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8 Financial Concepts to Master Before You Start Investing

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone and is not intended to be a source of investment advice. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

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If you think investing is a daunting topic — especially when you’re just getting started — you’re not the only one. About 60% of adults say investing in the stock market is “scary or intimidating,” according to a survey from Ally Invest.

It can seem like there’s a lot to learn (and there is), but you don’t have to learn everything right away. Grasping a few basic financial concepts can help you feel more comfortable diving in.

Here’s what you should understand before you get started.

8 financial concepts to learn before investing

1. Diversification is your friend

Diversification is essentially the idea that you shouldn’t put all your eggs in one basket — but with an investing spin. Consider a business that sells sunscreen. It does well during the sunny season, but come rain and snow, sales drop. If you want to see steady returns on your money, you should invest in the business that sells sunscreen and the business that sells winter gear.

“You want to own a portfolio that’s going to do well regardless of the market conditions and economic conditions,” said Thomas Rindahl, a financial planner in Tempe, Ariz. “And because we don’t know which sector of the market is going to do well in any given year, you want to include a little bit of everything in your portfolio.”

That way, when one area is doing poorly, another area might do well, and your portfolio will be less volatile and more consistent overall.

2. Risk tolerance is personal

If you’re aggressive with your investments — meaning you take a lot of risks — there’s the potential to see high returns. But there’s also the potential to see big losses. Assessing your risk tolerance is about figuring out how you feel about the possibility of losing money and investing accordingly.

“In 2008, depending on which sector of the market you were in, you lost 20% to 50% of your portfolio value,” Rindahl said. “If that’s going to keep you up at night, you don’t necessarily want to be high-risk. You must figure out what level of volatility in that portfolio you’re able to stomach.”

Generally, the more money you have in stocks, the riskier your portfolio; the more you have in bonds, the more conservative your investment. Most experts recommend that younger investors take some risks by putting more money in stocks since they have plenty of time to recover from a market dive before retirement.

3. Timing the market is really hard to do

Timing the market is the act of trying to buy and sell stocks based on what you expect the stock market to do in an effort to maximize your returns.

Beginner investors should understand that they cannot time the market,” said Chris Chen, a financial planner in Waltham, Mass. “People have tried. Most have failed. And those who have succeeded have a really difficult time repeating it.”

Chen pointed to data showing that investors who try to time the market don’t do so well. “From 1998 to the end of 2017, the S&P 500 returned 7.2%, and that’s going through the internet bubble in the early part of the century and the real estate issues that we had in 2008,” Chen said. “According to the same data, the average investor between 1998 and 2017 averaged 2.6%. That is a direct result of wanting to try to time the market.”

Few are lucky enough to strike it rich with a fortunate stock pick, so your efforts may be better spent focusing on your long-term investment strategy.

4. Compound interest is a big deal

You’ve probably heard that the earlier you start investing, the better. That’s because of the power of time and compound interest. Compound interest is what happens when the interest or dividends an investment pays out are reinvested in the portfolio, purchasing additional shares that also can continue to grow and pay out.

“What you’ll see is an ever-increasing growth rate of amount of interest and dividends that are paid out over time,” Rindahl said. “Because of the reinvestment back into the principal, the investment grows exponentially as time goes on.”

For instance, if you put $1,000 into an investment earning 6% a year, in 40 years, you’d have more than $10,000. Add $50 a month to that investment, and you’d have more than $100,000 in 40 years.

5. Fees can make or break your strategy

Cost is an important metric when it comes to the performance of your investments. The more fees you pay, the fewer dollars end up in your account. When you evaluate investments, pay attention to the expense ratio, which is the cost to run that investment each year.

If a mutual fund has an expense ratio of 1%, for instance, that means you’ll lose 1% of the fund’s assets to expenses each year, decreasing your earnings. The lower the expense ratio, the more returns you’ll keep in your own pocket.

“If you remove cost, your investments are going to perform better,” Chen said. “And over time, the compound effect of the savings will be worth a lot of money.”

Other fees could affect your bottom line as well, such as:

  • Sales loads: These are fees assessed on some investments when you buy them or sell them (or both).
  • Surrender fees: Some investments charge a fee if you sell them within a specific time frame.
  • Transaction fees: At some companies, there are costs involved in the buying and selling of investments.
  • Advisory fees: If you’re working with a financial advisor, they may structure their fees in a variety of ways. They might charge by the hour, by the service or by a percentage of your portfolio.

