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How Much Should I Save for Retirement?

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Saving enough for retirement is an extremely important goal everyone should be working toward but many tend to put off. However, neglecting your retirement savings can leave you in a terrible bind as you get closer to retirement. So how do you figure out how much to save for retirement? Here’s what you need to know about prioritizing your retirement savings at any age.

Why should I save for retirement?

There are plenty of reasons you’re not saving for retirement:

  • You have bills to pay
  • You assume Social Security will cover your living expenses through retirement
  • You still have decades to go before retirement

Although these excuses for delaying — or even flat-out avoiding — your retirement savings may sound convincing, they don’t tell the whole story.

To start, paying your bills while you’re employed is much easier than trying to pay bills on a fixed income in retirement. And your bills are not necessarily getting smaller as you age. According to an annual Fidelity report on the cost of healthcare in retirement, a 65-year-old couple retiring in 2018 will need an average of $280,000 for their healthcare needs for the rest of their lives. You would hate to face illness in retirement (or even just the changes that accompany aging) without having an emergency cushion in place.

As for Social Security, the retirement benefit only replaces a part of your income, and as of 2018, the average monthly benefit is only $1,413. It would be very difficult to live solely on this amount of money, even in a low cost-of-living area.

Finally, assuming that you have years (or decades) before you need to worry about retirement means you miss out on years of compounding interest. The longer you wait to start saving, the more money you have to put away to ensure a comfortable retirement. You will be in a much better position if you start as soon as you can.

Calculating how much to save for retirement

Knowing that you need to set money aside for your retirement is only the beginning. Next, you have to decide exactly how much to save — and that means thinking ahead to the end of your career and becoming familiar with any contribution limits.

Any calculation of retirement savings needs to start with your intended retirement date. If you’re in your 20s, 30s, or 40s, it’s pretty safe to start with the assumption that you’ll work until you are 65, unless you specifically hope to retire earlier. If you are in your 50s, you might want to be more specific as to your anticipated retirement date.

The 25x rule

Once you have a target date for your retirement, you need to figure out how much you will need. In a perfect world, there would be a universally-agreed upon amount that would guarantee you an ideal retirement. Although there are plenty rules of thumb you could follow — like aiming for a $1 million nest egg — the amount you need may be more or less than that, depending on how much you make, where you live and what you plan to do in retirement.

The best way to figure out how much you need to save is by calculating your annual retirement expenses. This will be a rather large and detailed list, including any mortgages, vehicle costs, medications and healthcare, childcare, disability insurance. (Note: Don’t forget to include the cost of inflation in your calculations. It only takes 24 years of 3% inflation for the buying power of your money to lose half its value.)

When you have a rough idea of what you will be spending per year in retirement, multiply that number by 25 to get your savings goal. The idea is that you’ll need 25 times your annual expenses in order to retire — known as the 25x rule.

The 4% strategy

The 25x rule is based on the theory behind the 4% withdrawal strategy. Ideally, you should be able to withdraw 4% of your assets in the first year of retirement, and then increase the withdrawal amount to match inflation rate in subsequent years. You should also factor in dividends and capital-gains distributions that are paid in cash when calculating the total withdrawal amount for each year. Hypothetically, this will allow your savings to last at least 30 years.

The 4% strategy assumes your investments will continue to receive a rate of return that is at least 4% or higher per year. This is a relatively safe assumption since the historical rate of return on stocks tends to hover around 10% annually.

Unfortunately, this strategy may not serve retirees well in bad economic times. During years with sub-4% growth in the market, retirees have to either dip into the principal or drastically cut back on their spending.

Even though the 4% strategy can potentially be risky during market downturns, the 25x rule for retirement savings is still a helpful metric for determining your savings goal. It gives you a specific, measurable and achievable goal that you can adjust as necessary over time.

Retirement saving milestones by age

While there are a few forward-thinking go-getters who are doing these kinds of calculations just after landing their first job, most of us don’t think about retirement until we’ve been in the workforce for quite a few years. So how do you determine how much to save to reach your 25x expenses goal?

This is where some rules of thumb can really come in handy. You should take time to calculate the exact amount you’ll need, which you should do every few years to make sure you’re on track.

