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Life Events, Mortgage

The Hidden Costs of Selling A Home

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

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When you decide to sell your home, you may dream of receiving an offer well above your asking price. But putting your home on the market requires you to open your wallet, which could cut into your potential profit.

While some line items probably won’t come as a surprise, you may find that there are a handful of hidden costs.

Below, we highlight those unexpected expenses and everything else you need to know about the cost of selling a house.

The hidden costs of selling a home

It’s easy to fixate on the money you expect to make as a home seller, but don’t forget the money you’ll need to cover the cost to sell your home.

A joint analysis by Thumbtack, a marketplace that connects consumers with local professional services, and real estate marketplace Zillow, found that homeowners spend nearly $21,000 on average for extra or hidden costs associated with a home sale.

Many of these expenses come before homeowners see any returns on their home sale. Money is spent in three main categories: location, home preparation and location.

Location

Your ZIP code can influence how much you pay to sell your home. Many extra costs are influenced by regional differences — like whether sellers are required to pay state or transfer taxes.

For example, if you’re in a major California metropolitan area like Los Angeles, you may pay more than double the national average in hidden costs when selling your home.

Below, we highlight 10 of the metros analyzed in the Thumbtack/Zillow study, their median home price and their average total hidden costs.

Metro Area

Median Home Price*

Average Total Hidden Costs of Selling

New York, NY

$438,900

$33,510

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA

$652,700

$46,060

Chicago, IL

$224,800

$18,625

Dallas-Fort Worth, TX

$243,000

$19,350

Philadelphia, PA

$232,800

$21,496

Houston, TX

$205,700

$17,477

Washington, D.C.

$405,900

$34,640

Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL

$283,900

$24,241

Atlanta, GA

$217,800

$18,056

Boston, MA

$ 466,000

$35,580

Source: Thumbtack and Zillow analysis, April 2019.


*As of February 2019.

Generally, selling costs correlate with the home price, so expect to pay a little more if you live in an area with a higher-than-average cost of living or one that has a lot of land to groom for sale.

Home preparation

Thumbtack’s analysis shows home sellers may spend $6,570 on average to prepare for their home sale. These costs can include staging, repairs and cleaning.

Buyers are generally expected to pay their own inspection costs; however, if you’ve lived in the home for a number of years and want to avoid any surprises, you might also consider paying for a home inspection before listing the property for sale. Inspection fees typically range from $300 to $500.

Staging is often another unavoidable expense for sellers and can cost about $1,000 on average, according to HomeAdvisor. Staging, which involves giving your home’s interior design a face-lift and removing clutter and personal items from the home, is often encouraged because it can help make the property more appealing to interested buyers.

It also helps to have great photos and vivid descriptions of the property online to help maximize exposure of the property to potential buyers. If your agent is handling the staging and online listing, keep an eye on the “wow” factors they include. Yes, a virtual tour of your house looks really cool, but it might place extra pressure on your budget.

You could potentially save hundreds on home preparation costs if you take the do-it-yourself (DIY) route, but expect a bill if you outsource.

Closing costs

Closing costs are the single largest added expense of the home selling process, coming in at a median cost of $14,281, according to Thumbtack. Closing costs include real estate agent commissions and local transfer taxes. There may be other closing costs, such as title insurance and attorney fees.

Real estate agent commissions range from 5-6% of the home price, according to Redfin. That amount is further broken down by 2.5-3% being paid to the seller’s agent and the other 2.5-3% being paid to the buyer’s agent.

The taxes you’ll pay to transfer ownership of your home to the buyer vary by state.

Other closing costs include title search and title insurance to verify that you currently own the home free and clear and there are no claims against it that can derail the sale. The cost of title insurance varies by loan amount, location and title company, but can go as high as $2,000.

If you live in a state that requires an attorney to be present at the mortgage closing, the fee for their services can range from $100 to $1,500.

There are also escrow fees to factor in if you’re in a state that doesn’t require an attorney. The cost varies and is usually split the homebuyer and seller.

If you have time to invest, you could try listing the home for sale by owner to eliminate commission fees. One caveat: Selling your home on your own is a more complicated approach to home selling and can be more difficult for those with little or no experience.

