What to Know About Getting a Mortgage on a Second Home

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Updated on Wednesday, March 14, 2018

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Although 36 percent of investors and 29 percent of vacation home buyers pay cash for their properties, many finance their homes, according to a survey by the National Association of Realtors Research Department. But even buyers who finance their second homes have a lot of cash on hand: 47 percent of investors and 45 percent of vacation home buyers finance less than 70 percent of the home’s purchase price.

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That’s not to say you can’t get a second home with a smaller down payment, but it’s one of many important things to think about when looking to get a mortgage on a second home.

Is buying a second home right for you?

Before making a huge financial commitment like this, make sure you ask yourself these crucial questions:

Can I afford a second home?

Many families love the idea of buying a second home, but think about all the costs you incurred when buying your primary residence:

  • Down payment
  • Closing costs
  • Monthly mortgage payment
  • Property taxes
  • Property insurance
  • Private mortgage insurance (PMI)
  • Utilities
  • Landscaping and upkeep

You’ll incur many of these same costs with a second home, too. For example, Doug Crouse, a senior loan officer with nearly 20 years of experience in the mortgage industry, says PMI can be especially costly: “When it comes to second homes, PMI rates are about 50% higher than what they would be for a primary residence.”

However, a second mortgage isn’t inherently more expensive than a first mortgage. Dan Green, founder of Growella and a former top producing loan officer with 15 years of mortgage lending experience, says, “There is no closing cost difference on a second home [or] vacation home mortgage as compared to a primary residence.”

Keep in mind that if your second home is in a faraway location, you have to consider the long-distance costs of upkeep.

Will this be a vacation rental or an investment property?

There are typically two reasons people want to purchase a second home: buying it as a vacation home or buying it as an investment property. How you use it will have implications for your taxes.

According to the IRS, your home is a vacation home if you spend the greater of 14 days a year or 10% of the time you rent it to others.

Keep in mind that if you use your home solely for your family to vacation there, you can’t deduct items on your tax returns like utilities and real estate taxes like you would if it was an investment property. While you can deduct mortgage interest on a vacation home like you do for your first home, the new tax law for 2018 only allows you to deduct mortgage interest on your total properties up to $750,000. So if you already own a $750,000 home, you would not be able to deduct your mortgage interest on a second home.

If you use your second home to generate income from rent, you may be able to deduct items on your tax returns like utilities, real estate taxes, the fees you pay your property manager and more, according to the IRS. (Think of it like being a business owner who gets to deduct business expenses versus a vacation home owner.)

If you don’t want to choose between your second home being a vacation home or being an investment property, you don’t have to. It can be used as both, but you have to keep impeccable records that show when it’s being used and how, so you can properly itemize your deductions. For example, if you use it for half the year as a vacation home and rent it out the other half of the year, the IRS says you can only deduct your utilities, etc., on your taxes for the portion of the year you’re treating your home as a business and renting it out. It’s a good idea to consult a tax professional about how such an investment will affect you before you commit to buying a second home.

Is a second home a good investment?

Whether or not a second home is a good investment depends on the individual. Roger Wohlner, a fee-only financial planner, says, “One should be buying a second home for a specific reason such as a family gathering spot, an affinity to a location (a lake, etc.) or some other reason. Because of that, it can’t really compare to another investment.”

In other words, you can’t quantify relaxation, memories or family time as part of a return-on-investment calculation. That’s why it’s crucial you make sure you can afford the second home from the get-go.

If you’re considering a second home strictly as an investment property, whether or not it’s a good decision depends on many other decisions you make along the way, like how much you choose to charge in rent, which improvements you make to the property and how you plan to manage the property, to name a few. Before you decide to rent out an income property, make sure you’ve considered these seven major cost areas.

How to get a mortgage on a second home

What’s the difference between your primary mortgage and your second home mortgage?

There are a few differences between these two mortgages. Depending on your credit score and other qualifications, you may be able to get a conventional mortgage for a primary residence with as little as 3 percent down (but you will have to pay private mortgage insurance, or PMI.) You might also qualify for an FHA loan with 3.5 percent down. Generally, the higher your credit score, the better interest rate you will qualify for, but lenders may consider your application with a 620 or lower credit score. (You can read more here about the most important factors in getting approved for a mortgage.)

