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What to Know Before You Sublet Your Apartment This Summer

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

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We’ve all been there. You landed a summer internship or a new job in a different city, or you have to move into a new house before your lease is up.

Rather than doubling up on rent or losing your deposit, consider a sublease. Leasing your apartment to another tenant allows you to get out of Dodge and keep some cash, but you could find yourself in unwanted — and expensive — legal battles if done improperly.

Here’s how you can manage a sublet legally to avoid unnecessary stress and hassle.

Create a sublease agreement

Even if you find a reliable subtenant, it’s a good idea to get your agreement in writing. You can find sublease samples online. The samples are basic boilerplates where you can put in the amount of rent, due dates and what the security deposit is.

Some people are able to make a profit off a sublease. Some have to take a loss, such as renting for a price lower than the rent they pay, if they are in a rush to find a subtenant. And others take the same amount of rent to break even. It all depends on the specific sublease situation, said John Bartlett, executive director of the Metropolitan Tenants Organization in Chicago, a tenant advocacy group.

“It is best to rent the unit to a trustworthy person,” Bartlett said. “And if that means suffering a small loss, then that is better rather than holding out to get the full rent or renting to someone with a less than stellar rental record.”

To avoid unexpected costs while you’re away, you can add additional clauses to the agreement to make sure your subletter complies with the terms of the lease. A few common examples:

  • Require the subtenant to take responsibility for any damage to the apartment during the stay.
  • The subtenant should keep furniture in good condition, assuming you plan to leave personal items.
  • If you live in a city that has specific recycling requirements, you can ask your subletter to follow those rules to avoid fines.

Ask for a security deposit

If you are subletting your apartment, experts suggested you take at least one month’s rent as a security deposit. You can request more if you think it’s appropriate, but for tenants of rent-stabilized apartments in New York, you can only take one month’s rent as a security deposit by law.

Remove yourself from the lease, if you can

Bartlett said in many leases, the tenant and subletter appear on the same lease contract. As a result, they will be jointly liable for damages or missed payments. That means that the landlord can go after one tenant or both if things go wrong.

If you don’t plan to return to the apartment, Bartlett recommended you try to convince the landlord to take you off the lease and sign a new lease with your subtenant. That would be the ideal situation for you, but the landlord has little incentive to sign a new lease if they can get you, the tenant on record, to pay rent should things go awry with the subtenant, Rozen said. Your landlord may refuse, but it’s worth a try. Sweetening the deal by paying a negotiated fee to your landlord may be worth it, Bartlett said.

Things you should do before subletting your apartment

Subletting means you become the landlord to the subletter, and there’s no contractual relationship between the subletter and your actual landlord, Jennifer Rozen, a New York City tenant lawyer, told MagnifyMoney.

If a subletter fails to pay rent, or damages the apartment, as long as the lease is still in effect, you could still be on the hook for the full rent amount or the damages, tenants’ rights experts said.

Given the potential risks involved in subletting, here’s some homework you need to do before giving your apartment key to your subtenant:

Before you do anything, review your state’s landlord-tenant laws and regulations. Every state has its own sublet laws, so it’s a good idea to understand your rights and obligations as a tenant.

In some places, like Illinois and New York, you have the legal right to sublet as long as the landlord doesn’t reasonably deny it. In New York, requests must be in writing and sent by certified mail with an attached proposed sublease that includes the subletter’s information. The landlord has 10 days to look over your request and ask additional questions, but Rozen says the entire approval process could take as long as two months. In other states, including Iowa and Kansas, you cannot sublet unless your lease permits it.

No laws prohibit subletting, but the subletting procedure may vary greatly based on specific leases. You should see if your lease has restrictions on subletting. If the lease or the state law requires you to contact the landlord and go through a formal process, then you need to abide.

In many states, landlords cannot unreasonably deny a subtenant, but they do want to be involved in a sublease, according to Bartlett.

“They’re not going to want some person that they don’t even know who it is to live in their unit,” Bartlett said.

Once you are clear on your obligations and responsibilities, you can start looking for a subtenant. Experts interviewed by MagnifyMoney strongly advised that you interview your candidate(s) and do your due diligence.

