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Personal Loans

LendingPoint Personal Loan Review

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Disclosure : By clicking “See Offers” you’ll be directed to our parent company, LendingTree. You may or may not be matched with the specific lender you clicked on, but up to five different lenders based on your creditworthiness.

APR

9.99%
To
35.99%

Credit Req.

600

Minimum Credit Score

Terms

24 to 48

months

Origination Fee

0.00% - 6.00%

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on LendingTree’s secure website

LendingPoint is an online lender that targets borrowers with fair credit, and allows borrowing up to $25,000.... Read More

LendingPoint personal loan details
 

Fees and penalties

  • Terms: 24 to 48 months
  • APR range: 9.99% to 35.99%
  • Loan amounts: $2,000 to $25,000
  • Time to funding: After the final approval, funds may be transferred in up to 1 to 2 business days, though often as soon as the next business day.
  • Hard pull/soft pull: LendingPoint conducts a soft pull when you first apply for a personal loan quote. After you review the loan offer(s) and select one, a hard pull will then be done to move forward with the final loan approval process.
  • Origination fee: The 0.00% - 6.00%, depending on your state of residence and credit history.
  • Prepayment fee: None
  • Late payment fee: Varies

Many lenders are strict about how many loans you can have at one time, sometimes maxing out at one per borrower. However, LendingPoint may allow you to take out two loans at once, depending on your current loan’s standing and your overall credit history. Being able to take out another personal loan can be helpful if a new financial issue comes up, such as an unexpected home repair, where you need more funds than your current loan can’t cover.

LendingPoint’s personal loans may be used for many different financial reasons. Whether you need to pay for an upcoming home renovation, you need funds to buy a car or need help paying off a medical bill your insurance won’t cover, a personal loan with LendingPoint can help. These personal loans can also be used to help consolidate your debt and refinance your credit cards.

Eligibility requirements

  • Minimum credit score: 600
  • Minimum credit history: LendingPoint looks at your overall financial potential to help determine whether you’re a good candidate for a personal loan, but it will only consider those who can show income of at least $20,000 a year.
  • Maximum debt-to-income ratio: 35%

All borrowers must be at least 18 years old and reside in one of LendingPoint’s 34 designated states or Washington, D.C. Borrowers are encouraged to show consistent employment history for at least the past 12 months and must have a bank account.

LendingPoint does not offer loans in:

  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Iowa
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Nevada
  • New York
  • North Dakota
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • Vermont
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

Applying for a personal loan from LendingPoint

To begin the application process with LendingPoint, you’ll first need to provide basic background information, such as your name, date of birth, Social Security number, and annual income. This is the pre-approval process which will generate one or more loan offers in just a few minutes.

If you choose one of the offers and agree with the terms and rates, you will then need to provide any additional information and documents LendingPoint may request, including your driver’s license, bank statements (with voided check) and proof of income. Once all documents have been received and reviewed, a final loan approval can happen in a few hours, and your funds can possibly be distributed to your bank account within the next business day.

Pros and cons of a LendingPoint personal loan

Pros:

Cons:

  • No prepayment penalty. If you decide to pay off your loan before your term is up, LendingPoint will not charge you a prepayment penalty.
  • Fast approval and funding. Many borrowers are pre-approved for a personal loan within just minutes and approved for the actual loan within hours. Borrowers can possibly receive funds in their bank account the next business day.
  • Works with borrowers with fair credit. LendingPoint provides personal loans to borrowers with fair credit.
  • Bankruptcy is not grounds for automatic disqualification. Borrowers with a discharged bankruptcy of 12 months or more can still apply for a personal loan with LendingPoint. Your credit history, income and discharged bankruptcy timeframe will all be determining factors.
  • No joint or cosigner loans. Some lenders allow you to have a cosigner with a higher credit score in order to qualify for a better personal loan rate. That is not the case with LendingPoint’s personal loans, as they are based only on your individual credit history.
  • Fluctuating payment schedule. Your monthly due date may change because LendingPoint uses a 28-day payment cycle.
  • Higher interest rates. LendingPoint may work with borrowers with fair credit, but that can mean higher interest rates when compared with other lenders.
  • Origination fee. Many lenders don’t charge an origination fee for personal loans, which is why LendingPoint’s possible charge of up to 6.00% can be off-putting.

