Advertiser Disclosure

Investing

How Much Can I Contribute to My IRA?

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

couple looking at paperwork and calculator
iStock

An IRA, or individual retirement account, is a tax-advantaged investment account designed to help you save for retirement. It’s a great way to beef up your nest egg, whether you’re working for a company that doesn’t offer a 401(k) or you’re just looking for more ways to save. In the case of a traditional IRA — the focus of this article — you’ll also get a nice tax break on your contributions.

However, you can’t contribute an unlimited amount of money to your IRA. Like other types of retirement accounts, traditional IRAs are governed by contribution limits set by the IRS. For 2019, that limit is $6,000 per year (or $7,000 for those age 50 or older, who get an extra $1,000 in catch-up contributions).

Depending on your circumstances, your contributions may not be eligible for full tax-deductible status. And your individual contribution limit may be lower than the standard $6,000 if you earn a high income or have a retirement account through your employer.

If you’re asking yourself “How much can I contribute to my IRA?” keep reading to learn all about the ins and outs of traditional IRA contributions.

Tax benefits of a traditional IRA

So how does a traditional IRA offer tax benefits in the first place?

For the majority of earners, money contributed to a traditional IRA doesn’t count toward annual income, meaning you don’t have to pay income taxes on it. However, this tax break does come with a trade-off: When it comes time to take distributions or withdrawals from your traditional IRA, you’ll have to pay taxes on the full amount, including growth earnings. This differs from a Roth IRA, in which your contributions are taxable today but grow tax-deferred and can be withdrawn tax-free later.

Whether a Roth or traditional IRA is right for you depends on a variety of factors, including what you expect your income tax bracket to be when you retire. For more information on how to decide between the two, check out this guide to choosing the right IRA.

Where to open an IRA

If you do decide to open an IRA — whether Roth or traditional — you’ll have lots of provider options to choose from. These common retirement vehicles are available through a variety of financial firms, including nationwide banks like Chase, brokerages like TD Ameritrade and even some mobile investing apps like Stash.

However, different companies will charge different fees to open and maintain an IRA — and those are on top of any fees associated with trades and commissions. You also may be required to make a minimum initial deposit, which may be out of reach if you don’t have much to put toward investments right now.

Deciding which IRA provider is right for you depends on how much guidance you want and how much you’re willing to pay for it.

Tax-deductible phase-out limits for traditional IRA contributions in 2019

Although anyone under the age of 70 and a half can contribute to a traditional IRA — as long as they’ve earned taxable income in the year they wish to make the contribution — they may or may not receive the full tax benefit. For example, if you earn more than a certain income threshold or are covered by an employer-sponsored retirement plan, your contribution limit and tax deduction eligibility may be lowered.

2019 Tax-Deductible Phase-Out Limits for Traditional IRA Contributions

Filing Status

Tax Deduction Eligibility

Single or head of household covered by a work retirement account
  • Full deduction up to the contribution limit if you earn $64,000 or less

  • Partial deduction if you earn between $64,000 and $74,000

  • No deduction if you earn $74,000 or more

Single or head of household not covered by a work retirement account
  • Full deduction up to the contribution limit, no matter how much you earn


Married filing jointly or qualified widowers covered by a work retirement account
  • Full deduction up to the contribution limit if you earn $103,000 or less

  • Partial deduction if you earn between $103,000 and $123,000

  • No deduction if you earn $123,000 or more

Married filing jointly or separately with a spouse who is not covered by a work retirement account
  • Full deduction up to the contribution limit, no matter how much you earn

Married filing jointly with a spouse who is covered by a work retirement account
  • Full deduction up to the contribution limit if you earn $193,000 or less

  • Partial deduction if you earn between $193,000 and $203,000

  • No deduction if you earn $203,000 or more


Married but filing separately, whether or not one spouse is covered by a work retirement account
  • Partial deduction if you earn less than $10,000

  • No deduction if you earn $10,000 or more


How to calculate your phase-out contribution amount

Even if your circumstances make you ineligible to deduct the full amount of your IRA contribution, you can put some money in the account, just not the $6,000 maximum. You can calculate your phase-out contribution amount — or the total tax-deductible amount you’re eligible to contribute to your IRA — by using an IRA contribution calculator.

