Advertiser Disclosure

Building Credit

3 Ways to Build Your Credit History from Scratch

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

howtobuildcredithistory-lg1

Meet Katie. Katie is a role model of financial health. She’s never overdrawn her bank account, always pays her bills on time, doesn’t carry any student loan debt and has diligently used one credit card for four years.

When Katie went to check her credit score, she discovered she was a thin file meaning her years of responsible financial behavior didn’t do much to boost her credit score. In part, Katie’s lack of diversity in her credit history could produce a thin file. Her credit card lender also might not report her card to all three credit bureaus.

Even though Katie is financially responsible, she still has to do some work to build her credit history.

Why you need credit history

If you ever plan to make a purchase you can’t buy outright in cash, such as a home, car or education, then you’re going to need a loan. Lenders want proof that you’re reliable; otherwise you may get hit with high interest rates or declined for a loan.

How do you establish (or rebuild) credit history?

To establish credit history, you need to have – you guessed it – a form of credit. Credit could come in the form of student loans, credit cards, home mortgages or a variety of other ways.

College credit cards

For young adults – especially college students – it’s relatively simple to begin creating a credit history. They can apply for a credit card (perhaps by having a parent co-sign) or take out a loan to help cover the cost of education. You can find a list by filtering for college students on our Cash Back Rewards page.

If you made it to later in your twenties with no debt, no credit cards and no loan of any kind – well congrats – but the time may have come to establish credit history.

Secured Cards

You can still open a credit card by applying for a secured card. A secured card is ideal for people who have no credit, are not students or have recently filed bankruptcy. Typically you provide a deposit (usually a few hundred dollars) and then your credit limit will be a few hundred dollars.

By simply making one purchase a month and paying it off on time and in full, you’ll begin to establish a line of credit and later be able to apply for other lines of credit and increase your “types of credit” factor in your credit score.

Store Cards

If you’re working on rebuilding credit, you can also consider applying for a store card. Banks are more likely to approve consumers with much lower scores through a store card than if the same consumer walked into the bank to apply for a credit card.

Protect your credit

Your credit history and score are huge assets to your financial health. You need to be diligent about ensuring they stay in good shape. Consider these tips the financial equivalent of eating your fruits and veggies:

  • Always pay on time – late or missed payments will cost you dearly

  • Try to keep your credit used below 30% of your available credit (ie: if your available credit is $1,000 then only spend $300)

  • If you apply for a store card to increase your credit then immediately put in the freezer (literally if you have to) and avoid spending

  • Be sure to check your credit reports for accuracy and signs of fraud – you’re entitled to one free report per year from each of the three credit bureaus

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Erin Lowry
Erin Lowry |

Erin Lowry is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Erin at erin@magnifymoney.com

TAGS: , , ,

Get A Pre-Approved Personal Loan

$

Won’t impact your credit score

Advertiser Disclosure

Eliminating Fees

Calling Out the Banks: Fix the Overdraft Market

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

solutionsforbrokenoverdraft-lg

 

Overdraft protection sounds like a program that would, I don’t know, protect you? Instead it helps lessen the fees but still gives banks the opportunity to charge you $10 to $12 (if not more) for transferring your money to cover an overdraft.

Understand what you’re up against

When I worked in banking, we would look at certain warning signals.  If a product is excessively complex and extracts revenue that is exponentially higher than the cost of providing the service, then something is wrong.

I believe the overdraft market in the US is fundamentally broken, and has morphed into the worst type of predatory lending.

I have a really simple solution, and banks all over the world are already doing this.

  • Declining a transaction costs banks fractions of a cent, so charging consumers a $35 decline fee is obscene.  The most they should charge is a few dollars. Some new entrants charge nothing at all – and they are right to do so.

  • An overdraft is a short-term loan.  Lets stop talking about fees, and start talking about interest rates

    • Checking accounts should have a disclosed overdraft limit.  In other words, you should know that you can go up to $500 overdraft

    • The bank should charge a fair interest rate for the money you borrow – and only for the days that you borrow the money

Some banks are reasonable when it comes to overdraft

First Direct, one of the most popular banks in the UK, offers the following:

  • Free overdraft protection up to $250

  • A line of credit above $250 (the better your credit score, the higher the available line).  The interest rate is about 15%.  You don’t pay a fee-only interest for the days that you use the credit line.  So, if you borrow $100 for 7 days, you would pay about $0.29.

  • If you use your entire overdraft line, and the bank declines additional transaction, you pay nothing.

Banks should make money.  This is not a charity.  But they should offer transparent pricing that is easy to understand and compare.  And the profit should be in line with the cost of providing the service.

Consumers should be able to compare and choose the best option – just like any other consumer product. Fortunately, we’re helping you do just that.

Banks that respect you and your money

Consider switching to an internet-only bank. I have made the switch.

If you have a few instances of going overdraft because of a simple mistake, then consider Ally Bank.  You get one of the best interest rates on the market for your savings account. And, if you go overdraft, Ally DOES NOT CHARGE YOU for transferring money from your savings account to your checking account.  Why you ask? Because, it doesn’t cost them anything to do it!

