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Personal Loans

Requirements to Get Your Personal Loan Approved

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

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For the right consumers, personal loans can be a quick way to get much-needed cash for anything from a home repair to a college tuition. With the right qualifications, you can be approved for a personal loan in the morning and have the cash deposited into your account in as little as one day depending on the lender.

While applying is easy, qualifying for a personal loan may be more difficult. Here’s what you need to know about personal loans and how to get approved for one.

What is a personal loan?

A personal loan allows a consumer to borrow a lump sum of money for personal use and pay it back in fixed monthly payments over a set amount of time.

One significant difference between unsecured personal loans and other types of loans is that they don’t require collateral. When you buy a car, for example, the car serves as collateral and the lender can repossess it if you fall behind on your mortgage payments. To get an unsecured personal loan, you just have to qualify.

Personal loans come in a wide range of amounts and interest rates. The terms of personal loans vary by lender and range from six months to 84 months as of Feb. 2, 2018. They can be for as little as $2,000 and as much as $100,000, although the majority of personal loans are for much less. Best Eggs’ loans average between $13,000 and $14,000, according to Bobby Ritterbeck, chief marketing officer for the company.

What are personal loans used for?

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Unlike a mortgage, which is a loan for a house, or an auto loan, which must be spent on a vehicle, personal loans can be used for almost anything.

“People use it for a ton of reasons, from home repairs to medical [expenses] to all kinds of major purchases,” Ritterbeck said. People most commonly take out personal loans, however, for debt consolidation. In this process, borrowers use a personal loan to pay off other high-interest debts, which can simplify and reduce their monthly debt payments.

Alia Dudum, millennial money expert at LendingClub, said that LendingClub encourages anyone who needs credit to think about personal loans as “a responsible way to pay for something expensive,” whether the expense is planned or unexpected.

“You can’t always control when you have a major expense, but you can make good decisions,” she said. LendingClub’s borrowers primarily use personal loans to pay off high-interest debt, unexpected expenses such as medical bills or car repairs or a planned expense such as a vacation or home remodel.

How do I qualify for a personal loan?

Most lenders will look at two factors when you apply for unsecured personal loans: your credit history and your ability to repay the loan. Borrowers don’t have to provide collateral, such as a house or car to back their loan, nor do they need a cosigner (unless a cosigner is needed to strengthen your odds of getting approved).

Instead, lenders will look at your personal credit history and other factors, such as your income.

“That makes it easier for us to provide you quicker and easier access to your loan in comparison, to say, a mortgage loan that requires an appraisal of your home,” Dudum said.

Here’s a breakdown of how lenders determine whether you qualify for a loan.

Credit score

Each lender will determine its minimum credit score for receiving a personal loan, and some are more lenient than others regarding what scores they will accept. For Best Egg, for example, the average credit score for qualified applicants is 710. Ritterbeck said that most conservative financial institutions are comfortable issuing personal loans to applicants with scores around 680 and above.

Your credit score matters because it is a reflection of your ability to repay a loan. The score is compiled from information gleaned about how you handle credit, which could include:

  • Types of credit or loans you’ve carried (revolving, like credit, or non-revolving, like a mortgage)
  • The amount of each loan or the credit limit for each credit card you own vs. how much of that balance you are using from month to month
  • Whether you paid on time
  • Collections activity, bankruptcies, foreclosures or other negative marks

There are three federal credit reporting agencies that compete to compile American consumers’ credit histories: Equifax, Experian and Transunion. While each agency collects about the same information on each consumer, their credit score calculations may differ because the agency may not have collected the exact same information or it may store or display the information differently than the other agencies.

It’s important to note that your credit score will change over time as credit reporting agencies collect more information and tweak their calculation models. That means your score could be different from one month to the next.

Get your credit report and score for free

Each of the three reporting agencies will provide one free credit report a year, which you can get by visiting AnnualCreditReport.com or calling 1-877-322-8228.

There are lots of ways to get your credit score or credit score estimate for free these days. The Discover Scorecard, for example, offers a free FICO score.
Here’s our guide on getting your free credit score >

How to improve your credit score to get better loan terms

 

First, look for errors on your credit report, where you may find information that is inaccurate or wrong. If you find errors that could have lowered your credit score, dispute the error with the appropriate credit bureau. Check all three reports.

