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How to Avoid Pyramid Schemes

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Direct selling can provide a flexible way for you to run your own sales business from home or online, but it’s important to distinguish legitimate companies from pyramid schemes. The red flag is when such a system depends on recruiting an ever-increasing number of “investors” than the selling of a product. We’ll help you avoid pyramid schemes and identify legal direct selling companies worthy of your research.

Direct selling vs. pyramid schemes

Direct selling is a legal business practice conducted through single-level sales (think door-to-door salesperson), host or party-plan sales and multilevel marketing companies, which depend on individual distributors to sell products to the public, often in a group, party-like setting or through catalogs or online stores. Distributors often have the opportunity to earn commission on their sales and those of the salespeople they recruit.

A pyramid scheme may be disguised as a multilevel marketing business, but it is actually an illegal scam that emphasizes recruitment rather than the sale of actual products. Instead of earning most of their income through selling, distributors are heavily rewarded for bringing on new sellers, who may have to pay an entry fee.

“It’s going to take some healthy skepticism and research for someone to recognize that difference,” said Stacie Bosley, associate economics professor at Hamline University in St. Paul, Minn.

As of 2018, direct selling represents $35.4 billion in retail sales in the U.S. and 6.2 million people work full-time or part-time in the industry, according to the Direct Selling Association. Continue reading to find out how to avoid a pyramid scheme if you’re thinking about pursuing a multilevel marketing opportunity.

What is a pyramid scheme?

A pyramid scheme can be defined as a company that requires participants to make an investment in the business in exchange for the opportunity to sell products to consumers. Oftentimes, sellers are highly rewarded for recruiting newcomers, who then make a similar investment in the company.

Many types of businesses provide rewards for referrals, giving customers a small incentive to suggest a product or service to others, Bosley said. But if the recruitment model is the central feature of the company, it may be a pyramid scheme.

“Look for a really strong pay-and-recruit structure,” Bosley said. “If that’s there, I would worry about its legality.”

How pyramid schemes work

Here’s an example of a formula that a pyramid scheme could follow. Let’s say a seller makes a $500 investment to join the business. She is told she would be rewarded $150 per person if she recruits three more sellers, who would also make a $500 investment in the business.

From there, she would earn $30 for each new member that her recruits bring on. All of her recruits are given the same offer.

The original seller stands to make an increasing profit on her $500 investment, depending on how many people her recruits bring into the company. But each new member would make $450 at the first level, $50 short of their break-even point if they only recruit three more people. If they can’t pass the first level, they won’t get a return on their investment. Meanwhile, the company would continue to collect $500 from every new recruit, although it would have to pay commission to those who recruit more new members.

There could be instances where legitimate companies follow a similar model of rewarding recruitment. But if new member recruitment earns you more money than selling actual products or services, then the company would likely be a pyramid scheme.

Why are pyramid schemes illegal?

Pyramid schemes are illegal because they defraud investors who are promised their money back. In reality, money from bottom-level investors is used to pay other investors farther up the pyramid. And products in these schemes are often unsellable.

Pyramid schemes took off in the U.S. in the 1970s. One-on-one selling became popular for consumer items, such as cosmetics, kitchen tools and branded items like Tupperware, and pyramid schemes took advantage of the trend. The Federal Trade Commission began cracking down on scams that emphasized networking over selling actual goods, and the organization has continued to monitor the direct sales industry.

Another wave of pyramid schemes swept through the U.S. in the 1990s with the rise of email and internet access. Such scams still pop up today, though the FTC continues to bring cases against deceitful companies.

“Fraud goes in cycles, just like economies,” said Cheryl Jarvis, marketing professor and department head at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Fla.

The problem with pyramid schemes is the people at the top of the chain are the only ones who make money, Jarvis said. The majority of participants don’t see a return on their investment and ultimately lose money. Pyramid schemes are often short-lived because eventually, distributors run out of people to recruit and the operation stops growing.

“Mathematically, they’re unsustainable,” Jarvis said.

Report suspicious behavior. In addition to the FTC, state agencies investigate pyramid schemes. For instance, any fraudulent activity in New York should be reported to The New York State Attorney General’s Office. You could also file complaints with the Better Business Bureau.

How to avoid pyramid schemes

In addition to an emphasis on recruitment, here are other indicators that a direct sales opportunity may be a scam.