If you go overdraft because you need the money, then Capital One 360 might be right for you. This is the old ING Direct.  They act a lot like First Direct of the UK: no overdraft transfer fee, a line of credit, and you only pay interest for the days that you are overdraft.

If you never want to go overdraft again – and wish the bank would just decline your transaction and not charge you a fee, then look into Bluebird or Serve (both from Amex). Bluebird is in partnership with Wal-Mart.  You can never go overdraft, and you will never be charged an NSF fee.

Even if you love brick-and-mortar bank branches, do the math to see if switching to an internet-only bank could save you a substantial amount of money in fees – and don’t forget the cost of gas!

Want to know more about Internet banking? Check out this article.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Nick Clements
Nick Clements |

Nick Clements is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Nick at nick@magnifymoney.com

TAGS: ,

Advertiser Disclosure

About MagnifyMoney

State of Our Finances: The MagnifyMoney Survey

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

stateofourfinances-cover-banner1

We launched MagnifyMoney because we believe people are paying too much in credit card interest, paying too many complicated overdraft fees and not earning enough on their hard-earned savings.

Banks are in the business of borrowing money from people in the form of checking and savings account deposits and then lending that money to people who need it through loans or credit cards. Right now, banks are charging very high rates on credit cards, and paying very low rates on deposits. They sit in the middle and enjoy rich profits.

But how much money are Americans leaving on the table (or in banks’ pockets)?  We decided to conduct a national survey to see just how much money people are losing to the banks’ fine print and fees.

Savings

Of those surveyed, 73.4% of Americans keep their money in an old-fashioned branch bank account. That means they are likely receiving 0% on their checking account money and 0.01% on their savings account. Yes, the big banks are paying an average of 0.01% on their savings accounts – that is not a typo.

Of those Americans who have a savings account, the average amount sitting in the bank was was $28,696. If, instead of giving money for free to branch-based banks, people switched to FDIC insured online savings accounts, like the ones offered by Barclays, GE or Ally Bank, they could earn close to 1%. Rather than earning less than $5 a year, they could be getting over $250.

Overdraft Fees

An overdraft happens when you spend more money than you have in your checking account. According to our survey, it has happened to 35% of us. But why do people go overdraft?

53% are just forgetful (mistakes happen).

47% of people go overdraft because they need the money: the month lasts longer than their paycheck.

Last year alone, Americans were charged $32 billion in overdraft fees. According to the CFPB, the amount in annual fees, on average, for accounts that had at least one overdraft was $225. Why so much? Every incident of overdraft costs $35 and banks will charge multiple incidents per day. For example, Bank of America could charge up to $140 per day – even if you only were overdraft by $20 (4 transactions).

Our survey showed that people are definitely fed up: 69% would like an account that does not let you go overdraft and charges no fee to decline. Fortunately, such products exist – like the internet bank Simple and Bluebird by American Express. We hope to help people find these products.

Credit Card Debt

42.4% of Americans have credit card debt. The average balance of those surveyed was $10,902.

Now, you will often hear that the average interest rate is 15%. However, at MagnifyMoney we know that credit card companies engage in risk-based pricing. That means lower interest rates are given to people who pay their balance in full every month and higher interest rates are charged to people who are likely (or have historically) revolved.  That means they pay less than the full balance, and then have to pay interest.

Our data proves this. 75.7% of those with credit card debt, paid an interest rate higher than 15%. The average monthly payment on that debt is $408. At an 18% interest rate, that means the average American will pay at least $1,707 in credit card interest over the next 12 months.

Think about it this way: banks will pay (savings account deposits) 0.01% for money.  So, for $10,902 a bank would pay about $1 in interest. Then they turnaround and charge the average American $1,707 in interest. Not a bad business.

Fortunately, there are options out there to help people save money. Fifty percent of Americans with credit card debt have considered a balance transfer. Of those who completed a balance transfer, 89% would do one again. However, there are still many misconceptions about balance transfers.

People don’t understand how the interest charges work — 31% think interest is charged retroactively and 35.2% don’t know how it is charged.

Some people don’t get the full benefit of the balance transfer because they spend on the card (46.7% of people do that) or by pay late (25% of people fail to pay on time).

Rather than looking online for the best balance transfer offers, an amazing 68.5% of people respond to a direct mail offer.

But, if you choose a market-leading balance transfer, pay on time and don’t spend on the card, the average American could save more than $1,300 over the next 12 months.

Personal loans could also be a great option if you can’t qualify for a balance transfer (or don’t trust yourself with another credit card). Only 36.5% of people with credit card debt considered a personal loan

The survey results are clear

At MagnifyMoney, we believe that people are not getting enough on their savings (less than $4 a year). We think they are being charged too much for overdrafts (an average of $225).  And they are paying way too much for their credit card debt ($1,707 a year).  We think the results of our survey are clear: people are paying far too much for their banking products and services.

The good news: alternatives exist.

State Of Finances

State Of Finances

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Nick Clements
Nick Clements |

Nick Clements is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Nick at nick@magnifymoney.com

TAGS: ,

Do you have a question?