According to Fidelity’s widely accepted savings guidelines, you should aim for the following by each decade:

  • 1x your annual salary saved by age 30
  • 3x your annual salary saved by age 40
  • 6x your annual salary by age 50
  • 8x your annual salary by age 60

Adjust retirement plan as needed

While these guidelines and your 25x calculation can give you a decent target to shoot for, it’s important to remember your retirement goals should not be static. As your life changes, make sure you adjust your retirement strategy accordingly.

So if you get a big raise, have a child, see some major investment growth (or losses), move to a place with a higher or lower cost of living, or even decide to go back to school, you will need to adjust your retirement goals and expectations accordingly. That way you won’t be stuck following an outdated retirement goal that no longer meets your needs.

The early bird gets the compound interest

While it’s certainly possible to save for the retirement of your dreams even if you don’t start until your 40s or 50s, you will have to save more money to hit the same goal than you would if you’d started earlier.

That’s because of the power of compound interest, which you can calculate here. Here’s one example:

Let’s say that Jane (age 25), and Violet (age 45), start saving for retirement at the same time. They both hope to retire at 65. Jane starts putting away $200 per month, earning 8% interest, which is compounded annually. Violet starts putting away $400 per month at the same interest rate.

If Jane maintains her savings rate of $200 per month for the next 40 years, she will put away $96,000 total. But because of the compounding interest, her nest egg will be worth nearly $622,000.

Violet will also put aside $96,000 over 20 years if she maintains her $400 per month savings rate. However, her account will only grow to about $220,000 because the compound interest has only had half of Jane’s time to grow.

The bottom line

If you want a comfortable and well-funded retirement, the buck starts with you. Start by calculating your annual expenses in retirement and then multiply that number by 25. This will give you a reasonable goal to shoot for, although you will need to adjust your goals and expectations with the fluctuations of life.

Finally, the earlier you start saving, the easier it will be for your nest egg grow via the power of compound interest. That means that even though saving for retirement may not feel urgent, it truly is.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Emily Guy Birken
Emily Guy Birken |

Emily Guy Birken is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Emily here

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Investing

Betterment Review 2019

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Robo-advisor Betterment uses exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and a high degree of automation to manage your portfolio. In addition, it’s possible to speak with financial professionals to receive more tailored advice on retirement and other financial goals.

Investors most likely to benefit from Betterment include beginning investors hoping for a low barrier to entry, as well as intermediate investors who are interested in keeping a portion of their portfolio in set-it-and-forget-it accounts. Investors interested in trading individual stocks or taking a more hands-on approach aren’t likely to benefit as much from Betterment.

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The bottom line: Betterment is great for investors looking to get started with minimum fuss — and who aren’t interested in active trading.

  • Easy to get started
  • Set up different investing goals
  • Benefit from tax optimization

Who should consider Betterment

Betterment is for investors who would like an automated approach to investing. Anyone can benefit from Betterment, but it’s especially helpful for beginner investors hoping to start growing their wealth.

Because of the low barrier to entry — there are no account minimums and you can get started with a minimum deposit of $10 — it’s possible for almost anyone to begin investing.

It’s also a great resource for intermediate investors looking to accomplish different goals with “buckets” of money. With Betterment, it’s possible to set varying levels of risk for different goals, with different asset allocations based on when you’re likely to need the money.

Finally, intermediate and advanced traders can use Betterment to build a long-term retirement portfolio, although there is no active trading. Betterment offers a place for assets to grow over longer periods at a pace that is likely to track the market as a whole.

Consider your goals and what you hope to accomplish with your investment portfolio. While Betterment can potentially be a good choice for anyone who keeps a portion of their portfolio in long-term assets, it’s not ideal for those who prefer to actively manage their portfolios or engage in active trading.

Betterment fees and features

Amount minimum to open account
  • $0
Management fees
  • 0.25% for Digital offering (no minimum account balance)
  • 0.40% for Premium offering ($100,000 minimum account balance)
Account fees (annual, transfer, inactivity)
  • $0 annual fee
  • $0 full account transfer fee
  • $0 partial account transfer fee
  • $0 inactivity fee
Current promotions

Three months free for new customers who are referred by an existing Betterment account holder

Account types
  • Individual taxable
  • Traditional IRA
  • Roth IRA
  • Joint taxable
  • Rollover IRA
  • Rollover Roth IRA
  • SEP IRA
  • Trust
Portfolio
  • 12 asset classes represented in ETF portfolio
Automatic rebalancing
Tax loss harvesting
Offers fractional shares
Ease of use
Mobile appiOS, Android
Customer supportPhone, Email

Management fees

Betterment’s pricing starts with a 0.25% management fee for the basic Digital account. This pricing is in line with other robo-advisors like Wealthfront, which also charges 0.25%.

