can cost more than private mortgage insurance. If you have good credit, you may be better off with a non-FHA loan with a low down payment and lower loan costs.

And if you’re buying an expensive home in a high-cost area, an FHA loan may not be able to provide you with a large enough mortgage. The FHA has a national loan limit, which is recalculated on an annual basis. For 2017, in high-cost areas, the FHA national loan limit ceiling is $636,150. You can check HUD.gov for a complete list of FHA lending limits by state.

SoFi

For borrowers who can afford a large monthly payment but haven’t saved up a big down payment, SoFi offers mortgages of up to $3 million. Interest rates will vary based on whether you’re looking for a 30-year fixed loan, a 15-year fixed loan, or an adjustable rate loan, which has a fixed rate for the first seven years, after which the interest rate may increase or decrease. Mortgage rates started as low as 3.09% for a 15-year mortgage as of this writing. You can find your rate using SoFi’s online rate quote tool without affecting your credit.

Down payment requirements

SoFi requires a minimum down payment of at least 10% of the purchase price for a new loan.

Approval requirements

Like most lenders, SoFi analyzes FICO scores as a part of its application process. However, it also considers factors such as professional history and career prospects, income, and history of on-time bill payments to determine an applicant’s overall financial health.

Mortgage insurance requirements

SoFi does not charge private mortgage insurance, even on loans for which less than 20% is put down.

What we like/don’t like

In addition to not requiring private mortgage insurance on any of their loans, SoFi doesn’t charge any loan origination, application, or broker commission fees. The average closing fee is 2% to 5% for most mortgages (it varies by location), so on a $300,000 home loan, that is $3,000. Avoiding those fees can save buyers a significant amount and make it a bit easier to come up with closing costs. Keep in mind, though, that you’ll still need to pay standard third-party closing costs that vary depending on loan type and location of the property.

There’s not much to dislike about SoFi unless you’re buying a very inexpensive home in a lower-cost market. They do have a minimum loan amount of $100,000.

Who SoFi mortgages are best for

SoFi mortgages are really only available for people with excellent credit and a solid income. They don’t work with people with poor credit.

SoFi does not publish minimum income or credit score requirements.

VA Loans

Rates can vary by lender, but currently, rates for a $225,000 30-year fixed-rate loan run at around 3.25%, according to LendingTree. (Disclosure: LendingTree is the parent company of MagnifyMoney.)

Down payment requirements

Eligible borrowers can get a VA loan with no down payment. Although the costs associated with getting a VA loan are generally lower than other types of low-down-payment mortgages, Fleming says there is a one-time funding fee, unless the veteran or military member has a service-related disability or you are the surviving spouse of a veteran who died in service or from a service-related disability.

That funding fee varies by the type of veteran and down-payment percentage, but for a new-purchase loan, the funding fee can run from 1.25% to 2.4% of the loan amount.

Approval requirements

VA loans are typically easier to qualify for than conventional mortgages. To be eligible, you must have suitable credit, sufficient income to make the monthly payment, and a valid Certificate of Eligibility (COE). The COE verifies to the lender that you are eligible for a VA-backed loan. You can apply for a COE online, through your lender, or by mail using VA Form 26-1880.

The VA does not require a minimum credit score, but lenders generally have their own requirements. Most ask for a credit score of 620 or higher.

If you’d like help seeing if you are qualified for a VA loan, check to see if there’s a HUD-approved housing counseling agency in your area.

Mortgage insurance requirements

Because VA loans are guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs, they do not require mortgage insurance. However, as we mentioned previously, be prepared to pay an additional funding fee of 1.25% to 2.4%.

What we like/don’t like

There’s no cap on the amount you can borrow. However, there are limits on the amount the VA can insure, which usually affects the loan amount a lender is willing to offer. Loan limits vary by county and are the same as the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s limits, which you can find here.

HomeReady

 

The HomeReady program is offered by Fannie Mae. HomeReady mortgage is aimed at consumers who have decent credit but low- to middle-income earnings. Borrowers do not have to be first-time home buyers but do have to complete a housing education program.

Approval requirements

HomeReady loans are available for purchasing and refinancing any single-family home, as long as the borrower meets income limits, which vary by property location. For properties in low-income areas (as determined by the U.S. Census), there is no income limit. For other properties, the income eligibility limit is 100% of the area median income.

The minimum credit score for a Fannie Mae loan, including HomeReady, is 620.

To qualify, borrowers must complete an online education program, which costs $75 and helps buyers understand the home-buying process and prepare for homeownership.

Down payment requirements

HomeReady is available through all Fannie Mae-approved lenders and offers down payments as low as 3%.

