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Which Debt Should You Pay Off First? Here’s What to Consider

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

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One of the most common questions consumers ask regarding paying down debt is which debt to pay off first. If you’ve recently made the decision to pay off your debt, you may be wondering the same thing.

There are multiple ways you can tackle your debt, and each strategy has pros and cons. This guide will walk you through some common debt payoff methods as well as how to determine which approach is the best in your situation.

Which debt you should pay off first? 7 factors to consider

When helping clients figure out which debt to pay off first, Chantel Bonneau, a San Diego-based wealth management advisor with Northwestern Mutual, takes a holistic look at their debt and financial picture.

“It’s a little bit math-based, but it’s a little bit customized to the client’s specific needs and situation,” she told MagnifyMoney.

Many factors contribute to how long it will take you to pay off your debt. Here’s what to consider when trying to determine which debt to pay first:

  1. Total amount of debt: The total amount of debt you have plays a role in choosing which to pay off first. If you are paying down $10,000 versus $100,000, you may approach your payoff differently.
  2. Minimum payment due: Each time you pay off a debt, you free up money in your budget to go towards your other debts, so take the minimum payments into account.
  3. Interest rate: Your debts mostly likely represent a range of interest rates. Naturally, the rate of each debt plays a role in how long it will take to pay it off. Also, consider promotional or introductory rates that you can leverage.
  4. Term of debt: The scheduled length of each debt makes a difference in how long it will take to pay it off.
  5. Type of debt: The type of debt you have and whom you owe it to should also be considered.
  6. Status of each debt: If you are past-due or delinquent, you may want to consider prioritizing those debts.
  7. How much you have available to put toward the debt: The amount of extra money you have available to pay down your debt will determine the time it will take to pay everything off.

In addition to looking at these quantifiable factors, your emotional and behavioral needs come into play.

“If I feel like someone will get discouraged or lose energy or not be motivated if they’re not getting rid of that $400 credit card payment that actually isn’t high-interest but it really annoys and frustrates them, then that’s when you have to take the behavioral component into account with how best to approach debt,” Bonneau said.

How to approach your debt

Let’s use an example to take a look at a few different debt payoff strategies. Let’s assume in the chart below that this is a married couple with six debts they want to pay down. They have an extra $200 each month to put towards their bills.

Here are their debts in no particular order.

Debt

Total Balance

Interest Rate

Minimum Payment

MasterCard

$450

18%

$15

Visa #1

$2,500

23%

$73

Visa #2

$5,000

31.99%

$184

Student loan

$45,000

4.25%

$235

Family loan

$1,300

0%

$0

Auto loan

$9,185

7%

$353

We’ll see how each debt payoff method prioritizes their bills.

Debt snowball

The debt snowball repayment method is a popular strategy championed by many personal financial experts, most notably by Dave Ramsey.

In the debt snowball method, you list your debts in order from the smallest balance to the largest. You pay the minimum payments on all of the debts, except for the debt with the smallest balance.

On that debt, you pay as much as possible, using any additional money you have until the balance is paid in full. Once that first debt is paid off, you take the payment you were paying on it, plus any additional money you have, and move onto the next debt.

You continue this pattern as you work your way down your list with the amount you pay on each debt (your snowball), getting bigger and bigger as you go. By the time you get to the debts towards the bottom of the list, the amount of money you’re paying on each debt will have grown significantly.

Here’s how the couple in our example would prioritize their debt using the debt snowball.

 

Debt

Total Balance

Interest Rate

Minimum Payment

#1

MasterCard

$450

18%

$15

#2

Family loan

$1,300

0%

$0

#3

Visa #1

$2,500

23%

$73

#4

Visa #2

$5,000

31.99%

$184

#5

Auto loan

$9,185

7%

$353

#6

Student loan

$45,000

4.25%

$235

With the couple being able to put an extra $200 toward their debt, they would pay off their first debt in just about two months.

The debt snowball method does not take interest rates into account; rather, it plays on the psychology and emotion of paying off debt. The primary goal of this method is to provide “quick wins” and keep you motivated throughout the payoff process.

“The debt snowball is about the momentum of getting rid of your debt,” Bonneau said, though she warned that mathematically, it may not work to your advantage. “At the end of the day, you can be paying significantly more in interest.”

Pros

  • You pay off your first debt pretty quickly
  • You build up momentum as you go
  • You see continuous progress
  • It’s simple and organized

Cons

  • You may pay more in interest
  • It may take longer

Debt avalanche

Another way to approach paying off your debt is using the debt avalanche method. Also called debt stacking, the goal of the debt avalanche is to pay the least amount of interest on your debt. Using this method, you put your debts in order from the highest interest rate to the lowest.

Similar to the debt snowball, you pay the minimum payments on all your bills, except instead of focusing on the smallest debt, you focus on the debt with the highest interest rate until it’s paid off.

After that bill is paid in full, you then move to the debt with the next highest rate and work your way down.

Here’s the order in which our couple would pay their debts using the debt avalanche.

 

Debt

Total Balance

Interest Rate

Minimum Payment

#1

Visa #2

$5,000

31.99%

$184

#2

Visa #1

$2,500

23%

$73

#3

MasterCard

$450

18%

$15

#4

Auto Loan

$9,185

7%

$353

#5

Student loan

$45,000

4.25%

$235

#6

Family loan

$1,300

0%

$0

On paper, this method comes out ahead of the debt snowball in terms of paying the least amount of interest and taking the least amount of time. You can plug in your debts in a snowball versus avalanche calculator to see how the two methods compare in your situation.

