Home Savings Review: Checking, Savings, CD, Money Market and IRA Accounts

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Updated on Tuesday, September 1, 2020

Home Savings’ checking account options

Simply Checking

This checking account is Home Savings’ version of a basic, no-frills checking account.
  • Minimum opening deposit: $25
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: None, if you opt in to online statements. Otherwise, $2 for paper statements without check images, or $3 for paper statements with check images.
  • ATM fee: None at Home Savings or MoneyPass ATMs. $2.50 at a PLUS network ATM. $2 at other ATMs. If you use your card abroad, you’ll pay a $3 ATM fee plus 0.8% – 1% of the transaction amount.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $36 per item, for a maximum daily fee of $154. If you set up overdraft transfers, it will cost you $10 per transfer. If you set up an overdraft line of credit, it will cost you $25 per year, plus interest. If your account stays overdrawn, you’ll pay $10 every seven days until it’s brought back in the black.

If you just want a standard, go-to account with no frills, this is the account for you at Home Savings. All of Home Savings’ checking accounts require just $25 to open, which is a pretty reasonable amount.

There is no fee for this account as long as you opt in to electronic statements. If you want paper statements, there will be a $2 or $3 monthly fee, depending on whether you want check images with the printed statements or not.

This isn’t a bad basic-level account, but given that the Simply Checking with Interest account is also free and offers interest above a certain balance level, why not try opening that account instead?

How to get Home Savings’ Simply Checking account

You can open the account online as a first step, but you’ll need to live in Home Savings’ core banking area because you’ll need to visit a branch location to finish signing the paperwork. You’ll also need to provide your Social Security number, a driver’s license (or other government-issued photo ID), and have a way to fund your new account (such as a check, ACH transfer, or credit card).

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Simply Checking With Interest

This is the only interest-bearing checking account that Home Savings offers to most customers.
APYMinimum Balance to Earn APY
0.01%
$1,000
0.01%
$10,000
0.03%
$25,000
0.03%
$50,000
  • Minimum opening deposit: $100
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: None, if you opt in to online statements. Otherwise, $2 for paper statements without check images, or $3 for paper statements with check images.
  • ATM fee: Free for Home Savings or MoneyPass ATMs. $2.50 at a PLUS network ATM. $2 at other ATMs. If you use your card abroad, you’ll pay a $3 ATM fee plus 0.8% – 1% of the transaction amount.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $36 per item, for a maximum daily fee of $154. If you set up overdraft transfers, it will cost you $10 per transfer. If you set up an overdraft line of credit, it will cost you $25 per year, plus interest. If your account stays overdrawn, you’ll pay $10 every seven days until it’s brought back in the black.

This is one of the few interest-bearing checking accounts we’ve seen at a bank like this that doesn’t charge a monthly fee. For that reason, this is the best checking account to open at Home Savings. After all, if you’re not able to meet the $1,000 balance requirement to earn interest, there won’t be any penalty in the form of a monthly fee like with many other checking accounts. So, you really have nothing to lose in opening this account.

Even though this account does earn interest, the interest rate offered is so low that you probably won’t see any real returns. As of press time, the interest rate offered on the lowest tier level is almost one point away from being zero, so don’t expect to get rich off this account.

How to get Home Savings’ Simply Checking With Interest account

You’ll need to visit a branch location in order to open this account. Make sure to bring your driver’s license with you and a way to fund your account. You can do this by providing a credit or debit card, or the routing information for your current bank account.

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Student Checking

This checking account doesn’t really offer much extra beyond the regular checking accounts.
  • Minimum opening deposit: $25
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: None if you opt in to online statements. Otherwise, $2 for paper statements without check images, or $3 for paper statements with check images.
  • ATM fee: Free for Home Savings or MoneyPass ATMs. $2.50 at a PLUS network ATM. $2 at other ATMs. If you use your card abroad, you’ll pay a $3 ATM fee plus 0.8% – 1% of the transaction amount.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $36 per item, for a maximum daily fee of $154. If you set up overdraft transfers, it will cost you $10 per transfer. If you set up an overdraft line of credit, it will cost you $25 per year, plus interest. If your account stays overdrawn, you’ll pay $10 every seven days until it’s brought back in the black.

