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Chase Bank Reviews: CD, Checking, and Savings Rates

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any credit card issuer. This site may be compensated through a credit card issuer partnership.

Chase Bank’s CD rates

Chase’s CDs come with many different term length options, but don’t expect the interest rates on these CDs to make you a millionaire.

Standard rates

Term

APY

1 Month0.01%
2 Month0.01%
3-5 Months0.01%
6-8 Months0.01%
9-11 Months0.01%
12-14 Months0.01%
15 - 17 Months0.01%
18-20 Months0.01%
21-23 Months0.01%
24-29 Months0.01%
30-35 Months0.01%
36-41 Months0.01%
42-47 Months0.50%
48-59 Months0.10%
60-83 Months0.30%
84-119 Months0.01%
120 Months0.30%

Relationship rates

$1,000-$9,999

$10,000-$99,999

$100,000+

1 Month

0.02%

0.02%

0.02%

2 Month

0.02%

0.02%

0.02%

3-5 Months

0.02%

0.02%

0.02%

6-8 Months

0.10%

0.20%

0.20%

9-11 Months

0.10%

0.20%

0.20%

12-14 Months

0.02%

0.02%

0.05%

15 - 17 Months

0.05%

0.15%

0.20%

18-20 Months

1.00%

1.00%

0.01%

21-23 Months

0.10%

0.20%

0.20%

24-29 Months

0.10%

0.20%

0.20%

30-35 Months

0.10%

0.20%

0.20%

36-41 Months

0.10%

0.20%

0.20%

42-47 Months

0.10%

0.20%

0.20%

48-59 Months

0.20%

0.20%

0.01%

60-83 Months

0.75%

1.01%

1.01%

84-119 Months

0.10%

0.20%

0.20%

120 Months

0.10%

0.20%

0.20%

  • Minimum opening deposit: $1,000
  • Minimum balance amount to earn APY: $1,000
  • Early withdrawal penalty:
    • For CDs of less than 24 months, you’ll pay 1% of the amount withdrawn.
    • For CDs of longer than 24 months, you’ll pay 2% of the amount withdrawn.

    In either case, the penalty won’t be more than the total interest you’ve earned.

Chase Bank offers many different CD term lengths, which can allow you to customize your savings plan. This feature is especially handy if you’re trying a creative CD laddering strategy. You can also withdraw the interest earned at any time without paying a penalty, which is a convenient feature if you need this income before the CD matures. However, you’ll still face an early withdrawal fee if you want to withdraw any of the principal (the amount you initially put in the CD).

When you open up a Chase CD, it’ll automatically renew for the same term length once it matures. However, after this happens, you’ll still have a 10-day grace period where you can withdraw the money or make any changes to your CD without penalty.

You can open up a CD with Chase Bank online as long as you’re a U.S. citizen and you have some form of government-issued ID. In addition, you’ll also need a way to fund your new account.

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How Chase Bank’s CD rates compare

We’ll be blunt. Chase Bank’s CD interest rates don’t even come close to the current top competitors for best CD rates. While it’s nice that it offers many different term length options, this isn’t what’s going to give you the greatest returns: high interest rates will. That’s why we suggest passing on these CDs and instead choosing another bank if you want to earn the most money possible.

Chase Bank’s checking account options

Chase Premier Plus Checking

This checking account comes with very high fees, but offers nice rewards for military members.

APY

Minimum balance amount

0.01%$0
  • Minimum opening deposit: $0
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $25
  • ATM fee: $2.50 for non-Chase ATMs within the U.S. If you’re using a foreign ATM, you’ll pay $5 per withdrawal and $2.50 per transfer or inquiry, plus a 3% foreign exchange fee.
  • ATM fee refund: Your first four non-Chase ATM uses are free.
  • Overdraft fee: $34 per each item over $5, up to three per day. If your account is overdrawn for five or more consecutive days, you’ll also face a $15 extended overdraft fee.

