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5 Lies Your Financial Adviser Might Tell You

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

More Americans are seeking professional help when it comes to managing their money.  

The percentage of people who used a financial adviser grew to 40 percent in 2015 from 28 percent five years earlier, according to a survey by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards. Those people said their decision had less to do with recent economic crises than with their desire for better financial guidance. 

However, reliable financial advisers are becoming increasingly hard to find, and more investors have grown distrustful of the profession as a whole. In the same 2015 survey, the board found that 60 percent of Americans thought their adviser valued his/her company’s interests over those of the consumer, compared with 25 percent in 2010.  

Jessica Parker, 23, is particularly wary. The first time she met with a financial adviser, she believed she was interviewing for an internship. Instead, she was given an hours-long investment pitch and left the meeting having unknowingly signed an insurance policy.  

“They made it sound so appealing,” says Parker, who works as a senior analyst for Johnson & Johnson in Raritan, N.J. “They had all of these metrics, graphs and data. They 100 percent lied about what it was going to be.” 

Whether lies are serious or more mundane, they can take a toll. Having an untrustworthy adviser can mean serious damage to your stock portfolio, your retirement plan or any number of other investments. Knowing the lies some financial planners will tell you  can help you avoid being tricked into a decision that could put your money in jeopardy. 

“Trust me, this is your best investment option.”

When speaking with your adviser, it’s important to know he or she has your wallet in mind, rather than his/her own.  

Julie Rains, 57, a writer in Winston-Salem, N.C., says she met with a financial planner who suggested an investment option that wasn’t in line with the type of portfolio she wanted. After refusing the offer and complaining to the brokerage, Rains said, she eventually discovered that the investment would have made her adviser a large amount of money.  

“His recommendation was complex and confusing, and would have resulted in a huge, unnecessary tax bill,” Rains says. “But the solution would have benefited him greatly with a large annual fee.” 

Ben Jacobs, a financial planning analyst based in Athens, Ga., says conflicts of interest are common among advisers who earn commissions for their services.  

Jacobs recommends seeking a financial planner who is registered with the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA), with some 3,000 members nationwide and high standards for membership. 

NAPFA members earn their money through a consistent client-paid fee instead of earning a commission from a percentage of the financial products they sell to customers, such as mutual funds, life insurance and annuities. As a result, fee-based planners have no financial incentive to sway you in any one direction, because they’ll get paid the same amount regardless.  

“Fee-only means you don’t pay me for the work.”

Still, fee-only advisers, who receive a set fee from clients and do not earn commission on the products they sell, can be just as misleading when it comes to how they’re paid. Jacobs says confusing pay structures are common in the industry, with consumers often misunderstanding how their financial planner calculates their total service charge. 

“You’d be surprised at the number of people who think they aren’t paying their financial adviser,” he says. 

The cost of working with a financial planner can vary depending on the planner’s experience and where you live. 

Vid Ponnapalli, founder of Unique Financial Advisors in Holmdel, N.J., says people should be weary of additional costs when making any agreement with a financial planner. These extra, sometimes hidden expenses can range from your adviser earning a percentage of your bond sales to 12b-1 fees — an annual marketing fee tacked onto some mutual fund agreements.  

You should read through any contract before signing, especially if you’re unsure how  your adviser is making money from your business, he says.  

“My credentials show that I’m an expert.”

Many advisers take on titles and certifications that have little to do with their actual skills.  The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau found more than 50 designations for senior-specific advisers in a 2013 study of financial problems facing senior citizens.

However, the CFPB also found that the educational and professional requirements for using those titles varied greatly, and that some could be obtained with little to no training or effort.  

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) maintains a database of professional designations and the prerequisites for earning them. Some of these titles — such as Behavioral Financial AdviserDisability Income Advocate, and Retirement Plans Associate — require almost zero qualifications.  

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) released a formal warning against deceitful titles in 2014, encouraging consumers to “look beyond a financial professional’s title when determining whether he or she can provide the type of financial services or products you need.”  

The titles that matter most, such as Certified Financial Planner (CFP) and Accredited Financial Counselor (AFC), involve accreditation by national standards agencies that often hold professionals to certain ethical standards. FINRA maintains a list of these designations, and you can also use the organization’s BrokerCheck tool to search for advisers who hold these titles.  