Reiss says buyers can combine a HomeReady mortgage with a Community Seconds loan, which can provide all or part of the down payment and closing costs. “Combined with a Community Seconds mortgage, a Fannie borrower can have a combined loan-to-value ratio of up to 105%,” Reiss says. The loan-to-value (LTV) ratio is the ratio of outstanding loan balance to the value of the property. When you pay down your mortgage balance or your property value increases, your LTV ratio goes down.

Mortgage insurance requirements

While HomeReady mortgages do require mortgage insurance when the buyer puts less than 20% down, unlike an FHA loan, the mortgage insurance is removed once the loan-to-value ratio reaches 78% or less.

What we like/don’t like

HomeReady loans do require private mortgage insurance, but the cost is generally lower than those charged by other lenders. Fannie Mae also makes it easier for borrowers to get creative with their down payment, allowing them to borrow it through a Community Seconds loan or have the down payment gifted from a friend or family member. Also, if you’re planning on having a roommate, income from that roommate will help you qualify for the loan.

However, be sure to talk to your lender to compare other options. The HomeReady program may have higher interest rates than other mortgage programs that advertise no or low down payments.

USDA Loan

USDA loans are guaranteed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Although the USDA doesn’t cap the amount a homeowner can borrow, most USDA-approved lenders extend financing for up to $417,000.

Rates vary by lender, but the agency gives a baseline interest rate. As of August 2016, that rate was just 2.875%

Approval requirements

USDA loans are available for purchasing and refinancing homes that meet the USDA’s definition of “rural.” The USDA provides a property eligibility map to give potential buyers a general idea of qualified locations. In general, the property must be located in “open country” or an area that has a population less than 10,000, or 20,000 in areas that are deemed as having a serious lack of mortgage credit.

USDA loans are not available directly from the USDA, but are issued by approved lenders. Most lenders require a minimum credit score of 620 to 640 with no foreclosures, bankruptcies, or major delinquencies in the past several years. Borrowers must have an income of no more than 115% of the median income for the area.

Down payment requirements

Eligible borrowers can get a home loan with no down payment. Other closing costs vary by lender, but the USDA loan program does allow borrowers to use money gifted from friends and family to pay for closing costs.

Mortgage insurance requirements

While USDA-backed mortgages do not require mortgage insurance, borrowers instead pay an upfront premium of 2% of the purchase price. The USDA also allows borrowers to finance that 2% with the home loan.

What we like/don’t like

Some buyers may dismiss USDA loans because they aren’t buying a home in a rural area, but many suburbs of metropolitan areas and small towns fall within the eligible zones. It could be worth a glance at the eligibility map to see if you qualify.

At a Glance: Low-Down-Payment Mortgage Options

To see how different low-down-payment mortgage options might look in the real world, let’s assume a buyer with an excellent credit score applies for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage on a home that costs $250,000.

As you can see in the table below, their monthly mortgage payment would vary a lot depending on which lender they use.

 

Down Payment


Total Borrowed


Interest Rate


Principal & Interest


Mortgage Insurance


Total Monthly Payment

FHA


FHA

3.5%
($8,750)

$241,250

4.625%

$1,083

$4,222 up front
$171 per month

$1,254

SoFi


SoFi

10%
($25,000)

$225,000

3.37%

$995

$0

$995

VA


VA Loan

0%
($0)

$250,000

3.25%

$1,088

$0

$1,088

HomeReady


homeready

3%
($7,500)

$242,500

4.25%

$1,193

$222 per month

$1,349

USDA


homeready

0%

$250,000

2.875%

$1,037

$5,000 up front,
can be included in
total financed

$1,037

Note that this comparison doesn’t include any closing costs other than the upfront mortgage insurance required by the FHA and USDA loans. The total monthly payments do not include homeowners insurance or property taxes that are typically included in the monthly payment.

ANALYSIS: Should I put down less than 20% on a new home just because I can?

So, if you can take advantage of a low- or no-down-payment loan, should you? For some people, it might make financial sense to keep more cash on hand for emergencies and get into the market sooner in a period of rising home prices. But before you apply, know what it will cost you. Let’s run the numbers to compare the cost of using a conventional loan with 20% down versus a 3% down payment.

Besides private mortgage insurance, there are other downsides to a smaller down payment. Lenders may charge higher interest rates, which translates into higher monthly payments and more money spent over the loan term. Also, because many closing costs are a percentage of the total loan amount, putting less money down means higher closing costs.

For this example, we’ll assume a $250,000 purchase price and a loan term of 30 years. According to Freddie Mac, during the week of June 22, 2017, the average rate for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage was 3.90%.