It’s sold as a passive income or easy money opportunity. As a recruitment strategy, distributors often emphasize how little effort is needed to make an income. In any business, selling enough product to turn a profit takes hard work, so be cautious if the company makes it sound simple.

Promise of unrealistic returns in a short amount of time. If you’re earning fast cash despite low sales, you’re likely receiving returns on people getting recruited to the company. Generating revenue too quickly could be a red flag.

No buy-back system. Pyramid schemes and legitimate multilevel marketing companies both typically require new members to purchase product to sell to consumers. However, reputable companies should offer a buy-back option if you want to leave the business. A company that doesn’t refund members for unsold product may be a part of a pyramid scheme.

High upfront fees. Be wary if the buy-in fee or initial investment seems high or exceeds the value of the products. High upfront fees combined with the lack of a buy-back program could indicate the business is a scam. Legitimate direct selling companies have a median startup fee of $99, according to the Direct Selling Association.

Abstract language. Take note if the company is unclear about processes or structures within the business. Product descriptions, prices and claims may also be vague or questionable. Recruiters could make inflated income claims as well to attract new sellers.

Do your own research rather than relying on what you hear from distributors, Bosley said. They are incentivized to recruit you and may not objectively present information.

“Of course, scheme operators aren’t going to make it easy for you,” she said. “There are layers of rhetoric and that makes it difficult to see the bones of the scheme.”

One way to quickly check a company’s legitimacy would be searching the Direct Selling Association’s database. Although not all existing direct sales companies are listed, a company that is a member of the DSA could be considered a reputable multilevel marketing business.

How to say ‘no’ to a direct sales recruiter

Social media has become a conduit for pyramid schemes. When people are approached about multilevel marketing opportunities, the sales pitch is often coming from someone they know, which can make it difficult to turn down, Bosley said.

“There’s feelings of obligation, allegiance, [of] not wanting to let someone down,” Bosley said. “We underestimate how powerful those kinds of emotions can be.”

The person asking you to join the company could be unknowingly participating in a pyramid scheme. If you’re skeptical about the operation, it’s best to reject them outright in a way you feel comfortable, Bosley said.

“If you give them any room, their incentives just keep coming,” she said.

First, you should be honest about your suspicions that there may be something illegal in the structure of the company. You could take a more thoughtful approach, communicating that you’re concerned about their involvement and well-being. You may want to point out that they could potentially harm others in the recruitment process.

“It doesn’t just affect you; it affects the person who recruited you and it affects the people you pass it on to,” Bosley said.

Request documentation. You could then ask for company documents, such as marketing plans or audited financial statements. The recruiter may not be able to provide this information, but if they can’t get such forms from someone else in the company, you could use that as a reason to reject their offer, Jarvis said.

“Whenever you get strong-arm social pressure, I’d say that’s a red flag,” she said.

Pyramid schemes vs. multi-level marketing companies

If you’re considering getting into the direct sales industry, here’s how to spot a pyramid scheme compared to a multilevel marketing company.

MLM company

Pyramid scheme

Recruitment rewards may be offered, but product sales drive income.

Recruitment is the primary revenue driver.

Buy-back program and exit strategy available for sellers.

No repurchase plan for unused inventory.

Initial investment cost is relative to the value of products.

Steep fees to join the business and receive products.

There is an actual consumer demand for products.

Product descriptions and claims are vague or misleading.

When direct selling could pay off

Not all multilevel marketing companies are pyramid schemes in disguise. A direct sales business could have a lower startup risk and lower cost of entry compared to other business opportunities, like buying a franchise, said Joseph Aquilina, ethics and compliance counsel for the Direct Selling Association. Although the payoff could be miniscule — as low as 70 cents or less per hour — sellers are usually independent contractors and can work on their own schedule.

“This is a very low-cost and low-risk opportunity for people to build their own businesses,” he said.

People often fall prey to pyramid schemes because of a need to supplement their household income, Aquilina said. While direct selling could provide a solution, scams and illegitimate businesses could turn people off the entire industry.

“It can take only a few bad apples to present a reputation challenge for the whole bunch,” he said.

You could also start a hobby-based business to monetize a personal interest. You would be able to follow your entrepreneurial instincts without answering to a larger organization. But getting a business up and running — and reaching profitability — takes time and commitment, even more so than direct selling.