What if you make too much to contribute to an IRA?

If you earn too much money to qualify for a traditional, tax-deductible IRA, there are plenty of retirement vehicles available to choose from, which may include:

  • A 401(k) or 403(b). These are employer-sponsored accounts that carry an overall contribution maximum of $56,000 or 100% of employee compensation, whichever is lower, for 2019.
  • A SEP IRA. An employer can contribute the lesser of $56,000 or 25% of employee compensation for 2019. The same limits apply to contributions if you are self-employed, but certain rules apply regarding the maximum deductible contribution.
  • A Roth IRA. This account carries the same contribution limits as a traditional IRA ($6,000 for 2019), but you’ll pay income taxes ahead of time, so you won’t run into this particular tax problem.

Unfortunately, not everybody can open and contribute directly to a Roth IRA. Your eligibility for this type of account is based on your income. If you make more than the designated income threshold, however, you can pursue a “backdoor Roth,” where you transfer assets from a traditional IRA to a Roth in order to reap its unique suite of benefits.

What happens if you contribute too much to your IRA?

IRAs have relatively low contribution limits, which means overcontributing is an easy mistake to make, especially if you’re contributing to multiple IRAs at the same time.

Although saving too much for retirement might not sound like a problem, the IRS has regulations and penalties that make going over the limit unattractive. Any excess contributions made to your traditional IRA will be subject to a 6% tax (on top of what you’ll pay when you eventually withdraw the money) not just for the year you went over the limit but for every year the excess money remains in the account.

Fortunately, if you recognize the error quickly enough, you can withdraw the excess money without paying a penalty — as long as you do so before you file your tax return. If you’re too late, it may be possible to file for an extension on your return or apply the contributions to the following tax year. However, if you do so, you’ll need to ensure you adjust next year’s contribution total so you don’t run into the same problem again.

Bottom line: how much can you contribute to a traditional IRA?

The maximum contribution limit for a traditional IRA is $6,000 for 2019 (or $7,000 if you’re age 50 or older). However, specific financial circumstances, such as having retirement coverage through an employer or earning above a certain income threshold, could lower your deductible limit.

If you overcontribute to an IRA, you’ll be subject to a recurrent 6% tax on the excess amount, but you can avoid that penalty if you withdraw the funds before filing your return or by applying them to the following taxable year (and adjusting that year’s contributions accordingly).

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Jamie Cattanach
Jamie Cattanach |

Jamie Cattanach is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Jamie here

Advertiser Disclosure

Investing

SoFi Automated Investing Review 2019

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

SoFi is mostly known for student loan refinancing. However, in recent years the company has expanded its offerings to include mortgages, life insurance and now investing through SoFi Automated Investing.

Using the principles outlined in Modern Portfolio Theory, SoFi Automated Investing, formerly known as SoFi Wealth, aims to help you grow your wealth over time. SoFi Automated Investing uses ETFs to construct your portfolio based on your answers to a questionnaire. There are different strategies you can choose from and you have access to financial advisers, but ultimately, SoFi Automated Investing acts as a robo-advisor that puts together a portfolio for you based on your goals and risk tolerance.

SoFi Automated Investing
Visit SoFiSecuredon SoFi Automated Investing’s secure site
The Bottom Line: SoFi Automated Investing offers a simple way to start investing with a small amount of money to start and low fees.

  • Receive financial planning assistance free of charge
  • Special bonuses for members, including invitations to special events
  • A wide range of low-cost ETFs from 20 different asset classes

Who should consider SoFi Automated Investing?

SoFi Automated Investing is ideal for beginning investors looking to get their feet wet without the need for a large amount of money. You can open an account with a $100 one-time deposit or $20 monthly deposit. This makes it easy for newbies to begin investing.