One way to protect yourself as a tenant is to call your potential subletter’s previous landlords to inquire about his/her rent payment history, Bartlett said. Rozen said it’s legal for you to request W-2s, recent pay stubs and credit reports from the prospective subtenant, or recent bank statements if this person is a freelancer or unemployed.

“You definitely shouldn’t get yourself in a situation where you no longer have the right to be in the apartment because you find the sublease, [but] you don’t know whether the person is financially viable,” said Rozen, who has represented hundreds of residential and commercial tenants.

If you want to go forward with a subtenant whose financials are questionable, you could ask him or her to pay upfront the partial or full rent amount for the sublease. “That’s the safest thing to do because the only thing you can do as the tenant of record is pay the rent to avoid getting sued by the landlord, then you have to go after the subtenant,” Rozen said.

What’s the risk of subletting without asking your landlord?

Although it’s best to inform your landlord of the sublease and follow the rules, in reality, many people don’t do that. It’s fine if you don’t get caught, but the consequences could be severe if you do.

In many leases, Bartlett said, there’s a clause stating that the unit is only for the person named on the lease. If the landlord finds out that a tenant has sublet their property while keeping it in the dark, the landlord could terminate the lease and demand that you leave the property. You could be liable for any damages or unpaid rent, experts said.

In New York, if your landlord finds out about a subtenant he or she didn’t approve, or simply doesn’t want the subtenant, the landlord may send you a legal notice requiring you to remove your subletter in 10 days. The landlord cannot directly evict the subtenant without getting you involved. Miss the deadline and your landlord could terminate your lease and try to evict you in housing court, which in turn, removes the subtenant. Or worse: “If you have a legal fee provision in your lease, then the landlord would be entitled to collect their legal fees from you if you go to court … and lose,” Rozen said.

What to do when things go wrong?

When she was in law school, Rozen sublet her apartment, but her subtenant wouldn’t leave the apartment when the lease was up and stopped paying rent.

In that situation, Rozen said the tenant would have to file a claim in court against the subtenant. Such cases often takes months, unless your subtenant voluntarily moves out after the case is filed. In Rozen’s case, her subletter finally left the apartment willingly, but he skipped on two months’ rent and left town. It was too late for Rozen to sue at that point.

“I will never make that mistake again,” Rozen said. “I was a poor law student.”

If your subletter doesn’t pay rent or damages your apartment, Rozen said the first step is to write a demand letter explaining the situation and threatening to sue if they don’t repay the rent or the costs.

If a demand letter doesn’t work, an easy and inexpensive way to handle the situation is to file a small claims lawsuit, which typically doesn’t require hiring an attorney, Rozen said. You could collect up to a few thousand dollars, depending on your state. In New York, for instance, the maximum is $5,000.

Resources for tenants

There are many housing advocacy groups across the country dedicated to helping tenants. When involved in disputes with your landlord or your subletter, you can turn to local organizations for legal advice and assistance. To find your local tenant advocacy groups, check out this Tenant Rights page on the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development website.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

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Study: More Men Received Pay Raises, Promotions Than Women Last Year

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

The 2018 household income growth numbers released by the United States Census Bureau revealed that the median earnings of all workers grew over 3% last year. Sounds like a win, right? But the research also revealed that the 2018 median earnings of men was $55,291. Women, on the other hand, only made a median of $45,097.

MagnifyMoney by LendingTree wanted to investigate this pay disparity further. They conducted a survey of Americans who work at least 30 hours a week about their pay raises, promotions and career moves.

Key findings:

  • 59% of working Americans received a pay raise within the last year. Of those who got a bump in salary, about half said the raise came with a promotion, too. Additionally, 36% said the boost in pay resulted from a new job.

  • More men received pay increases and promotions than women: 64% of men reported a raise, compared to just 52% of women. To make matters worse, 54% of men said their raise came with a promotion, versus 37% of women.
  • Millennials reported more raises than older generations: 64% of millennials received a raise, compared to 61% of Gen Xers and 47% of baby boomers. Millennials were also more likely than other age groups to say their raise came with a promotion.
  • Approximatly 62% of those whose earnings increased also raised their retirement savings contributions. Men were more likely than women to increase their savings level.
  • Around 47% of working Americans think they’ll receive a raise next year.
  • Women are more likely than men to say they probably won’t get a raise next year: 21% of women doubt their pay will increase within the next 12 months, compared to just 8% of men. The more respondents made, the more likely they were to think they would receive a pay raise next year.