Ask your brokerage company or financial advisor for a full fee schedule, and make sure you understand how the fees work for your investments.

6. Dollar cost averaging could pay off

Dollar cost averaging is the practice of investing a set amount in the market on a schedule — like you do when you make a 401(k) contribution every payday or when you automatically put $100 into an IRA every month. Because the market fluctuates, that money will buy different amounts of investments each time.

“Certain months, you might be buying 10 shares of an investment, other months 12 shares, other months eight shares,” Rindahl said. But because you’re buying a consistent dollar amount every period, you’re purchasing fewer shares when the price is high and more shares when the price is low — smoothing out the volatility and risk overall.

7. Invest for the long term

Investing now — especially when you’re young — isn’t really about what your investments do this year or even what your investments do over five years; it’s about what your investments do over decades. Setting early expectations for your portfolio and pulling money out of the market during a dive will only hurt you in the end, Chen said.

“There are months and years when the market will go down, but in the long run, it’s almost always positive,” Chen said. “From 1927 to 2018, if you bought the S&P 500 and held it for one year, it’s been positive 73% of the time. If you look at 10-year holding periods, it’s been positive 95% of the time. If you look at 20-year holding periods, it’s been positive 100% of the time.”

8. Tax loss harvesting could be a valuable tool

Tax loss harvesting is the practice of selling off your losing investments to counteract any taxable gains you may have in your portfolio. This is primarily a concern if you’re investing in a taxable account — where if you realize a gain on an investment, you’ll pay taxes on it. If you have $1,000 in gains, for instance, you might owe 15% in capital gains taxes, or $150. (Your rate varies by income level.) But if you can sell another investment that’s lost $1,000 in value, you’ll offset the gain and owe no capital gains tax.

“It’s about making your portfolio as tax-efficient as possible,” Rindahl said. “To minimize that taxable gain, you can offset it with enough stock losses for the year.”

Getting started in investing may mean getting familiar with some concepts you’ve never heard of before — but it’s not unmanageable. Once you’ve got the basics down, you’ll be better prepared to create a portfolio that works for you. If you have more questions, a chat with a financial advisor can help you draft the right investment plan.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Kate Ashford
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Kate Ashford is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Kate here

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Review of LPL Financial

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone and is not intended to be a source of investment advice. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

LPL Financial is the largest independent broker-dealer in the United States based on gross revenue. Dually registered as an investment advisor, the firm supports a network of over 16,000 affiliated advisors who operate their own businesses. LPL Financial is based in Boston, and it also has offices in San Diego and Fort Mill, S.C. The network of advisors it supports are located throughout the country. The firm’s advisors oversee nearly $159.1 billion in assets under management (AUM).

All information included in this profile is accurate as of January 23rd, 2020. For more information, please consult LPL Financial’s website.

Assets under management: $159,099,423,965
Minimum investment: Varies by service and portfolio type
Fee structure: Percentage of AUM, hourly fees, fixed fees and commissions
Headquarters:75 State Street
22nd Floor
Boston, MA 02109
617-423-3644
www.lpl.com

Overview of LPL Financial

LPL Financial was founded in 1989 after the merger of two smaller brokerage firms, Linsco and Private Ledger. With 16,109 advisors and 17,205 licensed insurance agents on its staff, LPL has $159.1 billion in assets under management LPL Financial is owned by LPL Financial Holdings, a publicly traded firm.

Advisors often choose to affiliate with LPL to tap into the firm’s technology, investment research and business building support, for which the firm earns a fee. LPL advisors maintain their own relationships with clients and negotiate their own fees and service offerings independently. LPL does not sell any of its own proprietary financial products, so advisors are free to recommend whichever investments and financial products they believe are in their clients’ best interests.

What types of clients does LPL Financial serve?

LPL Financial’s advisors serve mostly individual investors. In addition, the firm serves:

  • High net worth individuals
  • Trusts and estates
  • 401(k) plans
  • Individual retirement accounts
  • Pensions and profit-sharing plans
  • Charitable organizations
  • State and municipal entities
  • Corporations

The minimum amount of assets required to work with an LPL advisor varies depending on the service you receive. LPL does not have a minimum asset requirement for its financial planning, consulting or research services. For customized investment advisory plans, the investment minimum is up to the discretion of the advisor and is detailed in the client agreement.

Clients who opt to use one of the firm’s portfolio programs will be subject to minimum requirements that vary by program. Minimums start as low as $5,000 for Guided Wealth Portfolios and go up to $250,000 for Personal Wealth Portfolios (see more details on these options below).