Who’s the best fit for a LendingPoint personal loan

If you have fair credit and meet the income requirements, LendingPoint could be a good option, especially if you need funds fast. The lack of a prepayment penalty is a plus, but other lenders offer lower rates, even for those with less than ideal credit.

It’s always a good idea to search and compare personal loans before making a final decision. Shop around to find the best personal loans with a rate and term ideal for your financial needs while also keeping an eye out for any fees associated with the loans, including origination fees. LendingPoint may be the best fit for you, but you should take some time to compare with others to know for sure.

Alternative personal loan options

Peerform

Peerform
APR

5.99%
To
29.99%

Credit Req.

600

Minimum Credit Score

Terms

36 or 60

months

Origination Fee

1.00% - 5.00%

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on Peerform’s secure website

Even with a credit score of 600, you still might be able to secure a loan through Peerform. ... Read More


Peerform offers lower fixed rates ranging from 5.99% to 29.99% with loan amounts starting at $4,000 and maxing out at $25,000; terms are between 36 or 60 months. Similar to LendingPoint, there are no prepayment penalties should you want to pay off your loan in advance, but there may be an origination fee that varies from 1.00% - 5.00%. There are other fees to consider with Peerform as well — these include late fees, unsuccessful payment fees, and check processing fees, all of which can range around $15 each.

LendingClub

APR

6.95%
To
35.89%

Credit Req.

600

Minimum Credit Score

Terms

36 or 60

months

Origination Fee

1.00% - 6.00%

SEE OFFERS Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website

LendingClub is a great tool for borrowers that can offer competitive interest rates and approvals for people with credit scores as low as 600.... Read More


While LendingPoint allows borrowers to take up to $25,000, LendingClub offers loans up to $40,000 which is good for those looking to borrow more money. However, you will likely have to wait a little longer to receive the funds — LendingClub’s earliest distribution is within 7 business days. There are no prepayment penalties, but LendingClub charges an origination fee of anywhere from 1.00% - 6.00%, and you could also be charged a check processing fee or late payment fee. Credit history, the loan amount and any other outstanding debt are some of the factors used to determine the APR, which usually ranges from 6.95% to 35.89%.

OneMain Financial

APR

16.05%
To
35.99%

Credit Req.

Varies

Minimum Credit Score

Terms

24 to 60

months

Origination Fee

Varies

SEE OFFERS Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website

Advertiser Disclosure

If you have a credit score below 600, OneMain Financial is one of the few lenders that you can use to get a personal loan.... Read More


All loans subject to OneMain’s normal credit policies. Loan approval and actual loan terms depend on your ability to meet OneMain’s standard credit criteria (including credit history, income and debts) and the availability of collateral. Collateral requirements would include a first lien on a motor vehicle that meets our value requirements, titled in your name with valid insurance. Collateral offered must meet our criteria. The lowest annual percentage rate (APR) shown represents APRs for top 10% of loans closed. Maximum APR is 35.99%, subject to state restrictions. APRs are generally higher on loans not secured by a vehicle. Active duty military, their spouse or dependents covered under the Military Lending Act may not pledge any vehicle as collateral for a loan. OneMain loan proceeds cannot be used for postsecondary educational expenses as defined by the CFPB’s Regulation Z, such as college, university or vocational expenses; for any business or commercial purpose; to purchase securities; or for gambling or illegal purposes. Residents in the following states are subject to the following loan size restrictions: Alabama residents: $2,100 minimum loan amount. California residents: $3,000 minimum loan amount. Florida residents: Unless you are a present customer, $8,000 maximum loan amount for unsecured loans. Georgia residents: Unless you are a present customer, $3,100 minimum loan amount. Iowa residents: Unless you are a present customer, $8,500 maximum loan amount for unsecured loans. Maine residents: Unless you are a present customer, $7,000 maximum loan amount for unsecured loans. Mississippi residents: Unless you are a present customer, $7,500 maximum loan amount for unsecured loans. North Carolina residents: Unless you are a present customer, $7,500 maximum loan amount for unsecured loans. New York residents: Unless you are a present customer, $20,000 maximum loan amount for unsecured loans. Ohio residents: $2,000 minimum loan amount. Texas residents: Unless you are a present customer, $8,000 maximum loan amount for unsecured loans. Virginia residents: $2,600 minimum loan amount. West Virginia residents: Unless you are a present customer, $7,500 maximum loan amount for unsecured loans. An unsecured loan is a loan which does not require you to provide collateral (such as a motor vehicle) to the lender.