Bonneau usually looks to the debt avalanche when helping clients figure out what debt to pay off first. “Generally speaking, paying off the highest interest rate debt first will help your debt become reduced as quickly as possible,” she advised. “Any excess dollars that go towards interest longer than they have to is obviously not productive.”

But while this strategy looks best in theory, it doesn’t always work in reality, as Bonneau cautioned — “mathematically, the avalanche method will have you pay the least amount of dollars to get rid of the debt, but that might not be true if you slip up or if you don’t do your due diligence.”

In addition, she suggested that consumers can also get discouraged when using this method because it may not feel like they’re making progress right away, especially if their debt with the highest interest rate also happens to have a very large balance.

Pros

  • You’ll pay less in interest
  • You’ll pay your debt off faster

Cons

  • It can take a long time to pay off your first debt
  • You may give up
  • It does not take behavior or emotion into consideration

Debt snowflake

The debt snowflake is another method. The goal with this strategy is to leverage the power of making small payments towards your debt.

With this approach, you make multiple micropayments towards each of your debts, even if the amount of the individual payment is less than the minimum amount due (however, you do want to make sure that the multiple payments cover at least the minimum amount due).

If you have extra money to put towards your payments, then you select one debt to focus on.

The idea behind this strategy is that the small payments add up. If someone is struggling with budgeting large sums to put towards their debt, this approach may work for them.

In our example, the couple wouldn’t prioritize their debts in any order; they would make payments as often as they can regardless of the amount.

Bonneau said she doesn’t recommend using the debt snowflake as a primary way to tackle debt, but mentioned that it can enhance an existing approach. “I don’t I think it’s a method comparable to the avalanche or the snowball,” she said. “I think it’s an ancillary or peripheral method.”

Pros

  • Small payments can add up
  • It’s good for those who have a hard time budgeting their payments

Cons

  • Can be confusing and disorganized
  • You can possibly pay less than the minimum payment

Debt tsunami

No one is quite sure why debt payoff strategies all have weather-related names, but now we come to the debt tsunami. This strategy focuses purely on the emotion behind paying off debt.

In the debt tsunami, you rank your debts in order of their emotional impact, prioritizing the debt that you want out of your life the fastest.

Suppose in our example, the couple’s family loan is to their parents or in-laws. If the relationship has soured because of the loan, then they would pay that $1,300 debt off first, even though there is no interest and no minimum payment.

They would attack that debt with a vengeance — like a tsunami — until it’s gone, then move on to the debt that will provide them with the next biggest emotional impact.

Pros

  • Provides emotional relief
  • Builds momentum

Cons

  • You could pay more in interest

Hybrid

You could approach your debt payoff by combining any of these methods, or by taking your own unique approach.

When Steven Donovan, a Miami-based financial coach, decided to pay down his $100,000 of debt, he started using the debt snowball method. But when he discovered that the minimum payment on his $19,000 private student loan was going to triple from $70 to $210, he turned to the debt tsunami.

“I hated that student loan so much that I made I sure I paid it off before the smaller loans in the debt snowball,” Donovan told MagnifyMoney. “It made me happier to pay it off than to knock out the smaller debts.”

With a hybrid approach, you could choose to follow one debt payoff strategy, but you can then prioritize a debt for one reason or another.

In Donovan’s case, he used the debt snowball method and prioritized a debt for the emotional benefit. Another example is using the debt avalanche method, but prioritizing a small debt even if the interest rate is lower — you can get a quick win while building up some momentum to continue paying your debt.

Similarly, you could prioritize debt because of its urgency: for example, paying a federal student loan or tax debt to avoid wage garnishment. Using a hybrid approach allows you to customize your strategy.

Pros

  • Gives you flexibility as you pay off your debt

Cons

  • It could throw you off a consistent pattern

Equal treatment

Another way to approach paying off your debt is to give them all equal treatment. Like the debt snowball and the debt tsunami, you make the minimum payments on all your debts, but instead of applying the extra payment to one particular debt, you spread the amount equally over all your debts.

Pros

  • You pay extra on all your debts

Cons

  • You won’t see significant progress on one debt

Debt consolidation

Debt consolidation is another strategy you can use to pay off your debt. In this method, you would get a single new loan or credit card, and you use that to pay off all the other debts.

The goal with debt consolidation is to save interest and reduce both your total monthly payment and any anxiety or stress of dealing with multiple creditors. Debt consolidation can be done in various ways including a credit card balance transfer, a personal loan, a home equity loan or a HELOC.

Bonneau said she has worked with clients who successfully used debt consolidation, but cautioned that the primary motivation of consolidating debt should be to reduce interest and not just to feel better.

To kickstart your search for a debt consolidation loan, you can explore MagnifyMoney’s debt consolidation loan marketplace. LendingTree also has a personal loan marketplace you could use to see personalized rates from various lenders based on your creditworthiness.

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Origination Fee

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LendingTree is our parent company. LendingTree is unique in that you may be able to compare up to five personal loan offers within minutes. Everything is done online and you may be pre-qualified by lenders without impacting your credit score. LendingTree is not a lender.