Normally, student checking accounts offer special perks, like free checks, higher interest rates, or no monthly fees. But since Home Savings doesn’t really charge monthly fees on its checking accounts anyways (unless you want paper statements), it has to pursue other options to attract students. Right now, that special perk is offering account holders a free custom photo debit card. That’s it.

This account is also only available to students aged 18-24. So if you’re a young adult and you’re really jonesing for a fancy custom debit card, this is the account for you. Once you’re too old for this account, you’ll have to close it and re-apply for a new “adult” checking account. It does not automatically transfer into a new type of account; Home Savings will require you to do it on your own.

How to get Home Savings’ Student Checking account

Students can open this account online, but in order to complete the application, you’ll have to get to a Home Savings branch to sign paperwork in order to open the account. You’ll also need to provide your driver’s license, Social Security number, and have a way to fund your new checking account. If you’ll be doing this by ACH transfer, you’ll need to provide Home Savings with your current account’s routing number.

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Fabulous 50 Checking

This special account for customers ages 50 and above doesn’t offer anything extra of great value.
  • Minimum opening deposit: $25
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: None if you opt in to online statements. Otherwise, $2 for paper statements without check images, or $3 for paper statements with check images. If you keep at least $5,000 in the account, the paper statement fees will be waived.
  • ATM fee: None for Home Savings or MoneyPass ATMs. $2.50 at a PLUS network ATM. $2 at other ATMs. If you use your card abroad, you’ll pay a $3 ATM fee plus 0.8% – 1% of the transaction amount.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $36 per item, for a maximum daily fee of $154. If you set up overdraft transfers, it will cost you $10 per transfer. If you set up an overdraft line of credit, it will cost you $25 per year, plus interest. If your account stays overdrawn, you’ll pay $10 every seven days until it’s brought back in the black.

If you’re a senior age 50 or above, you are eligible to open this checking account. Just like with the student checking account, oftentimes banks will sweeten the deal for senior checking accounts with extras like a higher interest rate.

If you opt for this account, you’ll only get two specific perks over the regular checking accounts. If you keep at least $5,000 in this account, you’ll get free paper statements. This might be a challenge for many seniors living on a fixed income. Secondly, you’ll get one free order of checks every year with this account.

Frankly, we think that it’d be better to open a senior checking account at another bank. You may qualify for more — and better — perks. You should at least be able to find an interest-bearing senior checking account without too much hassle.

How to get Home Savings’ Fabulous 50 Checking

If you do decide you want to open this account, you’ll need to visit a local branch. Home Savings requires you to present your driver’s license and Social Security number. You’ll also need to have a way to fund your new checking account, such as by ACH transfer (remember to bring your current account’s routing information) or by debit card.

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How Home Savings’ checking accounts compare

Home Savings’ checking accounts are a bit lackluster. It’s great that none of them charge a monthly fee, unless you want paper statements. Even its interest-bearing checking account is free, which is unusual and a welcome outlier.

However, none of these accounts stand out in offerings. You can write checks from them, you may be able to earn a tiny smattering of interest, and maybe, if you’re older, you can get a free box of checks.

Instead, if you’d like to find a checking account that offers a much better interest rate along with other, worthwhile perks, consider one of these online checking accounts instead.

Home Savings’ savings account options

Statement Savings

This is Home Savings’ standard savings account. Sadly, it doesn’t earn much.
APYMinimum Balance to Earn APY
0.03%
$50
  • Minimum opening deposit: $50
  • Minimum balance to earn APY: $50
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $1, unless you keep at least $100 in the account at all times.
  • ATM fee: None at Home Savings or MoneyPass ATMs. $2.50 at a PLUS network ATM. $2 at other ATMs. If you use your card abroad, you’ll pay a $3 ATM fee plus 0.8% – 1% of the transaction amount.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $36 per item, for a maximum daily fee of $154. If you set up overdraft transfers, it will cost you $10 per transfer. If you set up an overdraft line of credit, it will cost you $25 per year, plus interest. If your account stays overdrawn, you’ll pay $10 every seven days until it’s brought back in the black.

If you’re just getting started on your savings journey at Home Savings and you don’t qualify for any of the bank’s other special savings accounts, this is the savings account you’ll start with. It only takes a $50 deposit to get started, but you might want to wait until you can commit to keeping at least $100 in the account. If you don’t keep $100 in the account each day of the month, you’ll have to pay a $1 monthly fee.