Gender pay gaps

You know the old saying: Men are from Mars, women are from Venus. We know it’s not true, so why are women and men being paid like they live on different planets? In the past year, 12% more men reported receiving pay increases and promotions than women. Even more disappointing news: 17% more men than women picked up a promotion with their raise.

These figures strongly suggest that women had fewer opportunities for financial and career growth than men in the last year. These occurrences have a ripple effect. Men were 21% more likely than women to increase their retirement savings after they got a pay raise. It makes you wonder whether men are receiving larger pay raises than their female counterparts, considering women have been found to save a higher percentage of their money than men.

This difference in retirement saving contributes to a worrying trend. A 2018 study by Prudential found that on average, women save 43% less for retirement than men. And almost half of the women surveyed admitted to having no retirement savings at all.

Generational pay gaps

Gender may not be the only divide in the workplace. Millennials get a lot of flak, but they’re moving up in the workplace. Millennials reported earning more raises last year than Gen Xers and baby boomers.

While Millennials are more likely to be in the growth stage of their career, it’s also worth noting that in 2016, Millennials became the largest generation in the workforce. Millennials were also the most likely of any generation to report that their raise came with a promotion. Not bad for the generation everyone likes to laugh at for being “lazy.” To top it off, they were also the generation most likely to increase their retirement savings after receiving a raise.

How Outlook Varies

It’s fair to assume that the life and work experiences of each individual surveyed mold their view of the world around them. Because the women surveyed reported receiving fewer raises than men, it’s clear why they would be more pessimistic about their odds of receiving future raises.

While 47% of working Americans believe they’ll receive a raise next year, more of those Americans are men than women. Twenty-one percent of women doubt their pay will increase within the next 12 months, whereas only 8% of men feel that way.

Confidence seems to come easier to those with higher incomes. The more the survey respondents made in wages, the more likely they were to think they would be getting a pay raise in the next year. In their defense, the group with the highest income did in fact receive the most pay raises in the past year.

Tips on asking for a raise

When it comes time to ask for a raise, prepare yourself by following these steps. Coming to your boss with evidence regarding why you deserve a raise and how you will increase your contributions to the company will help you work toward your professional and financial goals.

State the facts

Even though you think your boss has a pretty good idea of your accomplishments, they don’t know them as well as you do. A successful request for a raise can take lots of prep work. Keeping track of your accomplishments, tasks and the changes in your role throughout the year will help you remember the triumphs you’re likely to forget a few months later.

Did a thrilled client sing your praises in an email? Flag it. Did the CEO comment on how impressed he was with your presentation? Write down his feedback. If you helped make your team more productive by introducing a new software, saved your department money or increased sales, keep notes of those occurrences somewhere you can easily reference them.

When the time comes to ask for a raise, you’ll have plenty of solid evidence at your fingertips as to why you deserve it. And remember, the more cold hard proof you have of your success (like web analytics or sales growth), the better.

Be strategic

Your boss shouldn’t feel blindsided when you ask for a raise. It’s important to give them notice that you want to speak to them about something important. Ask to schedule a meeting with your manager. Generally, they won’t be able to give you a firm yes or no during this meeting — that’s okay, they also have a boss to report to.

Make sure you set a meeting to follow up on your conversation. This holds your manager responsible for following through and tempers your expectations so you aren’t on pins and needles until you get an answer.

Don’t take no as a final answer

You won’t walk away from every request for a raise successfully, that’s just a fact of life. But it’s important to remember that getting a no now doesn’t mean no forever.

Ask your manager to elaborate on why they said no and how you can work towards a goal of a raise. Maybe there is an area of your performance you really do need to improve upon. Or perhaps your company doesn’t have the money for a raise in their budget. Agree on a time to circle back to this conversation later in the year, and in the meantime, take your manager’s feedback to heart. If they don’t give you a clear path for working toward a raise, it may be time to move on.

Methodology

MagnifyMoney by LendingTree commissioned Qualtrics to conduct an online survey of 543 Americans who work at least 30 hours per week. The survey was fielded September 5-9, 2019.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

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How Much Does the Average American Have in Savings?