A Personal Loan can offer funds relatively quickly once you qualify you could have your funds within a few days to a week. A loan can be fixed for a term and rate or variable with fluctuating amount due and rate assessed, be sure to speak with your loan officer about the actual term and rate you may qualify for based on your credit history and ability to repay the loan. A personal loan can assist in paying off high-interest rate balances with one fixed term payment, so it is important that you try to obtain a fixed term and rate if your goal is to reduce your debt. Some lenders may require that you have an account with them already and for a prescribed period of time in order to qualify for better rates on their personal loan products. Lenders may charge an origination fee generally around 1% of the amount sought. Be sure to ask about all fees, costs and terms associated with each loan product. Loan amounts of $1,000 up to $50,000 are available through participating lenders; however, your state, credit history, credit score, personal financial situation, and lender underwriting criteria can impact the amount, fees, terms and rates offered. Ask your loan officer for details.

As of 17-May-19, LendingTree Personal Loan consumers were seeing match rates as low as 3.99% (3.99% APR) on a $10,000 loan amount for a term of three (3) years. Rates and APRs were based on a self-identified credit score of 700 or higher, zero down payment, origination fees of $0 to $100 (depending on loan amount and term selected).

Pros

  • May save interest
  • May reduce total monthly payment
  • One loan could be more manageable

Cons

  • You could pay more in interest if you consolidate low or no interest loans
  • You could extend the amount of time you’re in debt
  • You could lose protections on federal debt

Paying off your debt

These strategies, while different from each other, all have the same goal — to get you out of debt — and the one that’s best for you is the one you’re going to stick with. Consider what will keep you motivated as you pay down the debt.

If seeing immediate progress gets you excited about paying down your debt, then go with the debt snowball method. On the other hand, if a logical and mathematical approach appeals to you, the debt avalanche might work better for you. If you prefer some flexibility, then consider a variation of any of the methods we covered.

“Everyone is different,” Bonneau said. “At the end of the day [a debt payoff strategy] only works if you set goals to have accountability, if it’s realistic to implement, and if you are tracking it.”

Regardless of the strategy you use, make the most of it by putting as much as possible towards your debt. Seek ways to bring in additional income, and create a monthly budget to make sure every available dollar goes towards your debt.

“Make sure you set yourself up for success by putting those external factors in place to help you stay committed to your priority,” Bonneau advised.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Alaya Linton
Alaya Linton |

Alaya Linton is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Alaya here

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Best 0% APR Credit Card Offers – September 2019

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any credit card issuer. This site may be compensated through a credit card issuer partnership.

There are a lot of 0% APR credit card deals in your mailbox and online, but most of them slap you with a 3% to 4% fee just to make a transfer, which can seriously eat into your savings.

At MagnifyMoney we like to find deals no one else is showing, and we’ve searched hundreds of balance transfer credit card offers to find the banks and credit unions that ANYONE CAN JOIN which offer great 0% interest credit card deals AND no balance transfer fees. We’ve hand-picked them here.

If one 0% APR credit card doesn’t give you a big enough credit line you can try another bank or credit union for the rest of your debt. With several no fee options it’s not hard to avoid transfer fees even if you have a large balance to deal with.

1. The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express – Introductory 0% for 15 Months on balance transfers and purchases, $0 balance transfer fee.

This offer edges out competitors with its 0% intro period and standout perks. The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express has increased value with an intro 0% for 15 Months on purchases and balance transfers, then 14.99%-25.99% Variable APR and a $0 balance transfer fee. (For transfers requested within 60 days of account opening.) In addition to the great balance transfer offer, you can earn rewards — 2x points at US supermarkets, on up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1x), 1x points on other purchases.

The information related to The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express has been collected by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card prior to publication.

2. BankAmericard® credit card0% Introductory APR on purchases for 18 billing cycles, $0 Introductory Balance Transfer Fee

Cardholders can benefit from an 0% Introductory APR on purchases for 18 billing cycles and an introductory $0 balance transfer fee for the first 60 days your account is open. After that, the fee for future balance transfers is either $10 or 3% of the amount of each transaction, whichever is greater. Once the intro period ends, there is a 14.99% - 24.99% Variable APR. You can benefit from a $0 annual fee and access to your free FICO® Score.

The information related to BankAmericard® credit card has been collected by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card prior to publication.

When to consider a fee

While no-fee balance transfer cards are great, sometimes it may be worthwhile to consider a balance transfer card with a balance transfer fee. The fee will be a percentage — typically 3% or 5% — of the total amount you transfer, but cards that charge balance transfer fees often have longer intro periods. If you can’t afford the high monthly payments required to pay off your balance before the end of a 15-month intro period, a card offering a longer intro period — such as 18 months — can provide lower monthly payments while still allowing you to pay off your balance before the end of the intro period. Below, we provide an example that should help you decide when you should consider a fee.

For this example, we’re assuming $6,354 in credit card debt, which is the average balance Americans have, according to Experian’s 2017 State of Credit report.

By choosing the card offering an intro 0% for 18 months and a 3% transfer fee, you’ll only have to pay $364 a month to pay your debt and the balance transfer fee off in full during the intro period. That’s $60 less than the $424 monthly payment required by the card with an intro 0% for 15 months. Just beware that while you’re saving month to month, overall, you will end up paying about $190 more due to the balance transfer fee.

If you need a longer intro period and lower monthly payment, we recommend the Discover it® Balance Transfer which offers an intro 0% for 18 months on balance transfers (after that, 13.99% - 24.99% Variable APR) and has a 3% intro balance transfer fee, up to 5% fee on future balance transfers (see terms)*.