Other home selling costs to consider

Now that you have an understanding of the costs that may get overlooked, remember to budget for the below expenses as you prepare to sell your home.

Utilities

It’s important that you make room in your budget to keep the utilities — electricity and water — on until the property is sold. (This is in addition to budgeting for utilities in your new home.) Keeping these services active can help you sell your home since potential buyers won’t bother fumbling through a cold, dark property to look around. It may also prevent your home from facing other issues like mold during the humid summertime or trespassers.

Be sure to have all of your utilities running on the buyer’s final walk-through of the home, then turn everything off on closing day and pay any remaining account balances.

Homeowners insurance

Budget to pay for homeowners insurance on the home you’re selling as well as your new home. You’ll still need to ensure coverage of your old property until the sale is finalized. Check the terms first, as your homeowners insurance policy might not apply to a vacant home. If that’s the case, you can ask to pay for a rider — an add-on to your insurance policy — for the vacancy period.

Capital gains tax

If you could make more than $250,000 on the home’s sale (or $500,000 if you’re married and filing jointly), take a look at the rules on capital gains tax. If your proceeds are less than the applicable amount after subtracting selling costs, you’ll avoid the tax. However, if you don’t qualify for any of the exceptions, the gains above those thresholds could be subject to a 15% capital gains tax, or higher. Consult your tax professional for more information.

How to save money when selling your home

Keep the following tips in mind when you decide to put your home on the market:

  • Shop around and negotiate. Don’t settle on the first companies and professionals you come across. Comparison shop for your real estate agent, home inspector, closing attorney, photographer, etc. It could also work in your favor to try negotiating on the fees they charge to save even more.
  • Choose your selling time carefully. The best time to sell your home is during the spring and summer months. If you wait until the colder months to sell, there may not be as much competition for your home.
  • DIY as much as possible. Anything you can do on your own to spruce up your home — landscaping, painting, minor repairs, staging — can help you cut back on the money you’ll need to spend to get your home sold.

The bottom line

There are several upfront costs to consider when selling your home, but planning ahead can help you possibly reduce some of those costs and not feel as financially strained.

List each cost you’re expecting to pay and calculate how they might affect the profit you’d make on the home sale and your household’s overall financial picture. If you’re unsure of your costs, try using a sale proceeds calculator to get a ballpark estimate of your potential selling costs. Be sure to also consult a real estate agent.

If you’re starting from scratch on your next home, here’s what you need to know about the cost to build a house.

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Mortgage

5 Home Loans for People With Bad Credit

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

You don’t need a perfect credit score to get a mortgage — there are home loans for people with bad credit. But before getting this type of mortgage, find out how a lower credit score affects your overall borrowing costs.

Buying a home with bad credit

It’s possible to buy a home with bad credit — you could have a credit score as low as 500 and still qualify for a mortgage. The lower your credit score, though, the fewer lending options you’ll have and the higher your mortgage rate will be.

FICO scores, the credit scores used by most lenders, typically range from 300 to 850. Having a lower credit score translates to higher risk for a lender, and vice versa. Any score 669 or lower is considered “fair” or “poor.” Here’s a breakdown:

  • Exceptional: 800 and higher 
  • Very Good: 740-799
  • Good: 670-739
  • Fair: 580-669
  • Poor: 580 and lower 

Lenders like to see high credit scores because it exhibits an ability to manage debt, make on-time payments and use credit responsibly. Your creditworthiness will come into question if you plan on buying a home with bad credit, but it doesn’t have to hold you back from homeownership.

5 home loans for bad credit

Consider one of the following home loans for bad credit.

Fannie MaeHomeReady

Fannie Mae’s HomeReady mortgage program is an option for both first-time homebuyers and repeat buyers with limited access to down payment funds and a fair credit score. This conventional home loan has cancellable mortgage insurance for those who put down less than 20%, and gives borrowers the option to use boarder or rental income to help them qualify. If all borrowers on a loan are first-timers, at least one borrower is required to complete a homeownership education course.