Using the Loan Amortization Calculator from MortgageCalculator.org:

Assuming you don’t make any extra principal payments, you will have to pay private mortgage insurance for 112 months before the principal balance of the loan drops below 78% of the home’s original appraised value. That means in addition to paying $169,265.17 in interest, you’ll pay $11,316.48 for private mortgage insurance.

The bottom line

Under some circumstances, a low- or no-down-payment mortgage, even with private mortgage insurance, could be considered a worthwhile investment. If saving for a 20% down payment means you’ll be paying rent longer while you watch home prices and mortgage rates rise, it could make sense. In the past year alone, average home prices increased 16.8%, and Kiplinger is predicting that the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate will rise to 4.1% by the end of 2017.

If you do choose a loan that requires private mortgage insurance, consider making extra principal payments to reach 20% equity faster and request that your lender cancels private mortgage insurance. Even if you have to spend a few hundred dollars to have your home appraised, the monthly savings from private mortgage insurance premiums could quickly offset that cost.

Keep in mind, though, that the down payment is only one part of the home-buying equation. Sonja Bullard, a sales manager with Bay Equity Home Loans in Alpharetta, Ga., says whether you’re interested in an FHA loan or a conventional (i.e., non-government-backed) loan, there are other out-of-pocket costs when buying a home.

“Through my experience, when people hear zero down payment, they think that means there are no costs for obtaining the loan,” Bullard says. “People don’t realize there are still fees required to be paid.”

According to Bullard, those fees include:

  • Inspection: $300 to $1,000, based on the size of the home
  • Appraisal: $375 to $1,000, based on the size of the home
  • Homeowners insurance premiums, prepaid for one year, due at closing: $300 to $2,500, depending on coverage
  • Closing costs: $4,000 to $10,000, depending on sales price and loan amount
  • HOA initiation fees

So don’t let a seemingly insurmountable 20% down payment get in the way of homeownership. When you’re ready to take the plunge, talk to a lender or submit a loan application online. You might be surprised at what you qualify for.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Janet Berry-Johnson
Janet Berry-Johnson |

Janet Berry-Johnson is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Janet here

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Maine First-Time Homebuyer Programs

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Do you want to live in a state with gorgeous seaside views and fresh lobster? Maine just might be the right place. Whether you’re new to the state or already call it home, if you need help coming up with a down payment, Maine offers several programs designed to help first-time homebuyers make their homeowning dreams a reality.In January of 2019, we researched first-time homebuyer programs in Maine, which included a review of the Maine State Housing Authority website and other state resources. Here’s what first-time homebuyers in Maine need to know.

Maine first-time homebuyer programs

The Maine State Housing Authority administers several federal and statewide programs aimed at providing affordable homeownership for Maine residents.

Their programs provide fixed-rate mortgages and assistance with down payments and closing costs to help put homeownership within reach. Their mortgages also come with payment protection, in the event that buyers face unemployment.

Eligibility for Maine assistance

Homebuyers who wish to take advantage of one of the Maine assistance programs must meet income and purchase-price limitations. Income and purchase-price limits vary, depending on how many people live in your household and the county in which you buy a home. You can find a list of current income and purchase-price limits online.

Eligible properties include new and existing single-family homes, owner-occupied two- to four-unit apartment buildings and condominiums. Manufactured homes located on owned land and built within the last 20 years are also eligible. However, the purchase-price limit for single-wide and double-wide manufactured homes is $150,000.

MaineHousing First Home Loan Program

The MaineHousing First Home Loan Program provides low fixed-interest-rate mortgages with low or no down payments. It can also provide up to $3,500 in assistance with down payments and closing costs.

Features

The First Home Loan Program offers

  • Thirty-year fixed-rate mortgages
  • Low or no down payments
  • Up to $3,500 in down payment and closing cost assistance
  • Low fixed interest rates
  • Low- and no-point options
  • The option to finance between $500 and $35,000 for necessary home improvements in the same loan

Eligibility

In order to participate in the program, you must

  • Have a minimum credit score of 640.
  • Take an approved homebuyer education class before closing if you take advantage of the down payment and closing cost assistance option.
  • Contribute at least 1% of the loan toward the purchase price of your home (the cost of the homebuyer education class counts toward this 1%).
  • Be a first-time homebuyer (not have owned a home within the past three years) or a veteran, retired military or on qualified Active Duty.
  • Meet household income limits, which vary by county and household size.

How it works

The First Home Loan Program is available through a network of approved banks, credit unions and mortgage companies. You can begin the application process by contacting one of more than 40 approved lenders. The lender can help you determine how much home you can afford, decide on the right mortgage program and take you through the process of applying for and closing on the loan.