Discover it® Balance Transfer

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on Discover Bank’s secure website

Rates & Fees

Discover it® Balance Transfer

Intro BT APR
0% for 18 months
Regular APR
13.99% - 24.99% Variable
Balance Transfer Fee
3% intro balance transfer fee, up to 5% fee on future balance transfers (see terms)*
Credit required
good-credit
Excellent/Good

3. Chase Slate® – 0% Intro APR on Balance Transfers for 15 months and 0% Intro APR on Purchases for 15 months, $0 Introductory Balance Transfer Fee

This deal is easy to find – Chase is one of the biggest banks and makes this credit card deal well known. The card offers a 0% intro apr on balance transfers for 15 months and an intro $0 on transfers made within 60 days of account opening. after that: either $5 or 5%, whichever is greater. You also get a 0% Intro APR on Purchases for 15 months on purchases and a $0 annual fee. After the intro period, the APR is 16.99% - 25.74% Variable. Plus, you’ll receive monthly updates to your free FICO® Score and the reasons behind your score for free.’

The information related to the Chase Slate® has been collected by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card prior to publication.

4. Platinum Card from Navy Federal Credit Union – 0% introductory APR for 12 months on balance transfers, NO FEE

Platinum Card from Navy Federal Credit Union

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on Navy Federal Credit Union’s secure website

The Platinum Card from Navy Federal Credit Union offers a 0% introductory APR for 12 months on balance transfers (after a 7.99% and 18.00% Variable APR). Note: This offer expires on Jan. 2, 2020. Since Navy Federal is a credit union, membership is required to open this card. You can qualify if you or one of your family or household members has ties to the armed forces, DoD or National Guard. Find out more about membership qualifications on Navy Federal.

5. Edward Jones World MasterCard® – Intro 0% for 12 billing cycles on balance transfers, NO FEE

Edward Jones World MasterCard®

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on Edward Jones’s secure website

You’ll need to go to an Edward Jones branch to open up an account first if you want this deal. Edward Jones is an investment advisory company, so they’ll want to have a conversation about your retirement needs. But you don’t need to have money in stocks to be a customer of Edward Jones and try to get this card. Just beware that you only have 60 days to complete your transfer to lock in the intro 0% for 12 billing cycles, and after the intro period a 14.99% Variable APR applies.

6. Choice Rewards World MasterCard® from First Tech FCU – Intro 0% for 12 months on balance transfers, NO FEE

Choice Rewards World MasterCard® from First Tech FCU

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on First Technology Federal Credit Union’s secure website

Anyone can join First Tech Federal Credit Union by becoming a member of the Financial Fitness Association for $8, or the Computer History Museum for $15. You can apply for the card without joining first. The Choice Rewards World MasterCard® from First Tech FCU offers an intro 0% for 12 months on balances transferred within first 90 days of account opening and does not charge balance transfer fees. After the intro period, an APR of 12.24%-18.00% variable applies. You also Earn 20,000 Rewards Points when you spend $3,000 in your first two months.

7. Rewards Visa Card from La Capitol FCU – Intro 0% interest on balance transfers for 12 months*, NO FEE

Rewards Visa Card from La Capitol FCU

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on La Capitol Federal Credit Union’s secure website

Anyone can join La Capitol Federal Credit Union by becoming a member of the Louisiana Association for Personal Financial Achievement, which costs $20. Just indicate that that’s how you want to be eligible when you apply for the card – no need to join before you apply. And La Capitol accepts members from all across the country, so you don’t have to live in Louisiana to take advantage of this deal on the Rewards Visa Card from La Capitol FCU. The card offers an introductory 0% interest on balance transfers for 12 months within first 90 days of account opening*. After the intro period, a 12.50%-18.00% variable APR applies.

8. Visa® Signature Credit Card from Purdue FCU – Intro 0% for 12 months on balance transfers and purchases, NO FEE

Visa® Signature Credit Card from Purdue FCU

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on Purdue FCU’s secure website

The card offers an intro of 0% for 12 months. After the intro period ends, 11.50%-17.50% Fixed APR applies. The Purdue Federal Credit Union doesn’t have open membership, but one way to be eligible for credit union membership is to join the Purdue University Alumni Association as a Friend of the University.

Anyone can join the association, but it costs $50. The good news is you can apply and get a decision before you become a member of the Alumni Association.

9. Premier America Credit Union – 0% Intro APR for 6 months on balance transfers and purchases, NO FEE

Premier Privileges Rewards Mastercard® from Premier America CU

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on Premier America Credit Union’s secure website

Premier America is unique because it has the Student Mastercard® from Premier America CU that’s eligible for the intro 0% for 6 months on balance transfers, though credit limits on that card are $500 – $2,000. There is an 11.75% Variable APR after the intro period. There’s also a card for those with no credit history – the Premier First Rewards Privileges® from Premier America CU, with limits of $1,000 – $2,000 and a 19.50% Variable APR. If you’re looking for a bigger line, the Premier Privileges Rewards Mastercard® from Premier America CU is available with limits up to $50,000 and a 8.45% - 17.95% Variable APR.

Anyone can join Premier America by becoming a member of the Alliance for the Arts. You can select that option when you apply.

Other 0% intro APR cards to consider

10. Visa Platinum Card from Money One FCU – as low as 0% intro APR for 6 months on balance transfers and purchases, NO FEE

Visa Platinum Card from Money One FCU

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on Money One Federal’s secure website

Anyone can join Money One Federal by making a $20 donation to Gifts of Easter Seals. And you can apply without being a member. You’ll see a drop down option during the application process that lets you select Gifts of Easter Seals as the way you plan to become a member of the credit union. Credit lines for the Visa Platinum Card from Money One FCU are as high as $25,000. After the as low as 0% intro apr for 6 months, there’s a 8.75% to 18.00% Variable APR.