This account is probably best for current and former military members, as well as those with deep pockets and/or other banking relationships with this bank. People who fall under this umbrella can get the high monthly account maintenance fee waived under one of these options:

  • Be an active-duty military member or veteran with a military ID
  • Have an average daily balance of $15,000 across all your eligible linked Chase accounts and investments
  • Sign this account up to make automatic payments to your Chase first mortgage

If you have this account, you’ll also get a few other minor perks. You can get free checks, a free 3” x 5” security box (as long as there are some available) at your local Chase branch and free money orders and cashier’s checks.

In addition, if you are a current military member and have your military paycheck deposited into this account, you’ll get a few more free perks: no fees at all for using non-Chase ATMs, free wire transfers and no foreign exchange fees for ATM or debit card transactions.

You can easily open a Chase Premier Plus checking account online as long as you’re a U.S. citizen. You’ll need an ID number (such as a driver’s license number) and a way to fund your new account, such as via a transfer from another checking account or by debit card.

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Chase Sapphire Checking

This new checking account replaced Chase’s old-guard premium checking account, the Platinum Premier checking account as of Aug. 27, 2018.
APYMinimum Balance to Earn APY
0.01%
$0-$24,999
0.01%
$25,000-$49,999
0.01%
Over $50,000
  • Minimum opening deposit: $0
  • Minimum balance to earn APY: $0.01
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $25, unless you keep at least $75,000 in any combination in this account and linked qualifying deposits accounts or investments
  • ATM fee: None
  • ATM fee refund: Chase Bank will refund all ATM surcharge fees
  • Overdraft fee: Your first four overdrafts within a 12-month period are free. After that, you’ll only pay an overdraft fee if your account is overdrawn by $5 or more at the end of the day. If you do have to pay an overdraft fee, you’ll pay $34 per item on up to three items per day.

Chase seems to be piggybacking off of the success of its Sapphire line of credit cards with this new account. It’s based on the old Platinum Premier checking account model (the account that this one is replacing) and has the same policies in terms of its monthly fee, and the requirement to waive the monthly fee.

What happens to your old Platinum Premier account?
If you already had the Platinum Premier checking account, you should have already gotten a notice in the mail that your old checking account will be automatically converted into this new Chase Sapphire Checking account.

What new features does the Sapphire Checking account have?
The Sapphire Checking account brings in some of the more traveler-friendly features that made the Sapphire credit cards so successful. Notably, there are no ATM fees for anything, no foreign transaction fees for using this card abroad, and unlimited ATM surcharge fee reimbursements.

This account also waives some of the random, miscellaneous fees that most people don’t pay anyways. For example, you’ll get a free 3” x 5” security box and you won’t pay a fee for stop payment orders, returned checks, rush debit card replacements, wire transfers, money orders or cashier’s checks. You’ll also get free stock and ETF trades through J.P. Morgan’s online investing platform, You Invest.

Finally, Chase sprinkles in a few other random perks. You’ll get premier relationship interest rates on a linked Premier Savings account (though these interest rates aren’t much higher, to be honest). You can also get early access and special access to certain entertainment and sports events, just like with the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card. But on the whole, however, these perks seem a bit like fresh sprinkles on a week-old donut: the checking account itself isn’t the greatest, and the perks don’t really do enough to freshen it up. You can find better donuts with tastier sprinkles elsewhere.

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Chase Total Checking

A solid checking account option but look at other no-fee checking accounts if you want to avoid fees.
  • Minimum opening deposit: $0
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $12
  • ATM fee: $2.50 for non-Chase ATMs within the U.S. If you’re using a foreign ATM, you’ll pay $5 per withdrawal and $2.50 per transfer or inquiry, plus a 3% foreign exchange fee.
  • ATM fee refund: None.
  • Overdraft fee: $34 per each item over $5, up to three per day. If your account is overdrawn for 5 or more consecutive days, you’ll also face a $15 extended overdraft fee.