OneMain Financial has issued loans for more than 100 years and, similar to LendingPoint, can have money in your hands within the next business day after final approval. Loan amounts are from $1,500 to $30,000 with an APR range of 16.05% to 35.99%. Borrowers are eligible for terms of 24 to 60 months, depending on your credit and financial history and any other debts you may have. Credit score requirements vary and all personal loans have fixed rates and payments without any prepayment penalties. You may be able to get a loan offer within minutes when you apply online but will need to meet with a loan specialist in person for final approval.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Carissa Chesanek
Carissa Chesanek |

Carissa Chesanek is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Carissa here

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Personal Loans

Here’s Why You Should Avoid Cosigning a Loan for a Friend

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

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You’re in a tricky situation: your friend, who you love and care about deeply, has come to you asking for your help getting a loan that they desperately need. You know the loan could benefit your friend, but you’re also unsure of the risks behind cosigning a loan.

The most important step you can take is to learn why cosigning a loan for a friend is rarely a good idea. That way, you can understand why you probably should avoid it.

Should you cosign a loan for a friend?

In general, you may want to avoid cosign a loan for a friend. Here’s why:

  • You become legally responsible for the loan. In the eyes of the lender, the full loan amount is 100% yours. That means if your friend doesn’t make payments, the two of you will be held responsible.
  • Your credit score could be affected. Should your friend miss even one payment, your credit score could be negatively impacted since the loan is considered to be in your name too. And if the borrower defaults on the loan completely, it could impact your credit score even more.
  • You could damage your friendship. Consider the risks to the relationship with the person you are cosigning a loan for if they are unable to pay back the loan. Is the risk of ruining your friendship worth it?
  • You could lose personal property. If a loan — such as a personal loan — requires any collateral, such as your car, house or other personal asset, you are at risk of losing your property should your friend default on the loan.

Reasons why you may or may not choose to cosign a loan

Here’s a more comprehensive look at reasons why you might choose not to cosign a loan:

  • You can’t afford the loan. You should not take the risk on of cosigning a loan unless you can afford to pay the loan in its entirety. Otherwise, you could liable in court or even have your assets seized as part of your state’s collection practices.
  • You need a loan for yourself. If you know you will need your own loan soon, cosigning a friend’s loan could prevent you from being eligible for a loan for yourself.
  • You’re concerned about your credit score. If you’ve had a history of bad credit, are trying to build up your own credit or just don’t want to see your credit score negatively affected, you need to be aware that cosigning a loan could hurt your own credit score if your friend misses payments or defaults on the loan all together.
  • Your friend has a history of bad financial decisions. You should know why your friend needs a loan. It’s within your right to decide that you won’t cosign a loan if you don’t agree with how they’ll use loan funds. If your friend tends to rack up debt, you’re also free to explain to your friend that you don’t feel confident they need the added debt.

That being said, there may be a few circumstances where it is acceptable to cosign a loan for a friend. For example:

  • You can afford to pay the loan completely. If you cosign a loan, you are agreeing to be responsible for the loan amount in the event that your friend is unable to pay it. So, if you can afford to pay off the entire loan amount and are willing to do so, you could cosign a loan with less risk of hurting your own finances. Aside from the money you’d be out for the loan amount, of course.
  • The loan is for both of you. If you are purchasing something together, cosigning a loan might be a logical move, as you will both be utilizing the item or asset. For family members, a parent might choose to cosign a loan so their child could potentially consolidate student loan debt at a lower interest rate.
  • You’re willing to take on the risk. Maybe you feel like your friend has no other options, this is a necessary step and you are fully aware of the risks involved. In that case, cosigning a loan is a personal decision that only you can make.