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

  • The average American household has $183,200 worth of savings in bank accounts and retirement savings accounts as of June 2019.
  • The median American household currently holds about $12,330 across these same types of accounts.
  • The top 1% of households (as measured by income) have an average of $2,630,760 in these various saving accounts. The bottom 20% have an average of $9,190.
  • Roughly 83% of savings are in located in retirement accounts like IRAs and workplace-sponsored retirement savings plans like 401(k)s.
  • Millennials, who have just started their savings journey, have currently socked away an average of $24,570 retirement savings. Gen Xers have $127,550 in retirement savings. Baby boomers and those born before 1946 have an average of $279,250.
  • 29% of households have less than $1,000 in savings.
  • 30% of Americans deplete their savings an average of $14,230 every year.

You often read or hear stories about how Americans aren’t saving enough for college, for retirement, for a rainy day — for anything, really. But how much do they currently have in their bank, credit union or online brokerage?

MagnifyMoney used data from the Federal Reserve and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC) to estimate the average and median household balances in various types of banking and retirement savings accounts. 2016 household data from the Fed’s Survey of Consumer Finances was adjusted to 2019 levels by using March 2019 market values and fund flows.

Of course, these are very broad numbers, and very few of the 127 million U.S. households will be average. As of 2016, about 78% of households had at least one of the following: a savings account, a retirement savings account, a money market deposit account or certificates of deposit.

Average account balances

As of June 2019, among all households (including those with no account):

  • The average American household savings account balance is $17,750
  • The average American household has $6,220 in certificates of deposits (CDs)
  • The average American household has $9,430 in money market deposit accounts
  • The average American household has $9,820 in checking accounts
  • The average American household has $149,790 in one or more retirement savings accounts, including individual retirement accounts (IRAs), 401(k)s and other types of retirement accounts

Note that all households won’t necessarily own each type of savings account. For example, only about 7% of households currently have savings in some type of CD, meaning that the 93% without one will necessarily drive down the average.

Here are the average balances among savers, regardless of the kinds of savings vehicles they use. The averages below only exclude the 22% of households without any of these savings accounts. Households that have some savings vehicles but not necessarily all of the savings vehicles below were factored into each average.

Across all “saver” households:

  • The average savings account balance is $24,290
  • The average money market deposit account balance is $12,210
  • The average amount held in one or more CDs is $8,520
  • The average balance of all retirement accounts is $205,020
  • The average checking account balance is $11,970

 

When you look at the average balances of those who own the particular account, the averages are even higher:

  • 51% of American households have a savings account, and the average balance among them is $34,730
  • 18% have money market deposit accounts, and the average balance is $74,970
  • 7% have one or more CDs with an average toal value of $95,600
  • 52% have one or more retirement accounts, and the total average balance is $287,736
  • 83% have checking accounts and the average balance is $11,970

 

Median account balances

Median balances are considerably lower than the averages. For example, the median savings account balance (among those with savings accounts) is $4,960, significantly lower than the $34,730 average American savings account balance. Fifty percent of households have more than $4,960 in those types of accounts, while 50% have less. (The median figures below only include households that have that type of account.)

  • The median American household savings account balance is $4,960
  • The median American household money market deposit account balance is $12,680
  • The median American household amount in one or more CDs is $25,280
  • The median retirement account size in American households is $75,480
  • The median American household checking account balance is $2,480

 

Demographics and savings

Who are the above-average saving households? Wealthier households comprise most of them, but less-well heeled households can have healthy levels of savings as well. When you look at households who have saved more than the national average of $183,200, 59 percent of them are top income earners– those households in the top 20 percent of annual income. But 41 percent of above average savers are in the bottom 80% by income.

    • Millennial households have saved an average of less than $25,000, Gen Xers have about $128,000 saved, while baby boomers have saved nearly $280,000.
    • Regardless of income or age, 29% of households have less than $1,000 saved.

When savings is viewed through certain demographic prisms, like age, income and education, the average and median savings account balances start making more sense. For instance, it won’t surprise anyone that households with higher incomes save more than those of more modest means.