Keep in mind that multilevel marketing depends on sales, and you have to be willing to put in effort to become successful, Jarvis said. Chasing a quick-fix or easy way to make income would likely land you in a pyramid scheme rather than a legitimate company.

“You’re going to be spending a lot more time than you think to make sales,” she said. “Those who are successful are the ones who make it a full-time job.”

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Small Business

Guide to Small Business Funding for Women

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

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As the number of women-owned businesses grows across the U.S., women entrepreneurs are increasingly in need of funding for their businesses. While there aren’t specific small business loans for women, there are many lenders and organizations that offer small business help for women entrepreneurs, including SBA loans, term loans and business lines of credit, among other resources.

Small business loans for women: 3 options to consider

SBA loans

Best for: Businesses looking for long-term financing and businesses struggling to get loan approval.

The Small Business Administration (SBA) offers small business help for women that includes business training, counseling and assistance in accessing financing. The SBA can also help you if other lenders have deemed your business too risky. Since SBA loans are guaranteed by the Small Business Administration, lenders may be more likely to approve your application and even offer lower interest rates and longer repayment terms.

The SBA offers multiple loan types, with amounts ranging from $500 to $5.5 million. Requirements to qualify for each loan type are unique, and eligibility varies depending on the lender and the loan program. However, SBA loans are available for most business purposes.

Term loans

Best for: Businesses that can clearly project how much cash they’ll need or for startup capital when a business doesn’t want to forfeit any ownership to an investor.

A term loan is a typical loan arrangement that allows you to borrow a lump sum of money and pay it back in installments, with interest. Interest rates and other fees can vary greatly from one lender to the next, but you’ll likely need to present your business plan, expense sheet and financial projections in order to apply for a term loan at any bank or credit union.

Some lenders are committed to offering small business term loans to women. Learn more about these lenders and their loan product options below.

Business lines of credit

Best for: Businesses that need ongoing access to capital or that have an open-ended project.

A business line of credit is an account that allows you to draw money up to a set limit. Similar to a credit card, each time you pay down your balance you can draw up to the limit again, and fees and interest payments are based on your account balance. Unlike business credit cards, which generally have higher interest rates, business lines of credit tend to have lower interest rates and allow you to make cash withdrawals without any limitations and write checks from your account.

You can take out a business line of credit through a bank, credit union or online lender. Qualification is based on your personal credit.

5 best small business loans for women

To select the top five small business loans for women, we looked at a number of lenders and chose a mix of online and traditional bank lenders. While traditional lenders may be more difficult to qualify for, the two we have listed are among the most active SBA lenders, making them a potentially compelling option for women business owners.

Additionally, the lenders we selected had to meet the following criteria:

  • Transparent websites. These lenders clearly list necessary information on their websites so small business owners can easily find what they need.
  • Wide range of amounts and term lengths. Many of these lenders offer a range of loan products as well as amounts and term lengths, which means they can cater to a range of small business owners’ needs.
  • Lender credibility. These lenders have all been in business for at least a decade and have established themselves in the space through things like positive customer reviews and high approval counts.

1. Kabbage

Type of financing

Rate

Amount

Min. credit score

Best for...

Business line of credit

Monthly fee is 1.25% to 10.00% of principal

Up to $250,000

None

Ongoing access to capital

Although Kabbage often refers to its financing product as a loan, it is technically a line of credit, one the company says is commonly used by women business owners for inventory purchases, office expansion, marketing campaigns, equipment purchase and hiring employees. Kabbage’s monthly fees for business lines of credit start at 1.25% and are only charged based on the amount you draw.

Kabbage offers a simple online application process, and you can manage your line of credit account from a mobile device.

2. Smartbiz

Type of financing

Rate

Amount

Min. credit score

Best for...

SBA loans

5.04% to 10.29% APR

$30,000 to $5,000,000

650 for a $30,00 to $350,000 loan

675 for a $500,000 to $5 million loan

Faster processing on SBA loans

According to Smartbiz, 30% of its 7(a) SBA loans are granted to women-owned businesses. The national average is only 14% for SBA lenders.

Smartbiz helps expedite the application process by submitting your application to an online marketplace of multiple SBA lenders at once. Prequalification is available within five minutes, and funding is available in as few as seven days upon approval.

3. Wells Fargo Bank

Type of financing

Rate

Amount

Min. credit score

Best for...