Then, take a look at your financial situation and make some changes.

  • Lower your debt: Stop spending on credit cards and come up with a strategy for paying down your balances.
  • Pay your bills on time: As much as 35 percent of your credit score could be based on your payment history, so make sure you pay all of your bills on time. If you are forgetful, set up automatic payments or monthly reminders.
  • Don’t close your unused credit card accounts: Unless your credit cards carry expensive annual fees, there’s no real benefit to closing them even if you aren’t using them. Your credit score will take into account the average length of time you’ve been using credit, so holding an account for a long time could actually benefit your score.
  • Don’t open new credit: As you rein back your spending, avoid the temptation to apply for more credit cards. Lenders may consider you risky if you open a lot of new accounts in a short amount of time.

The length of time it takes to improve your credit score depends on why your credit score is low in the first place. In any case, the personal financial discipline you develop as you work to improve your score will leave you with better spending and saving habits.

Debt-to-income ratio (DTI)

Your DTI is the amount of monthly debt obligations you have, including credit card payments, auto loans and student loans, divided by your monthly gross income. The calculation shows lenders the percentage of your income that you use to pay off debts.

“Lenders see this as an indicator of your ability to comfortably take on and pay off more debt,” Dudum said.

Wells Fargo lists a DTI of 35 percent as “looking good” and indicating that your debt is manageable in relation to your income, and that you likely have spending money left over after you pay your bills.

If you have a DTI between 36 and 49 percent, you may want to improve your financial situation so that you are in better shape to handle extra expenses. If your DTI is in this range, lenders
may look at additional eligibility criteria, like your income or whether you have a cosigner.

Credit utilization rate: This rate is calculated by dividing how much credit you’re using (the statement balance for each of your accounts) by the amount of credit you have
access to. “If it’s higher than about 30 percent, many financial companies see this as an indicator that you might not be as responsible as you could be,” Dudum said.

Credit history: How you’ve managed debt in the past can be a good determinant for how likely you are to pay back a personal loan. That means if you have little or no credit history, lenders may not approve your personal loan application.

“If you don’t have a track record with credit, it’s difficult for lenders to guess how you might handle paying your debts,” Dudum said.

Cosigner: If you have trouble meeting personal loan requirements, which could happen if you have a low credit score, no credit history or a bankruptcy in your past, you may need a cosigner.

Typically, cosigners are trusted friends or family members with good credit who will agree to take responsibility for the loan if you can’t make the payments. Lenders will factor in your cosigner’s credit history and credit score rather than yours when determining whether you qualify for the loan, which will up your chances of qualifying and securing a good interest rate.

Proceed with caution when considering a cosigner. If you don’t make your loan payments, you could ruin your cosigner’s credit history, stick them with the balance of the loan, and wreck your relationship with your cosigner.

How to apply for a personal loan

The application process for an unsecured personal loan is simple and fast.

“The old way is you’d walk into your local bank, wait in line to speak with a loan officer and apply that way,” Ritterbeck said. “In a lot of cases today you can still do that, but you also can go online, and in some cases call, and get a decision in a couple of minutes of what options are available to you.”

Online lending platforms will first ask you to fill out an application to check your credit rate. The personal loan industry can often show you your personal loan options without running a “hard” credit inquiry that would impact your credit score. These are typically called pre-approvals or prequalification checks but they aren’t final. When you are ready to apply for the loan, it will result in a hard credit inquiry. You may be able to get free quotes from LendingTree’s personal loan marketplace by filling out a short online form. LendingTree is the parent company of MagnifyMoney.

After you receive options for a personal loan, including the amount you qualify for and the interest rate, you can choose one to apply. “Generally speaking, the better your credit profile, the lower the rate of interest you’ll be charged in exchange for borrowing,” Dudum said. “That said, there are many other factors we take into consideration. One number couldn’t tell your whole financial story.”

Interest rates vary, but they can be as high as each state allows. OneMain, for example, can offer interest rates as high as almost 35.99% on personal loans, and Best Egg’s highest rate is 29.99%.