“I can help with all of your financial needs.”

Even when their credentials are legitimate, planners may try to emphasize skills they don’t have. For example, advisers may claim they’re qualified to sell you insurance despite having little knowledge of the subject.   

Rains, who runs a website called Investing to Thrive, says she thinks advisers are  attempting to seem more versatile and appeal to a large client base. 

“Certainly, some are qualified to handle a broad range of functions, but many have a specialty,” she says. “It’s good to be aware of the strengths, and limitations, of whoever you might hire to help you.” 

Even financial planners with highly respected designations can have their blind spots. For example, Jacobs says the CFP exam doesn’t include certain specialized topics—such as divorce settlement and disability planning—that advisers may need to seek separate training in order to properly cover.   

In order to ensure that he could meet the needs of prospective clients, Ponnapalli began offering free, hourlong consultations before doing business with them.  

“I can guarantee you big returns on your investments.”

Parker says it’s a bad idea to trust advisers who say they’re only concerned about making you money. Nothing is ever certain in finance, and consumers should be suspicious of planners who promise them a specific return on their investment. 

Advisers have the responsibility to set realistic expectations, and promising clients a specific payoff “can lead to huge problems,” Ponnapalli says. 

“The big myth is that we are moneymakers,” he says. “We have to explain to (clients) that money management is one small part of our job.” 

Tips for finding a reliable financial planner:

  • Look for a fiduciary. As a fiduciary, a financial adviser is required to take a formal oath stating that he or she will work in the best interests of clients. When looking for a fiduciary, start with the NAPFA, which requires each of its registered financial planners to renew the Fiduciary Oath every year. Also, MagnifyMoney has reviewed some financial planners, including online options Stash Wealth and the XY Planning Network. 
  • Compare advisers. Finding a financial planner who fits your specific needs can take time, and it may involve meeting with many in person. Rains recommends looking for substance over flash and charm. “Personally, I’d choose the smart person who’s good with money but slightly clumsy with conversation over the one who’s a smooth talker,” she says. 
  • Do your research. As important as in-person meetings are, you also need to do your homework.  According to a 2016 study at the University of Minnesota, 7 percent of financial advisers at the average firm have a record of misconduct (the figure reaches 15 percent at some of the largest firms), with almost half of these individuals keeping their jobs after they were caught or disciplined. To help with this, the SEC has an online database where you can do a background check on most registered financial planners.  
  • Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Once you pick an adviser, you need to make sure you’re both on the same page. When meeting with your planner for the first time, it’s good to come in with a long list of questions, as well as a full brief of your own financial situation. “Do your research on what type of plans they offer,” Parker says. “When you’re in there, be very clear on your intentions of what you want to do with your money, otherwise they might try to steer you another way.” 

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Dillon Thompson
Dillon Thompson |

Dillon Thompson is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Dillon here

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Multi-Level Marketing and Military Families: How to Spot a Scam

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Being a military spouse isn’t an easy job. Non-enlisted spouses deal with difficult realities that many Americans don’t understand, from frequent relocation to defacto single parenting during deployment periods. That makes earning an income while caring for a family — especially one with young children — extremely difficult.

With challenges like these, it’s no wonder the unemployment rate among military spouses is 13%. That’s more than three times as high as the unemployment rate among civilian men and women.

Enter multilevel marketing businesses, or MLMs for short, that promote the opportunity to make money selling products directly to others. On the surface, their flexibility and built-in community may seem like a godsend to military spouses looking to bring in some extra cash. But are they all they’re cracked up to be?

How MLMs work

Besides selling your own products, MLMs involve recruiting others to join your team and sell products to the people in their circles as well. With most MLMs, you get a portion of your team member’s profits when someone joins your sales network. As the process repeats itself and your team members recruit sales networks of their own, you may continue to get a piece of the profit from everyone who signs up underneath you.

You can probably name several MLMs, also called network marketing companies, off the top of your head. There are the classics, like Tupperware, Amway, Avon and Mary Kay, along with newcomers like Beachbody, LuLaRoe and Rodan + Fields.