Eligibility requirements include:

  • A minimum 620credit score
  • A minimum 3% down payment
  • A low- to moderate income

FHA Loans

Mortgages backed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) could be considered bad credit home loans because they make it easier for low-credit-score homebuyers to get a mortgage. FHA loans have a low down payment requirement, but you’ll pay mortgage insurance premiums (both upfront and annual) for the life of your loan. If you put down at least 10%, you can get rid of mortgage insurance after 11 years.

Eligibility requirements include:

  • A minimum 10% down payment for a 500-579 credit score
  • A minimum 3.5% down for a 580+ credit score
  • Borrowing within your county’s FHA loan limits

USDA loans

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) insures mortgages funded by approved lenders through the USDA home loan program. There’s no minimum required credit score, but a 640 score could help you get approved automatically if you meet employment and income requirements.

Eligibility requirements include:

  • No minimum required down payment
  • Meeting local income limits
  • Buying a home in a designated rural area

VA Loans

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) also offers bad credit home loans through approved lenders for active-duty service members, veterans and eligible spouses. The VA doesn’t have a specific credit score requirement, but lenders may require a minimum 620score. No down payment is required. Additionally, most borrowers will have to pay an upfront funding fee to offset the cost of VA loans to taxpayers.

Eligibility requirements include:

Non-qualified mortgage loans

The loans discussed above are all qualified mortgages, meaning they meet certain requirements that establish a borrower’s ability to repay a loan. There are also non-qualified mortgage (non-QM) loans, which have more wiggle room for high-risk borrowers, such as accepting credit scores below 500.

Eligibility requirements include:

  • Demonstrating your ability to repay the loan
  • A minimum down payment up to 20%
  • A maximum debt-to-income ratio of up to 55%

How to get a home loan with bad credit

Use the following list of tips as a resource to help you get a bad credit home loan.

  • Avoid applying for new credit. A new auto loan, credit card or personal loan application means you’ll have new inquiries on your credit reports, which can drop your credit score.
  • Dispute any credit report errors. Finding and disputing inaccurate information on your credit reports could improve your credit score and help lenders see you as a less risky borrower.
  • Pay your bills on time. Your payment history makes up the biggest chunk of your credit score at 35%, according to FICO. Making on-time payments can help boost your score and demonstrate your creditworthiness as a borrower.
  • Lower your outstanding debt load. Pay down your credit card and loan balances. Lenders don’t want to see that your income is stretched too thin to afford a mortgage. Keep your credit usage below 30% of your maximum credit limit across each of your accounts.
  • Don’t close any accounts. Closing old accounts, especially credit cards, shortens your overall credit history and can negatively impact your credit score.
  • Have your rent payments reported to the credit bureaus. As long as you’ve been maintaining an on-time rental payment history, having your rent payments reported to the bureaus may boost your score.
  • Make a larger down payment. A larger down payment can compensate for a lower credit score. Don’t completely drain your cash reserves, though. Keep three to six months’ worth of living expenses in a savings account for emergencies.
  • Pay for mortgage points. If you have the extra cash, consider buying mortgage points to lower your interest rate and overall loan costs. One point is equal 1% of your loan amount and can lower your rate by up to 0.25%.

Should you get a bad credit home loan?

Home loans for bad credit come with more risk for lenders, so you can expect to pay more as a borrower. Crunch the numbers with a mortgage calculator to help you determine whether to move forward with a bad credit mortgage or wait until your credit profile improves.

Here’s an example of how your credit score can affect your costs on a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage:

 620 credit score760 credit score
Mortgage rate4.84%3.25%
Loan amount$200,000$200,000
Monthly payment
(Principal and interest)
$1,054.17$870.41
Total interest cost$179,501.82$113,348.55

As you can see, improving your score from “fair” to “very good” could amount to a mortgage payment that is nearly $184 less each month, saving you more than $2,200 each year and more than $66,000 in interest over the term of your mortgage.

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Life Events, Mortgage

What is Mortgage Amortization?

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

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The difference between your home’s value and how much you owe on your mortgage is your home equity. With each mortgage payment you make, mortgage amortization — or paying down the loan in installments — is at play, and each monthly payment brings you closer to owning your home outright.

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What is mortgage amortization?