If you don’t quite have the high balances required to waive the monthly maintenance fees on the more premium checking accounts, the Total Checking account might be a better option for you. With this account, you can have the monthly maintenance fee waived in one of three ways each month:

  • Have at least $500 direct-deposited into your account
  • Keep a balance of $1,500 in your account
  • Have at least $5,000 in this and other linked Chase accounts and investments

This account offers no interest and none of the perks of Chase Bank’s other accounts, such as free checks or free ATM uses.

If you’re a U.S. citizen and have the number from your government-issued ID handy, you can easily open an account online. You’ll also need to provide a method to fund your new account, such as a transfer from another bank account or with a debit card.

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Chase College Checking

Chase Bank’s College Checking account is free for college students for their first five years in college. Once you pass the five-year mark, you might be better off graduating into a no-fee checking account option unless you meet the requirements to have the fee waived.
  • Minimum opening deposit: $0
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $6 (your first five years are free, however)
  • ATM fee: $2.50 for non-Chase ATMs within the U.S. If you’re using a foreign ATM, you’ll pay $5 per withdrawal and $2.50 per transfer or inquiry, plus a 3% foreign exchange fee.
  • ATM fee refund: None.
  • Overdraft fee: $34 per each item over $5, up to three per day. If your account is overdrawn for 5 or more consecutive days, you’ll also face a $15 extended overdraft fee.

If you’re a college student between the ages of 17 and 24 (and can prove your status), you’re eligible to open up a College Checking account with Chase.

There won’t be any monthly maintenance fees for the first five years after you open the account. If it takes you a long time to graduate or if you go to grad school and extend your college career past the five-year mark, however, there are still a couple of ways you can get the monthly maintenance fee waived:

  • Have at least one direct deposit (any amount) per month
  • Keep an average daily balance of $5,000 in your account

If you’re a U.S. citizen, and a college student between the ages of 17 and 24, you can open a College Checking account with Chase Bank online. You’ll also need to provide a way to fund the account, and a government-issued ID.

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Bonus offer: Chase College Checking account

For a limited time (until Aug. 13, 2018), Chase Bank is offering a special $50 bonus to new customers who open up a College Checking account. You’ll need to go on the website to get a coupon, which you then can bring into a local branch (the offer is not available for people who sign up online).

When you open your account, you’ll need to enroll in electronic statements. Finally, you’ll need to make at least 10 transactions with your new checking account within 60 days to be eligible for the $50 bonus. If you meet all these qualifications, you’ll get your bonus money within 10 days.

One final heads up: Don’t close your account for at least six months after you open it. Otherwise, Chase will deduct the $50 bonus from your account.

Chase High School Checking

This student account comes with a $6 monthly fee, but it’s highly unlikely you’ll ever have to pay it if you have a parent who already banks with Chase.
  • Minimum opening deposit: $25
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $6
  • ATM fee: $2.50 for non-Chase ATMs within the U.S. If you’re using a foreign ATM, you’ll pay $5 per withdrawal and $2.50 per transfer or inquiry, plus a 3% foreign exchange fee.
  • ATM fee refund: None.
  • Overdraft fee: $34 per each item over $5, up to three per day. If your account is overdrawn for 5 or more consecutive days, you’ll also face a $15 extended overdraft fee.

This checking account is available to high school students between the ages of 13 and 17 who apply along with a parent. Parents who already have a banking relationship with Chase (not including a College Checking or High School Checking account) are eligible to apply for this account as a co-owner along with their student.

Although it comes with a $6 monthly maintenance fee, it’s almost guaranteed that you won’t have to pay it, since one of the ways to waive this fee is by having a parental co-owner with a linked non-College Checking and non-High School Checking account. Conveniently, those are also the requirements to open this account.

But, if Chase Bank ever does change the rules, or you find yourself in some weird loophole where this doesn’t apply to you, there are a couple of other ways that you can get the $6 monthly maintenance fee waived:

  • Have at least one monthly direct deposit made into the account
  • Keep a daily average of at least $5,000 in this account

Once the student co-owner turns age 19, this account will automatically transform into a Chase Total Checking account. It’s a good idea to keep this in mind, since the Total Checking account comes with a $12 monthly maintenance fee that you definitely do not want to be surprised by.