Yet although MLMs have been around for decades (or centuries — Avon was founded in 1886), they’re often a poor investment of your time and money. An AARP Foundation study reveals that 74% of people reported making no money or losing money as a result of their involvement with an MLM. (Investing your cash in a high-yield online savings account would actually be a safer bet, statistically.)

Why MLMs are so popular with military families

Military families in particular are often targeted by direct-selling consultants. Sometimes, this comes from a genuine desire to help military families that are looking for an additional source of income, suggested Anthony Kirlew, financial coach at Fiscally Sound.

Yet others believe the intentions of MLM recruiters may be more sinister. “Military wives are an easy target [for MLMs],” said Melissa Blevins, founder of Perfection Hangover, a small business website geared toward women, “because they’re seeking community, purpose and ways to stay busy and make money while their husbands are deployed.”

MLM recruiters often approach women (military wives or otherwise) with promises to solve the problems they’re facing. For example, a recruiter may show you a flexible way to earn extra cash (often lots of it) with a work schedule that fits your busy life. Plus, if you move, you don’t have to start over. You can take your direct-selling business with you.

The targeting of military families has a lot to do with the transient nature of military service, said Peter Marinello, vice president of the Direct Selling Self-Regulatory Council for Better Business Bureau (BBB) National Programs. “I think the military community is very vulnerable to direct-selling opportunities and a lot of different kinds of scams.”

This frequent relocation can also lead to loneliness among military spouses, and MLMs offer to help those who are seeking new friendships. But Blevins, who had her own negative experience selling for Beachbody, warned the friendships you make when you join an MLM may not last once you stop participating, and you run the risk of losing your existing friends if you start bombarding them with sales pitches.

The difference between a legitimate opportunity and a scam

You’ll find people who are superfans of multilevel marketing programs and others who despise MLMs as a whole. Perhaps the truth lies somewhere between these two extremes.

Marinello confirmed, “There are a lot of good MLM opportunities out there. They are not all scams.” But they require due diligence before signing up. To properly vet an MLM, Marinello suggests reading income disclosures to “see who’s making money [and] at what level.” You should also review compensation plans and rely on outside resources to help shape your decision.

If you want to learn more about a specific direct selling organization, the following ideas may help:

  • Check with your state attorney general for complaints before signing up for any networking marketing opportunity.
  • Search online to see if any lawsuits have been filed against an MLM before joining — such as the FTC’s settlement with Herbalife or the more recent lawsuit brought against LuLaRoe by the Washington state attorney general.
  • Talk to former consultants or search online for the opinions of people who once joined a particular MLM but ultimately left.
  • The BBB Institute for Marketplace Trust sponsors the Military & Veterans Initiative — a program designed to help veterans, servicemembers and their families avoid scams.
  • The Direct Selling Self-Regulatory Council (DSSRC), a collaboration between the BBB and the Direct Selling Association (DSA), is another solid resource to use when vetting MLMs.

How to spot a pyramid scheme

Some MLMs are pyramid schemes in disguise. A pyramid scheme may look like a legitimate network marketing opportunity on the outside. But there are key distinctions that could waste both your time and your money if you fall for it.

  • You don’t earn money by selling a legitimate product or service.
  • You’re trained to focus primarily on recruiting new team members underneath you.
  • Financial statements from the company either (a) are not available or (b) show that the MLM earns most of its money from recruitment instead of sales.
  • The commissions you earn come primarily from money paid by new team members themselves, not outside sales.

Working for an MLM is not a quick fix to your financial struggles

The reality doesn’t always live up to the hype where MLMs are concerned. Some MLM participants are quick to over-promise your chances of success in an effort to add a new team member to their network.

In reality, most people who join MLMs don’t earn the enormous sums of money often advertised by salespeople. AARP’s study found that nearly 21 million Americans have participated in an MLM. Yet only 7% earned over $10,000. Fewer than 1% earned more than $100,000.

Even those who do manage to make some money through MLMs may have to work much harder to earn that income when compared with other jobs. A MagnifyMoney survey finds that the vast majority of multilevel marketing participants earn less than 70 cents an hour.

Kirlew also advised approaching MLMs with the right mindset. “While MLM’s are pitched as a great way to earn extra income, people should know it’s not like a part-time job, but rather a part-time business.”