Equipment Express Loan

5.50% to 9.50% APR for vehicle loans

6.00% to 12.25% for equipment loans

$10,000 to $100,000

Not disclosed

Purchasing vehicles or equipment

In 2013, Wells Fargo Bank committed to lending $55 billion to women-owned businesses by the year 2020. The bank offers several small business loan products, including its Equipment Express Loan. The interest rate on the bank’s secured vehicle loans starts as low as 5.50%.

However, you’ll need to be an existing customer of the bank to apply. Wells Fargo small business loans are only available to customers who have had a checking or savings account with the bank for a minimum of one year.

4. Celtic Bank

Type of financing

Rate

Amount

Min. credit score

Best for...

Express Loan

Variable

$20,000-$150,000

Not disclosed

Wide variety of loans

Celtic Bank is perhaps best known as an SBA lender, but the Utah-based lender offers a variety of loans well-suited to all types of businesses, small to large. The Celtic Express loan offers loans between $20,000 and $150,000 for up to 120 months.

To be eligible, the business must be a for-profit, owner-operated enterprise. Loan proceeds may not be used for construction or tenant improvements. Newer businesses are considered, but you must have a location identified and be able to start operations at funding.

5. OnDeck

Type of loan

Rate

Amount

Min. credit score

Best for...

Short-term loan

11.89% APR and up

$5,000 to $500,000

600

Business owners with lower personal credit scores

OnDeck is an online lender that has funded over $6 billion in small business loans for women. The lender offers business loans for women with bad credit, with a minimum credit score requirement of just 600. However, its APRs start relatively high, at 11.89% and up.

In order to qualify for a loan with OnDeck, your business must be at least a year old and earn at least $100,000 a year in revenue. Those who qualify may receive funding within as little time as 24 hours.

Alternative financing options for women-owned businesses

Grants for female business owners

Small business grants can provide you with funds to start or expand your business — and, unlike loans, they don’t have to be repaid. Grantors who fund women-owned businesses include the federal government, local governments and private funds. The amount of money available and the requirements to qualify will vary depending on the source of the funds.

Here are a variety of women-owned business grants to consider:

  • Amber Foundation Grant.Grants of $4,000 are awarded on a monthly basis to women-owned businesses of all kinds. Monthly grant winners are eligible for an additional $25,000 grant at the end of the year.
  • Cartier Women’s Initiative. This grant is for women-owned, women-run businesses focused on sustainable social and/or environmental impact. Applicants in a select group receive one-on-one business training and cash awards of $30,000 or $100,000.
  • Girlboss Foundation Grant.Grants are available up to $15,000 for women entrepreneurs working in the areas of design, fashion, music or the arts.
  • NASE Growth Grants. The National Association for the Self-Employed (NASE) offers $4,000 grants for female business owners. You must become a NASE member to apply.
  • SBA. Though there technically are not Small Business Administration grants for women (or anyone else), the SBA does facilitate federal grants for all types of business owners through the Small Business Innovation Research and the Small Business Technology Transfer programs.

Equity financing opportunities

Venture capital firms and individual investors, sometimes known as “angel investors,” differ from lenders. Instead of offering debt, these venture capitalists offer to make a long-term investment in your company in exchange for equity. They may also require some form of ownership and/or a seat on your company’s board of directors.

Here are some investing groups and firms that cater to women-owned businesses:

Additional resources for women-owned businesses

  • SBA Women’s Business Centers: The SBA offers over 100 office locations throughout the U.S. where women can receive free training, workshops, mentorship and more. Use the SBA directory to find your nearest location.
  • Women-Owned Small Businesses (WOSB) Federal Contracting Program: This federal program sets aside contracting opportunities for women applicants in industries where women’s businesses are underrepresented or disadvantaged. Those industries include construction, manufacturing, publishing and more.
  • National Women’s Business Council (NWBC): This federal advisory committee advises the president, the U.S. Congress and the SBA on matters affecting women entrepreneurs and women-owned businesses. The NWBC hosts round-table events around the country to gather input and promote women’s STEM-focused and rural-owned businesses.
  • DreamBuilder: This free online program offers interactive courses for women on how to start, build and finance your business. Courses are available in Spanish and English.
  • National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO):NAWBO is an advocacy organization that promotes networking events for women entrepreneurs, provides online resources and has local chapters throughout the U.S.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.