If you, as a parent, already have a qualifying personal checking account with Chase Bank and are prepared to be a co-owner on the checking account with your 13- to 17-year-old, then they are eligible for this account.

You’ll need to provide a way to fund the account along with your and your child’s government-issued IDs. Finally, you’ll need to apply for this account in-person at a local branch, rather than online.

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How Chase Bank’s checking accounts compare

Overall, we’re not too impressed with Chase Bank’s checking accounts. Each account charges a monthly maintenance fee, and while it is possible (and even probable, in some cases) to have this fee waived, you’ll still need to be on your toes each month to make sure you meet the requirements.

Furthermore, only two of its checking accounts offer any interest on your deposit. And even then, it’s worth noting that it’s only currently at 0.01% APY, which is the smallest amount of interest a bank can offer while still technically saying that it does offer interest.

If you’re looking for a higher interest-earning online checking account, take a look at these top-rated online checking account options instead.

Chase Bank’s savings account options

Chase Savings Account

Earn rock-bottom interest rates while trying to skirt the monthly fee with Chase Bank’s Savings Account.

APY

Minimum Deposit Amount

0.01%$0
  • Minimum opening deposit: $0
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $5
  • ATM fee: $2.50 for non-Chase ATMs within the U.S. If you’re using a foreign ATM, you’ll pay $5 per withdrawal and $2.50 per transfer or inquiry, plus a 3% foreign exchange fee.
  • ATM fee refund: None.
  • Overdraft fee: $34 per each item over $5, up to three per day. If your account is overdrawn for five or more consecutive days, you’ll also face a $15 extended overdraft fee.

You don’t get much with this savings account. Furthermore, you’ll need to find ways to waive the monthly maintenance fee, otherwise this fee could easily wipe out any earnings you receive for the month. There are four different ways you can get this monthly maintenance fee waived:

  • Keep at least $300 in this account
  • Set up a recurring monthly deposit of at least $25 from a linked Chase Bank personal checking account
  • Be under the age of 18
  • Have a linked Chase Premier Plus, Premier Platinum or Private Client checking account

You’ll also need to make an opening deposit of at least $25 to establish the account. This account also comes with a $5 “savings withdrawal limit fee” that will be charged each time you exceed six withdrawals per month. Unlike with the Chase Premier Savings account, there is no way to have this fee waived, so if you think you’ll be making a lot of withdrawals, you may want to consider another savings account.

Finally, if you exceed the Federal Regulation D limits (not including ATM or in-person withdrawals), the bank may also downgrade your account to a Chase Total Checking account.

Chase Bank does make it easy to sign up for a Savings Account online. U.S. citizens are eligible to apply, and all you’ll need is a way to fund the account and a government-issued ID number.

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Chase Premier Savings

Chase’s Premier Savings account doesn’t offer much in the way of returns or consumer-friendly benefits.

Standard rates

APY

Minimum Deposit Amount

0.01%$0

Relationship rates

APY

Balance Amount

0.02%$0-$49,999
0.03%$50,000-$99,999
0.04%$100,000-$249,999
0.05%$250,000+
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $25
  • ATM fee: $2.50 for non-Chase ATMs within the U.S. If you’re using a foreign ATM, you’ll pay $5 per withdrawal and $2.50 per transfer or inquiry, plus a 3% foreign exchange fee.
  • ATM fee refund: None.
  • Overdraft fee: $34 per each item over $5, up to three per day. If your account is overdrawn for 5 or more consecutive days, you’ll also face a $15 extended overdraft fee.