Services offered by LPL Financial

LPL’s financial advisors offer the full gamut of financial planning and advisory services, such as budgeting, financial projections and selling insurance, though not all advisors offer every type of service. Among the services LPL advisors may offer are:

  • Investment advisory services and portfolio management
  • Wrap programs
  • Financial planning
  • Insurance
  • Retirement plan and pension consulting
  • Selection of other advisors
  • Workshops and seminars
  • Brokerage services

In addition to the services that LPL advisors provide directly to clients, when advisors affiliate with LPL, they get access to a range of services to help them build and manage their businesses. This includes business building ideas, compliance and technology support, investment research and the execution of trades.

How LPL Financial invests your money

Because LPL’s advisors work independently, investment approaches and strategies vary from advisor to advisor and client to client. Advisors can offer customized investment advisory services, and LPL also provides advisors with programs for investing client funds.

One option offered by LPL is the Strategic Asset Management program, which allows a high level of customization so clients can choose to exclude certain investments or emphasize others. The program offers access to a full range of investment options, including mutual funds, exchange-traded funds, equities, fixed income and alternative investments, such as non-traded real estate investment trusts and non-traditional exchange-traded funds.

Advisors who want to take a more hands-on approach with their high net worth clients can use a separately managed account wrap program from LPL called Manager Select. With this program, LPL reviews and recommends outside institutional portfolio management firms for inclusion.

For advisors who don’t want to create customized portfolios, there is also the option to invest clients’ money in one of LPL’s model portfolios. These portfolios — which include Personal Wealth Portfolios, Model Wealth Portfolios, Optimum Market Portfolios and Guided Wealth Portfolios — are professional asset allocation strategies that are created, managed and monitored by LPL. Mutual funds and ETFs make up the investments within these portfolios, but the exact mix will depend on a client’s responses to an online questionnaire about their financial goals, investment horizon and risk tolerance.

Portfolio NameInvestment Strategy
Strategic Asset Management
($25,000 minimum)
Open architecture program that allows advisors to invest client assets in mutual funds, ETFs, individual equities, variable annuities and other investments.
Manager Select
($50,000 minimum)
Separately managed wrap program for high net worth clients that uses LPL-researched and monitored institutional portfolio managers.
Personal Wealth Portfolios
($250,000 minimum)
Asset allocation investment program that combines mutual funds, ETFs and investment models for high net worth investors.
Model Wealth Portfolios
($10,000 minimum)
Program that uses strategic asset allocations to take advantage of market opportunities that will persist for the next 3 or 5 years; designed for more aggressive investors.
Optimum Market Portfolios
($10,000 minimum)
Suite of model portfolios that invests in up to six mutual funds from the Optimum Funds family.
Guided Wealth Portfolios
($5,000 minimum)
Digital investment platform for low-balance investors.

Fees LPL Financial charges for its services

It’s up to LPL advisors to determine how to charge for their services. Advisors use several fee models, including a percentage of assets under management, hourly fees, fixed fees and commissions. Fees are negotiated between clients and their advisors and detailed in the client agreement. All fees are paid directly to LPL, and LPL then shares a portion with the independent advisor representative.

That said, the firm typically charges for financial planning consulting services on an hourly or per plan basis, which is a flat rate. The maximum hourly fee that LPL advisors will charge is typically $400 per hour, while the maximum flat fee is typically $15,000.

For customized advisory services, LPL typically charges based on a percentage of assets under management. A client’s rate will be set out in their agreement with the firm. LPL states in its Form ADV that the maximum rate it generally charges is 1.50%.

For clients who opt to participate in one of the programs offered by LPL that’s laid out above, they will also pay a fee based on a percentage of assets under management. The maximum account fee is generally 2.50%.

Along with the account fees, clients may pay other miscellaneous administrative or custodial-related fees and charges. Clients are notified of these fees when they open an account, and LPL provides clients with a list of fees on its website.

LPL Financial’s highlights

  • Awards and recognition: LPL advisors consistently appear on top advisor lists. In 2019, for example, 65 LPL advisors ranked among the best advisors in their states in Forbes’ list of Best-in-State Wealth Advisors. Deborah Danielson, an advisor based in Las Vegas, ranked No. 3 in her home state on Barron’s list of 1,200 Top Financial Advisors in 2019.
  • Advisors for all types of clients: Because LPL has a vast network of advisors across the U.S., clients are likely to find an advisor whose specialty matches their needs. In addition to one-on-one advice with advisors, clients can also tap into technology-assisted portfolio management platforms similar to what they might find at a robo-advisor.
  • Inclusive workplace: Human Rights Campaign gave LPL a 100% score in its Corporate Equality Index as one of the “Best Places to Work for LGBT Equality.”