“If someone has a need for immediate income,” he continued, “I would recommend a part-time job and not an MLM.”

Most businesses don’t succeed — including MLMs — Kirlew pointed out. “The extra added pressure of trying to meet short-term financial goals is usually not a good combination with starting a new business.”

If you’re already in debt because of an MLM investment or other financial missteps, there are a number of tools you can use to improve your situation. This guide detailing financial resources for veterans in debt is a great place to start.

Seven red flags to look for before joining a multilevel marketing team

  1. Beware of MLMs that require a hefty buy-in. If you’re asked to put up a large upfront amount to join, Kirlew said it could be a sign of a scam.
  2. An aggressive sign-up pitch is cause for concern. Kirlew advised looking out for “high-pressure sales tactics to get you to sign up” when you’re considering an MLM. If someone tells you to “act now” or lose out on an opportunity, you should probably walk away.
  3. Proceed with caution if a company won’t buy back unused products. If you purchase product to stock your inventory and don’t sell it all, some MLMs offer to buy your unused product back. Mary Kay, for example, will repurchase product at 90% of the original cost for up to one year after purchase. MLMs that won’t rebuy your unused products should be avoided.
  4. Watch out for companies that require you to continue purchasing inventory after your sign up. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) warns if you have to buy more products than you can sell in order to stay active in an MLM, you should hang on to your money.
  5. When an MLM focuses on recruitment, not sales, it could be a sign of trouble. Marinello said, “Anytime you hear a sales pitch that’s recruitment heavy and not focused on selling the product, I’d be very wary.”
  6. If a company promises a huge return on your investment, be on guard. Extravagant income claims made by a salesperson, particularly in the social media space, may be a warning sign, Marinello advised.
  7. You should also be on guard if an MLM company promises “miracle cures” for buyers. The FTC recommends avoiding any companies that make claims of “miracle ingredients” or “guaranteed results” where health products are concerned.

The bottom line

While some MLMs may offer the flexibility and community military spouses crave, don’t make any rash decisions and do your homework. Kirlew also advised that you trust your gut instincts before signing up.

“If something doesn’t feel right,” Kirlew said, “it is either not right or not right for you.”

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Michelle Black
Michelle Black |

Michelle Black is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Michelle here

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10 Great Free Checking Accounts

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

The humble checking account may not offer rewards, cash back or many of the other perks offered by ritzy credit cards, but it remains the cornerstone of your financial life. Nobody likes paying monthly maintenance fees, so why not pick a free checking account that does away with them altogether?

Below, we’ve selected nine of the best free checking accounts by scouring our database for products meeting the following criteria:

  • No monthly maintenance fee
  • A low initial deposit amount (between $0-$50) needed to open the account
  • No minimum balance requirement
  • Minimal third-party ATM fees
  • Available nationwide

10 bests free checking accounts of November 2019

Account Name

Minimum needed to open

APY

Consumers Credit Union (IL) Free Rewards Checking$05.09% (applies to balances up to $10,000)
TAB Bank Free Kasasa Cash Checking$04.00% (applies to balances up to $50,000)
Orion FCU Premium Checking$25 deposit in Primary Share Account4.00% (applies to balances up to $30,000)
T-Mobile Money$04.00%(applies to balances up to $3,000)
One American Bank Kasasa Cash Account$503.50%(applies to balances up to $10,000)
Evansville Teachers FCU Vertical Checking$30 ($25 if you're already a member of this credit union)3.30% (applies to balances up to $20,000)
Lake Michigan Credit Union Max Checking$03.00%(applies to balances up to $15,000)
Andigo Credit Union High-Yield Checking$03.00% (applies to balances up to $10,000)
All America Bank Ultimate Rewards Checking$50, in-person2.75% (applies to balances up to $10,000)
Simple Account$02.02% to 2.15% on balances in Protected Goals

Consumers Credit Union (IL) Free Rewards Checking

The Consumers Credit Union provides an online-only Free Rewards Checking account to anyone in the nation who becomes a member. You can qualify for membership with a one-time $5 payment to Consumers Cooperative Association. Perks of the account, which charges no monthly maintenance fees and requires no minimum balance, include unlimited third-party ATM fee refunds.