How to protect yourself when cosigning a loan

If you do decide to cosign a loan with a friend or someone else, you should also take steps to protect yourself as much as possible before the loan is enacted. You can minimize your risk by taking actions such as:

  • Don’t put down personal assets as collateral. If you’re willing to cosign on a loan, you shouldn’t wager more than that. Using your home, car or other personal asset as collateral only increases your risk.
  • Establish expectations in advance. You should sit down with your friend to establish expectations for the loan and repayment. It’s helpful if you can set out a plan in writing about the consequences if your friend misses payments or is unable to fully repay the loan.
  • Stay on top of the loan. Although it is recommended that you keep close tabs on the borrower to ensure that they are repaying the loan on time each month, you could also ask the creditor to inform you of any missed or late payments automatically. If the lender has an online system, you and your friend could also share the account information. That way, you could easily log into your account to review payment information.
  • Try negotiating loan terms. Rules will vary by lender and state, but you may be able to negotiate what you’re responsible for as a cosigner, such as limiting your liability to the loan principal balance instead of the full principal and interest amount. You can also try to negotiate responsibility for late fees, attorney fees or accrued court costs.

Other ways of helping your friend

Outside of cosigning a loan for your friend, there may be other ways that you can help, such as:

  • Assisting with a down payment. Perhaps you can’t afford to take on the risk of cosigning an entire loan for your friend, but you may be able to help them put together a down payment so that they may qualify for a conventional loan.
  • Lend them the money directly. To ensure that you would not be legally responsible for your friend’s debt and to avoid possible damage to your own credit score, you could consider lending your friend the money they need directly, either as a lump sum or in installments. It is advisable to get all loan terms in writing and to have the loan contract notarized if you do choose to DIY a loan.

The bottom line

Although you may want to cosign a loan with a friend to help them, taking on the legal responsibility of someone else’s debt is usually not a good idea for most people. Agreeing to become a cosigner means you run the risk of being liable for the loan amount and the possibility of your own credit score taking a negative impact.

You should carefully consider the risks you are willing to take and take steps to minimize them before agreeing to cosign a loan for a friend. In most cases, unless you can fully afford and are willing to pay off the entire loan amount, the cons do outweigh the risk of cosigning on a loan for a friend.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Chaunie Brusie
Chaunie Brusie |

Chaunie Brusie is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Chaunie here

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Personal Loans

Should You Use a Personal Loan to Build Credit? What to Consider

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

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If you’ve been trying to build up your personal credit, you may have considered using a personal loan. Taking out a personal loan could show creditors that you can responsibly handle different kinds of debt and follow the terms to which you and your lender have agreed.

But how successful you are depends on your ability to pay the loan back within the given term limits. Here’s what you should consider before taking out a personal loan to build credit.

Pros vs. cons: Using a personal loan to build credit

There are both pros and cons to taking out a personal loan in an attempt to increase your credit score:

Pros

  • Add to your credit mix: A personal loan could help you diversify your credit mix, which accounts for 10% of your FICO score.
  • Stay current on payments: You could use a personal loan to refinance a debt or consolidate debts to a lower interest rate. Doing so could help ensure you stay current on payments, which positively impacts your credit.
  • May not have to put down collateral: An unsecured personal loan doesn’t require you to put up collateral to secure the loan. That means your house or other assets can’t be taken away if you default.
  • Lower your credit utilization ratio: A personal loan can also lower your credit utilization ratio if you pay off your credit card balance with your loan and keep the card open. Credit utilization is important factor in your FICO score, and it is basically the amount you owe divided by the total amount you have available to you. Personal loans don’t count toward it.

Cons

  • Fees, fees, fees: Depending on your credit score, you could be paying hefty interest fees over the length of the loan, in addition to any other fees your lender charges, such as prepayment penalties, late fees and origination fees.
  • Could increase your debt-to-income ratio: Taking out a personal loan could change your debt-to-income ratio. This could make future lenders less likely to let you borrow funds until some, or even most, of your personal loan is paid off.
  • Strict payment schedule: Personal loans are often issued for a period of between 24 to 60 months and offer little flexibility when it comes to adjusting payments. So if you lose your job or face other financial struggles, your lender may be unwilling to work with you to reduce or delay payments.