Balances above $100,000 earn Betterment’s Premium account status, featuring unlimited access to personalized advice for a management fee of 0.40%. This isn’t out of line with other robo-advisors: Wealthsimple charges 0.40% for account balances above $100,000. Wealthfront, however, maintains the 0.25% management fee, no matter the size of your account. Once your balance reaches $2 million, your fee drops to 0.15%.

In addition to regular management fees, it’s also important to note that you’ll pay expense ratios on the ETFs Betterment selects on your behalf. Betterment’s recommended portfolios feature expense ratios of 0.07% to 0.15%. According to Betterment, this is much lower than the industry average.

Finally, there are additional fees if you want access to specialized financial planning. If you have $100,000 or more invested with Betterment, you get access to these services as part of your annual management fee. However, if your balance is lower, you pay a flat fee for financial advice ranging between $199 and $299 per advisory session.

Portfolio options and portfolio management

Betterment chooses an investment portfolio for you based on your goals and time horizon. The core portfolio includes stock and bond ETFs allocated in a way that helps you reach your goals. It’s also possible to tweak your asset allocation in your account.

In addition, Betterment offers different portfolio options based on specific goals and targets. Here are some of the additional choices available with Betterment:

  • Socially Responsible Investing (SRI): This portfolio focuses on reducing exposure to companies that have a negative social impact. The expense ratio is a little higher with these portfolios, around 0.14% to 0.22%, depending on the allocation within the portfolio.
  • BlackRock Target Income Portfolio: Aimed at retirees, this portfolio is designed to provide a regular income stream. The portfolio focuses on bond investments that offer dividends that can be used for income rather than focusing on principal and capital appreciation.
  • Goldman Sachs Smart Beta Portfolio: Rather than using basic asset allocation principles, this portfolio focuses on assets that possess four characteristics considered to drive performance — strong momentum, good value, low volatility and high quality. It’s possible to adjust this portfolio in 101 different ways.

With all portfolios, Betterment handles automatic rebalancing when your assets experience a certain amount of drift. For example, if market performance is resulting in an asset allocation that is too far outside the target for your portfolio, Betterment will sell and buy different assets to bring your portfolio back to its target.

Another way Betterment automatically manages your portfolio is by using tax optimization strategies. Different assets are assigned to your accounts based on their overall tax efficiency. Additionally, when certain assets lose value, Betterment will sell them automatically in an effort to offset capital gains in other areas. With the help of the Tax Loss Harvesting+ feature, rebalancing can occur daily.

Financial planning features

If you want a big-picture view of your finances, Betterment’s account sync feature can be helpful. With this feature, you connect some or all of your outside accounts to Betterment, which lets you view all of your financial information in one place. The app then offers personalized recommendations for managing your money.

You have the option to speak with Betterment financial professionals about planning for specific goals and life milestones. Account holders above the $100,000 balance requirement get unlimited access to personalized advice and help by phone and email as part of the management fee.

If you don’t meet this threshold, you can pay for advice packages tailored to the goals you’re working on. Here are some of the Betterment advice packages available for a flat fee:

  • Getting Started: A 45-minute phone call with a certified financial planner (CFP) who can provide step-by-step help setting up a Betterment account that helps you maximize a variety of goals. Price: $199.
  • Financial Checkup: Get a review of your investment portfolio and how it fits into your financial situation in a 60-minute call with a Certified Financial Planner. Price: $299.
  • College Planning: Aimed at families who want help getting set up for college costs and using higher education plans. It consists of a 60-minute phone call that can help you review your choices and decide what’s best for you. Price: $299.
  • Marriage Planning: Planning to tie the knot soon? Get help as you navigate goals, priorities and merging finances in a 60-minute phone call. Price: $299.
  • Retirement Planning: Set up a 60-minute holistic review of your portfolio, current situation and more that can help you make better decisions for your retirement. Price: $299.

The Betterment Advisor Network can also help you get your own dedicated financial advisor who can help you with almost any financial need. Betterment will help match you with a professional who is likely to fit your goals and priorities.