LPL Financial’s downsides

  • Advisor defections: Over the last few years, several big RIA firms have left LPL, citing the firm’s lack of service to their advisor groups. These groups included Retirement Benefits Group, which managed $10 billion, and Resources Investment Advisors, which oversaw $5 billion.
  • Potential conflicts of interest: Some LPL advisors are dually registered, meaning that they are able to charge fees for financial advice as well as for products they recommend, such as 12b-1 fees, paid to cover distribution costs for mutual funds. This could incentivize advisors to sell certain products. One way that LPL has attempted to mitigate these potential conflicts is to credit back certain fees to client accounts, thus eliminating the financial incentive.
  • Numerous disclosures: Over the years, LPL has been fined on several occasions for failing to supervise its brokers carefully, leading to sales of inappropriate and complex investment products.

LPL Financial disciplinary disclosures

LPL has had a long history of disciplinary disclosures, many of which are centered around the firm’s failure to properly supervise its brokerage practices. The firm has been ordered to pay fines and restitution as a result.

Among the most serious instances of wrongdoing, LPL was fined $26 million in 2018 for failing to establish and maintain reasonable policies and procedures to prevent the sale of unregistered, non-exempt securities to its customers.

In 2015, the firm was fined $11.7 million for “broad supervisory failures” in a few key areas, such as non-traditional ETFs, variable annuities, non-traded real estate investment trusts and other complex investment products. The firm was ordered to pay an additional nearly $1.7 million in restitution directly to clients who had bought non-traditional ETFs.

LPL Financial’s onboarding process

Advisors have their own onboarding process when they sign on new clients. LPL has recently streamlined its sign up process by reducing the number of fields clients must fill in and introducing a progress bar.

If you are interested in working with an LPL advisor, you can find one near you by searching on the firm’s website. You can either search for a specific advisor by name or take a look at the advisors in your area.

Is LPL Financial right for you?

With LPL’s vast network of affiliated advisors, potential clients should be able to find an advisor who can address their needs. However, LPL’s size does bring downsides — indeed, the firm has faced numerous disciplinary actions in recent years. Further, some of LPL’s advisors are dually registered as brokers and receive commissions for sales, which could create potential conflicts of interest. Some investors may prefer a smaller, more intimate advisory practice with fewer potential conflicts of interest and a more personalized feel.

Before choosing a financial advisor, it’s always important to do your research and compare several options to ensure your advisor is the right fit for you.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Ilana Polyak
Ilana Polyak |

Ilana Polyak is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Ilana here

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Everything You Need to Know About Bonds

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone and is not intended to be a source of investment advice. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

When it comes to investment news, stocks tend to dominate the headlines. Yet, bonds are just as important for investors looking to create a diversified investment portfolio. Since bonds aren’t covered as much in the news, and can be harder to understand, they can be intimidating to invest in for the first time. This guide aims to explain what you need to know about bonds as a personal investor.

What are bonds?

Government entities, public corporations and private companies issue bonds to raise money. A bond works like a loan: When an investor buys a bond, they agree to give a set amount of money to the bond issuer for a fixed amount of time. During this time period, the bond issuer pays the investor a set rate of interest, either at regular intervals or in a single installment. At the end of the bond term, the organization pays the investor back the original sum of money they lent out.

For example, you buy a $1,000 10-year bond from Google with a 5% interest rate. Every year, you will receive $50 in interest ($1,000 x 5%). At the end of 10 years, Google will give you the $1,000 back.

What’s the difference between bonds and stocks?

Companies can raise money by issuing both stocks and bonds. When you buy stock, you become a part owner of the company and get to share in their profits. When you buy a bond, you are a lender. The company agrees to pay you interest in good times and bad — it’s not based on their profits.

Stocks are riskier because your return is not guaranteed. If the company doesn’t earn a profit, you won’t receive money and your investment could lose money. With bonds, you receive the interest payments each year, plus your money back at the end of the term (unless the company runs into financial trouble). However, stocks historically have a higher long-run return than bonds. It’s a tradeoff between risk and return.

What are bond credit ratings?

Besides the interest rate, another key factor for bonds is their credit ratings. While the bond issuer promises to pay interest and your money back at the end of the term, if they run into financial trouble, they might not be able to make all the interest payments. Even worse if they go bankrupt, you might lose part or even all of your initial deposit.