Given the fact that the interest rate is so low on this account, you’ll want to avoid the fee at all costs because it’ll probably swamp out any meager earnings you do get. As soon as you’re able, you may want to consider opening a higher-yielding account at Home Savings, or at another bank entirely.

How to get Home Savings’ Statement Savings account

Even though you can start to open this account online, it’s still basically restricted to people living in Home Savings’ core banking area in Ohio, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania. That’s because you’ll need to come into a branch to finish the account-opening process.

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Holiday Club

You won’t be getting many more Christmas presents with the interest rate that this account is offering.
APYMinimum Balance to Earn APY
0.03%
$0.01
  • Minimum opening deposit: $10
  • Minimum balance to earn APY: $0.01
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: None
  • ATM fee: None at Home Savings or MoneyPass ATMs. $2.50 at a PLUS network ATM. $2 at other ATMs. If you use your card abroad, you’ll pay a $3 ATM fee plus 0.8% – 1% of the transaction amount.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $36 per item, for a maximum daily fee of $154. If you set up overdraft transfers, it will cost you $10 per transfer. If you set up an overdraft line of credit, it will cost you $25 per year, plus interest. If your account stays overdrawn, you’ll pay $10 every seven days until it’s brought back in the black.

Home Savings offers this special savings account for people looking to save up for extra expenses during the holidays. When you open this account, you choose which account you want the funds deposited into when the club pays out — either your checking or savings account. The club savings account will automatically pay out the balance of the account into whichever account you designate on October 15 of each year, right in time to start shopping for the holidays.

Even though this account will start accruing as soon as you put money into it, you won’t see it credited to your account until it’s paid out in October. That might be kind of confusing at first because you won’t see interest deposits in your account, but rest assured, they will be included with your automatic transfer in October.

There are no automatic deposit requirements for this account. Rather, it’s entirely on you to remember to save into this account. It may be a good idea to set up automatic transfers anyways, just so that you don’t forget. You also are not allowed to make early withdrawals from the account, so only commit to putting in funds you won’t need until the holidays.

How to get Home Savings’ Holiday Club account

Home Savings does not support online applications for its Holiday Club account. Instead, you’ll need to go into a branch to open this account.

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Big Bucks Children’s Savings

This savings account earns small change for interest.
APYMinimum Balance to Earn APY
0.03%
$0.01
  • Minimum opening deposit: $10
  • Minimum balance to earn APY: $0.01
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: None
  • ATM fee: None at Home Savings or MoneyPass ATMs. $2.50 at a PLUS network ATM. $2 at other ATMs. If you use your card abroad, you’ll pay a $3 ATM fee plus 0.8% – 1% of the transaction amount.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $36 per item, for a maximum daily fee of $154. If you set up overdraft transfers, it will cost you $10 per transfer. If you set up an overdraft line of credit, it will cost you $25 per year, plus interest. If your account stays overdrawn, you’ll pay $10 every seven days until it’s brought back in the black.

Home Savings makes it pretty easy for your child to get started with this savings account. All they’ll need is a $10 deposit to open the account, and they’ll start earning interest right from the start. There are also no monthly fees to worry about, so your child can watch their savings grow without being chipped away by fees.

Unfortunately, this account doesn’t offer a very high interest rate, so it’ll be awhile before your child sees any gains getting excited about. Many other banks and credit unions offer higher interest rates for kids’ savings account to yield earnings earlier, but Home Savings does not.

How to get Home Savings’ Big Bucks Children’s Savings account

Home Savings requires you to open this account with your child at a branch location. It operates branches in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Ohio.

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Student Savers

Surprise — this account doesn’t offer anything special for teenage savers.
APYMinimum Balance to Earn APY
0.03%
$0.01
  • Minimum opening deposit: $10
  • Minimum balance to earn APY: $0.01
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: None
  • ATM fee: None at Home Savings or MoneyPass ATMs. $2.50 at a PLUS network ATM. $2 at other ATMs. If you use your card abroad, you’ll pay a $3 ATM fee plus 0.8% – 1% of the transaction amount.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $36 per item, for a maximum daily fee of $154. If you set up overdraft transfers, it will cost you $10 per transfer. If you set up an overdraft line of credit, it will cost you $25 per year, plus interest. If your account stays overdrawn, you’ll pay $10 every seven days until it’s brought back in the black.