Learn more

MaineHousing Salute ME & Salute Home Again programs

The Salute ME and Salute Home Again programs help qualified active duty, veterans and retired military personnel achieve homeownership by giving them a 0.25% discount on First Home Loan mortgages.

Features

The Salute ME and Salute Home Again programs offer

  • An additional 0.25% discount on 30-year mortgages offered through the First Home Loan Program
  • Low or no down payments
  • Up to $3,500 in down payment and closing cost assistance
  • Low fixed interest rates
  • Low- and no-point options
  • Option to finance between $500 and $35,000 for necessary home improvements in the same loan

Eligibility

In order to participate in the programs, you must

  • Take an approved homebuyer education class prior to closing if you take advantage of the down payment and closing cost assistance option.
  • Have a minimum credit score of 640.
  • Be on active duty or have been honorably discharged from military service, have served on active duty for 180 days or within a war zone.
  • Use your new home as a primary residence.
  • Meet household income and purchase-price limits, which vary by county and household size.

How it works

MaineHousing programs are available through a network of approved banks, credit unions and mortgage companies. You can begin the application process by contacting one of more than 40 approved lenders. The lender can help you determine how much home you can afford, decide on the right mortgage program and take you through the process of applying for and closing on the loan.

MaineHousing Mobile Home Self-Insured Program

The MaineHousing Mobile Home Self-Insured Program allows manufactured/mobile home buyers to get higher loan-to-value (LTV) mortgages and pay a higher interest rate instead of mortgage insurance premiums (MIPs).

Features

The Mobile Home Self-Insured Program offers

  • Up to 30-year loan terms
  • Down payments as low as 5%
  • Up to $3,500 in down payment and closing cost assistance
  • The option that 3% of the purchase price may come from a seller contribution
  • The option to add up to $35,000 to the loan for repairs

Eligibility

In order to participate in the program, you must

  • Be a first-time homebuyer (not have owned a home in the past three years), have only owned an unattached manufactured/mobile home on leased land, or be a veteran.
  • Pay a maximum of 33% of your income toward housing and have a maximum total debt-to-income (DTI) ratio of 41%.
  • Have a minimum credit score of 640.
  • Meet income limits, which vary by county and household size.
  • Have a maximum purchase price of $150,000.
  • Purchase a single-wide or double-wide manufactured home that is less than 20 years of age and is permanently attached per code at the time of closing.
  • Move into the home as your main residence.
  • Not use more than 15% of the home for a trade or business.
  • Contribute a minimum of 3% toward the purchase of the home.

How it works

MaineHousing programs are available through a network of approved banks, credit unions and mortgage companies. You can begin the application process by contacting one of more than 40 approved lenders. The lender can help you determine how much home you can afford, decide on the right mortgage program, and take you through the process of applying for and closing on the loan.

National first-time homebuyer programs

If you want to buy a home in Maine, you’re not limited to first-time homebuyer programs available through the Maine State Housing Authority. There are other federal programs available to help first-time homebuyers across the country. If you’re interested in learning about national programs, start by checking out LendingTree’s guide to first-time homebuyer programs nationwide.

This article contains links to LendingTree, our parent company.  The information in this article is accurate as of the date of publishing.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Janet Berry-Johnson
Janet Berry-Johnson |

Janet Berry-Johnson is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Janet here

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Rhode Island First-Time Homebuyer Programs

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Buying a new home is a scary prospect — and not just because change can be overwhelming. Figuring out how to afford a down payment, closing costs and monthly mortgage payments can feel like an Olympic gymnastics routine. Luckily, first-time homebuyers in Rhode Island have several programs that can provide assistance.

Whether you’re looking to pay less in taxes or you need help covering a down payment, the state’s solutions may be able to help you. We reviewed the state’s offerings to help you pick the best program for you.

Rhode Island first-time homebuyer programs

Rhode Island Housing offers affordable housing programs designed to make living in the state more attractive and affordable — no matter your financial situation. Not sure how to start your homebuying journey? The organization offers first-time homebuyer education for all buyers to help you understand the ins and outs of this complicated process.

But there’s real money available, too. The programs below offer down payment assistance, tax credits and affordable mortgages. They can even help you avoid paying mortgage insurance.

Eligibility for Rhode Island assistance

All of Rhode Island Housing’s first-time homebuyer programs — except for the First Down Program — require purchasing a house that costs no more than $441,176. Your new home can be a one- to four-unit home or a condominium.

And, of course, you must be a first-time homebuyer.

FirstHomes100

What is it?