However you do have to meet some requirements in order to get all of the benefits of the account (including the high APY). The APY for this account is divided into three tiers, with the lowest earning 3.09%, the middle 4.09% and the highest tier 5.09%. The requirements for each of these tiers are:

To earn 3.09%

  • Receive eStatements
  • Make at least 12 debit card purchases a month
  • Post direct deposits or ACH payments of at least $500 each month

To earn 4.09%

  • Meet all the requirements of the previous tier
  • Have a Consumers Credit Union Visa credit card and spend at least $500 a month on it

To earn 5.09%

  • Meet all the requirements of the previous tier
  • Spend at least $1,000 a month on your Consumers Credit Union Visa credit card

Keep in mind these high APYs only apply to balances up to $10,000. The portion of any balance between $10,000.01 and $25,000 earn 0.20% APY, and balances greater than $25,000 earn an APY of 0.10%.

LEARN MORE Secured

on Consumers Credit Union (IL)’s secure website

NCUA Insured

TAB Bank Free Kasasa Cash Checking

Headquartered in Ogden, Utah, TAB Bank offers a great rate on its Free Kasasa Cash Checking account. Developed by the Kasasa Corporation, a Texas-based financial services and marketing organization, Kasasa accounts help smaller banks compete against larger rivals by providing higher rates.

TAB’s account charges no fees for using third-party ATMs, and reimburses up to $15 in third-party ATM fees per month. There are no fees and no minimum balance requirement for this account, but to earn 4.00% APY reward rate, every month you must:

  • Deposit at least one ACH payment or direct deposit, or make one bill pay transaction
  • Make at least 15 signature-based debit card purchases

If you don’t qualify in any given month, your balance earns 0.05% APY, and third-party ATM fees are not refunded. You can earn the reward rate APY on balances up to $50,000, which is well above the other maximum balances on this roundup. Balances greater than $50,000 earn an APY of 0.25%.

LEARN MORE Secured

on TAB Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

Orion Federal Credit Union Premium Checking

Orion Federal Credit Union has served the community in Memphis, Tenn. since 1957 — and now it offers its outstanding Premium Checking product online to anyone who becomes a member. This involves opening a Primary Share Account savings account with a $25 deposit, and donating $10 to one of five local charities.

This account charges no fees for using third-party ATMs, and reimburses fees charged to you by owners of third-party ATMs, making it free to access your cash from anywhere. To earn the 4.00% APY interest rate, and also get ATM fee reimbursements and waive the $5 monthly fee for the account, you must:

  • Deposit at least $500 a month in the account, either by direct deposit or other mobile electronic deposit
  • Perform at least eight signature-based debit card transactions

Orion lets you earn their high APY on balances up to $30,000. Balances greater than $30,000 earn an APY of 0.05%.

LEARN MORE Secured

on Orion Federal Credit Union’s secure website

NCUA Insured

T-Mobile Money

Wireless carrier T-Mobile is venturing out into new territory with a financial product – a competitive one, too. T-Mobile Money is a new checking account that pays a 4.00% APY on balances up to $3,000. Balances over $3,000 earn an APY of 1.00%. There are no monthly fees, overdraft fees, transfer fees, ATM fees or minimum balance requirements.

In order to receive the 4.00% APY, though, T-Mobile Money does require the following:

  • Enroll in a qualifying T-Mobile wireless plan
  • Register for Perks with your T-Mobile ID
  • Make at least $200 in qualifying deposits to your checking account in the calendar month

Balances that do not meet these requirements, or balances over $3,000, will earn 1.00% APY.

LEARN MORE Secured

on T-Mobile Money’s secure website

Member FDIC

One American Bank Kasasa Cash Account

This small community bank, based in Sioux Falls, SD, offers a nationally available Kasasa Cash checking account that earns a decent 3.50% APY on balances up to $10,000. You need a minimum of $50 to open the account, but after that all you need to do to earn the very competitive APY of 3.50% is:

  • Make at least 12 debit card purchase transactions a month of at least $5.00 each
  • Receive electronic bank statements, account notices and disclosures
  • Log in to online banking at least one time a month

If you meet these qualifications, One American Bank also refunds up $25 in third-party ATM funds per month.