Once you decide which loan to apply for, you’ll need to submit proof of employment and income, such as a pay stub, said Kim Wijkstrom, chief marketing officer for OneMain Financial. Decisions on the loan can come within the hour, and the money could be deposited in your account the same day.

Lenders with alternative qualifications

Not all lenders follow the typical formula for personal loan requirements. OneMain, for example, uses credit scores as a guideline that gives a picture of a consumer’s credit history and focuses more on the applicant’s income and debt obligations, Wijkstrom said.
Here are others:

SoFi: SoFi is strict about approvals, as it prefers applicants with a good job and a history of on-time payments. It also does not allow cosigners or joint applicants. SoFi is unique in that there is No origination fee and has additional perks like loan forbearance if a borrower loses a job through no fault of his or her own. Interest will continue to accrue and is added to the loan balance, and SoFi will not report your payments to a credit bureau as being overdue.
Read our review of SoFi here.

SoFi
APR

5.99%
To
18.07%

Credit Req.

680

Minimum Credit Score

Terms

24 to 84

months

Origination Fee

No origination fee

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SoFi offers some of the best rates and terms on the market. ... Read More


Fixed rates from 5.99% APR to 18.07% APR (with AutoPay). Variable rates from 5.74% APR to 14.70% APR (with AutoPay). SoFi rate ranges are current as of October 10, 2019 and are subject to change without notice. Not all rates and amounts available in all states. See Personal Loan eligibility details. Not all applicants qualify for the lowest rate. If approved for a loan, to qualify for the lowest rate, you must have a responsible financial history and meet other conditions. Your actual rate will be within the range of rates listed above and will depend on a variety of factors, including evaluation of your credit worthiness, years of professional experience, income and other factors. See APR examples and terms. Interest rates on variable rate loans are capped at 14.95%. Lowest variable rate of 5.74% APR assumes current 1-month LIBOR rate of 2.05% plus 3.08% margin minus 0.25% AutoPay discount. For the SoFi variable rate loan, the 1-month LIBOR index will adjust monthly and the loan payment will be re-amortized and may change monthly. APRs for variable rate loans may increase after origination if the LIBOR index increases. The SoFi 0.25% AutoPay interest rate reduction requires you to agree to make monthly principal and interest payments by an automatic monthly deduction from a savings or checking account. The benefit will discontinue and be lost for periods in which you do not pay by automatic deduction from a savings or checking account.

All rates, terms, and figures are subject to change by the lender without notice. For the most up-to-date information, visit the lender's website directly. To check the rates and terms you qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. However, if you choose a product and continue your application, we will request your full credit report from one or more consumer reporting agencies, which is considered a hard credit pull.

See Consumer Licenses.

SoFi Personal Loans are not available to residents of MS. Minimum loan requirements might be higher than $5,000 in specific states due to legal requirements. Fixed and variable-rate caps may be lower in some states due to legal requirements and may impact your eligibility to qualify for a SoFi loan.

If you lose your job through no fault of your own, you may apply for Unemployment Protection. SoFi will suspend your monthly SoFi loan payments and provide job placement assistance during your forbearance period. Interest will continue to accrue and will be added to your principal balance at the end of each forbearance period, to the extent permitted by applicable law. Benefits are offered in three month increments, and capped at 12 months, in aggregate, over the life of the loan. To be eligible for this assistance you must provide proof that you have applied for and are eligible for unemployment compensation, and you must actively work with our Career Advisory Group to look for new employment. If the loan is co-signed the unemployment protection applies where both the borrower and cosigner lose their job and meet conditions.