11. Andigo Credit Union – Intro 0% for 6 months on balance transfers and purchases, NO FEE

Visa Platinum Card from Andigo

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on Andigo’s secure website

You’ll have a choice to apply for the Visa Platinum Cash Back Card from Andigo, Visa Platinum Rewards Card from Andigo, or Visa Platinum Card from Andigo. The Visa Platinum Card from Andigo has a lower ongoing APR at 11.65% - 20.65% Variable, compared to 12.24% - 21.24% Variable for the Visa Platinum Cash Back Card from Andigo and 13.65% - 22.65% Variable for the Visa Platinum Rewards Card from Andigo. So, if you’re not sure you’ll pay it all off in 6 months, the Visa Platinum Card from Andigo is a better bet.

Anyone can join Andigo by making a donation to Connect Vets for $15, and you can submit an application for the card without being a member yet.

12. ETFCU's Platinum Rewards Credit Card – Intro 0% for 6 first billing cycles on balance transfers, NO FEE

ETFCU's Platinum Rewards Credit Card

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on Evansville Teachers Federal Credit Union’s secure website

You don’t need to be a teacher to join this credit union. Just make a $5 donation to Mater Dei Friends & Alumni Association. The ETFCU's Platinum Rewards Credit Card has an ongoing APR of 10.50% to 18.00% Variable, so you can enjoy a decent rate even after the intro deal ends.

13. Elements Financial Platinum Visa® Credit Card – Intro 0% for 6 months on balance transfers and purchases, NO FEE

Elements Financial Platinum Visa® Credit Card

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on ELFCU’s secure website

To become a member and apply, you’ll just need to join TruDirection, a financial literacy organization. It costs just $5 and you can join as part of the application process. The ongoing APR is 11.24% Variable which is lower than typical cards.

14. Justice Federal Credit Union – Intro 0% for 6 months on purchases, balance transfers, and cash advances, NO FEE

Student VISA® Rewards Credit Card from Justice FCU

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on Justice Federal Credit Union’s secure website

If you’re not a Department of Justice, Homeland Security, or U.S. court employee (or a few others), you need to join a law enforcement organization to be a member of Justice Federal. One of the eligible associations for membership is the National Native American Law Enforcement Association. It costs $15 to join.

You can apply as a non-member online to get a decision before joining. And Justice is unique in that the Student VISA® Rewards Credit Card from Justice FCU is also eligible for the intro 0% for 6 months on purchases, balance transfers, and cash advances. So, if your credit history is limited and you’re trying to deal with a balance on your very first card, this could be an option. The APR after the intro period ends is 16.90% fixed.

15. Platinum Visa Card from Michigan State FCU – Intro 0% for 6 months on balance transfers, NO FEE

Platinum Visa Card from Michigan State FCU

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on Michigan State University Federal Credit Union’s secure website

There is the option to apply for the Cash Back Platinum Plus Visa Credit Card from Michigan State FCU or the Platinum Visa Card from Michigan State FCU. The Platinum Visa Card from Michigan State FCU has a lower ongoing APR at 9.90% APR - 17.90% variable, compared to the 13.90% APR - 17.90% variable APR for the Cash Back Platinum Plus Visa Credit Card from Michigan State FCU which can earn 1% cash back on all purchases. Anyone can join the Michigan State University Federal Credit Union by first becoming a member of the Michigan United Conservation Clubs. However, this comes at a high fee of $30 for one year.

Are these the best deals for you?

If you can pay off your debt within the 0% period, then yes, a no fee 0% balance transfer credit card is your absolute best bet. And if you can’t, you can hope that other 0% deals will be around to switch again.

But if you’re unsure, you might want to consider…

  • A deal that has a longer period before the rate goes up. In that case, a balance transfer fee could be worth it to lock in a 0% rate for longer.
  • Or, a card with a rate a little above 0% that could lock you into a low rate even longer.

The good news is we can figure it out for you.

Our handy, free balance transfer tool lets you input how much debt you have, and how much of a monthly payment you can afford. It will run the numbers to show you which offers will save you the most for the longest period of time.

promo balancetransfer wide

The savings from just one balance transfer can be substantial.

Let’s say you have $5,000 in credit card debt, you’re paying 18% in interest, and can afford to pay $200 a month on it. Here’s what you can save with a 0% deal:

  • 18%: It will take 32 months to pay off, with $1,312 in interest paid.
  • 0% for 12 months: You’ll pay it off in 28 months, with just $502 in interest, saving you $810 in cash. That even assumes your rate goes back up to 18% after 12 months!

But your rate doesn’t have to go up after 12 months. If you pay everything on time and maintain good credit, there’s a great chance you’ll be able to shop around and find another bank willing to offer you 0% interest again, letting you pay it off even faster.

Before you do any balance transfer though, make sure you follow these 6 golden rules of balance transfer success:

  • Never use the card for spending. You are only ready to do a balance transfer once you’ve gotten your budget in order and are no longer spending more than you earn. This card should never be used for new purchases, as it’s possible you’ll get charged a higher rate on those purchases.
  • Have a plan for the end of the promotional period. Make sure you set a reminder on your phone calendar about a month or so before your promotional period ends so you can shop around for a low rate from another bank.
  • Don’t try to transfer debt between two cards of the same bank. It won’t work. Balance transfer deals are meant to ‘steal’ your balance from a competing bank, not lower your rate from the same bank. So if you have a Chase card with a high rate, don’t apply for another Chase card like a Chase Slate® and expect you can transfer the balance. Apply for one from another bank.
  • Get that transfer done within 60 days. Otherwise your promotional deal may expire unused.
  • Never use a card at an ATM. You should never use the card for spending, and getting cash is incredibly expensive. Just don’t do it with this or any credit card.
  • Always pay on time. If you pay more than 30 days late your credit will be hurt, your rate may go up, and you may find it harder to find good deals in the future. Only do balance transfers if you’re ready to pay at least the minimum due on time, every time.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Alexandria White
Alexandria White |

Alexandria White is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Alexandria at [email protected]

MagnifyMoney

Advertiser Disclosure

Balance Transfer, Best of, Pay Down My Debt

Best 0% APR Credit Card Offers – September 2019

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any credit card issuer. This site may be compensated through a credit card issuer partnership.