Mortgage amortization is the process of paying off your loan balance in equal installments of principal and interest for a set time period. The interest you pay is tied to the balance of your loan (your principal) and the mortgage rate. When you first start making payments, most of the payment is applied to the interest rather than the principal.

Your principal payments catch up with interest over time until your loan is paid off. Once it reaches a zero balance, it becomes a “fully amortized loan.”

How mortgage amortization works

The easiest way to understand mortgage amortization is to look at how monthly mortgage payments are applied to the principal and interest on an amortization table. There are two calculations that occur every month.

  1. The first calculation measures how much interest is paid based on the rate you agreed to. The interest charge is recalculated each month as you pay down the balance, and you pay less interest over time.
  2. The second calculation reflects how much of the principal you pay. As the loan balance shrinks, more of your monthly payment is applied to your principal.

If you’re a math whiz, here’s the formula:

A mortgage amortization calculator does the heavy lifting for you. You can see the effects of amortization on a 30-year fixed loan amount of $200,000 at a rate of 4.375% below.

In the first year, you pay more than twice as much toward interest as you do toward the principal. However, the balance slowly drops with each additional payment. By the 15th year, principal payments outpace interest and equity starts building at a much faster pace.

How mortgage amortization can help with financial planning

A mortgage amortization table helps you assess the short- and long-term benefits of adjusting your mortgage payments. Making extra payments over the life of the loan or refinancing to a lower interest rate or term could save you thousands in interest charges over the life loan. Even better: you’ll end up with a mortgage free home sooner.

Using a mortgage calculator to configure a few scenarios, here are some financial goals you might be able to accomplish using mortgage amortization.

Calculate how much money you can save by refinancing

If mortgage rates have dropped since you bought your home, consider refinancing. If you’re in your forever home and don’t plan to move for a while, a half-percentage point drop in rates could make room in your budget to boost retirement savings, your emergency fund or put money toward other long-term financial goals.

The example below shows the monthly payment and lifetime interest savings if you replaced a 30-year, fixed-rate loan for $200,000 at 4% with a new loan with a 3.5% interest rate with the same terms.

While saving $56.74 per month on payments doesn’t seem like much, it adds up to $20,426.83 in interest savings over the loan’s lifetime.

See the effect of making extra payments

The amount of interest you pay every month is directly connected to your loan balance. Even a small amount added to the principal each month reduces interest over time. The graphic below shows how much you’d save adding an extra $50 every month to your payment on a $200,000, 30-year fixed loan with an interest rate of 4.375%.

Figure out when you can get rid of PMI

Borrowers who don’t make a 20% down payment on a conventional mortgage typically pay for private mortgage insurance (PMI). The coverage protects a lender against financial losses if you don’t repay the loan.

Once your loan-to-value ratio, or the loan balance in relation to the home’s value, reaches 78%, PMI automatically drops off. Multiply the price you paid for your home by 0.78 to determine where your loan balance would need to be for PMI to be canceled. Locate that balance on your loan payment schedule for a rough idea of the month and year PMI will end.

Decide if it’s time to refinance an adjustable-rate mortgage

Adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) are a helpful tool to save money on monthly mortgage payments. However, ARMs make more sense if you plan to refinance the loan or sell your home before the initial fixed-rate period ends and the loan resets to a variable interest rate.

An adjustable-rate mortgage amortization schedule helps you pinpoint when the loan will reset and gives you an idea of the worst-case scenario on payments. If the adjustments are outside of your comfort zone, consider refinancing your ARM into a fixed-rate mortgage.

The difference between a 15-year fixed and 30-year fixed payment schedule

Refinancing to a shorter term, such as a 15-year fixed mortgage, may save you hundreds of thousands of dollars over the life of a loan — but the trade-off is a higher monthly payment.

The graphs below show the difference between a 30-year amortization schedule for a $200,000, fixed-rate loan at 4.375% and a 15-year amortization schedule for the same loan amount at 3.875%.

The lifetime interest savings for a shorter loan payment schedule is $95,447.16. As long as the $468.31 increase in your mortgage payment doesn’t prevent you from meeting other savings or investment goals, the long-term savings are worth it.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

By clicking “See Rates”, you will be directed to LendingTree. Based on your creditworthiness, you may be matched with up to five different lenders in our partner network.