Terms and Conditions Apply. SOFI RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MODIFY OR DISCONTINUE PRODUCTS AND BENEFITS AT ANY TIME WITHOUT NOTICE. To qualify, a borrower must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident in an eligible state and meet SoFi's underwriting requirements. Not all borrowers receive the lowest rate. To qualify for the lowest rate, you must have a responsible financial history and meet other conditions. If approved, your actual rate will be within the range of rates listed above and will depend on a variety of factors, including term of loan, a responsible financial history, years of experience, income and other factors. Rates and Terms are subject to change at anytime without notice and are subject to state restrictions. SoFi refinance loans are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that the federal loan program offers such as Income Based Repayment or Income Contingent Repayment or PAYE. Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Financing Law License No. 6054612. SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Lending Corp., NMLS # 1121636. (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org)

Upstart: While Upstart initially focused on helping graduate students with significant debt, it now also offers loans to consumers with a strong credit history. Upstart’s formula for calculating approval is unique and considers an applicant’s career, education, job history and standardized test scores.
Read our review of Upstart here.

APR

5.67%
To
35.99%

Credit Req.

620

Minimum Credit Score

Terms

36 or 60

months

Origination Fee

Up to 8.00%

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on LendingTree’s secure website

Upstart is an online lender created by ex-Googlers.... Read More

Earnest: Unlike most lenders, Earnest uses a merit-based system for determining who qualifies for a loan. Recent graduates and others who are starting to build credit history may qualify for these loans, which offer some of the most flexible terms along with customized loan and repayment plans.

What if you are rejected for a personal loan?

You may not qualify for a personal loan the first time you apply, but it is possible to improve your financial position and successfully qualify later.

“People are of course usually very disappointed if they don’t get a loan, and the first thing to address is the emotional response,” Wijkstrom said. “Don’t be defeated when rejected.”

At OneMain, financial advisers will talk with clients about why they were not approved and what they can change. Sometimes that means fixing their credit history, such as paying bills on time for a set period. Others may find errors on their credit report that hurt their chances of qualifying for a personal loan.

You may also want to look into other options for credit, such as equity in your home that could help you get a different kind of loan, Ritterbeck said.

When used wisely, personal loans can help you get out of debt and manage large expenses. Regardless of when you need a personal loan, it’s never too early to integrate good habits into your financial life to ensure that when you do apply for a personal loan, you will qualify for the amount you need.

 

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Marty Minchin
Marty Minchin |

Marty Minchin is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Marty here

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The Most (And Least) Charitable Places in the U.S.

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

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In order to find the most charitable places in America, researchers analyzed data for the 100 largest metro areas.

Giving to charity is a good thing, generally speaking. Not only may you support a cause you care about, but it could help lower your tax burden if you itemize deductions.

However, despite these benefits, our researchers found that certain places in the U.S. are more charitable than others. They compared 2017 itemized tax returns and analyzed data for the 100 largest metro areas to determine which places in the U.S. were the most charitable.

Key findings

  • Ogden, Utah, is the most charitable place in the U.S., followed by Birmingham, Alabama and Memphis.
  • In Birmingham, more than 89% of tax returns itemized deduction donations to charity.
  • Southern metro areas tended to be the most charitable. Seven of the top 10 most charitable places are in the South.
  • Religious centers tended to be more charitable than non-religious. The religious South and Utah tended to be the more charitable, while the less-religious Northeast tended to score the worst in our metrics. One obvious explanation for this is that church donations are tax-deductible for people who itemize.
  • Springfield, Massachusetts was the least charitable metro area in the study. People itemizing their tax returns there gave just 2% of their income.
  • Springfield’s neighbors were also stingy when it came to giving to charity. Worcester came in second-to-last. Here, tax returns with itemized deductions showed an average of 1.8% of income donated to charity.
  • The poorest who gave to charity tended to be the most generous, although the poorest tended to donate the least often, a fact that has not changed over time. According to 2016 data, Americans who earned at least $1 but less than $10,000 donated 14% of their income on average, though just 58.5% of them had charitable deductions.
  • The rich are more likely to have charitable deductions but tend to give a smaller portion of their income.

Rankings: The most charitable U.S. metro areas

This map shows how the 100 largest metro areas in the U.S. ranked according to the percentage of people who took charitable donation deductions on their tax returns in 2017. Areas represented by a blue dot are the most charitable, while those represented with orange dots are the least charitable. Purple and red dots represent areas that fall in the middle of our rankings.
The most charitable metro areas are located in states that are known for being heavily religious — Utah and the Bible Belt in the Southeast. The Northeast tends to be less religious and is blanketed with metro areas that have low donation rates.