Chase’s Premier Savings account offers you the best chance to earn high interest rates with a savings account at this bank. However, you’ll need to watch out for the $25 monthly maintenance fee, which you can skirt in one of two ways:

  • Keep at least $15,000 in this account
  • Have a linked Chase Premier Plus or Chase Premier Platinum Checking account

You’ll also need to make an opening deposit of at least $100 to open this account (however, the balance can drop below that afterward). If you make more than six withdrawals per month, you’ll also face a $5 “savings withdrawal limit fee,” unless you have more than $15,000 in your account.

This is different from the Federal Regulation D limits, which limit you to six transactions per month, not including ATM or in-person transfers. If you exceed these limits, your account may automatically be downgraded to a Chase Total Checking account instead.

If you’re interested in opening a Premier Savings account with Chase Bank online, you’ll need to be a U.S. citizen. In addition, you’ll also need a way to fund your new account (such as with a transfer from an existing bank account) and you’ll need to provide the bank with a government-issued ID number.

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How Chase Bank’s savings accounts compare

Like many traditional bricks-and-mortar banks, Chase Bank offers some less-than-stellar interest rates. Case in point: the current highest-yielding online savings accounts are paying 15X what the maximum interest rate Chase offers, and with a lot less hassle. It may be convenient for you to open a savings account with Chase if you want to bank with a local branch, but if you want to earn the most money possible from your savings account, this isn’t the account to choose.

Overall review of Chase Bank’s products

Chase Bank has made quite a name for itself over the years. However, when it comes to its personal deposit accounts, there’s a lot left to be desired. Each of these accounts comes with high fees and super-low interest rates that make it hardly worthwhile to bank with Chase.

There may be good reasons to bank with Chase, such as if you prefer to use a conveniently-located branch near you. But in terms of earning the most money possible from your bank deposits, Chase Bank is definitely one to pass up.

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Earning Interest, Eliminating Fees, Reviews

Schwab High Yield Investor Checking Account Review

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 3.35.54 PM

The Schwab Bank High Yield Investor Checking account offered by Charles Schwab Bank isn’t your average checking account. In fact, it’s a checking account designed exclusively for investors. If you want the convenience of having your idle cash and invested assets all under one roof, this product could be for you.

What is the Schwab Bank High Yield Investor Checking account?

The Schwab Bank High Yield Investor Checking account is an interest-bearing checking account that is linked to your Schwab One brokerage account, making it easy and convenient to invest otherwise idle cash.

This product comes with attractive features that many traditional checking accounts offer — including no minimum balance requirements, no monthly service or ATM fees and a variable interest rate — as well as the unique feature of easy transfers to and from your linked brokerage account. When you open your High Yield Investor Checking account, a Schwab One brokerage account will also be opened for you. The accounts will have separate account numbers, but both can be viewed online with a single login.

Here’s what you can expect to receive upon opening and funding a Schwab High Yield Investor Checking account:

  • 0.03% APY
  • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) insurance
  • Free transfers to and from your linked brokerage account
  • Schwab Bank Visa Platinum debit card
  • Complimentary checks, deposit slips, mailing labels and pre-addressed, postage-paid envelopes

How is the High Yield Investor Checking account different from other checking accounts?

In most cases, checking accounts do not require you to open another linked account in which funds will flow to and from. The Schwab High Yield Investor Checking account, however, is only available as a linked account with the Schwab One brokerage account.

If you’re in the market for just a checking account to stash the cash you use for your everyday spending needs, opening a brokerage account alongside your checking account can seem like an unnecessary step. The brokerage account’s main function is to trade stocks, options, bonds, mutual funds, ETFs and other financial products.

However, it is worth noting that the Schwab One brokerage account does not have any minimum balance requirements or requirements to fund the account, making it relatively accessible and easy to open.

Schwab Bank High Yield Investor Checking account fees and minimums

The Schwab Bank High Yield Investor Checking account features the following fees and minimums:

Monthly service fee

$0

Minimum balance fee

$0

ATM fee

Unlimited ATM fee rebates

Foreign transaction fee

$0

It’s worth noting that while the Schwab One brokerage account also does not have any minimum balance requirements or monthly maintenance fees, other account fees may apply. For example, trades placed through a broker come with a service charge of $25.