 

So although the average American household has saved roughly $180,000 in various types of savings accounts, only the top 10%-20% of earners will likely have savings levels approaching or exceeding that amount. Indeed, and as the chart above shows, the bottom 40% of American households are more likely than not to have any savings whatsoever. Conversely, the top 10% of the population by income is likely to have many times the national household savings average.

Similarly, millennials will have saved less than boomers, as the latter has had a 35-year head start, among other factors. Currently, the average boomer has roughly 11 times the amount saved as the average millennial.

 

How much does the average American have in savings for retirement?

Of course, many American households store much of their savings in retirement accounts, like 401(k) plans from their employers and IRAs, both of which are tax-advantaged accounts that can hold not only “liquid” savings but also investments like financial securities and, in some cases, other types of assets like real estate. Fifty-two percent of households have some sort of retirement account, according to a 2016 survey by the Federal Reserve.

Among all households (including those with no account), the average retirement savings account balance as of June 2019 is $149,800.

But among households with an account (about 52% of all households):

  • American households with a retirement account (accounts like employer-sponsored 401(k) plans and IRAs) have an average of $287,740 in such accounts.
  • The median household balance as of June 2018 is $75,480 among those with retirement accounts.

For those households with retirement accounts, here’s how retirement savings break out among the different generations:

  • Millennials have saved an average of $34,570
  • Gen Xers have an average of $168,480 in retirement savings.
  • Baby boomers and those born before 1946 have an average of $386,110 in retirement accounts.

Nearly one-third of Americans deplete their savings by an average of $14,230 every year

According to data from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, while nearly half of households grew their savings, 30% of households depleted their savings accounts at least once over the past five years. As might be expected, those with lower incomes (which may include working families as well as retirees) were more likely to draw down their savings an average of $14,230.

  • 49% of people with savings and investment accounts reported that they contributed to their balances over the course of the previous year, while 30% dipped into their savings, and 21% kept contributions and withdrawals even
  • Households with incomes of $25,000 averaged a net year-over-year withdrawal of $2,834. Net withdrawal for households between $25,001 and $50,000 was $792
  • 64% said they depleted their accounts to pay bills and 57% said they did to pay for general living expenses. (Respondents were allowed to choose more than cause.)
  • 15% said their voluntary decision to stop working was a cause, which suggests their savings were planned for that reason
  • 27% blamed reduced health and 16% said involuntary job loss was a factor
  • 24% of respondents said they didn’t have savings or investment accounts

Recent trends in deposit accounts

Here’s a closer look at how customers of banks and credit unions are allocating their deposits:

CDs are finally getting attention

The amount of savings in FDIC-insured banks have grown by nearly $4 trillion since the recession.

 

But until recently that deposit growth wasn’t going into CDs. Collectively there’s still less savings in CDs than ten years ago, while $2 trillion more have gone into savings accounts, and $2.2 trillion in Money Market Deposit Accounts (a type of savings account that typically allows checkwriting).

 

CD yields

As you may suspect, the primary culprit behind declining CD deposits are the accounts’ low yields. As illustrated in the chart below, the popularity of CDs has waned as banks paid relatively little interest for all CDs, even those with longer maturities. For much of the past decade, the average yield for locking up savings in 1-year CD barely exceeded the average yield on a money market account, which is more liquid than a CD.

 

Longer-term CDs haven’t been yielding much more, until recently. Although the Federal Reserve began its most recent series of short-term rate hikes in early 2017, CD yields only started to climb from rock bottom in spring 2018. And as you might expect, as the yields for CDs increased, the deposits from savers have followed. Over the past year CDs at commercial banks grew by 17%, to $1.86 trillion in June 2019.

 

Credit unions: A smaller pool with slightly better yields

While savings have also increased in the much smaller credit union universe, CD deposits have remained steady.

 

While there are multiple explanations for the steady share of CDs at credit unions, such as the institutions’ not-for-profit status (members are the shareholders), one obvious reason is the competitive rates they offer customers relative to banks. According to the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) quarterly survey, credit unions usually offer consistently higher rates on savings than commercial banks.

 

Fortunately, savers (or would-be savers) are not consigned to improving-but-still-meager average savings yields. The best yields for savings accounts, CDs and money market accounts well exceed the average APY by at least one percentage point and often more.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

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Chris Horymski is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Chris at [email protected]