Everyday Savings Account

Betterment offers Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)-insured banking options. While the checking account isn’t universally available yet, it is possible to use Everyday Savings to earn up to 2.04% APY. Additionally, there are no limits on withdrawals and no minimum balance. You also don’t have to worry about paying fees on your balance. The money in your Everyday Savings account is actually held at partner banks — it’s possible to opt out of a specific partner bank, if you wish.

In addition to providing a high-yield savings option, you can also decide to use the Two-Way Sweep feature. With this feature, Betterment automatically analyzes a connected account each day and will move excess cash from your connected account and into your savings account. If you need the money back in your main account, Betterment will sweep it from your Everyday Savings without the need to take further action on your part.

Strengths of Betterment

Betterment is always adding new goals and features. Here are some of the most helpful features it currently offers:

  • Tax optimization: Betterment uses tax loss harvesting to help offset taxes on your gains. The company also uses its Tax-Coordinated Portfolio to give you the maximum tax benefit. Certain assets are assigned to your IRA, while others are kept in your taxable accounts.
  • Betterment Everyday: Betterment now offers FDIC-insured checking and savings accounts. While the checking product is still in the roll-out stages, it’s possible to earn up to 2.04% APY with Everyday Savings.
  • Set up different goals: One of Betterment’s most useful features is the ability to set up different goals. It’s possible to have a traditional IRA and a rollover IRA, as well as open a Roth IRA. It’s also possible to open taxable accounts for a variety of other goals. Set different asset mixes for each type of account and adjust what you add simply and easily.
  • Chance to talk to a human: Betterment offers customer service by phone in addition to email. However, you can also speak with a financial professional with packages starting at $199, depending on what you’re looking for. It’s also possible to be matched with an advisor if you meet the requirements for access to the Betterment Advisor Network.
  • Portfolio projection tools: Set goals with the help of Betterment’s projection tools and track your progress toward reaching your objectives. Betterment offers insight into whether you’re on track with your goals as well as graphs to help you visualize the potential of your portfolio.

Drawbacks of Betterment

While Betterment is a great choice for many investors, it’s not for everyone. There are some drawbacks, and no Betterment review would be complete without mentioning them.

  • No active trading: If you’re interested in choosing your own investments and actively trading, you won’t be able to do that with Betterment. While you can do a little more self-directed investing with a Premium account, the reality is that you’re mostly limited to choosing your prefered asset mix rather than picking individual investments.
  • Lack of 529 and education savings accounts (ESAs): There are no custodial accounts with Betterment, and you can’t set up a 529 or ESA to save for your child’s education. A similar robo-investing company that does offer a 529 is Wealthfront.

Is Betterment safe?

Anytime you invest, there is a chance you could lose money. Poor market conditions can always lead to a loss. However, Betterment’s use of modern portfolio theory in its asset allocation helps reduce your exposure to risk. Additionally, Betterment carries Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC) insurance, protecting each of your Betterment accounts up to $500,000 in the event of a failure by the company. (Note that market losses aren’t covered by SIPC insurance.)

In addition to making sure an investment company is SIPC-insured, you also can use the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority’s BrokerCheck to find out about disclosures and actions, and search the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Consumer Complaint Database. The Better Business Bureau is also a good source of information.

Final thoughts

Betterment is a great choice for beginner investors looking to get their feet wet and for long-term investors hoping to grow a retirement portfolio. For investors with more than $100,000, it can also be a decent place to keep your money if you’re looking for basic advice.

However, for active traders and those who want a little more control over their assets, Betterment might not be the best choice. Instead, it could make more sense to use platforms like E-Trade or Robinhood if you want to get involved with active trading. Stockpile is also a good choice for investors who want to buy individual stocks using fractional shares.

Overall, though, Betterment is a great choice for building wealth for the long term, including setting accounts for specific goals and using tools that help you see if you’re on track to meet your objectives.

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Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Miranda Marquit
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Miranda Marquit is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Miranda here

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Investing

Ally Invest Review 2019

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Not having enough cash to open an online brokerage account can be seen as a barrier to starting your investing journey. If that’s a concern check out Ally Invest, which doesn’t have a minimum balance requirement.

Ally Invest is a good choice even if you don’t already have another account with Ally Bank. This online broker offers a wide range of account features, as well as a robo-advisor option. Take advantage of Ally Invest’s online platform and mobile app to track your investments whenever and wherever you wish.

Ally Invest
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The Bottom Line: Ally Invest is an affordable broker with a wide range of investments to choose from.