That’s why as part of your research, you should check the credit rating of any organization issuing a bond. Independent agencies — Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s and Fitch are the most prominent ones— review the finances of different organizations and give them a letter score based on what they see.

If a government or company is in strong shape financially and very likely to pay the money back, they will have a high rating like AAA. Riskier bonds will have a lower rating to show they are more likely to miss payments. Bonds with a rating below BBB- on the Standard & Poor’s system lower are called junk bonds because of their extra financial risk.

Typically, a bond with a worse credit rating pays a higher interest rate — otherwise, investors wouldn’t buy them. On the other hand, safe bonds can get away with paying a lower interest rate.

How do bonds compare against CDs?

There are certain similarities between bonds and certificates of deposit (CDs). They are both I.O.U.s from an issuer, which promises to pay you interest plus your original deposit. Still, there are also some important differences between bonds and CDs.

First and foremost, CDs issued by banks are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). If the issuing bank goes out of business, the FDIC will in most circumstances return your money, up to the legal limit per account. Bonds do not have this protection, so if the issuer goes bankrupt, you could lose your money.

Another difference is that you can sell bonds to other investors for a profit or loss after buying them. With bank CDs, you can take your money out early in exchange for paying a penalty fee, but generally you can’t sell the CD to another investor (unless you buy brokered CDs).

According to Steven W. Kaye, CFP and managing director of Wealth Enhancement Group, CDs are much simpler, as they only have two components, “interest rate and the term of the investment,” adding that they are “two dimensional” and “completely predictable as long as you stay within the FDIC limits.” However, he pointed out that bonds typically have better returns.

What are the different types of bonds?

The bond issuer is the main differentiator among the types of bonds: is it a company, the federal government, a state? Some of the more common bond types include:

  • Corporate bonds: Corporate bonds come from private companies like Google, Ford or Exxon. Companies in good financial condition will have a higher credit rating, whereas struggling companies will have a low credit rating.
  • Treasury bonds: Bonds from the U.S. federal government are called treasuries. They have different names based on their terms: treasury Bills have a term of one year or less, treasury notes last between two and 10 years, and treasury bonds have a term of 30 years. These are some of the safest investments in the world because they are backed by the U.S. government. You can also buy bonds issued by other national governments.
  • Savings bonds:Savings bonds are also issued by the federal government, and they pay a set interest rate on your investment. You can buy these bonds for as little as $25, much lower than other categories. Another difference is that you cannot sell a savings bond to another investor. Instead, you can redeem them early with the U.S. Treasury, in exchange for forfeiting some of your interest.
  • Municipal bonds: When state and local governments raise money, they sell municipal bonds. These can be safe, but you’ll need to check the rating, as not every state or town is in good financial shape. To help state and local governments raise money, the IRS gives municipal bonds a tax advantage: You do not need to pay federal income tax on the interest from most municipal bonds. They also may be free of state and local taxes, depending on where you live.
  • Zero-coupon bonds: While most bonds pay interest, you could also find zero-coupon bonds that do not. Instead, you buy these bonds at a lower price initially and then get more money back at the end. For example, you pay $800 and get $1,000 back in five years. That larger lump sum payment at the end can be nice, but the downside is these bonds don’t pay out interest income each year.

How do you buy bonds?

One way to buy bonds is through an investment brokerage account like Fidelity or E-Trade. If you have a retirement account like a 401(k), you could also use money in that account to buy bonds.

One way to buy bonds is directly from an organization when they release them for the first time, known as a primary issue. You can also buy and sell bonds on the secondary market from other investors. For example, you buy a 3-year old Google bond that still has seven years left of payments from an investor. This can give you more options as companies aren’t issuing new bonds every day.

Finally, there are bond mutual funds and exchange traded funds (ETFs). These are professionally managed funds that build a portfolio of many different bonds for a large group of investors. By buying into the fund, you get a small piece of the entire portfolio.

Kristi Sullivan, a CFP from Denver, thinks that funds are the best option for beginner investors because they help you get more exposure with a smaller investment.

“There are different areas of the bond market (investment grade, high yield, foreign, and various maturities) and many bond funds specialize in these sub-asset classes,” said Sullivan. “You can also buy individual bonds, but they sell for about $1,000 per bond so it takes more money to create a diversified bond portfolio that way.”

What sets the price of bonds?

When organizations issue bonds, they typically set the price for each one at $1,000. However, after the initial issue you can buy and sell bonds on the open market and the price can change.