Additionally, SoFi is especially suited for long-term investors looking to do very little of their own portfolio management.Due to broad-based ETFs that don’t rely on individual stock picking, there is very little effort required on the investors side. This makes SoFi investing ideal for financial goals such as retirement.

SoFi Automated Investing fees and features

Amount minimum to open account
  • $100 one-time deposit or $20 monthly deposit
Management fees
  • 0%
Account fees (annual, transfer, inactivity)
  • $0 annual fee
  • $0 full account transfer fee
  • $0 partial account transfer fee
  • $0 inactivity fee
Account types
  • Individual taxable
  • Traditional IRA
  • Roth IRA
  • Joint taxable
  • Rollover IRA
  • Rollover Roth IRA
  • SEP IRA
Portfolio
  • ETFs covering 20 asset classes
Automatic rebalancing
Tax loss harvesting
Tax loss harvesting detailSoFi does not currently offer tax loss harvesting.
Offers fractional shares
Ease of use
Mobile appiOS, Android
Customer supportPhone, Email, 4 branch locations

Strengths of SoFi Automated Investing

SoFi Automated Investing has several things going for it, making it a good choice for many investors.

  • No management fees: Right now, SoFi isn’t charging any management fees. ETF expense ratios still apply.
  • Diverse investments: SoFi investing offers a wide range of ETFs from 20 different asset classes. This makes it possible for you to enjoy diversity in your portfolio, according to your risk tolerance. You can get exposure to U.S. and international stocks, bonds and real estate with automatic rebalancing when needed.
  • Free access to financial advisers: SoFi Automated Investing offers unlimited access to financial planning professionals at no additional charge. There’s a wide range of hours available and you can meet with your adviser via chat, video or phone. SoFi’s financial advisers are fiduciaries, which means they must adhere to your best interest and they don’t make commissions based on recommendations.
  • Bonuses: Being a “member” of SoFi allows you access to some special bonuses. For example, SoFi often holds in-person events for which you can receive an invitation to join. On top of that, if you use SoFi investing, you can get a discount on your interest rates with SoFi loans. Finally, you can access career advice on top of financial planning help.

SoFi can be a great option for beginners looking to get started and who need a little help planning a goals-based roadmap.

Drawbacks of SoFi Automated Investing

No SoFi Automated Investing review is complete without offering some of the drawbacks to the product. While there are some great upsides, the reality is that SoFi is relatively new to investing and doesn’t offer some of the benefits you might see with other robo-advisors like Betterment and Wealthfront.

  • No tax-loss harvesting: SoFi investing doesn’t offer any sort of tax strategy. It doesn’t automatically harvest losses when you sell ETFs and it won’t distribute your assets across your accounts in the most advantageous way.
  • Limited types of accounts: While you can open individual and joint taxable accounts, and set up retirement accounts, there aren’t a lot of other options. You can’t open a 529 account or set up a custodial account. If you’re looking to do a little more, you may want to explore other options.

Is SoFi Automated Investing safe?

Anytime you invest, it’s important to be careful and comfortable with your strategy. You always run the risk of loss whenever you put your money into any investment account. However, SoFi investing is as safe as any other robo-advisor. The use of index ETFs means that your portfolio follows overall market trends, which, over time, tend to head higher returns (despite short-term losses).

On top of that, SoFi Automated Investing carries SIPC insurance, which protects account holders if the broker fails. However, realize that SIPC insurance doesn’t protect your portfolio from losses due to market and economic events.

Before you invest, check with resources like FINRA BrokerCheck and the Better Business Bureau to see what disclosures and complaints might be related to the company.

Final thoughts

SoFi Automated Investing is a good option for most investors looking for a simple way to manage a long-term portfolio. It’s very easy to open an account and you get free personalized financial planning help and advice to help you coordinate your portfolio to meet your financial goals.