  • Zero commissions on buying or selling ETFs, U.S. exchange-traded stock and options.
  • There’s no minimum deposit required for a self-directed trading account and no minimum account balance requirement.
  • Ally Invest offers tons of investment options, including stocks, bonds, mutual funds, options, futures and forex.
  • Managed portfolios don’t have advisory fees, annual charges or rebalancing fees.

Who should consider Ally Invest

If you’re new to investing, Ally Invest is a great option. It doesn’t have an account minimum to start, which lets you start investing even if you only have a few extra dollars. The managed portfolio — Ally’s take on a robo-advisor — requires $100 minimum to get started. The managed portfolio include a variety of individual retirement accounts (IRAs):

  • Individual
  • Joint
  • Traditional
  • Roth
  • Rollover
  • Custodial

Ally Invest is also a solid choice if you’re trying to minimize the impact fees have on your overall investments. Ally doesn’t charge trading commissions on exchange traded funds (ETFs), options or U.S. exchange-traded stocks.

Once you’ve opened your account, Ally Invest’s online trading platform and research tools are easy to use. While you won’t find earnings transcripts, SEC filings, earnings press releases or audio calls, you can still dig into technical data using free screeners and other tools powered by Recognia.

Ally Invest fees and features

Current promotions

New Ally Invest accounts accounts receive 90 days of commission-free trades, up to $500 in value, regardless of deposit amount. Cash bonuses are available for new accounts starting at $50 for if you deposit or transfer at least $10,000.

Stock trading fees
  • $0.00 per trade
Amount minimum to open account
  • $0
Tradable securities
  • Stocks
  • ETFs
  • Mutual funds
  • Bonds
  • Options
  • Futures / commodities
  • Forex
Account fees (annual, transfer, inactivity)
  • $0 annual fee
  • $50 full account transfer fee
  • $50 partial account transfer fee
  • $0 inactivity fee
Commission-free ETFs offered
Mutual funds (no transaction fee) offered
Offers automated portfolio/robo-advisor
Account types
  • Individual taxable
  • Traditional IRA
  • Roth IRA
  • 529 Plan
  • Joint taxable
  • Rollover IRA
  • Rollover Roth IRA
  • Coverdell Education Savings Account(ESA)
  • Custodial Uniform Gifts to Minors Act (UGMA)/Uniform Transfers to Minors Act (UTMA)
  • SEP IRA
  • SIMPLE IRA (Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees)
  • Trust
Ease of use
Mobile appiOS, Android , Windows phone
Customer supportPhone, 24/7 live support, Chat, Email

Commissions and fees

Online brokers, including Ally Invest, have reduced trading commissions to zero on a wide range of assets. As mentioned above, Ally Invest offers commission-free trading of ETFs, U.S. exchange-traded stock and options. However, the online broker still charges some fees:

  • Bonds: $1.00 per trade
  • Mutual funds: $9.95 per trade
  • Margin accounts: Varies
  • IRA transfer fee: $50
  • IRA closure fee: $25
  • Returned checks, ACH or wires: $30
  • Paper statements: $4
  • Restricted accounts and broker-assisted trades: $20 plus commission
  • Short stock: daily charge at cost
  • ATM withdrawals: $1

Additionally, Ally Invest will reimburse you up to $150 in transfer fees you might accrue from your current brokerage firm.

Fees mentioned in the article are accurate as of the date of publishing.

Tradable asset categories

Ally Invest allows you to trade a variety of asset classes, including:

  • Stocks
  • ETFs
  • Options (equity and index)
  • Mutual funds
  • Bonds
  • Margin account
  • Forex

If you’d rather take a hands-off approach, you can look into managed portfolios, which is Ally’s version of a robo-advisor. There are four different portfolio types:

  • Core: A variety of diversified choices, including international, domestic and fixed-income assets. You can choose your risk tolerance, from conservative to aggressive.
  • Income: If you’re in retirement or close to it, this option allows you to take a conservative risk tolerance with higher dividend returns.
  • Tax optimized: If you earn a lot of money, you can make after-tax contributions to your investment account, which can lower your tax bill and maximize investments.
  • Socially responsible: This account is filled with ethical companies that practice sustainability, energy efficiency or other initiatives that are good for the environment.

While these portfolios are managed and rebalanced algorithmically by computers like other robo-advisors, Ally Invest says that live financial analysts design its portfolios.