Schwab High Yield Investor Checking account pros and cons

Pros

  • Easy to invest idle cash: By having your checking account linked to your brokerage account, it makes it much more convenient to invest any idle cash.
  • Minimal fees: Schwab’s High Yield Investor Checking account boasts minimal fees compared to other checking accounts, specifically ones offered by other big banks.
  • Unlimited ATM rebates: This is a valuable feature and could save you a significant amount of money over time.

Cons

  • Low interest rate: The account’s 0.03% APY pales in comparison to other high-yield checking accounts, some of which have rates that climb to over 5.00% APY.
  • Unnecessary complexity: The requirement of having a Schwab One brokerage account could be viewed as an added hoop to jump through for those simply looking for a traditional checking account product.
  • Non-sufficient funds fee: Watch out for the account’s non-sufficient funds (NSF) fee of $25, up to $100 maximum per day, if you don’t have enough money in your account to cover a transaction. Still, this is less than the average NSF fee of $30.50.

Who is the Schwab Bank High Yield Investor Checking account good for?

If you’re just looking for a liquid checking account that you can use for your everyday spending needs, the Schwab High Yield Investor Checking account is likely not for you. There are other checking accounts offering much higher interest rates without requiring you to link a brokerage account in order to open the account. Additionally, if your strategy is to let your extra cash sit in the Schwab High Yield Investor Checking account without initiating regular transfers to your Schwab One brokerage account, your money would grow at a considerably faster rate in a high-yield savings account, money market account or CD.

If you already are an investor and have a Schwab One brokerage account — or are looking for a checking account that provides easy and instant transfers to and from your brokerage account — the Schwab High Yield Investor Checking account is certainly worth exploring. It has many of the same, standout features that the best traditional checking accounts have, while also being one of the few checking accounts out there that provides instant access to your invested assets.

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Best of, Reviews

The Top 7 Second Chance Bank Accounts

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any credit card issuer. This site may be compensated through a credit card issuer partnership.

Some banks don’t like giving second chances to customers who have less-than-stellar financial histories, especially since it could expose them to expensive risks. A record of bounced checks or debit card overdrafts could easily lock you out of the conveniences of modern banking.

Fortunately, banks also like making money, and some offer special “second chance” accounts that minimize their risk while allowing consumers to stay in the banking system. A second chance bank account gives customers with troubled records a fresh opportunity to demonstrate they can bank responsibly.

When it comes to a second chance account, fees are an unfortunate reality. But some accounts offer customers a better deal than others, and we’ve researched our database to find the second chance accounts with the most reasonable fee structures, while also factoring in whether they provide online and mobile banking, and how accessible accounts are throughout the country.

Account Name

Monthly Fee

Minimum to open

Availability

Chime$0$0Nationwide
Peoples Bank Cash Solutions Second Chance Checking$4.95 $30Nationwide
GoBank Checking Account$8.95, can be waived if you meet requirements$20Nationwide
Radius Essential Checking$0$10Nationwide
Wells Fargo Opportunity Checking and Savings Accounts$10, can be waived if you meet requirements$25Nationwide
BBVA Easy Checking$13.95$25Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, New Mexico and Texas
Woodforest National Bank Second Chance Checking$9.95 monthly maintenance fee if you use a direct deposit; $11.95 without a direct deposit$25Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia

Second chance account basics

With a second chance bank account, customers shut out of traditional bank accounts get the opportunity to win their way back into a bank’s good graces. Similar to credit bureaus, financial services company ChexSystems maintains records of consumers’ banking histories. Bounced checks, overdrawn accounts or instances of fraud can all end up on your ChexSystems record; if you accumulate enough black marks on ChexSystems, banks could deny your application to open a new account.

Because second chance accounts are meant for customers who have demonstrated bad banking behavior, some lack features of traditional accounts, such as overdraft protection. In the eyes of the bank, you represent too much of a risk for them to extend you such courtesies.