One major factor is market interest rates. When interest rates go up, the prices of old bonds go down. If you have an old bond paying 4% but now people can go out and buy a brand-new one for 5%, you need to give them a price discount for them to accept the lower interest payments. This is called selling at a discount.

On the other hand, if interest rates go down, the price of old bonds go up. You could sell your original $1,000 bond for more than that, like $1,100. This is called selling your bond at a premium. To get an approximate value of how much your bond is worth based on its interest rate versus market rates, you can use an online calculator like this one.

Investors buy and sell bonds to each other through financial markets so the actual price you’ll receive depends on what someone else is willing to pay for your bond.

Another factor is the underlying finances of the bond issuer. If the bond issuer runs into financial trouble after you sign up, investors are going to be reluctant to buy that old bond so the price will fall to make up for the extra risk.

Are bonds a safe investment?

Bonds are a moderately safe investment, especially compared to stocks. While there is a chance you might not get your money when an issuer runs into financial trouble, if you buy higher-grade bonds you are relatively secure against facing losses. In other words, you should receive the interest plus your money back. However, as Kaye pointed out, there are other types of risk as well.

“CDs and high-quality bonds are safe in terms of default risk but have inflation risk,” he said. Recently for these kinds of investments, “rates have been so low that after you subtract income taxes and inflation, you could actually have a negative return.” Stocks, on the other hand, with their higher potential return, “provide inflation protection.” This is why a diversified portfolio has a mix of different assets, so you get all their advantages.

What are strategies for investing in bonds?

We asked financial advisors whether they had any tips for investing in bonds; here are a few they thought worth considering.

  • Stick with high-quality bonds. Kaye believes that beginners should stick with high-quality bonds, those with a high credit rating. That way you can feel confident that your interest income will come in each year and that you won’t lose your initial investment. While the higher interest rates on junk bonds may be tempting, they are more likely to lose money.
  • Avoid micromanaging: With so much research and daily news out there, beginner investors can overreact to market changes. “I am a buy-hold-annual-rebalance advisor, so I’d say don’t micromanage your bond investments,” said Sullivan. So after buying a bond, wait a year before making any buy/sell decisions.
  • Consider bond funds for lower budgets: “For those who do not have enough money to buy individual bonds, there are investments like BulletShares, which is a basket of bonds with specific maturity dates for smaller investors,” suggests Kaye.
  • Keep in mind tax breaks from municipal bonds. Marguerita Cheng, CFP and CEO of Blue Ocean Global Wealth, sometimes sees people misusing the tax breaks on municipal bonds. “It doesn’t make sense to have municipal or tax-free bonds in tax-deferred accounts, such as IRAs. The benefit to investing in municipal bonds is that they are exempt from federal & state taxes.” Since municipal bonds are already tax-free, you should keep them in a regular brokerage account while saving your retirement plan tax breaks for taxable bonds.She also says you should watch out for your state’s rules for bond taxes. “In states like Virginia, Virginia residents can purchase Virginia municipal bonds and not be subject to state or local income tax. While they can purchase bonds from another state, those would not be exempt from Virginia taxes.”
  • Consider a bond ladder. One risk with bond investments is that interest rates will change after you sign up. To get around this, you could set up a bond ladder, where you buy bonds with different maturities. For example, rather than putting all your money in 5-year bonds, you divide it up between 1-year, 3-year and 5-year bonds.If interest rates go up after you buy, you’ll be able to renew the 1-year bonds soon at a better rate. If interest rates go down after you sign up, you’ll still keep the higher rates on your longer-term bonds. By getting a mix of short and long-term bonds, you cover yourself in both scenarios.

How can someone get help investing in bonds?

If you still need some help figuring out how to trade bonds, there are ways you can prepare. First, you can see whether the broker selling the bonds can give you advice. FINRA, an investment regulatory agency, recommends that you look for a broker that specializes in bond trading so you can get this support.

Another option is to buy bond funds and ETFs. The fund prospectus will list the types of investments and fees so you can find one that’s appropriate for your situation. For more hands-on support, you could hire a financial advisor, who could recommend a suitable bond portfolio for your goals and even personally manage it for you. You would need to pay for this advice, either as an hourly fee or as a percentage of your portfolio every year.

Whichever system you use, you will be adding a valuable asset class to your portfolio that balances out your stocks. With a little research and the information in this guide, you can feel more confident about your bond investing decisions.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

David Rodeck
David Rodeck |

David Rodeck is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email David here