Rhode Island Housing’s FirstHomes100 program helps first-time homebuyers at any income level afford a new place. The program combines a traditional mortgage with down payment assistance funds so you can finance your home 100%.

The FirstHomes100 program offers first-time homebuyers

  • One hundred percent financing
  • Assistance with down payment or closing costs through low-interest, 15-year loans
  • The ability to forego mortgage insurance in exchange for a slightly higher interest rate.

Requirements

In order to qualify for the FirstHomes100 program, you must

  • Purchase a house that costs no more than $441,176.
  • Buy a one- to four-unit single-family home or a condominium.

How to apply

If your income is less than $93,623 for a one- or two-person household, or less than $107,667 for a household of three or more, you’ll need to work directly with Rhode Island Housing’s Loan Center. Homebuyers with higher incomes can contact any participating lender to begin the loan application process.

Learn more

FirstHomes100+

What is it?

FirstHomes100+ is the sister program of FirstHomes100. It allows first-time homebuyers to not just purchase but also renovate the home of their dreams. Once buyers are approved for a FirstHomes100 mortgage, they’ll work with a consultant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to determine what repairs are needed. Once the final costs are determined, and if they exceed $5,000, the loan will become an all-inclusive FirstHomes100+ loan.

FirstHomes100+ provides buyers with

  • One hundred percent financing to buy and renovate the home of their choice.
  • Assistance with down payment or closing costs through low-interest, 15-year loans.
  • The ability to forego mortgage insurance in exchange for a slightly higher interest rate.

Eligibility

To be eligible for FirstHomes100+, first-time buyers must

  • Purchase a house that costs no more than $441,176 and that requires a minimum of $5,000 in renovations.
  • But a one- to four-unit single-family home or a condominium.
  • Complete FHA 203(k) Homebuyer Education before closing.

How it works

Buyers with incomes of less than $93,623 for a one- or two-person household or less than $107,667 for a household with three or more people will work directly with Rhode Island Housing’s Loan Center. If your income is higher, you can contact any participating lender to apply for the program directly through them.

Learn more

FirstHomes Tax Credit

What is it?

The FirstHomes Tax Credit is a federal tax credit for part of the mortgage interest you pay in a given year. A tax credit directly reduces the tax amount you owe. You can claim the tax credit every year, making this program helpful for years to come. Reduce your taxes even further by itemizing and deducting any other mortgage interest you’ve paid.

The FirstHomes Tax Credit offers buyers

  • A mortgage credit certificate for 20% of the total mortgage interest you pay each year.
  • Maximum credit of $2,000 a year.

Requirements

To be eligible for the FirstHomes Tax Credit, buyers must

  • Purchase a house that costs no more than $441,176.
  • Be buying a one- to four-unit home or a condominium.
  • Plan to live in the home as their primary residence.
  • Have income of less than $93,623 for a one- or two-person household, or less than $107,667 for a household of three or more.
  • You don’t have to be a first-time homebuyer if you live in the federally targeted areas of Central Falls, Pawtucket, Providence and Woonsocket.

How to apply

Ready to get started? Get in touch with Rhode Island Housing’s Loan Center or reach out to any of the approved lenders.

Learn more

First Down Program

What is it?

The First Down Program helps first-time homebuyers in the counties most affected by the recent foreclosure crisis. Through this program, buyers receive down payment assistance in the form of a second mortgage. As long as you live in the house full-time for five years, the assistance is forgiven. If you sell, refinance or no longer use the property as your primary residence, you’ll need to repay part of the loan.

The First Down Program offers buyers

  • A forgivable down payment assistance loan of $7,500.

Requirements

To be eligible for this down payment assistance program, first-time buyers must

  • Treat the home as their primary residence.
  • Purchase a home that costs no more than $454,250.
  • Be buying a one-to-four-unit home or condo.
  • Live in Cranston, Pawtucket, Providence, Warwick or Woonsocket counties.
  • Have income of less than $93,623 for a one- or two-person household, or less than $107,667 for a household with three or more people.

How to apply

Funds for this program are limited. Reach out to Rhode Island Housing’s Loan Center or a participating lender to get started.

Learn more

National first-time homebuyer programs

Rhode Island offers several helpful programs for first-time homebuyers, but buyers in the state should consider looking to nationwide programs, too. These programs can help you find an affordable mortgage, down payment and closing cost assistance, and federal tax credits.

LendingTree’s guide to first-time homebuyer programs can help you find the solution that works best for you.

This article contains links to LendingTree, our parent company.  The information in this article is accurate as of the date of publishing.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Jamie Wiebe
Jamie Wiebe |

Jamie Wiebe is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Jamie here

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