After your child turns 13, they’re eligible to open a Student Savers account at Home Savings. This account works much the same way as the Big Bucks Children’s Savings account, with a few caveats.

With this account, teens are given their own ATM card, and can access their account through online banking. Just like everyone else with a savings account, they’re limited up to six certain withdrawals per month, per Regulation D. Otherwise they’ll pay a $10 per withdrawal fee starting with the seventh withdrawal from the bank. If they go over the withdrawal limits too many times with the account, Home Savings may convert the account to a transaction-based account, such as a checking account.

When your child turns 18, they’ll need to close this account down and re-apply for another of Home Savings’ adult savings accounts. It does not automatically transfer into a new account, like at some other banks.

How to get Home Savings’ Student Savers account

You’ll need to visit a local Home Savings branch location with your teen to open this account. You’ll need to provide your Social Security number and a way to fund this account in order to get started.

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Platinum Savings

This high-yield savings account doesn’t really offer high yields at all.
APYMinimum Balance to Earn APY
0.01%
$0.01-$4,999.99
0.03%
Over $5,000
  • Minimum opening deposit: $5,000
  • Minimum balance to earn APY: $0.01
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $10, unless you keep at least $5,000 in the account.
  • ATM fee: None Home Savings or MoneyPass ATMs. $2.50 at a PLUS network ATM. $2 at other ATMs. If you use your card abroad, you’ll pay a $3 ATM fee plus 0.8% – 1% of the transaction amount.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $36 per item, for a maximum daily fee of $154. If you set up overdraft transfers, it will cost you $10 per transfer. If you set up an overdraft line of credit, it will cost you $25 per year, plus interest. If your account stays overdrawn, you’ll pay $10 every seven days until it’s brought back in the black.

If you don’t have the big bucks to open up a higher-yielding money market account (at least $10,000) and don’t want to lock your money away in a CD, this account might be your best bet to earn the most money at Home Savings. That’s not to say it’s a true high-yield savings account, however — far from it.

With this account, you can earn higher interest rates than with the Statement Savings account if you have at least $5,000 to deposit into the account. Again, you’ll want to make sure you keep at least this much in the account because if your balance drops below $5,000, you could face a $10 monthly service fee (ouch). Keep in mind that this may not be the best savings account if you’re saving up for a particular purchase, such as a fancy vacation or a vehicle, because due to the account limitations, you can’t liquidate the account without paying a monthly service fee.

This account is also limited up to six certain withdrawals per month due to federal Regulation D guidelines. If you go over that limit, Home Savings will charge you a $10 per withdrawal fee.

How to get Home Savings’ Platinum Savings account

Unfortunately, Home Savings does not offer online applications for this account. To get the Platinum Savings account, you’ll need to walk into a branch location. You can find these locations online, but they are all located throughout Ohio and in parts of West Virginia and Pennsylvania.

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How Home Savings’ savings accounts compare

For a bank named “Home Savings,” you’d expect that it would offer at least decent interest rates on its savings accounts. That’s just not the case here. In fact, it’s hard to go much lower than what Home Savings offers.

This is why we try to steer people to one of these online high-yield savings accounts instead. These accounts offer fewer fees and actually offer good interest rates, so you won’t be old and in your rocker before you actually start to see measurable money pile up in your savings account.

Home Savings’ CD rates

Regular CD

These CDs offer very low rates as well.
TermAPY
28 days0.05%
91 days0.05%
182 days0.10%
365 days0.20%
12 months0.30%
18 months0.35%
24 months0.40%
30 months0.50%
36 months0.55%
48 months 0.60%
60 months0.70%
72 months0.80%
  • Minimum opening deposit: $500
  • Minimum balance amount to earn APY: $500
  • Early withdrawal penalty: This depends on your CD’s term length:
    • For the 28-day CD, you’ll pay either half of the interest you would have earned if you kept that money in the CD or all of the interest that you’ve earned so far, whichever is more. If you withdraw the money within the first six days, you’ll pay seven days’ worth of interest instead.
    • For 91- and 182-day CDs, you’ll pay 30 days’ worth of interest.
    • For the 365-day CDs through to the 24-month CDs, you’ll pay 90 days’ worth of interest.
    • For CDs longer than 24 months, you’ll pay 180 days’ worth of interest.