Nobody likes paying fees, and we generally advise consumers to avoid needless banking fees due to the many fee-free banking options available. But fees are the price you pay for access to banking when you have a poor record. Plus, the second chance accounts listed below give you access to online and mobile banking, which is always a plus.

The 7 best second chance bank accounts

1. Chime

Chime

Fintech app developer Chime is not a bank, however their online checking account product is open to everybody no matter how bad your record is with ChexSystems. Chime does not check on applicants with ChexSystems, plus they offer lots of non-traditional features to help you get your financial life back on track. Best of all is the fact that they charge no fees at all, and require neither a minimum opening deposit or a minimum balance.

Chime account features:

  • No opening balance or minimum balance requirements.
  • Set up direct deposit for your paycheck, and the funds from each pay period will be deposited as soon as the transaction is initiated, giving you access to your pay up to two days earlier than conventional checking accounts.
  • Automatic savings features to help you save in your connected Chime Savings account.
  • The app sends you daily bank account balance notifications, and sends transaction alerts every time you use your debit card.
  • You can disable the debit card from the app.

Fees to watch out for:

  • Chime’s service is almost entirely fee-free: No monthly charges, no ACH transfer fees, no foreign transaction fees, and no ATM fees if you withdraw funds from MoneyPass ATMs.
  • If you make an ATM withdrawal outside of these networks, there is a $2.50 fee.
  • Overdrafts are not permitted, so there is never an overdraft fee.

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2. Peoples Bank Cash Solutions Second Chance Checking

Peoples Bank Cash Solutions

This Texas-based bank offers a second chance bank account that is available nationwide, and so long as you don’t have a record of bank or checking fraud on your record, you should be approved for this account. You’ll need to deposit at least $30 before the bank activates your account and provides you with checks and a debit card.

Fees to watch out for:

  • $4.95 monthly maintenance fee
  • $27.50 overdraft fee
  • $27.50 nonsufficient funds fee
  • $3.95 printed statement fee (which can be avoided with electronic statements)
  • $2.00 ATM withdrawal fee at machines not owned by Peoples Bank
  • $25 stop payment fee
  • $20 account closure fee (if within 90 days of opening account)

SEE DETAILS Secured

on Peoples Bank Cash Solutions’s secure website

Member FDIC

3. GoBank Checking Account

GoBank

A brand of Green Dot Bank, GoBank does not run a background check for new checking customers on ChexSystems, and it does not require a credit check. The account comes with a free debit card and fee-free access to a large network of ATMs, although be warned that out-of-network ATM withdrawals carry a $3 fee, on top of whatever the ATM operator charges. GoBank’s $8.95 monthly fee is high. However, this fee can be avoided with a monthly $500 direct deposit.

Account Features:

  • A free debit card
  • 24/7 mobile and online banking
  • Simple budgeting and spending tracker tools
  • Mobile check deposits

Fees to watch out for:

  • $2.95 sign-up fee, waived if you set up your account online
  • $8.95 monthly maintenance fee, waived each month your account receives payroll or government direct deposits totaling at least $500
  • Fees of up to $4.95 charged by retailers to make cash deposits
  • $3 out-of-network ATM withdrawal fee
  • $5 card replacement fee
  • Foreign transaction fee is 3% total transaction

SEE DETAILS Secured

on GoBank’s secure website

Member FDIC

4. Radius Essential Checking

Radius Bank

Products from online bank Radius are available to customers nationwide, and accessibility is a strong point in its favor. This second chance bank account only requires customers to deposit $10 to open an Essential Checking account, which is lower than some other accounts on this list.