Is using a personal loan to build credit right for you?

A personal loan might make sense for you if your goal is to diversify your credit mix or lower your credit utilization ratio by paying off a credit card. It’s also a good option if you plan to use the funds at a lower interest rate to pay off other debt that’s charging you a higher interest rate.

A personal loan to build credit might not be a good option if you’re already struggling with paying off debt, if you have no prior credit history or if you could get a credit card with a lower rate of interest instead. If you can’t get a reasonable interest rate, a personal loan might not be a good choice, said David Gokhshtein, a New York-based member of the Forbes Finance Council.

“In most cases, people in this scenario already have lower credit scores, leading to very high interest rates they could be paying off indefinitely,” he said. “If the debt gets sent to a collection agency, it will further damage the person’s credit score.”

That said, it’s important you have a clear picture of your financial situation. Consider the following questions:

  • Is your credit score good enough to qualify for competitive interest rates?
  • Can you afford the cost of a personal loan?
  • Is taking out debt and repaying it with interest worth it to build your credit?
  • Do you have a good use for the funds?

Answering these questions could help you decide whether or not to move forward with this option.

How to take out a personal loan

The first thing you should do if you decide to get a personal loan is to check your credit score. A FICO score of 700, on a range that spans 300 to 850, indicates you have good credit and would be likely eligible for a variety of loan offers, including a personal loan at a reasonable rate of interest. Because FICO scores are seen as an accurate reflection of your creditworthiness, lenders rely on them in 90% of all decisions.

You’ll want to research your options for lenders before committing to a loan, as well. You can use MagnifyMoney’s personal loan marketplace to compare lenders. You may also look to local banks or credit unions.

If possible, apply for preapproval from your top lenders of choice. Preapproval will allow you to see rates and terms you might qualify for with a soft credit check, which won’t affect your credit score.

Consider the following when weighing your loan options:

  • Rates
  • Fees
  • Conditions
  • Lender perks, such as support in case of job loss

Once you decide on a lender, you can submit to a hard credit check to see your final rates and terms. Depending on the lender, you could get loan funds within a few business days.

Others strategies to improving your credit

Consider the following ways to build credit without accumulating any additional debt:

Get a credit builder loan. With this type of loan, the money you borrow is deposited into an interest-bearing account. As you make payments on the debt, your payments are reported to the credit bureaus. Once you pay off your debt, the loan funds and the interest they earned are released to you.

Charge only what you can pay in full each month. If you have a credit card, you could use to work on your credit. Just make sure you pay off the card in full each month. “It is imperative to create and use a simple budget to make sure you follow this rule,” said Freddie Huynh, the San Francisco-based vice president of credit risk analytics at Freedom Financial Network. “Being able to pay your bills on time is the most important factor in the calculation of your credit score, accounting for 35 percent.”

Review your credit reports regularly for accuracy and correct any errors you find. You can access credit reports from each of the three main credit reporting agencies once a year for free at www.annualcreditreport.com. “If any report shows any inaccuracy, follow the directions on each agency’s website to correct it,” Huynh said.

The bottom line

Carefully consider your options before taking out a personal loan. You should have a clear idea of how you’ll use the loan funds and what the total cost of the loan will be. Most importantly, if your credit has been damaged by poor financial habits in the past, you need to consider whether or not a personal loan is only a temporary solution to a larger problem.

“My biggest concern with anyone considering a personal loan to pay off high interest credit cards is that they are focusing on the symptom, not the cause,” said Todd Christensen, the Boise, Idaho-based education manager at Money Fit by DRS. “If the borrower is disciplined, it might make sense; otherwise, debt management through a nonprofit credit counseling agency could make more sense.”

While a personal loan can be one part of the credit building or repairing process, it’s not your only possible solution. In fact, Christensen said taking out a personal loan could be part of a multi-pronged strategy to boosting your credit. Still, a personal loan on its own could help depending on your finances — given that you properly research lenders, stay disciplined during repayment and take extra care of your money throughout the process.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Barbara Balfour
Barbara Balfour |

Barbara Balfour is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Barbara here

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