Utah is a standout state when it comes to charitable giving, with two metro areas in the top 10. Ogden claims the top spot, and Salt Lake City comes in sixth place. Most of the rest of the top 10 is made up of metro areas in the Southeast: Birmingham, Ala. (second), Memphis, Tenn. (third), Atlanta (fourth), and Augusta, Ga. (fifth).
Springfield, Mass., is at the very bottom of our list rankings, with Worcester, Mass., following in the 99th slot. The rest of the bottom five includes: Scranton, Penn. (98th), Allentown, Pa. (96th), and Providence, R.I. (95th). Portland, Ore., represents the west coast as the 97th least charitable metro area on the list.

How charitable Americans are at different income levels

The following graphic shows how rates of charitable giving differ at various income levels. Each blue bar shows the percentage of tax returns on which itemized charitable donations were claimed at each income level. Each purple bar shows the average percentage of one’s income those charitable donations make up in each income bracket.

Overall, 81.9% of people itemized charitable deductions on their tax returns, and those donations make up an average of 3.4% of their income. Those who make more money tend to give to charity more often. Of people making $200,000 or more per year, 91% claim charitable deductions, while only 58.5% of those making less than $10,000 do so.

It’s not those who make the most who give the biggest portion of their income to charity, though. Those who make less than $10,000 a year give the biggest portion of their earnings (14%). Americans who make $100,000 to $199,000 give the smallest proportion of their income at just 2.7%.

Changes in charitable giving by year

In order to determine how charitable Americans are over time, we looked at charitable donations over a 12-year span. The following graphic reveals charitable giving as a percentage of income across various income levels.

Overall, the average percentage of income that’s claimed as a charitable donation has remained at fairly consistent levels between the years of 2004 (3.6%) and 2016 (3.5%). It dipped to a low of 3% in 2008, in the midst of the Great Recession.

Lower income brackets tend to have more ups and downs in charitable giving. In 2004, those making $5,000 or less donated an average 19.4% of their income to charity. But in 2007 and 2012, that average dropped to 14.6%.

Those in the highest income bracket on the graph ($10 million or more) made a significant jump in charitable donations in the last two years we analyzed, with their charitable donations going from 7% to 9.1% of their income.

5 tips if you’re donating to charity

While your intentions to donate to charity may be purely altruistic, if you’re making them, you may as well get credit for them if you can. Here are five things to keep in mind when making charitable contributions:

  • Research charities before donating. Sites such as Charity Navigator and GuideStar provide information about charity missions, as well as how they operate and spend money.
  • Ask for verification of an organization’s tax status before donating. In order for your donation to be tax deductible, it must be made to an organization that qualifies under IRS guidelines as tax-exempt.
  • Remember: You can only claim charitable donations if you itemize your taxes. You won’t qualify for a deduction if you take the standard deduction. If your deductible expenses including charitable donations are greater than the standard exemption ($24,400 for married couples and $12,200 for single taxpayers in 2019) then itemizing can save you money. (If you’re unsure whether itemizing your taxes makes sense, you may need to seek out a pro.)
  • Request and keep your receipts. While you don’t need to submit them with your tax return, if you ever get audited, you want to have them on hand.
  • Keep these two dates in mind. Remember that even though taxes must be filed by April 15 each year, charitable deductions must be made by the end of the calendar year (December 31) in order to be claimed on your taxes for that year.

Methodology

In order to find the most charitable places in the U.S., researchers analyzed data for the 100 largest metro areas. Specifically, we compared them across the following three categories:

  • Percent of itemized returns with charitable donations. Data comes from the IRS and is for the 2017 filing year.
  • Percent of adjusted gross income given to charity. This is the total deducted amount from charitable donations divided by total adjusted gross income for itemized returns. Data comes from the IRS and is for the 2017 filing year.
  • Average itemized charitable donation. This is the total amount donated to charity divided by the number of returns deducting charitable donations. Data comes from the IRS and is for the 2017 filing year.