Some of Home Savings’ CDs offer just about the highest rates you can find at this bank. But as always, there’s a catch: You’ll need to be willing to lock up your money away for a good chunk of time. You are allowed to withdraw interest on these CDs without paying a penalty, however, provided one thing: You withdraw the money when it’s credited to your account.

For CDs longer than a year, interest will be credited to your account on a monthly basis, whereas it’ll be credited to your account when it matures for CD terms under a year. So, realistically, you can’t withdraw your interest earned on short-term CDs anyways without paying a penalty.

Once your CD matures, it will automatically renew for another term length. If you want to take out the money, add more, or change the CD’s term length, you’ll need to do so during a brief seven-day grace period after the CD matures. After that, it’ll be locked in again for another term.

How to get Home Savings’ Regular CDs

You can start the account opening process for these CDs online, however you’ll still need to be able to make it into a branch to finish signing paperwork for this account. You’ll also need to be able to provide a funding source (debit card, credit card, or ACH transfer), a driver’s license, and your Social Security Number.

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Jumbo CD

You’ll need to contact Home Savings directly for rates and terms if you’re interested in opening one of these mammoths.
  • Minimum opening deposit: $100,000
  • Minimum balance amount to earn APY: $100,000
  • Early withdrawal penalty: This depends on your CD’s term length:
    • For the 28-day CD, you’ll pay either half of the interest you would have earned if you kept that money in the CD or all of the interest that you’ve earned so far, whichever is more. If you withdraw the money within the first six days, you’ll pay seven days’ worth of interest instead.
    • For 91- and 182-day CDs, you’ll pay 30 days’ worth of interest.
    • For the 365-day CDs through to the 24-month CDs, you’ll pay 90 days’ worth of interest.
    • For CDs longer than 24 months, you’ll pay 180 days’ worth of interest.

If you’ve got a lot of change rattling around in your bank accounts and you’re wondering what to do with it, consider opening a Jumbo CD. We can’t say whether Home Savings would be the right bank to hold your Jumbo CDs since it doesn’t publish its rates online, but typically the rates that most banks offer on these types of accounts are higher than on normal CDs.

You’ll need at least $100,000 to open these CDs. Remember that the limits of FDIC insurance are $250,000 per depositor, per bank, so you probably won’t want to deposit more than this. But if you are looking to park that amount of cash and you’re also interested in Home Savings, you do have this option.

How to get Home Savings’ Jumbo CDs

To open one of these CDs, you’ll need to speak with a bank representative in person at the branch. You’ll also need some way to provide that hefty deposit, whether it be via ACH transfer (bring your current account’s routing information), cash, check, etc.

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How Home Savings’ CD rates compare

Home Savings is currently offering a semi-decent rate for its 60-month CD, but that’s about it. Even so, you can still find higher rates out there — maybe with one of these CDs.

As for the rest of its CDs, don’t bother. The rates are simply too low to be worth your time. In fact, it might be a good idea to skip this bank entirely for one that offers better rates on all of its CDs, in case you decide to open a different term length. That way you don’t need to fuss around with moving your money between banks.

Home Savings’ money market account option

Money Market

These are some of the lowest interest rates on a money market account we’ve seen in a long time.
APYMinimum Balance to Earn APY
0.40%
$10,000-$24,999.99
0.40%
$25,000-$49,9999.99
0.45%
$50,000-$99,999.99
0.45%
Over $100,000
  • Minimum opening deposit: $10,000
  • Minimum balance to earn APY: $10,000
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $10, unless you keep at least $10,000 in the account.
  • ATM fee: None at Home Savings ATMs or MoneyPass ATMs. $2.50 at a PLUS network ATM. $2 at other ATMs. If you use your card abroad, you’ll pay a $3 ATM fee plus 0.8% – 1% of the transaction amount.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $36 per item, for a maximum daily fee of $154. If you set up overdraft transfers, it will cost you $10 per transfer. If you set up an overdraft line of credit, it will cost you $25 per year, plus interest. If your account stays overdrawn, you’ll pay $10 every seven days until it’s brought back in the black.