There are a lot of 0% APR credit card deals in your mailbox and online, but most of them slap you with a 3 to 4% fee just to make a transfer, and that can seriously eat into your savings.

At MagnifyMoney we like to find deals no one else is showing, and we’ve searched hundreds of balance transfer credit card offers to find the banks and credit unions that ANYONE CAN JOIN which offer great 0% interest credit card deals AND no balance transfer fees. We’ve hand-picked them here.

If one 0% APR credit card doesn’t give you a big enough credit line you can try another bank or credit union for the rest of your debt. With several no fee options it’s not hard to avoid transfer fees even if you have a large balance to deal with.

1. The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express – Introductory 0% for 15 Months on balance transfers and purchases, $0 balance transfer fee.

This offer edges out competitors with the longest 0% intro period and standout perks. The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express has increased value with an intro 0% for 15 Months on purchases and balance transfers, then 14.99%-25.99% Variable APR and a $0 balance transfer fee. (For transfers requested within 60 days of account opening.) In addition to the great balance transfer offer, you can earn rewards — 2x points at US supermarkets, on up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1x), 1x points on other purchases.

The information related to The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express has been collected by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card prior to publication.

2. BankAmericard® credit card0% Introductory APR on purchases for 18 billing cycles, $0 Introductory Balance Transfer Fee

Cardholders can benefit from an 0% Introductory APR on purchases for 18 billing cycles and an introductory $0 balance transfer fee for the first 60 days your account is open. After that, the fee for future balance transfers is either $10 or 3% of the amount of each transaction, whichever is greater. Once the intro period ends, there is a 14.99% - 24.99% Variable APR. You can benefit from a $0 annual fee and access to your free FICO® Score.

The information related to BankAmericard® credit card has been collected by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card prior to publication.

When to consider a fee

While no-fee balance transfer cards are great, sometimes it may be worthwhile to consider a balance transfer card with a balance transfer fee. The fee will be a percentage — typically 3% or 5% — of the total amount you transfer, but cards that charge balance transfer fees often have longer intro periods. If you can’t afford the high monthly payments required to pay off your balance before the end of a 15-month intro period, a card offering a longer intro period — such as 18 months — can provide lower monthly payments while still allowing you to pay off your balance before the end of the intro period. Below, we provide an example that should help you decide when you should consider a fee.

For this example, we’re assuming $6,354 in credit card debt, which is the average balance Americans have, according to Experian’s 2017 State of Credit report.

By choosing the card offering an intro 0% for 18 months and a 3% transfer fee, you’ll only have to pay $364 a month to pay your debt and the balance transfer fee off in full during the intro period. That’s $60 less than the $424 monthly payment required by the card with an intro 0% for 15 months. Just beware that while you’re saving month to month, overall, you will end up paying about $190 more due to the balance transfer fee.

If you need a longer intro period and lower monthly payment, we recommend the Discover it® Balance Transfer or the Wells Fargo Platinum card. The Discover it® Balance Transfer offers an intro 0% for 18 months on balance transfers (after, 13.99% - 24.99% Variable APR) and has a 3% intro balance transfer fee, up to 5% fee on future balance transfers (see terms)*

The Wells Fargo Platinum card has an intro 0% for 18 months on qualifying balance transfers and has a 3% for 120 days, then 5% balance transfer fee. After the intro period, it has a 17.49%-26.99% (Variable) APR.

Discover it® Balance Transfer

APPLY NOW Secured

on Discover Bank’s secure website

Rates & Fees

Discover it® Balance Transfer

Intro BT APR
0% for 18 months
Regular APR
13.99% - 24.99% Variable
Balance Transfer Fee
3% intro balance transfer fee, up to 5% fee on future balance transfers (see terms)*
Credit required
good-credit
Excellent/Good

Wells Fargo Platinum card

The information related to Wells Fargo Platinum card has been collected by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card prior to publication.

Wells Fargo Platinum card

Intro Purchase APR
0% for 18 months
Intro BT APR
0% for 18 months on qualifying balance transfers
Regular Purchase APR
17.49%-26.99% (Variable)
Annual fee
$0
Credit required
good-credit
Excellent/Good

3. Chase Slate® – 0% Intro APR on Balance Transfers for 15 months and 0% Intro APR on Purchases for 15 months, $0 Introductory Balance Transfer Fee

This deal is easy to find – Chase is one of the biggest banks and makes this credit card deal well known. Save with a 0% intro apr on balance transfers for 15 months and intro $0 on transfers made within 60 days of account opening. after that: either $5 or 5%, whichever is greater. You also get a 0% Intro APR on Purchases for 15 months on purchases and balance transfers, and $0 annual fee. After the intro period, the APR is currently 16.99% - 25.74% Variable. Plus, see monthly updates to your free FICO® Score and the reasons behind your score for free.’

The information related to the Chase Slate® has been collected by MagnifyMoney and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card prior to publication.