We then created a score averaging the three percentile ranks each metro scored in each metric. Each metric was given the same weight. For the over-time data, we looked at the percent of adjusted gross income given to charity for each income bracket from 2004 to 2016.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Julie Ryan Evans
Julie Ryan Evans |

Julie Ryan Evans is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Julie here

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Marcus by Goldman Sachs Review: GS Bank Takes on Online Savings, CDs, and Personal Loans

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Marcus by Goldman Sachs savings account

A very high interest rate and no fees make this one of the best savings accounts out there.

APY

Minimum Balance Amount

1.90%

None

  • Minimum opening deposit: None. However, you’ll need to deposit at least $1.00 if you want to earn any interest
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: None
  • ATM fee: N/A
  • ATM fee refund: N/A
  • Overdraft fee: None

This is a great account for almost anyone. However, before you click that “Learn More” button below, there are a couple of things to know.

No ATMs. First, Marcus by Goldman Sachs doesn’t offer ATM access to your savings account. You’ll either need to deposit or withdraw money by sending in a physical check, setting up direct deposits, or by moving the money to and from your other bank accounts via ACH or wire transfer.

No checking account. Second, Marcus does’t offer a corresponding checking account. That means you can only use this account as an external place to park your cash from your everyday money flow.

Keeping a separate savings account does have its benefits. For example, it’s harder to tempt yourself to withdraw the cash if you’re a chronic over-spender. But, it also means that there might be a delay of a few days if you need to transfer the money out of your Goldman Sachs online savings account and into your other checking account.

How to open a Goldman Sachs online savings account

It’s really easy to open an online savings account with Marcus by Goldman Sachs. You can do it online or over the phone as long as you’re 18 years or older, have a physical street address, and a Social Security Number or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number.

You’ll be required to sign a form which you can do online, or by mail if you’re opening the account over the phone.

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How their online savings account compares

Marcus’ online savings account can easily be described with one word: outstanding.

You’ll get a relatively high interest rate with this account, which is among the best online savings account rates you’ll find today. In fact, these rates are currently over seven times higher than the average savings account interest rate.

Even better, this account won’t charge you any fees for the privilege of keeping your money stashed there. It’s a tall order to find another bank that offers these high interest rates with terms this good.

Marcus by Goldman Sachs CD rates

Sky-high CD rates, but watch out for early withdrawal limitations.

Term

APY

Minimum Deposit Amount

6 months

0.60%

$500

9 months

0.70%

$500

12 months

2.10%

$500

18 months

2.10%

$500

24 months

2.10%

$500

3 years

2.15%

$500

4 years

2.20%

$500

5 years

2.25%

$500

6 years

2.35%

$500

  • Minimum opening deposit: $500
  • Minimum balance amount to earn APY: $500
  • Early withdrawal penalty:
    • For CDs under 12 months, 90 days’ worth of interest
    • For CDs of 12 months to 5 years, 270 days’ worth of interest
    • For CDs of 5 years or over, 365 days’ worth of interest

Marcus’ CDs work a little differently from other CDs. Rather than having to set up and fund your account all at once, Goldman Sachs will give you 30 days to fully fund your account.

Once open, your interest will be tallied up and credited to your CD account each month. You can withdraw the interest earned at any time without paying an early withdrawal penalty, but heads up: If you withdraw the interest, your returns will be lower than the stated APY when you opened your account.

If you need to withdraw the money from your CD, you can only do so by pulling out the entire CD balance and paying the required early withdrawal penalty. There is no option for partial withdrawals of your cash.

Finally, once your CD has fully matured, you’ll have a 10-day grace period to withdraw the money, add more funds, and/or switch to a different CD term. If you don’t do anything, Marcus will automatically roll over your CD into another one of the same type, but with the current interest rate of the day.

How to open a Goldman Sachs CD

Marcus has made it super simple to open up a CD. First, you’ll need to be at least 18 years old, and have either a Social Security Number or an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number.

You can open an account easily online, or call them up by phone. You’ll need to sign an account opening form, which you can do online or via a hard-copy mailed form. Then, simply fund your CD account within 30 days, and you’re all set.

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How their CDs compare

The interest rates that Marcus offers on their CDs are top-notch. In fact, a few of their CD terms are among the current contenders for the best CD rates.