SoFi investing is still relatively new, so you might miss out on some benefits and tools offered by those that have been in the investing space for decades. Consider your needs and compare SoFi Automated Investing with services like Betterment, Ellevest, and Wealthfront to see if it works for you.

Open a SoFi Automated Investing accountSecured
on SoFi Automated Investing’s secure website

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Miranda Marquit
Miranda Marquit |

Miranda Marquit is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Miranda here

Advertiser Disclosure

Investing

Vanguard vs Fidelity: Which Broker Should You Choose?

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

When it comes to building long-term wealth, investing in markets is the key to growing your money. Vanguard and Fidelity are two brokerage giants you’ve probably heard of. In fact, we have ranked both companies among our top picks for the best online brokerages. While it may seem difficult to choose between Vanguard and Fidelity, we’ve broken down each company’s fees, account minimums and special features to help you decide which broker is best for your needs.

For beginner investors who don’t have a lot of money stashed away, Fidelity is the clear winner since it has no account minimum. Established investors who want more personalized attention or who want to invest their money in futures may prefer Vanguard. Read on to find out more about these brokers and how they differ from one another.

Vanguard vs. Fidelity: Feature comparison

VanguardFidelity
Stock trading fees
  • $7 per trade for the first 25 trades per year, $20 per trade thereafter for accounts with less than $50,000
  • $7 per trade for accounts with $50,000 to $500,000
  • $7 per trade for accounts with $50,000 to $500,000
  • $2 per trade for accounts with $500,000 to $1M
  • $0 per trade for accounts with $1M to $5M for the first 25 trades per year, $2 per trade thereafter
  • $0 per trade for accounts with more than $5M for 100 trades per year, $2 per trade thereafter
  • $0 per trade for accounts with $1M to $5M for the first 25 trades per year, $2 per trade thereafter
  • $0 per trade for accounts with more than $5M for 100 trades per year, $2 per trade thereafter
  • $4.95 per trade
Amount minimum to open account
  • $1,000 for Vanguard Target Retirement Funds and Vanguard STAR® Funds; $3,000 for most other Vanguard funds
  • $0
Tradable securities
  • Stocks
  • ETFs
  • Mutual funds
  • Bonds
  • Options
  • Forex
  • Crypto-currency
  • Stocks
  • ETFs
  • Mutual funds
  • Bonds
  • Options
  • Futures / commodities
  • Forex
  • Crypto-currency
Account fees (annual, transfer, inactivity)
  • $20 annual fee for account balances below $10,000; waived if you have at least $10,000 in Vanguard funds or ETFs or sign up for statement e-delivery
  • $0 full account transfer fee
  • $0 partial account transfer fee
  • $0 annual fee
  • $0 full account transfer fee
  • $0 partial account transfer fee
  • $0 inactivity fee
Commission-free ETFs offered
Mutual funds (no transaction fee) offered
Offers automated portfolio/robo-advisor
Account types
  • Individual taxable
  • Traditional IRA
  • Roth IRA
  • 529 Plan
  • Joint taxable
  • Rollover IRA
  • Rollover Roth IRA
  • Custodial Uniform Gifts to Minors Act (UGMA)/Uniform Transfers to Minors Act (UTMA)
  • SEP IRA
  • Solo 401(k) (for small businesses)
  • SIMPLE IRA (Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees)
  • Trust
  • Individual taxable
  • Traditional IRA
  • Roth IRA
  • 529 Plan
  • Joint taxable
  • Rollover IRA
  • Rollover Roth IRA
  • Custodial Uniform Gifts to Minors Act (UGMA)/Uniform Transfers to Minors Act (UTMA)
  • Custodial IRA
  • SEP IRA
  • Solo 401(k) (for small businesses)
  • SIMPLE IRA (Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees)
  • Trust
  • Guardianship or Conservatorship
Ease of use
 
 
Mobile appiOS, Android, Fire OSiOS, Android, Fire OS
Customer supportPhone, EmailPhone, 24/7 live support, Chat, Email, 190branch locations
Research resources
  • SEC filings
  • Mutual fund reports
  • SEC filings
  • Mutual fund reports
  • Earnings press releases

Vanguard vs. Fidelity: Fees & account minimums

When deciding between Vanguard and Fidelity, it’s important to understand the companies’ different brokerage account options, fees, and account minimums.