4. Platinum Card from Navy Federal Credit Union – 0% introductory APR for 12 months on balance transfers, NO FEE

Platinum Card from Navy Federal Credit Union

APPLY NOW Secured

on Navy Federal Credit Union’s secure website

The Platinum Card from Navy Federal Credit Union offers a 0% introductory APR for 12 months on balance transfers (after a 7.99% and 18.00% Variable APR). Note: This offer expires on Jan. 2, 2020. Since Navy Federal is a credit union, membership is required to open this card. You can qualify if you or one of your family or household members has ties to the armed forces, DoD or National Guard. Find out more about membership qualifications on Navy Federal.

5. Edward Jones World MasterCard® – Intro 0% for 12 billing cycles on balance transfers, NO FEE

Edward Jones World MasterCard®

APPLY NOW Secured

on Edward Jones’s secure website

You’ll need to go to an Edward Jones branch to open up an account first if you want this deal. Edward Jones is an investment advisory company, so they’ll want to have a conversation about your retirement needs. But you don’t need to have money in stocks to be a customer of Edward Jones and try to get this card. Just beware that you only have 60 days to complete your transfer to lock in the intro 0% for 12 billing cycles, and after the intro period a 14.99% Variable APR applies.

6. Choice Rewards World MasterCard® from First Tech FCU – Intro 0% for 12 months on balance transfers, NO FEE

Choice Rewards World MasterCard® from First Tech FCU

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on First Technology Federal Credit Union’s secure website

Anyone can join First Tech Federal Credit Union by becoming a member of the Financial Fitness Association for $8, or the Computer History Museum for $15. You can apply for the card without joining first. The intro 0% for 12 months and no transfer fee on balances transferred within first 90 days of account opening is for the Choice Rewards World MasterCard® from First Tech FCU. After the intro period, an APR of 12.24%-18.00% variable applies. You also Earn 20,000 Rewards Points when you spend $3,000 in your first two months.

7. Rewards Visa Card from La Capitol FCU – Intro 0% interest on balance transfers for 12 months on balance transfers, NO FEE

Rewards Visa Card from La Capitol FCU

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on La Capitol Federal Credit Union’s secure website

Anyone can join La Capitol Federal Credit Union by becoming a member of the Louisiana Association for Personal Financial Achievement, which costs $20. Just indicate that’s how you want to be eligible when you apply for the card – no need to join before you apply. And La Capitol accepts members from all across the country, so you don’t have to live in Louisiana to take advantage of this deal on the Rewards Visa Card from La Capitol FCU. The introductory 0% interest on balance transfers for 12 months on balance transfers applies to balances transferred within first 90 days of account opening. After the intro period, a 12.50%-18.00% variable APR applies.

8. Visa® Signature Credit Card from Purdue FCU – Intro 0% for 12 months on balance transfers and purchases, NO FEE

Visa® Signature Credit Card from Purdue FCU

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on Purdue FCU’s secure website

The intro 0% for 12 months offer is only for their Visa® Signature Credit Card – other cards have a higher intro rate. After the intro period ends, 11.50%-17.50% Fixed APR applies. The Purdue Federal Credit Union doesn’t have open membership, but one way to be eligible for credit union membership is to join the Purdue University Alumni Association as a Friend of the University.

Anyone can join the association, but it costs $50. The good news is you can apply and get a decision before you become a member of the Alumni Association.

9. Premier America Credit Union – 0% Intro APR for 6 months on balance transfers and purchases, NO FEE

Premier Privileges Rewards Mastercard® from Premier America CU

APPLY NOW Secured

on Premier America Credit Union’s secure website

Premier America is unique because it has the Student Mastercard® from Premier America CU that’s eligible for the intro 0% for 6 months on balance transfers, though credit limits on that card are $500 – $2,000. There is an 11.75% Variable APR after the intro period. There’s also a card for those with no credit history – the Premier First Rewards Privileges® from Premier America CU, with limits of $1,000 – $2,000 and a 19.50% Variable APR. If you’re looking for a bigger line, the Premier Privileges Rewards Mastercard® from Premier America CU is available with limits up to $50,000 and a 8.45% - 17.95% Variable APR.

Anyone can join Premier America by becoming a member of the Alliance for the Arts. You can select that option when you apply.

Other 0% intro APR cards to consider

10. Visa Platinum Card from Money One FCU – as low as 0% intro APR for 6 months on balance transfers and purchases, NO FEE

Visa Platinum Card from Money One FCU

APPLY NOW Secured

on Money One Federal’s secure website

Anyone can join Money One Federal by making a $20 donation to Gifts of Easter Seals. And you can apply without being a member. You’ll see a drop down option during the application process that lets you select Gifts of Easter Seals as the way you plan to become a member of the credit union. Credit lines for the Visa Platinum Card from Money One FCU are as high as $25,000. After the as low as 0% intro apr for 6 months, there’s a 8.75% to 18.00% Variable APR.

11. Andigo Credit Union – Intro 0% for 6 months on balance transfers and purchases, NO FEE

Visa Platinum Card from Andigo

APPLY NOW Secured

on Andigo’s secure website

You’ll have a choice to apply for the Visa Platinum Cash Back Card from Andigo, Visa Platinum Rewards Card from Andigo, or Visa Platinum Card from Andigo. The Visa Platinum Card from Andigo has a lower ongoing APR at 11.65% - 20.65% Variable, compared to 12.24% - 21.24% Variable for the Visa Platinum Cash Back Card from Andigo and 13.65% - 22.65% Variable for the Visa Platinum Rewards Card from Andigo. So, if you’re not sure you’ll pay it all off in 6 months, the Visa Platinum Card from Andigo is a better bet.