For a second home, you could be required to put 10 percent to 30 percent down, depending on your credit or debt to income ratio. Lenders like to see cash reserves, as well, to show that you can cover one to 12 months of payments. Additionally, lenders like to see a 640-700 credit score for second homes, and your interest rates might be a quarter of a point to a half a point higher than your primary mortgage, although Green says, “Mortgage rates on second homes may be slightly higher, or may not be higher at all.”

When it comes to credit qualifications for a second home, Crouse says, “Second home credit requirements are typically the same as primary residence for conventional lending.” Additionally, he says there’s no difference in the approval process. Green corroborates this. He says, “Minimum credit score thresholds aren’t usually different for vacation homes as compared to primary residences. However, lenders often ask for additional monies down.”

If you want to find a mortgage for a second home, Crouse says, “Typically lenders who offer primary home loans would also offer second home financing.” Green advises, “The mortgage-comparison process is the same. Do your research, talk to two or more lenders, and choose the lender that works best for you.”

You’ll also want to ask yourself these questions in order to avoid common mistakes:

Can I really afford this place? Wohlner says, “If you don’t have the cash for the down payment on a second home you shouldn’t be buying one.”

What loan terms make the most sense for this property? Just because you have a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage on your primary residence doesn’t mean that’s the right choice for a second home. Crouse says, “A common mistake is not looking at adjustable rate loans as an option,” because second homes are often “a luxury item and therefore something people liquidate when there is a change financial situation.”

Have I explored all my options? Green says, “When you’re shopping for a mortgage on a second home, make sure to actually shop.” He adds, “You’re looking for the best combination of price and service on your loan. It’s good to shop around.”

What are some ways to pay the down payment on a second home?

One of the best ways to pay for a down payment on a second home is to pay for it with cash. Crouse says, in his experience, most people use cash as their down payment on second homes. The reason, he says, is, “Most buyers don’t want to tie up personal residence equity into their second home.”

If you don’t have the cash on hand and you’re committed to buying a second home, you can consider taking out a HELOC on your primary residence and using that money for the downpayment for your second home.

Taking out a HELOC comes with risks, though. You are leveraging your primary residence to purchase a second residence, which could cause you to lose your home if you fail to make your HELOC payments. In fact, Wohlner completely advises his financial planning clients against getting a HELOC to pay for a down payment on a second home. He says you should pay for it in cash.

Alternatives to mortgages for a second home

Getting a mortgage for a second home isn’t the only way to get the vacation property or investment property you want. Here are some other options:

Pay cash

Paying cash for your second home is a great way to ensure you don’t pay interest to a bank. It also means you’ll have no monthly mortgage payments on your second home, and that’s a great feeling. Of course, you’ll no longer have easy access to that money in case of an emergency. You might also prefer to get a mortgage at a low-interest rate and instead invest your cash in the stock market. Again, this is up to you, your risk tolerance and your cash reserves.

Get a joint mortgage with family

Sharing a second home and getting a mortgage with a family member could be a great way to split the costs and responsibilities of having a second home. Of course, involving multiple applicants in the mortgage process may make it a bit more logistically challenging.

You should also know that there are tax implications. When claiming the mortgage interest deduction, you may have to include an attachment in your tax return showing how much of the mortgage interest you paid. If you’re the person who receives the Form 1098 (the mortgage interest statement), you will deduct only the portion you paid and have to let the other borrowers know what their shares are.

Timeshare

Timeshares are an $8.6 billion industry, and the average price of a timeshare interval is $20,040, according to the American Resort Development Association. (A timeshare interval is the set number of days and nights per year an owner uses the property, usually a week, according to the ARDA.)

Now, you can go to large, well-known companies like Disney to find your own timeshare. With a timeshare, you typically get to visit a specific place every year for a set amount of time, like one week. So, you don’t have the flexibility of getting to visit your second home any time you want, but it can be more cost-efficient. Another con is that timeshares come with hefty dues that can increase each year.

Bottom line

Ultimately, buying a second home is an exciting prospect. If you vacation often to the same place, it can be a great way to become an official part of that community. However, buying a second home is a serious financial commitment that requires a large down payment and other maintenance costs. Luckily, if you decide you aren’t ready to buy a second home yet, you can still use vacation rental websites and continue to try new locations until you’re finally ready to take the plunge.

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