LEARN MORE Secured

on One American Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

Evansville Teachers Federal Credit Union Vertical Checking

Don’t let the name of this credit union fool you—anyone can become a member if they open a $5 savings account, which then allows you to open a Vertical Checking account with a minimum balance of $25.

This free checking account doesn’t charge a monthly service fee or require you to maintain a minimum balance, and in return gives you an APY of as high as 3.30% on balances up to $20,000, provided you fulfill the below requirements:

  • Make at least 15 debit purchases each month
  • Make at least one direct deposit into the account each month
  • Login to your mobile or online banking at least once each month
  • Opt in to receive eStatements
  • In addition to the high APY, meeting these requirements entitles you to $15 a month for reimbursing third-party ATM fees.

In addition to the high APY, meeting these requirements entitles you to $15 a month for reimbursing third-party ATM fees.

LEARN MORE Secured

on Evansville Teachers Federal Credit Union’s secure website

NCUA Insured

Lake Michigan Credit Union Max Checking

Despite its name, the Lake Michigan Credit Union is open to anyone who makes a $5 donation to the ALS Foundation. That small donation can pay off tenfold with the credit union’s Max Checking account, which features a 3.00% APY on balances up to $15,000. The account also has no minimum balance requirements and no monthly fees.

In order to receive the 3.00% APY, you must:

  • Direct deposit into any LMCU account
  • Make a minimum of 10 debit or credit card transactions per month
  • Make 4 logins to home banking per month
  • Sign up for e-statements

The Lake Michigan Credit Union’s Max Checking account also offers up to $10 in monthly reimbursements for non-LMCU ATM fees.

LEARN MORE Secured

on Lake Michigan Credit Union’s secure website

NCUA Insured

Andigo Credit Union High Yield Checking

Another credit union with a competitive checking account is the Andigo Credit Union High Yield Checking account. With a handful of physical branches in Illinois and mobile banking services, Andigo Credit Union is open to anyone who makes a $15 donation to ConnectVETS.

Andigo’s High Yield Checking account features a 3.00% APY on balances up to $10,000, has no monthly fees, no minimum balance requirements and $12 a month in ATM surcharge rebates. However, to take advantage of the 3.00% APY, you must:

  • Have $500 or more in total direct deposit
  • Make 15 or more debit card purchases per month

Accounts that do not meet those qualifications earn a 0.06% APY. Balances above $10,000 earn 0.10% APY.

LEARN MORE Secured

on Andigo’s secure website

NCUA Insured

All America Bank Ultimate Rewards Checking

All America Bank’s Ultimate Rewards Checking is a standout account that features a 2.75% APY, no monthly service charge, no minimum balance requirements and free ATM transactions.

It’s worth noting, however, that to open an account you must make a $50 minimum deposit in-person – All America Bank has physical branches in Oklahoma. If you cannot make the deposit in-person, there is a hefty minimum balance of $500 required to open an account online.

To receive the 2.75% APY on this account, you must meet the following requirements:

  • Make 10 All America Bank Visa debit card transactions per month
  • Receive statements electronically

If those requirements aren’t met, you’ll earn an APY of 0.25%. Balances over $10,000 will earn 0.50% APY.

LEARN MORE Secured

on All America Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

Simple Account

Another online-only account, Simple is owned and backed by regional bank BBVA Compass and offers customers a checking account that’s intertwined with the app’s Protected Goals savings account, and additional budgeting tools. Simple doesn’t charge any fees, meaning users enjoy:

  • No monthly maintenance fee
  • No minimum balance needed
  • No account closing fee
  • No stop payment fees
  • No debit card replacement fee
  • No ATM fee if using Simple’s network, but users can be charged a fee by other banks if using a non-network ATM

One fee you do have to pay is a foreign transaction fee when using your Simple card internationally, which can be up to 1% of the transaction.

As a cash management product, the Simple Account automatically comes with a savings account feature. While the checking balance in a Simple Account earns a token 0.01% APY, Simple’s Protected Goals savings balances earn an APY of 2.15%.

LEARN MORE Secured

on Simple’s secure website

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

James Ellis
James Ellis |

James Ellis is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email James here