Anyone can join Andigo by making a donation to Connect Vets for $15, and you can submit an application for the card without being a member yet.

12. ETFCU's Platinum Rewards Credit Card – Intro 0% for 6 first billing cycles on balance transfers, NO FEE

ETFCU's Platinum Rewards Credit Card

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on Evansville Teachers Federal Credit Union’s secure website

You don’t need to be a teacher to join this credit union. Just make a $5 donation to Mater Dei Friends & Alumni Association. The ETFCU's Platinum Rewards Credit Card has an ongoing APR of 10.50% to 18.00% Variable, so you can enjoy a decent rate even after the intro deal ends.

13. Elements Financial Platinum Visa® Credit Card – Intro 0% for 6 months on balance transfers and purchases, NO FEE

Elements Financial Platinum Visa® Credit Card

APPLY NOW Secured

on ELFCU’s secure website

To become a member and apply, you’ll just need to join TruDirection, a financial literacy organization. It costs just $5 and you can join as part of the application process. The ongoing APR is 11.24% Variable which is lower than typical cards.

14. Justice Federal Credit Union – Intro 0% for 6 months on purchases, balance transfers, and cash advances, NO FEE

Student VISA® Rewards Credit Card from Justice FCU

APPLY NOW Secured

on Justice Federal Credit Union’s secure website

If you’re not a Department of Justice, Homeland Security, or U.S. court employee (or a few others), you need to join a law enforcement organization to be a member of Justice Federal. One of the eligible associations for membership is the National Native American Law Enforcement Association. It costs $15 to join.

You can apply as a non-member online to get a decision before joining. And Justice is unique in that the Student VISA® Rewards Credit Card from Justice FCU is also eligible for the intro 0% for 6 months on purchases, balance transfers, and cash advances. So, if your credit history is limited and you’re trying to deal with a balance on your very first card, this could be an option. The APR after the intro period ends is 16.90% fixed.

15. Platinum Visa Card from Michigan State FCU – Intro 0% for 6 months on balance transfers, NO FEE

Platinum Visa Card from Michigan State FCU

APPLY NOW Secured

on Michigan State University Federal Credit Union’s secure website

There is the option to apply for the Cash Back Platinum Plus Visa Credit Card from Michigan State FCU or the Platinum Visa Card from Michigan State FCU. The Platinum Visa Card from Michigan State FCU has a lower ongoing APR at 9.90% APR - 17.90% variable, compared to the 13.90% APR - 17.90% variable APR for the Cash Back Platinum Plus Visa Credit Card from Michigan State FCU which can earn 1% cash back on all purchases. Anyone can join the Michigan State University Federal Credit Union by first becoming a member of the Michigan United Conservation Clubs. However, this comes at a high fee of $30 for one year.

Are these the best deals for you?

If you can pay off your debt within the 0% period, then yes, a no fee 0% balance transfer credit card is your absolute best bet. And if you can’t, you can hope that other 0% deals will be around to switch again.

But if you’re unsure, you might want to consider…

  • A deal that has a longer period before the rate goes up. In that case, a balance transfer fee could be worth it to lock in a 0% rate for longer.
  • Or, a card with a rate a little above 0% that could lock you into a low rate even longer.

The good news is we can figure it out for you.

Our handy, free balance transfer tool lets you input how much debt you have, and how much of a monthly payment you can afford. It will run the numbers to show you which offers will save you the most for the longest period of time.

promo balancetransfer wide

The savings from just one balance transfer can be substantial.

Let’s say you have $5,000 in credit card debt, you’re paying 18% in interest, and can afford to pay $200 a month on it. Here’s what you can save with a 0% deal:

  • 18%: It will take 32 months to pay off, with $1,312 in interest paid.
  • 0% for 12 months: You’ll pay it off in 28 months, with just $502 in interest, saving you $810 in cash. That even assumes your rate goes back up to 18% after 12 months!

But your rate doesn’t have to go up after 12 months. If you pay everything on time and maintain good credit, there’s a great chance you’ll be able to shop around and find another bank willing to offer you 0% interest again, letting you pay it off even faster.

Before you do any balance transfer though, make sure you follow these 6 golden rules of balance transfer success:

  • Never use the card for spending. You are only ready to do a balance transfer once you’ve gotten your budget in order and are no longer spending more than you earn. This card should never be used for new purchases, as it’s possible you’ll get charged a higher rate on those purchases.
  • Have a plan for the end of the promotional period. Make sure you set a reminder on your phone calendar about a month or so before your promotional period ends so you can shop around for a low rate from another bank.
  • Don’t try to transfer debt between two cards of the same bank. It won’t work. Balance transfer deals are meant to ‘steal’ your balance from a competing bank, not lower your rate from the same bank. So if you have a Chase credit card with a high rate, don’t apply for another Chase card like a Chase Slate® and expect you can transfer the balance. Apply for one from another bank.
  • Get that transfer done within 60 days. Otherwise your promotional deal may expire unused.
  • Never use a card at an ATM. You should never use the card for spending, and getting cash is incredibly expensive. Just don’t do it with this or any credit card.
  • Always pay on time. If you pay more than 30 days late your credit will be hurt, your rate may go up, and you may find it harder to find good deals in the future. Only do balance transfers if you’re ready to pay at least the minimum due on time, every time.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Alexandria White
Alexandria White |

Alexandria White is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Alexandria at [email protected]

MagnifyMoney