Fidelity offers three investment management services:

  1. Fidelity Go: Fidelity Go is a robo-advisor program featuring an annual management fee of 0.35% of your account balance and a $0 minimum to open an account.
  2. Fidelity Personalized Planning and Advice: Fidelity Personalized Planning and Advice is a hybrid robo-advisor that also gives you access to a team of advisors for coaching, for a 0.50% annual management fee. You need to have at least $25,000 in total minimum investments across all Fidelity accounts to be enrolled in this service.
  3. Portfolio Advisory Services: Portfolio Advisory Services gives you access to professionally managed investment accounts, with annual management fees ranging from 0.50% to 1.50%, depending on your investment balance. There is a $50,000 minimum investment.

Vanguard offers four options, including:

  1. Target Retirement Funds: For novice investors or those who prefer a hands-off approach, you can invest in a Vanguard Retirement Fund based on your targeted retirement date. The account is automatically rebalanced as you approach your retirement date, so you don’t have to worry about manually shifting your investments from stocks to bonds. You’ll need to have at least $1,000 to get started. The average expense ratio on Target Retirement Funds is 0.12%.
  2. Vanguard STAR Fund: The Vanguard STAR Fund is an option that invests 60% of your money in stocks, and 40% in bonds. It allows you to instantly diversify your portfolio across asset classes. To invest in a STAR Fund, you need a minimum of $1,000. STAR Funds have an expense ratio of 0.31%.
  3. Actively-managed funds: For more seasoned investors, you can opt for an actively-managed fund where a portfolio manager hand-picks the fund’s investments. You’ll need a minimum of $50,000 to invest in most actively-managed funds. The expense ratio is dependent on the fund; expense ratios average 0.12%.
  4. Personal Advisor Services: Vanguard Personal Advisor Services is a hybrid robo-advisor option with a 0.30% annual advisory fee for accounts with $5 million or less in assets. To get started, you need to have at least $50,000 in managed assets with Vanguard. Individual investment accounts, IRAs, trust accounts, and Vanguard Variable Annuity accounts all count toward the $50,000 minimum.

You may also be subject to an annual service fee with Vanguard. For example, brokerage and mutual fund-only accounts have a $20 annual fee.

When it comes to transaction fees, Fidelity is much simpler than Vanguard. Fidelity charges a flat transaction fee of $4.95 for any online trades that you make. With Vanguard, your fee is dependent on the kind of security you’re trading and whether you do it by phone or online. For example, you’ll pay $0 to trade ETFs online, but you’ll be subject to a $25 fee per trade if you complete the transaction over the phone.

In terms of expense ratios, Vanguard’s average expense ratio is 0.10% — that’s 83% less than the industry average. However, Fidelity reported that it offers lower expense ratios than other major companies, including Vanguard. Fidelity recently launched four new zero expense ratio index mutual funds that have no minimum deposit requirements.

Vanguard vs. Fidelity: Tradable securities

While both Vanguard and Fidelity allow you to invest in stocks, bonds and CDs, there are other security options to consider:

  • Mutual funds: Fidelity offers over 10,000 professionally managed mutual funds. By contrast, Vanguard allows you to invest in its own mutual funds, or thousands of outside mutual funds. As of August 2019, there are 129 Vanguard-exclusive mutual funds available.
  • Options trading: With options, you can sell securities at a preset price over a set period of time on the options market. Fidelity allows you to invest in the options market, and you can get up to 500 commission free trades over the course of two years. Like Fidelity, Vanguard also allows you to invest in the options market. However, the process to get started is more involved. You’ll have to submit an application and include information about your finances, investment experience and your objectives. Also, your application could be denied.
  • Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs): Fidelity has over 500 commision-free ETFs. Vanguard offers commission-free trading on 1,800 ETFs from the company, and about 100 from outside companies.
  • Foreign exchange trading: If you want to invest in the foreign exchange market, you can do so by signing up with Fidelity FOREX, LLC, a Fidelity subsidiary. You’ll get access to currencies from over 35 countries, and you can transfer money from your brokerage accounts. By contrast, Vanguard doesn’t offer a foreign exchange option.
  • Futures: As of August 2019, Fidelity doesn’t offer futures trading. Vanguard recently launched the Vanguard Commodity Strategy Fund, an actively-managed commodity futures fund.
  • Cryptocurrency: Neither Fidelity or Vanguard allow you to invest in cryptocurrency.

Vanguard vs. Fidelity: Special features

  • Trading platforms: With Fidelity, you can get access to Active Trader Pro if you make at least 36 trades within a 12-month period. This tool gives you real-time insights, actionable alerts, and detailed analytics so you can make informed investing decisions.
  • Investor centers: If you want in-person advice, Fidelity operates over 140 brick-and-mortar investor centers throughout the United States. You can meet with an advisor to get financial and investment guidance, including one-on-one retirement planning or college planning services.
  • Advisor access: With Vanguard Personal Advisor Services, you can schedule an appointment and talk with an advisor via phone, email or chat.
  • Comprehensive assistance: Vanguard Personal Advisor Services doesn’t just offer help with your investments. You can also contact an advisor for guidance on Social Security, health care funding or the right approach for withdrawing from your retirement savings.
  • Robo-advisors: Both Vanguard and Fidelity offer robo-advisor options. However, Fidelity’s program — Fidelity Go — has a $0 minimum to get started, whereas Vanguard Personal Advisor Services has a $50,000 minimum.

Vanguard advantages

  • Investment options: Vanguard’s funds have low expense ratios and excellent past performance records. You can choose index funds or actively managed funds so you can maximize your investment.
  • Complete financial planning: Vanguard’s programs will take into account your outside investments, such as a company-offered 401(k), when building your personalized financial plan. Taking those other accounts into consideration will ensure your investments are properly balanced for your goals.
  • Actively managed funds: For seasoned investors who have more assets, opting for a Vanguard actively-managed fund can be a smart move. The company offers more than 70 U.S. based actively-managed funds, including a range of stock, bond and balanced funds.
  • Past performance: Vanguard has an outstanding record. The company boasts that 88% of its funds have performed better than peer-group averages over the past decade.

Fidelity advantages

  • Low account minimums: Vanguard has account minimums ranging from $1,000 to $3,000, depending on the account, which makes it harder for new investors to get started. Fidelity allows you to get started with just $0, making it a great choice for beginners.
  • Technology: For those who prefer online trading or using an app, Fidelity is more technology-friendly. And, the firm’s Active Trader Pro platform is a powerful resource.
  • Flat transaction fees: Unlike Vanguard, which has different transaction fees depending on the type of security and how you complete trades, Fidelity has a flat $4.95 fee, so there are no surprises.
  • Investor education: Fidelity has a robust library of investor education resources, including articles and videos, so you can become better informed on investing topics.

Vanguard vs Fidelity: Which is best for you?

Vanguard and Fidelity offer excellent investment options for investors of every experience level, allowing you to grow your money with confidence. When looking at which company is best for you, it’s important to consider your starting point and the level of attention you think you’ll need.

With Fidelity, you can get started with $0 and can take advantage of flat transaction fees and its educational tools. And, if you do need to speak to someone in person, you can meet with an advisor at one of its investor centers.

If you’re a more established investor with a significant amount of assets, Vanguard may be a better choice for you. You can take advantage of Vanguard’s low cost funds and its low fees, and get access to comprehensive financial planning.

If you’re researching all of your investment options, make sure you check out the best online stock brokers of 2019.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Kat Tretina
Kat Tretina |

Kat Tretina is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Kat here