Trading technology and experience

Ally Invest allows you to set up an investing platform with customizable features that work best for you. You can create custom watchlists to observe market data that’s relevant to your investments. This also helps you monitor particular stocks or other investments — if they drop to a favorable amount, you can jump in to buy. Other technology highlights include:

  • Profit/loss graph: If you’re interested in a particular investment, the profit/loss graph gives you the chance to see the potential of it before buying. This is helpful if you’re considering an investment but want to determine whether it’ll earn you money without actually putting money towards it.
  • Market data: When you’re looking to learn more about a company, your investment platform lets you check company quotes, charts, high and low prices, dividend dates, peer performance comparisons and other news about the company.
  • Probability calculator: Unsure about an investment’s potential performance? This lets you check the volatility of it and see if it will help you hit your investment goals.

Ally Invest has mobile apps for iOS and Android users, or you can log in to your account through your mobile browser to use the Ally Invest LIVE platform. From there, you can check your watchlist and stream quotes.

You can also check quotes, charts, earnings, company news and more when you log in to your account and click “Research.”

Strengths of Ally Invest

Ally Invest has plenty of strengths to help it stand out from the competition, including the following:

  • No minimum deposit required: Ally Invest doesn’t have a minimum initial deposit requirement, which makes it simple to get started with only a little cash. You can also earn a cash bonus for opening an Ally Invest account if you deposit or transfer just $10,000, compared with a $25,000 minimum to earn a cash bonus with E*Trade or $20,000 with Merrill Edge.
  • Powerful tools and intuitive trading platform: Ally Invest’s online site offers you powerful tools to screen investments. Its trading platform is intuitive and provides the features necessary to be an informed investor. This includes a dashboard you can customize to your preferred view, as well as real-time streaming quotes and up-to-date data.
  • Responsive online and phone customer service: Ally Invest can be contacted via phone 24/7. There’s also an online chat feature, where you can get answers within seconds from helpful customer service agents. Email support is available, as well.
  • Hundreds of ETFs. Ally Invest offers 500+ ETFs from Vanguard, GlobalX, iShares and others.

Drawbacks of Ally Invest

Ally Invest also has some downsides to consider:

  • Mutual fund transaction fees: Ally Invest charges a $9.95 transaction fee per trade for no-load mutual funds. But many competitors offer options without any transaction fees, including E*Trade, which offers more than 4,400 fee-free funds.
  • A mobile app with minimal features: While you can do the basics with Ally Invest’s mobile app, it offers far fewer features and investment tools than competitor apps such as TD Ameritrade Mobile.
  • No physical branches: Ally Invest is an online-only company. There are no physical branches, unlike competitors such as Merrill Edge or E-Trade, which has more than 30 branches spread across the country.

Is Ally Invest safe?

Ally Invest is a trusted online brokerage with more than $4.7 billion in assets under management. It’s a member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and the Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC), so you can rest assured that the cash in your accounts is safe. And since the company has passed its Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) broker check, you can count on the fact that it’s in full compliance with regulations.

Since Ally Invest is online-only, it’s also important to review Ally’s data protection policies. The good news is Ally Invest promises that they use “multiple levels of security” to keep your info safe. This includes 128-bit SSL encryption for any exchange of data from your browser and Ally’s servers if your personal information is being transmitted. The downside, however, is that Ally’s privacy policy does permit Ally Invest to share your information with third parties. While common, it’s important to keep in mind.

Of course, once you invest your money, there’s always a risk of losses. Investing means you can potentially lose money. Research what you’re investing in carefully, and diversify your portfolio to minimize the risks you’re taking.

Bottom line

Thanks to the fact it has no minimum deposit requirement for its self-directed brokerage accounts, Ally Invest is a great choice if you’re looking to get started investing and you don’t have a ton of money. Commission-free investments give you a diverse offering of low-cost or no-cost options.

But the high mutual fund transaction fees are a turnoff. Along with that, not being able to meet with an advisor face-to-face could deter you from signing up. Since Ally doesn’t have physical branches, you may feel like you’re missing out without the in-person interaction.

Overall, it’s a great option for beginning and intermediate investors. The offerings might not be as detailed for expert investors, but if you’re looking to get started or enhance your experience, Ally Invest might work for you.

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Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Christy Rakoczy
Christy Rakoczy |

Christy Rakoczy is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Christy here