This account is a bit tricky. You’d think that it would offer higher interest rates than Home Savings’ savings accounts on all balances, but in fact it only begins to offer higher interest rates once you reach at least $50,000. That means that even though you need at least $10,000 to open the account, you’ll actually be at an earnings disadvantage for the next $40,000, until you reach the magic $50,000 threshold.

Above that level, however, this is the highest-yielding liquid savings account that Home Savings offers. You can even write checks from this account. There are a few limitations, however. You are allowed to make up to six certain withdrawals per month due to federal Regulation D laws, and any withdrawals in excess of that will cost you $10 a pop from the bank.

How to get Home Savings’ Money Market account

You can “open” this Money Market account online, but you’ll still need to go to a branch to finish signing the paperwork to open this account.

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How Home Savings’ money market account compares

This is hardly a comparison at all. When you look at other accounts, Home Savings is left behind in the dust in terms of interest rates. These rates are so low that this account isn’t worth the trouble at all.

If you’d rather see real earnings on your money market account, consider one of these high-yielding money market accounts instead. You (and your wallet) will be glad you did.

Home Savings’ IRA account options

IRA CDs

You won’t be earning much for retirement with these IRA CDs, except for the 12 month CD.
TermAPY
12 months0.30%
18 months (variable rate)0.35% Variable
18 months0.35%
24 months0.40%
30 months0.50%
36 months0.55%
60 months0.70%
72 months0.80%
  • Minimum opening deposit: $500, or $100 for the 18-month variable-rate IRA CD.
  • Minimum balance amount to earn APY: $500, or $0.01 for the 18-month variable-rate IRA CD.
  • Early withdrawal penalty: This depends on your IRA CD’s term length:
    • For IRA CDs up to and including 24 months, you’ll pay 90 days’ worth of interest.
    • For IRA CDs over 24 months, you’ll pay 180 days’ worth of interest.

Home Savings’ IRA CDs come in a smaller variety than its regular CDs, which is probably fine because for most people, retirement is a long-term savings plan. The shortest-term IRA CD you can get at Home Savings is 12 months (which, coincidentally, offers a far higher rate than any of the other IRA CDs), and the longest term you can get is six years.

You can open these IRA CDs within a Traditional IRA or a Roth IRA.

These IRA CDs behave just like Home Savings’ regular CDs. They’ll automatically roll over into another CD of the same type when they mature, with a short seven-day grace period when you can withdraw the funds or transfer them to an IRA account at a different (hopefully higher-yielding) institution.

How to get Home Savings’ IRA CDs

You can start the account-opening process online if you’re interested in these IRA CDs, however Home Savings still requires you to come in to finish opening the account. The reason is because you’ll need to be present to sign some paperwork. You will also need to provide your Social Security number, driver’s license, and a way to fund your new IRA CD.

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How Home Savings’ IRA CD rates compare

Home Bank only offers one IRA CD rate that we’d say is any good: its 12-month IRA CD. It’s pretty close to the top 12-month IRA CDs available today. Still, the bank can change the rate at any time, and judging by its other IRA CDs (which offer very low rates), it might not be a very good rate. The bank appears to be using its 12-month IRA CDs as a loss leader right now in an attempt to lure clients, but because its other accounts offer poor rates, we’d suggest not taking the bait.

If IRA CDs are a part of your retirement savings plan, consider one of these IRA CDs in their place. These IRA CDs are offering much higher rates, so hopefully you’ll be able to earn more than a few peanut’s worth of interest in retirement.

Overall review of Home Savings’ banking products

Home Savings starts out with a bold promise. Anytime we hear the word “savings” in a bank’s name, our ears perk up. Unfortunately, we’re a bit let down by this bank’s interest rates. Almost all of its accounts offer rock-bottom interest rates.

We do like that very few of Home Savings’ accounts come with monthly fees. It’s especially refreshing to see a free interest-bearing checking account (although that it offers almost nothing for interest). Still, since we’re rate-hunters and we can guess that you may be too, we’d suggest passing on Home Savings. There’s just too many other banks and credit unions out there that value your patronage and reward you for it in the form of better interest rates.

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