If you’re interested in pursuing a CD ladder approach, Marcus is one of our top picks because each of their CD terms offer above-average rates. This means you can rest easy that you’ll get the best rates for your CD ladder without having to complicate things by spreading out all of your CDs among a handful of different banks.

The only downside to these CDs compared with many other banks is that you can’t withdraw a portion of your cash if you need it. It’s either all-in, or all-out. However, once out, you’re still free to open a new CD with the surplus cash, as long as it’s at least the $500 minimum deposit size.

Marcus by Goldman Sachs personal loan

Personal loans offered by Marcus have low APRs, flexible terms, and no fees.

Terms

APR

Credit Required

Fees

Max Loan Amount

36 to 72 months

6.99%-28.99%

Not specified

None

$40,000

Marcus by Goldman Sachs® personal loans can be used for just about anything, from consolidating debt to financing a large home improvement project. They offer some of the best rates available, with APRs as low as 6.99%, and you’ll not only be able to choose between a range of loan terms, but you can also choose the specific day of the month when you want to make your loan payments.

While there are no specific credit requirements to get a loan through Marcus, the company does try to target those that have “prime” credit, which is usually those with a FICO score higher than 660. Even with a less than excellent credit score, you may be able to qualify for a personal loan from Marcus, though, those that have recent, negative marks on their credit report, such as missed payments, will likely be rejected.

Applicants must be over 18 (19 in Alabama and Nebraska, 21 in Mississippi and Puerto Rico) and have a valid U.S. bank account. You are also required to have a Social Security or Individual Tax I.D. Number.

No fees. Marcus charges no extra fees for their personal loans. There is No origination fee associated with getting a loan, but there are also no late fees associated with missing payments. Those missed payments simply accrue more interest and your loan will be extended.

Defer payments. Once you have made on-time payments for a full year, you will have the ability to defer a payment. This means that if an unexpected expense or lost job hurts your budget one month, you can push that payment back by a month without negatively impacting your credit report.

How to apply for a Marcus personal loan

Marcus by Goldman Sachs offers a process that is completely online, allowing you to apply, choose the loan you want, submit all of your documents, and get approved without having to leave home. Here are the steps that you will complete to get a personal loan from Marcus:

  1. Fill out the information that is required in the online application, including your basic personal and financial information, as well as how much you would like to borrow and what you will use the money for.
  2. After a soft pull on your credit, and if you qualify, you will be presented a list of different loan options that may include different rates and terms.
  3. Once you have chosen the loan you want, you will need to provide additional information to verify your identity. You may also be asked for information that can be used to verify your income and you will need to provide your bank account information so that the money can be distributed.
  4. You will receive your funds 1 – 4 business days after your loan has been approved.

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How their personal loans compare

Marcus offers low APRs and flexible terms with their personal loans, but their main feature is that they have no fees. If you are looking for a straightforward lending experience with no hidden fees or costs, Marcus will be perfect for you since you won’t even have to worry about late fees if you happen to miss a payment.

While Marcus offers some great perks, you may be able to get a lower rate if you choose to go with another lender, such as LightStream or SoFi. Both of these lenders offer lower APR ranges and they don’t charge origination fees, though, LightStream will do a hard pull on your credit to preapprove you.

LendingClub and Peerform both have lower credit requirements than Marcus, but they also charge origination fees and, being P2P lending platforms, you will need to wait for your loan to be funded and you run the risk that other users might not fund your loan.

Overall review of Marcus by Goldman Sachs‘ products

Marcus has really hit it out of the park with their personal loans, online savings, and CD accounts. Each of these accounts offers some of the best features available on the market, while shrinking the fees down to a minuscule, or even nonexistent, amount. Their website is also slick and easy to use for online-savvy people.

The only thing we can find to complain about with Marcus is that they don’t offer an equally-awesome checking account to accompany their other deposit products. Indeed, it seems like Marcus has turned their former hoity-toity image around: Today, they’re a bank that we’d recommend to anyone, even blue-collar folks.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Lindsay VanSomeren
Lindsay VanSomeren |

Lindsay VanSomeren is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Lindsay here