Account Features:

  • A free debit card
  • 24/7 mobile and online banking
  • Access to Radius’s budgeting and personal finance tracking apps
  • Eligibility to upgrade to Radius’s Reward Checking account after 12 months of positive banking history

Fees to watch out for:

  • $9 monthly maintenance fee
  • $25 per item non-sufficient funds fee (waived on all overdraft items $5 or less)
  • $5 daily overdraft fee

SEE DETAILS Secured

on Radius Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

5. Wells Fargo Opportunity Checking and Savings Accounts

Wells Fargo Bank

Wells Fargo’s Opportunity Checking and Savings Accounts are tailor-made for folks with a lackluster credit or banking history. With a $25 opening deposit, you’ll get access to a second chance bank account that offers most of the bells and whistles of a traditional bank account. The account does come with a monthly fee, although it’s possible to waive it if you meet a few requirements (see below).

Account features:

  • $25 minimum deposit to open
  • Free transfers are available between Opportunity Checking and Savings accounts
  • You can choose to opt into overdraft protection
  • Free access to bill pay
  • “My Spending Report with Budget Watch” is available if you want to pay extra attention to where your money is going
  • Free debit card with access to more than 13,000 Wells Fargo ATMs throughout the country

Fees to watch out for:

  • $10 monthly service fee, waived if any of the following are true:
    • You make 10 posted debit card purchases or payments
    • You keep a minimum daily balance of $1,500 in the account
    • You receive $500 total in direct deposits each statement cycle
  • $35 overdraft and returned item fee
  • $12.50 overdraft protection transfer fee
  • $15 fee for excess activity (exceeding withdrawals from your savings account)
  • 3% foreign transaction fee with your debit card
  • $5 for money orders
  • $31 for stop payments

SEE DETAILS Secured

on Wells Fargo Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

6. BBVA Easy Checking

BBVA
BBVA’s Easy Checking product is available as a second chance account to customers in Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, New Mexico and Texas. There is a $13.95 monthly service charge to maintain the account. You can request that BBVA upgrade your account one of their regular checking products after 12 months — and ditch that high monthly fee — so long as the Easy Checking account remains active and has a positive balance.

BBVA Easy Checking features::

  • Online and mobile banking, customized alerts, and a free debit card (with option to personalize)
  • $25 minimum deposit to open
  • Free BBVA ATM withdrawals

Fees to watch out for:

  • $3 fee for out-of-network ATM withdrawals
  • $38 insufficient funds fee ($32 in California)
  • $15 deposit item returned fee
  • $32 stop payment fee made over the phone or in person ($30 in California); $25 if made online

SEE DETAILS Secured

on BBVA’s secure website

Member FDIC

7. Woodforest National Bank Second Chance Checking

Woodforest National Bank

This regional bank has a checking account aptly named Second Chance Checking, to help people rejected by other banks access — provided they live in one of the 17 states where a physical branch exists and can meet the $25 minimum opening deposit requirement. Those states are: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Fees to watch out for:

  • $9.95 monthly maintenance fee if you use a direct deposit
  • $9 one-time account set-up fee
  • $2.50 ATM withdrawal fee when used at a non-Woodforest network ATM
  • $15 debit card set-up fee
  • $32 overdraft fee (for each charge)

SEE DETAILS Secured

on Woodforest National Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

Alternatives to a second chance bank account

Get a prepaid debit card

Tired of the traditional banking experience? You could opt for a prepaid debit card instead. With a prepaid card, you can load money onto it and spend at merchants that accept major credit and debit cards. But if you try and spend more money than what’s on the card, the transaction is declined — although this prevents you from accruing any overdraft or insufficient funds fees. This is useful if you feel you may still have trouble managing your spending and need an extra layer of security to prevent you from getting into trouble.

Some prepaid cards offer extra perks like advance direct deposit and free ATMs so long as you stay in their network.

Open a secured credit card

You may also have better luck applying for a secured credit card if your credit score is in good enough shape. Usually, this requires depositing cash with the lender, who then gives you the credit card for the same amount. Each month that you make on-time payments, the bank will report that good behavior to the credit bureaus, helping you boost your credit score. At the end of the payment period (generally 12 months, though it varies by banks), you’ll get the full deposit back.

Secured cards can come with high interest rates and many don’t feature the enticing rewards other high-end cards do, but they get the basic job done for consumers who don’t need a card with a high credit limit.

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